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2017 Election Results

Discussion in 'Politics Forum (Local/National/World)' started by Goldhedge, Nov 7, 2017.



  1. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Doesn't look good for Virginia


    Live Election Results: Virginia


    By MATTHEW BLOCH and JASMINE LEE LIVE 10:01:36 PM ET

    Virginians voted in races for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and the state legislature on Tuesday. The state’s 100 House of Delegate races represent the purest test of grass-roots anger at the president, election analysts said.

    That is because the candidates are little known to voters, largely absent from TV ads, and the races approximate a generic partisan ballot. If the past is a guide, they may also prefigure nationwide congressional voting in 2018.


    Governor
    CANDIDATE PARTY VOTES PCT.
    Ralph Northam Democrat 1,356,296 53.6%
    Ed Gillespie Republican 1,144,668 45.2
    Clifford Hyra Libertarian 29,676 1.2
    99% reporting (2,554 of 2,566 precincts)


    Lieutenant Governor
    CANDIDATE PARTY VOTES PCT.
    Justin Fairfax Democrat 1,315,325 52.4%
    Jill Vogel Republican 1,192,658 47.6
    99% reporting (2,552 of 2,566 precincts)

    Dem.506070
    Rep.506070

    Attorney General
    CANDIDATE PARTY VOTES PCT.
    Mark Herring* Democrat 1,286,505 52.8%
    John Adams Republican 1,149,376 47.2
    97% reporting (2,490 of 2,566 precincts)



    House of Delegates

    Dem. 47 (+13 seats)
    Rep. 45
     
  2. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    To be fair the Repukes haven't done themselves any favors!
     
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  3. BigJim#1-8

    BigJim#1-8 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    From what I read the R candidate distanced himself from Trump, was a bush, barbour favorite.
    Annnndddd they elected a freak dem tranny to some position.
    RIP Virginia you're done.
     
  4. Thecrensh

    Thecrensh Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    The thought of a transvestite being elected doesn't necessarily bother me. What bothers me is that they are (typically) absolutely and insanely left-leaning. Like militantly against anything remotely conservative and traditional.
     
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  5. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    10 Things You Need To Know About Democrats SHELLACKING Republicans In Virginia...And What It Means For 2018


    ByBEN SHAPIRO
    @benshapiro
    November 7, 2017
    12.1k views


    On Tuesday evening, despite polls showing a narrowing gubernatorial race between Democrat Ralph Northam and Republican Ed Gillespie in the days leading up to the election, Northam pulled off a massive victory – and more importantly, Democrats across the state trounced Republicans, putting control of the heretofore Republican-dominated House in question. Democrats have already picked up 10 seats in the statehouse and could easily pick up another seven, flipping the legislature. Meanwhile, they picked up seats in the Washington state senate, the governor’s mansion in New Jersey, and two Georgia House seats, as well as expanding Medicaid in Maine, among other gains.

    Ouch.

    Here are 10 things you need to know:

    1. Virginia Was Already Moving Democratic. The 2016 map looks a lot like the 2017 map; between 2013 and 2017, Virginia moved steadily Democratic. Northern Virginia in particular has moved to the Left in radical fashion thanks to people moving in from Washington D.C. As Sean Trende of RealClearPolitics notes, “A lot of those state House seats that flipped were R seats in 2012, but were Clinton seats in 2016. They were primed to flip.” Here’s Nate Cohn’s map showing the shift from 2013 to 2017:


    2. The Gubernatorial Loss Isn’t Unprecedented. Chris Donovan of ABC News points out that losing both the Virginia and New Jersey governor’s mansions isn’t unprecedented for parties in off-year elections:


    3. It’s Not Clear Why Gillespie Lost. There are people who claim that Gillespie lost because he didn’t campaign militantly enough – that particularly in an off-year election, he needed to drum up the base by going hard after cultural issues. Gillespie did avoid talking about those issues, though his ad campaigns were far more militant and Trumpian. On the other hand, Gillespie’s main areas of loss were Democratic areas where people turned out in droves to vote down Republicans; as Dave Weigel of The Washington Post notes:

    If Gillespie had gone full Trump – or if Corey Stewart had won his primary instead – it’s highly unlikely that the race swings the other way.

    4. The Legislative Losses Are Unprecedented In Modern Times. As Jessica Post of the Democratic Leadership Congressional Council states, “flipping 14 seats from red to blue in VA is the biggest Democratic pick-up since 1899.” That’s why Republicans should be so disturbed: Gillespie’s supposed lack of Trumpian flair isn’t responsible for Republicans getting annihilated across the board. Democrats are turning out, and Republicans aren’t – at least not without Hillary on the ballot.

    5. Democrats Have A Real Turnout Advantage In 2018. Ten percent more Democrats than Republicans turned out in Virginia today. That’s a disastrous number. There’s a reason for it: many Democrats stayed home in 2016, thinking that Hillary Clinton didn’t need their help, and that she was an off-putting candidate. She’s not on the ballot in 2018. But Trump’s record is, and they despise Trump. They’ll show up this time, knowing that staying home made Trump president. Polls right now have generic Democrats walloping generic Republicans by an 11 percent margin. Meanwhile, Trump isn’t going to drive people out to the polls when he’s not on the ballot – we’ve seen that in Alabama already, and now Virginia, too. 2020 may be a different story, but 2018 looks like it’s shaping up for disaster, which is why so many Republicans are already bowing out of House races.

    6. Trump Gives Democrats Part Of That Advantage. President Trump’s approval rating is historically awful for someone this early in his term; that isn’t helping. Despite much of the base’s interest in Trump and sympathy for him, his numbers just aren’t high enough to drive winning turnout. In fact, his tendency to polarize every issue drives out Democrats: ABC News exit polling showed that “voters by a 2-1 margin said they were casting their ballot to show opposition to Trump rather than support for him. In New Jersey the margin was 3-1.” Republicans may thrill to Trump’s cultural warfare, but it can easily backfire, too.


    7. Trump Isn't The Main Reason Republicans Showed Up To Vote In 2016. Many Republicans are under the dramatic misimpression that Trump boosts Republican ballot chances rather than hurting them, but the evidence simply isn’t there for that. Trump radically underperformed nearly every Republican Senate candidate in 2016. He won fewer votes than Mitt Romney did in Wisconsin; Romney lost the state, Trump won. He won fewer votes in Michigan than Bush did in 2004; Bush lost the state. Trump won because nobody showed up to vote for Hillary. But Hillary’s not on the ballot anymore, which means many Republicans will stay home; furthermore, Hillary’s absence means that more Democrats will show up.


    8. Trumpism Doesn’t Exist. The person hardest hit by Gillespie’s loss is actually Steve Bannon. Bannon had been trying to take credit for Gillespie’s poll rise, stating that Gillespie had embraced Trumpian politics. After Northam’s blowout, however, Breitbart suddenly flipped and insisted that Gillespie was a “Republican swamp thing.” All of this is nonsense. Trumpism isn’t a movement. Trump isn’t a movement. Trump is Trump, and there are many people who like him. It’s that simple. You can’t imitate Trump’s positions and hope to channel his popularity – even Trump doesn’t know his positions. You can’t even mimic his aggression and hope to channel his popularity – Trump has a certain draw that virtually no one else does. The notion that Gillespie lost because he wasn’t adherent to Trumpism is a Bannon creation – and Bannon has a stake in that creation because Bannon wants to represent Trumpism sans Trump. But Trumpism sans Trump is a figment of the media’s imagination. There is no evidence for its existence whatsoever, which is why Bannon runs around the country picking candidates with no unifying agenda other than that Bannon can call them “anti-establishment.”


    9. The Trumpian Unfalsifiable Hypothesis Is Gaining Steam. With the Virginia losses, those most loyal to Trump have two options: they can acknowledge that Trump is governing in unpopular fashion and that something must change, or they can blame everyone for failing to be sufficiently deferential to Trump. You can guess which way they lean. They’ve constructed a fictional universe in which everyone who loses lost because Trump wasn’t paid proper homage, and in which everyone who wins emerges victorious only thanks to the saving grace of Trump. It’s utterly evidenceless, but it’s also politically dangerous. Cults of personality don’t have a great deal of currency at the ballot box when that personality isn’t on the ballot.

    10. Trump Only Cares About His Personal Power And Image. Before the election, Trump touted Gillespie. Then, just as he did after Luther Strange lost his Senate primary in Alabama, Trump dumped Gillespie under the bus, blaming his loss on his failures to kiss the ring:

    This is a problem for a variety of reasons. First off, cultivating a cult of personality built around one man bodes ill for a national party – ask the Democrats who kept worshipping Obama as they lost 1,000 legislative seats across the country. Second, Trump’s willingness to dump on his own candidates could lead Republicans to stay home for those candidates – and that’s actually in Trump’s interest. If he thinks he’s going to take a serious loss in 2018, he can rip Republicans and then blame them for losing, stating that they failed to properly pay homage to him.

    It’s easy to overread a single election night; it’s also possible things will change radically before 2018. But if the 2018 elections were held next week, Republicans would be rightly preparing for disaster.


    http://www.dailywire.com/news/23303/10-things-you-need-know-about-democrats-ben-shapiro
     
  6. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    A Big Night for Democrats
    Ralph Northam won the Virginia governor’s race on Tuesday, while Phil Murphy won the New Jersey governor’s race.

    Tuesday delivered a string of high-profile victories for Democrats in gubernatorial races. Democrat Ralph Northam won the Virginia governor’s race in what had become a nail-biter of a contest, defeating Republican Ed Gillespie in the election to replace outgoing Democratic governor Terry McAuliffe. In New Jersey, Democrat Phil Murphy prevailed in the race to replace Republican governor Chris Christie, an expected victory over Republican Kim Guadagno.

    The New Jersey gubernatorial Democratic win paves the way for the party to enact progressive policies statewide. Christie has clashed with the state’s Democratic-controlled legislature. Murphy’s win could set the stage for tax increases, marijuana legalization, health care, education investments and the enactment of other liberal policy priorities.

    The Virginia race had been the most closely watched and competitive of the two contests. Northam’s victory will reassure Democrats who have been buffeted by a string of defeats in special elections in 2017 so far, and may tamp down some of the divisions between the party’s progressive and moderate wing.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politic...ts-virginia-new-jersey-governors-race/545201/
     
  7. EO 11110

    EO 11110 He Hate Me Mother Lode

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    urbanite sjw/gov employees outvoted the other 2/3rd of the state. same as prez elec

    https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/...yland-Virginia-Residents-Voted-400595031.html

    Clinton won 49.47 percent of the vote in Virginia, compared to Trump's 44.7 percent.

    Counties and cities in Northern Virginia, near Richmond, in the southeast corner of the state and a few other scattered locations had a majority of voters pick Clinton.

    A majority of voters in Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince William counties, plus the City of Alexandria, backed Clinton.



    [​IMG]
     
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  8. hammerhead

    hammerhead Not just a screen name Gold Chaser

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    Do I hear taxes being raised? More government instilled?
    Offering legal weed will get you elected every time. But other than decriminalizing something rightfully, they are going to feel some monetary pains.
     
  9. Mr Paradise

    Mr Paradise Midas Member Midas Member

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    Apparently the 20-29 age group went all in on the democratic ticket. Those high $$$$ reeducation centers called colleges at work. This doesn't bode well for the future.
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Democrats hit back in New Jersey, Virginia, signaling danger for Trump, GOP
    Updated: November 7, 2017 — 11:24 PM EST



    by Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau


    The size of their victories in governor’s races in New Jersey and, especially, Virginia were widely interpreted as a powerful backlash to President Trump, and a blaring warning for suburban Republicans as the GOP tries to keep control of Congress next year.

    “Our two states have provided the United States of America with the very first definitive, statewide rebuttal to the Trump administration,” Sen. Cory A. Booker (D., N.J.) said at Democrat Phil Murphy’s victory party in Asbury Park, N.J.

    “You can’t really look at tonight’s results and conclude that Democrats are anything other than the current favorites to pick up the U.S. House in 2018,” tweeted David Wasserman, a congressional campaign analyst for the Cook Political Report.

    Arriving one year after Trump’s surprise election victory, the campaigns that concluded Tuesday amounted to a live test of methods, messages, and mood as both parties grope for ways forward.

    Could a more moderate Democrat, Virginia’s Ralph Northam, connect with liberal voters? Or did Democrats need a more combative voice to rally their base against Trump?

    Could a Virginia Republican with a traditional background — the Mount Laurel, N.J.-born Ed Gillespie, former chairman of the Republican National Committee — win over the Trump coalition by driving at cultural issues like immigration and Confederate statues? Or had the president’s style alienated the moderate voters who swing elections?

    Though the campaigns invoked Trump to widely varying degrees, the president has loomed over all politics since his stunning victory last year. The results Tuesday were an affirmation of Democratic voters’ motivation and an indication that Trump’s low public approval could hurt his party.

    “Fear and division and hatred do not work,” Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat, said on CNN. They didn’t work in Virginia “and they do not work in America.”

    Of particular concern for Republican incumbents in Philadelphia suburbs could be Democratic routs in the wealthy, well-educated areas just outside of Washington, which in many ways mirror places like Chester and Delaware Counties, where critical congressional races loom. Such races could determine control of the House.

    Mike DuHaime, a top political adviser to Gov. Christie, called it “a rejection of the president.”

    Of course, it was just a handful of races in New Jersey, Virginia, and elsewhere, and Democrats had been expected to win the two big gubernatorial contests. Both states supported Democrat Hillary Clinton last year and a Democratic loss in either would have been calamitous for them.

    But few expected the blowout that emerged in Virginia. Not only did Northam win, but Democrats made major gains in the state legislature — taking more seats from Republicans than in any race since 1899, according to Democrats.

    Among the victors was Chris Hurst, a former news anchor in Virginia who grew up outside Philadelphia and turned to politics after his girlfriend, a reporter, was shot and killed while on television. Hurst unseated a Republican incumbent in a district based in Blacksburg.

    In Maine, voters approved an expansion of Medicaid, adopting a policy championed by Democrats.

    Republicans said not to read too much into the results. Campaigns hinge on individual candidates, they noted, and there is a year to go before the next election.

    Trump distanced himself from the results. He did not campaign with Gillespie, though he did send supportive tweets and recorded a robo-call for him.

    “Ed Gillespie worked hard but did not embrace me or what I stand for. Don’t forget, Republicans won 4 out of 4 House seats,” Trump tweeted after the results came in, referring to previous special congressional elections where Republicans prevailed. “With the economy doing record numbers, we will continue to win, even bigger than before!”

    Josh Novotney, a Republican consultant from Philadelphia, chalked up the size of the Democratic win to the work of the individual campaigns, rather than any broad sign.

    Other election analysts saw signals in the massive Democratic margins in suburban areas — continuing a trend that began last year when Trump surged with rural, blue-collar voters, but struggled in wealthier, highly educated areas.

    In Loudoun County, a Washington suburb in Northern Virginia, Gillespie won around 40 percent of the vote — compared with 49 percent when he narrowly won the county as a U.S. Senate candidate in 2014, to choose one key example.

    “Anger’s such a great motivator,” said Kyle Kondik, referring to the Democratic reaction to last year’s Trump victory. Kondik, managing editor for Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a University of Virginia election forecasting site. “In terms of the competitive suburbs where there are a lot of competitive House races, this is like a flashing red warning sign.”

    “Canary in the coal mine, Trump apologists,” tweeted Julie Roginsky, a Democratic consultant from New Jersey, as the Virginia race was called far earlier in the night than most expected.

    Patrick Murray, director of the Monmouth University polling institute, warned that governors’ races hinge on different issues than will likely be the focus in 2018.

    “However,” he added, “these results are really a big shot in the arm for Democrats, who were really fretting what would happen.”

    Staff writer Andrew Seidman contributed to this article.

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/p...n-2017-murphy-northam-trump-gop-20171107.html
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Larry Krasner wins race for Philly DA
    Updated: November 7, 2017 — 10:37 PM EST

    by Chris Brennan & Aubrey Whelan - Staff Writers

    Larry Krasner was elected Philadelphia district attorney on Tuesday, capping a once-improbable campaign to be the city’s top prosecutor and amid signals that he would bring significant, if not drastic, changes to the office.

    A longtime defense lawyer, the Democrat won despite lacking political or prosecutorial experience and, at least early in the race, establishment support. But he rode the financial backing of one of his party’s most progressive billionaires, and benefited from a fractured field of opponents.

    His last challenger, Republican Beth Grossman, proved to be slightly more formidable than some of her party’s predecessors in a city dominated by Democrats. But Grossman failed Tuesday to convince enough voters that her 21 years as an assistant district attorney made her the better choice.


    The Associated Press proclaimed Krasner the winner just after 9 p.m. With nearly 98 percent of the votes counted, he had outpaced her by a 3-1 ratio, unofficial returns showed.

    Addressing supporters gathered for his victory party at the William Way LGBT Community Center, Krasner promised his election would herald “transformational change” in the city’s criminal justice system and a fairness “for a system that has systematically picked on black and brown people.”

    “This,” he told the crowd, “is what a movement looks like.”

    The son of a crime-fiction author and an evangelical Christian minister, Krasner grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Stanford Law School, and is married to Common Pleas Court Judge Lisa M. Rau.

    Despite three decades as a lawyer, the 56-year-old was assailed from the start of his campaign by critics as unsuitable for the job — as an attorney best known for taking on civil rights cases and suing the Philadelphia Police Department. It was for some of the same reasons that he drew support from activists demanding criminal justice reform from an office they deemed unfair, and he returned to those themes Tuesday night.

    “If you, like us, believe it’s time to end the death penalty…mass incarceration … cash bail …,” he said, drawing cheers from the crowd that packed into an overheated and small second-floor ballroom.

    In the end, several factors worked in his favor in what is typically a low-key election won by a Democrat.

    First, former District Attorney Seth Williams dropped his bid for a third term two days after Krasner entered the race in February. Williams, a Democrat, was indicted on federal corruption charges in March, pleaded guilty to a bribery charge during his trial in June and was sentenced in October to five years in prison.

    The open seat drew a crowd of seven candidates for the Democratic primary, most with experience as assistant district attorneys. Krasner, running as a reformer, knocked them as “part of the problem.”

    And Krasner had a significant political patron on his side — New York billionaire George Soros sank nearly $1.7 million into an independent political action committee that aired television ads in support of Krasner, who easily won the primary.

    Grossman ran unopposed for the Republican nomination but could not marshal the resources to catch Krasner in a city where Democratic voters outnumber GOP by 7-1.

    “I️ am just proud. I️ feel honored and privileged to have run this race,” she told supporters in her concession speech at the United Republican Club in Kensington. “I️ am so proud of the numbers — a great showing for a Republican candidate.”

    Lodge 5 of the Fraternal Order of Police became Grossman’s most public backer, giving her campaign $12,500 and issuing a letter to police officers in October accusing Krasner of showing “an open hostility against police and law enforcement in general.”

    The Republican City Committee and the state Republican Party, while railing against Krasner, did not foster the fundraising needed to raise Grossman’s name recognition in the city. Still, they tried to keep their spirits up Tuesday night as they watched returns at the Kensington club.

    Chris Mundiath, Grossman’s communications director, said the campaign had always expected an uphill battle but had hoped for a slimmer margin. He said he had heard from some Democrats and ward leaders concerned that Krasner was too far to the left and had hoped that might translate into more votes.

    Across the room, Daphne Goggins, a Republican ward leader and the vice chair of the Philadelphia Black Ward Leaders Caucus, was livid. Earlier in the night, she said she’d felt a Grossman victory was coming, the same way she felt a Trump victory last year. Now, she called Krasner “Lucifer.”

    “I’m very, very upset,” she said. But she said she hoped Grossman would run for office again: “We’ll dust her off and run her for mayor.”

    Grossman had proved to be a lively opponent, frequently suggesting that she was interested in justice for victims of crime while claiming Krasner was more interested in reforms to help those accused of crimes.

    Krasner countered with stories of going to court to secure the assets of convicted criminals to benefit their victims. And he recounted being sliced with a blade he never saw during a mugging in the alley behind his Center City office a decade ago.

    With Krasner’s election, many expect some level of disruption in the District Attorney’s Office, which employs about 300 lawyers and 300 support staff, and has a budget of $54 million for the fiscal year that started in July. Krasner has said he has “no magic list” of employees to keep or fire, although he has been critical of the office’s past performance.

    Kelley Hodge was appointed interim district attorney in July by the Common Pleas Court Board of Judges and has won praise for restoring order to the scandal-plagued agency.

    In his brief speech, Krasner thanked Grossman for maintaining a level of civility “that frankly is uncommon in Trump world” and urged his supporters to apply for jobs at KrasnerTransition.com. Though the crowd included some party stalwarts, it was mostly young and casual, filled with activists known for protests and lobbying at City Hall.

    Will Mega, a former reality television performer who has four times run unsuccessfully for office without traditional party support, said Krasner’s victory told supporters one thing — “that their vote matters.”

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/politics/city/larry-krasner-wins-race-for-philly-da-20171107.html
     
  12. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    50 states, we can't save them all!
     
  13. oldgaranddad

    oldgaranddad Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    I foresee a lot of base closings and government department redeployments in VA.
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  16. D-FENZ

    D-FENZ Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    But none of last night's winners were named Clinton (or Bush) or were associated with them. This fact is being completely overlooked but is quite relevant.

    Trump is so full of himself that even he fails to see it, attributing his own win a year ago to his genius rather than the even more repulsive names and legacies of his opponents.

    We just got lucky last year.
     
  17. gliddenralston

    gliddenralston Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    A president with the same personality as... Ric "nature boy" Flair... gets tiring quite rapidly!!!!

    Trump peddling his golf course in S Korea speech....what a clown!!
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2017
  18. southfork

    southfork Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

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    never before have the dems, media and the pubs been against their own president like this, Trump has back peddled on too many things and the swamp is deeper than ever, he will be a one term president. he's letting Mueller destroy whats left of the party and sessions sits with his thumb up his ass

     
  19. solarion

    solarion Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Do you really think so? That'd be super! Imagine how much better of we'd be if both wings of the uniparty DIED.
     
  20. Thecrensh

    Thecrensh Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    This was their plan all along...to unite the left against conservatives (not the "right" per se, but conservatives). Energize them and turn as much of America against conservative ideals as possible with the 2nd worst possible candidate.
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Transgender woman beats 13-term incumbent who authored bathroom-ban bill and referred to her as 'him' much of the campaign (but she would rather talk about rush hour traffic)
    • Democrat Danica Roem of Virginia, a former journalist, makes history as the first openly transgender person elected and seated in a state legislature
    • She defeated 13-term incumbent Bob Marshall, who has been in the legislature since 1992 and authored the state's anti-trans bathroom-ban bill
    • Roem focused on jobs, schools and, with particular fervor, northern Virginia's traffic congestion in her campaign
    • She lives with her boyfriend, who she has not named, and his 9-year-old child whom she considers her stepdaughter.
    • 'He'll be one of my constituents and I'm not going to attack my constituents,' said Roem after her win
    • Andrea Jenkins became the first openly trans woman of color elected to the city council of a major city when she was elected to represent Ward 8 of Minneapolis


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5061319/Transgender-woman-makes-history-Virginia-House-seat-win.html#ixzz4xrFyKrRV
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  22. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    So brave!!!
     
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  23. Joseph

    Joseph Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    The most notable quote from 'msm' was that 'Danica' will change the "bathroom law" so men can go into women's bathroom . . evidently a most important priority amongst Virginians

    So bizarre ... the dems elected obama. Not for his qualifications, but because he is black. They wanted Hillary. Not because of her qualifications, but because she is a woman, now they elected 'Danica'. Not because of his qualifications, but because he's a she ...and will change a bathroom law ... W ...... T ...... F ..... ???
     
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  24. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    What about Milo?

    Which is why it was so critical to get a half way decent Supreme Court pick. Hopefully we'll get two more soon and if so, that'll put a cap on the amount of damage that those you speak of will be able to do over the next 2 decades.

    So fortunate indeed! We'd be so f'ed right now had the skank won. She'd be pushin' gun control hard and probably getting it. Along with single payer. Between Obozo and her intended term, America really would have been fundamentally changed, and for the worse.

    News Flash: They all get tiring at some point for everyone. If for no other reason than they are just people too. Imperfect people, I might add. Same as all of us. President Trump included.
    ....but even with his imperfections, he is still better for the Union than any of his opponents would have been. Especially whatsherface. She'd be pushing gun control like never before and shoving single payer down our throats. You should be glad of at least those two things.
     
  25. BigJim#1-8

    BigJim#1-8 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    I get kick out of how a few states that weren't going to vote Repub anyway means President Trump has destroyed everything. The libtard & msm will & have declared this a repudiation of Trump, typical as lib/soc/dem'comm, nevertrumpers will never give him any credit for anything or support him in any way.
    The results, no matter what the libs say, wasn't a landslide like Trumps victory a year ago.
    The repub candidate in Virginia distanced himself from Trump, was a bush crony. , big mistake.
    I feel real sorry for the conservatives in Virginia.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2017
  26. BigJim#1-8

    BigJim#1-8 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    I think it's a transgender, identifies as the opposite sex, not a transvestite who just like to feel pretty.
     
  27. gliddenralston

    gliddenralston Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    what landslide victory?
     
  28. gliddenralston

    gliddenralston Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Making assumptions, doesn't change fact.
     
  29. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    This one maybe?

    countymaprb1024.png
     
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  30. gliddenralston

    gliddenralston Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Oh, you meant landmass, not voter count.
     
  31. BigJim#1-8

    BigJim#1-8 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    [​IMG]
    Remember, libtards & nevertrumpers will never give any credit where credits due. They'll always come out with some silly argument, they can't face it that their beast candidate lost by huge margins, they're pitiful.

    Happy Anniversary!!!
     
  32. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    News Flash! Presidental elections are not popular vote elections.

    There's this thing called the Electoral College that is used to elect Presidents and based upon the way it works, it was in fact a landslide victory.
    Edited to add: 304 to 227 isn't even close.


    I understand that you hate Trump, but could you enlighten us as to who would have been better that had an actual chance to win?

    IMHO, none of the other parties offered anyone better and I believe that you are smart enough to realize that the only other possible winner was whatsherface. Would you prefer her as POTUS? Keep in mind that in light of recent events, she'd be actively trying to take away your Right to own a gun. Is that what you'd prefer? A further dismantling of the Constitution?
     
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  33. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    It is a national embarrassment. Virginia wants to be like New England, NYC and the west coast.
     
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  34. oldgaranddad

    oldgaranddad Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    NYC just re-elected it’s own worse enemy for a second term. This commie makes David “Where’s the tennis courts at?” Dinkins look good. Watch NYC to revert to its 1960s and 1970s decay. For the last year smart money has been selling both their NYC condos and co-ops along with their Hamptons summer homes.

    My own county, Nassau, once a conservative bastion elected a Democrat who ran on “Tired of corruption? Vote Democrat!” You just can’t make this stuff up considering we have had Clinton, Weiner, Client #9, Sheldon Silver, and too many more to mention. While we’ve had corrupt Republicans the Democrats have made it an art form.

    My own town just voted out a one term supervisor who took on a $6 million dollar deficit and turned it into a $3 million dollar surplus. I’m starting a pool to see how soon his Democrat successor and her union masters put us back in the hole.

    I pray my wife’s hospital offers my wife an early buyout in the next few years so I don’t get any arguments about moving. This place is populated with dolts intent on engineering their own Hell. I am so out of here.
     
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  35. andial

    andial Sir Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    America's epitath. Man's right to pee in the girls bathroom trumped the right to bear arms.
     
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  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    GOP faces wrenching call: Running with or away from Trump

    The election outcome Tuesday exacerbated tensions within the party over how candidates should position themselves vis-à-vis the president.

    By ALEX ISENSTADT

    11/08/2017 07:14 PM EST

    Sweeping losses in Tuesday’s elections have exacerbated a growing rift inside the GOP over whether the party’s candidates should embrace President Donald Trump in next year’s midterms — or make a clean break.

    With Trump’s approval ratings cratering in swing states across the country, some senior party strategists are imploring lawmakers to abandon the president. Others argue that shunning Trump and his populist base is simply out of the question and that anything other than a full embrace of the president would spell electoral disaster.

    In the Virginia gubernatorial race, Republican Ed Gillespie tried to have it both ways — with disastrous consequences. Gillespie, who privately agonized about the degree to which Trump should be involved in the contest, refused to campaign with the president. But at the same time, he trumpeted Trump’s culture war issues in ads.

    White House advisers spent Wednesday combing through the election results and fuming about Gillespie’s have-it-both-ways approach. By keeping Trump at arm’s length, they said, Gillespie squandered an opportunity to motivate conservatives whose support he needed.

    “He wouldn’t embrace the president, so the base that came out to vote for the president and that voted for me, didn’t come out,” said Prince William County Board of Supervisors Chairman Corey Stewart, a Trump campaign official who nearly defeated Gillespie in the June GOP primary. “The Trump-Stewart base just didn’t turn out.”

    Others, however, said Gillespie — an establishment-minded former Beltway lobbyist who never felt entirely at ease highlighting populist issues — went too far in aligning himself with the president. By vowing to preserve the state’s Confederate monuments and to combat MS-13 gang violence, they argued, the candidate fired up Democrats in the state’s population centers and liberal northern suburbs.

    Appearing onstage with the president would have only exacerbated the problem, they said.

    “Be yourself and run your own campaign,” said GOP strategist John Weaver, a veteran of presidential campaigns. “Don’t embrace this nationalist approach.”

    Trump, he added, “is a tremendous drag in a general election.”

    Republicans running down-ballot have long grappled with how to deal with the president. But as Trump’s poll numbers wane and the midterm season grows closer, the debate has taken on greater urgency. While the president’s approval ratings have plummeted in moderate and liberal areas, his core base of supporters has remained steadfast.

    The dilemma is expected to be a major topic of discussion next week at the Republican Governors Association annual meeting in Austin, Texas. And top House GOP campaign strategists, trying to preserve their now-tenuous majority, said they wanted to look more deeply into the Virginia results before drawing conclusions.

    “It’s quite a predicament,” said Tony Fabrizio, a longtime GOP pollster who worked on the Trump campaign.

    “You can’t be the anti-Trump guy in the primary. But you don’t want to be the 100-percent-for-Trump guy in the general,” he added. “When you go to one extreme or the other, that’s when you fall short.”

    Gillespie spent months trying to perform a balancing act. He emerged from the June primary deeply frustrated, after Trump supporters nearly powered Stewart to an upset victory. Gillespie vented about his political operation and even considered a staff shakeup. The former national party chairman sketched out several possible paths forward, including a full-on embrace of the president.

    But Gillespie — who in 2006 penned an op-ed in which he warned the GOP against becoming an “anti-immigration party” — never felt truly comfortable running under the Trump banner, people close to the campaign said. So he adopted a moderated approach, airing commercials that spotlighted Trump-centric issues like MS-13 and the Confederate monuments, while avoiding attaching himself to the president personally.

    Gillespie’s team deliberated extensively about whether to bring in Trump for a campaign event in conservative southwest Virginia. The candidate ended up having Vice President Mike Pence hold a campaign rally and fundraiser for him. Gillespie never made a hard ask for the commander in chief.

    In the end, Gillespie released about $500,000 worth of mailers highlighting the president’s endorsement of him. Trump also sent a batch of tweets highlighting his support. On Monday evening and then on Election Day, Trump released a robocall bashing Democratic candidate Ralph Northam. One wave of the calls was directed to southwestern Virginia.

    White House officials were dismayed by Gillespie’s approach, convinced that he ultimately got the worst of both worlds — ginning up liberal turnout without ever fully motivating Trump’s core supporters.

    “GOP candidates cannot keep Trump at arm’s length right up until the end and then expect to energize the base,” said conservative radio show host Laura Ingraham, an outspoken Trump backer. “It seems inauthentic because it is.”

    Stewart, for his part, said he reached out to Gillespie multiple times after the primary in hopes of persuading him to run a more pro-Trump campaign. But he said Gillespie never expressed much interest.

    Tying oneself to Trump, however, may do little to stem a rising tide of liberal enthusiasm. As they pored over voter figures on Wednesday, Gillespie’s strategists conceded they had been caught off guard by the wave of Democratic turnout.

    “If you’re in a district or state with a high percentage of college-educated white voters, you should be quaking in your boots right now,” said Phil Cox, a Gillespie adviser and former executive director of the Republican Governors Association.

    He noted that Democrats far outperformed turnout expectations in an off-year election.

    As to the difficult question of whether Republicans should align themselves with the president, “There will be a political market test,” Cox said. “Candidates will determine the outcome.”

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/11/08/virginia-trump-republicans-2018-244721
     
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Republicans suddenly fear disastrous 2018
    By Katie Glueck

    kglueck@mcclatchydc.com
    November 08, 2017 12:50 PM

    WASHINGTON

    The Tuesday night rout of Republican candidates up and down the ballot has triggered alarm bells in Republican circles that a deteriorating political environment could set in motion a Democratic wave in the 2018 midterm elections.

    The most dramatic results unfolded in Virginia, where Democrats swept up victories in the governor’s race and delegate contests across the state, fueled by suburban voters who once favored Republicans. But it wasn’t just Virginia: Democrats won the New Jersey governor’s mansion and in several suburban Philadelphia counties, where they nabbed local offices that have long been controlled by the GOP.

    “I had an expectation that it would be tight, I did not expect it to break as dramatically as it did,” said Rep. Ryan Costello, a Republican who represents suburban Philadelphia’s Chester County, where Democrats notched unprecedented local wins. “It is largely driven by mainstream Republicans and independents being displeased by the tone and style of the administration, coupled with an historic off-year intensity by Democratic voters who wanted to make a statement. This is their first opportunity to do that.”

    For Republicans, who have won all of the marquee special congressional elections of the Donald Trump era to date, Tuesday’s results across the country were a reminder that Democrats are, in fact, capable of translating liberal anti-Trump energy into actual votes. It was evidence of the environmental perils that often await a president’s party in the midterm elections—especially when that president has historically low approval ratings.

    “A major statewide race where both candidates are well defined is one thing,” said Republican pollster Robert Blizzard. “State legislative races, where candidates typically aren’t as well known, typically follow environmental trends.”

    Following results in places like Virginia and Pennsylvania, those concerns are now particularly acute for moderate suburban areas that weren’t natural territory for Trump to begin with.

    “If you’re a GOP incumbent in a heavily suburban, college-educated district, I think you’re worried today, and rightfully so,” said veteran Republican strategist Chris Wilson.

    Trump won an Electoral College victory without the support of some of those voters, while others, seeing the race as a binary choice between Trump and Hillary Clinton—who also had high unfavorable ratings—reluctantly backed him. The concern is that, without facing that stark choice again, some of these suburbanites may be inclined to more actively consider Democrats going forward.

    “Clinton was such a horrible candidate that distaste for her may have held back the swing of college educated whites towards the Democrats,” Wilson said. “If that’s true, it’s a real problem and one that Republicans must address prior to 2018.”

    For members of Congress like Costello—whose competitive district is a top Democratic target—the outcome underscored the urgent need to strengthen individual brands, or risk being overtaken by what looks to be an increasingly rough environment for Republicans.

    “If you don’t give your constituents enough opportunities to see you, listen to you, then you run the risk of being caught up in a wave,” said Costello, noting his commitment to doing constituent meetings and holding town halls, as well as to making more appearances on local and cable news—where he is willing to discuss his disagreements with Trump as they arise.

    “In a district like mine, No. 1, that’s just what you should be doing, that’s the job. But No. 2, what are Democrats going to do in 2018? They’re going to try to tie every member such as myself to the president, regardless of how much I speak out, no matter what I do,” he continued. “I need to make sure that voters have a good sense of who I am, what I do.”

    Certainly, the biggest races on Tuesday unfolded in deep-blue New Jersey and in Virginia, a state that has been trended more and more Democratic. GOP strategists cautioned against reading too much into results in those states, especially in an off-year election cycle, and given that efforts in 2016 to make every race about Trump backfired spectacularly for the Democrats. And there is still time for Republicans to make good on their legislative promises, they say, as GOP lawmakers scramble to land a tax reform deal.

    “What we all have to acknowledge and address is that the electorate all over the country is mad at Congress, mad at Washington, D.C., mad at both political parties,” said Rob Simms, the former executive director of the National Republican Congressional Committee. “The way to address that is to…legislate and govern. If we don’t, then we are setting ourselves up to be held hostage by an extraordinarily volatile environment in which our opponents are extraordinarily energized and engaged.”

    David Kochel, a longtime Iowa-based Republican operative, said that the best way for individual Republican members to guard against that kind of environment is to make every effort to carve out identities that aren’t reliant on the rest of the party.

    “The biggest lesson for any Republican coming out of last night is to take care of your own message, your own district, your own state,” he said. “The cavalry from Washington isn’t coming.”

    http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics-government/election/article183451431.html
     
  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  39. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'Karma, brother': Actress sister of anti-transgender bathroom-bill backer who lost his seat to a transwoman in the general election blasts him as 'judgmental and homophobic' and backs his successor
    • Bob Marshall was ousted from the Va. legislature by transwoman Danica Roem
    • Marshall's sister denounced him for calling Roem 'him' and 'a man in a dress'
    • Paula Marshall Nucci, 53, said his loss was 'karma' for being 'judgmental'
    • Victory by Roem, 33, over 13-term incumbent Marshall, 73, occurred Tuesday
    • Marshall had authored the state's anti-transgender bathroom-ban bill
    • His sister complained that he had refused to debate Roem during his campaign
    • Roem focused on jobs, schools and fighting congestion in her run for delegate


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5066837/Sister-anti-trans-ex-Va-delegate-says-loss-karma.html#ixzz4xxPF6nzs
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Dead (Congress)Men Walking: Are Philly's suburban GOPers totally doomed? | Will Bunch
    Updated: November 9, 2017 — 2:39 PM EST

    by Will Bunch, STAFF COLUMNIST

    Meet U.S. Rep. Pat Meehan’s worst nightmare: An angry anti-Trump female Delaware County suburbanite with some worn shoe leather.

    Kristin Seale, who works for an energy non-profit and lives in Media, had already been thinking about getting involved in local politics after she was elected as a Bernie Sanders delegate to 2016’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, but she said the shock of President Trump’s victory last November “sealed the deal.” She went through a training program for first-time candidates, filed to run for a seat on the Rose Tree Media school board, a longtime GOP bastion, and with her volunteers this fall rang about 3,000 doorbells.

    “I had some longer conversations where I tried convincing voters who said they were disgusted (with politics in the Trump era) about why they should not wash their hands of it, how local elections can impact people,” Seale said — and that must have worked. On Tuesday, Seale and the three other Democrats on her slate won an upset victory — one small part of a Democratic tidal wave in the Philadelphia suburbs that elected scores of newcomers and ousted GOP incumbents throughout Delaware, Bucks and Chester counties.

    The terrible news for Republican Meehan — whose bizarrely gerrymandered district centers on Delco — and his suburban GOP colleagues Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick and Ryan Costello is that Tuesday’s results now have Democratic activists like Seale jacked up to do this all over again next fall, when the three congressman will be fighting for their political lives in the same upscale suburbs where Democrats rampaged on Tuesday.

    They are — politically speaking, after Tuesday’s tidal wave — Dead (Congress)Men Walking.

    Even the much ballyhooed luck of the Irish may not be enough for Meehan, Costello and Fitzpatrick when it’s their turn to face the same angry and energized suburban electorate in 2018, barring the completely unexpected (like an upsurge in Trump’s currently anemic popularity or his sudden resignation … don’t hold your breath for either). Is it too late to free the Suburban Philly 3 and see them join the Trump resistance, not just by verbally criticizing the president but by fighting to block his worst policies? Or are they fated to go down with the USS Donald this time next year?

    Any Republican — but especially those in affluent districts with a high rate of college grads — must feel shell-shocked after Election Night 2017. Despite the still decrepit and divided state of the national Democratic leadership, the party exceeded every expectation thanks largely to bottom-up grassroots energy sparked by those most angry or most marginalized by a Trump presidency. Each headline on Tuesday night seemed more remarkable than the next: The historic wins by transgender candidates, including the woman in Virginia who ousted a self-proclaimed “homophobe” lawmaker, the Liberian refugee who won in Montana, the Sikhs and Asian-Americans who battled racist flyers and other prejudice to score big victories, the woman in New Jersey so offended by a county freeholder’s sexist joke that she ran against him and won. All this while hundreds of first-timers like Seale were winning under the radar.

    Beneath the frothing surface, the center of this tsunami was women — especially more affluent and college-educated women — who’ve been seething since November 8, 2016 that a self-described p-word grabber and serial liar is in the Oval Office after an often misogynistic and racist campaign stymied a highly qualified woman and also put the lie to everything that many had taught their children about honesty, decency, and the American way.

    In Virginia, the day’s bellwether race, the win by Gov.-elect Ralph Northam and a string of surprising legislative upsets were centered in the wealthier suburbs just west of Washington, D.C., while closer to home the Democratic near-sweep against Delaware County’s entrenched Republican machine was anchored in high-income Zip codes around Radnor, Newtown Square and Media. Yes, local issues still mattered — but an unexpectedly high turnout in an off-year seemed proof that nothing mattered more than sending a message to Trump, and any of his allies.

    That’s bleak news for Meehan, the former prosecutor (and hockey ref) who’s won the 7th District with relative ease since 2010, even more so after the district’s ink-blotter gerrymandering in 2012 to make it a can’t-lose district for Republicans. Since last summer, Meehan — more so than most Republicans — has struggled with how to handle a problem like Donald. He stayed home from Trump’s coronation in Cleveland and wrote-in “Mike Pence” on his presidential ballot — only to turn around and vote with the new president some 88 percent of the time, according to a tracker on the FiveThirtyEight.com website which projected Meehan would follow Trump far less, considering that Hillary Clinton narrowly carried his district in 2016. His pro-Trump votes have already brought scores of protesters to his district office in Springfield even as the ex-hockey ref mightily ducks any town halls.

    And that was before Tuesday. Larry Sabato, the University of Virginia history professor and election pundit who watched the Democratic wave wash through his home state, told me that GOP reps in competitive districts like the Pennsylvania 3 now face a kind of Catch-22.with Trump. “In a sense, they can’t live with Trump and can’t live without him,” he said. “Without [the president’s] backing, the Trump base won’t show up — or will vote for a primary challenger. With Trump’s backing, they energize Democrats and NeverTrump Republicans to oppose them.”

    Costello told my Inquirer colleague Jonathan Tamari that “[c]learly Democrats have probably a historic intensity behind that vote [Tuesday] as being the first chance to vote against the president.” Ya think? And Costello acknowledged that many independents and some Republicans joined in. That’s first week Poly-Sci 101 stuff — but what are Costello and his allegedly moderate colleagues going to do about it?

    Will the endangered Pennsylvanians will take a page from the playbook of Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake (who, interestingly, is resigning rather than face a perilous primary challenge on his right flank) and step up their verbal criticism of Trump’s style and rhetoric? It seems like most voters would see right through that as long as they and other House Republican continue to vote with Trump on the issues.

    No, the most dramatic thing that Meehan, Costello and Fitzpatrick can do would be to vote to kill the ill-conceived tax-reform scheme cooked up by congressional GOP leaders and backed by Trump, who is desperate to sign any piece of paper that Congress can get to his desk. The tax plan seems largely a con job that would actually hurt taxpayers in Pennsylvania’s middle-class communities while funneling billions of dollars to corporations (who will pocket the dough instead of hiring more U.S. workers) and the wealthiest 0.1 percent. What’s more, the GOP financial wizards crafted the bill to take away benefits in the anti-Trump coastal areas, especially the deductability of state and local taxes, which are higher in Pennsylvania than most states. For the Pennsylvania GOPers, a vote for the tax boondoggle — or any new push to roll back Obamacare, for that matter — would be political suicide.

    Meanwhile, there are other, positive things that would win back middle-of-the-road suburban women — nothing more so than supporting commonsense gun-safety measures, including the background-check bill backed by their Senate colleague Pat Toomey and maybe even bring back the ban on assault weapons that were used in Sutherland Springs, Las Vegas, Orlando, etc., etc., etc. Or, the congressman could prove their anti-Trump bona fides by joining the growing movement, which has some GOP support, to restrict the president’s ability to launch a nuclear first strike.

    Or, they could march with Trump like lemmings toward the great sea of 2018.

    Here’s the thing: Too many voters in places like Kristin Seale’s Media may already be too mad for the likes of Rep. Meehan to do one blessed thing to prevent their defeat next November. My unsolicited and possibly unwelcome advice to them would be to resist the worst of Trumpism, no matter what. It may not save their jobs on Capitol Hill, but it could save the country. And, facing unemployment, wouldn’t you want that on your resume?

    http://www.philly.com/philly/column...opers-totally-doomed-will-bunch-20171109.html
     

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