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Alternative Living Spaces: Off Grid Cribs, Tiny Houses, Underground Homes, Etc.

Discussion in 'Projects, Builds, Woodworking, Metalworks' started by searcher, Nov 6, 2016.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    50+ Year Old Couple Build Off Grid Cob Tiny House For $30k
    Life Inside A Box



    Published on Dec 11, 2015
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Ted's Little House: A Modern Earthship
    OGB



    Published on Mar 30, 2015
    OGB presents this project by Ted Elsasser, owner of http://www.SouthwestSustainableBuilde... . This is a very achievable spec house that Ted built in his spare time over the course of two years. About $100 per square foot. It's a wonderful place to live, and has everything you could need.
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    BIOTECTURE: Earthship Building For The Planet
    Tiny House Listings



    Published on Mar 30, 2017
    Building residences using Earthship architectural techniques makes a lot of sense. You're using materials that nobody wants, actually want to get rid of, that lost a really long time, while using nature, building orientation and thermal mass principles along the way. Southern exposure means capturing the sun's energy in the winter and shaded roof means blocking it in the summer. That's just the tip of it. Thanks for Marcus for sharing this awesome video with us!

    More info. here: https://www.facebook.com/biotectureof...

    Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1QoPzmt

    Tiny houses listed for sale and rent daily: http://tinyhouselistings.com

    Tiny houses for sale in your inbox: http://eepurl.com/bAcWb
    Instagram: http://instagram.com/tinyhouselistings
    Facebook: http://facebook.com/tinyhouselistings

    Music by rogyr: https://soundcloud.com/rogiermuller

    Zip line kit: http://amzn.to/2oaLPcV
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Jaw-Dropping Traditional Small Japanese Home Renovation
    Living Big In A Tiny House



    Published on Mar 30, 2017
    This episode is brought to you by Audible. Get your free 30-day trial here: http://www.audible.com/livingbig

    Imagine having the opportunity to renovate a wonderfully unique building and turn it into your dream home. When Daigo came across an abandoned small home in rural Japan which previously had been used to grow silk worms, that's exactly what he did. The home takes full advantage of the original traditional Japanese construction materials, yet is styled with an minimalist, modern edge.

    Become a Living Big Patron: https://www.patreon.com/livingbig

    Read More: http://www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com/...

    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/livingbiginat...

    Twitter: @TinyHouseNZ

    Instagram: @livingbiginatinyhouse

    Please subscribe for more videos on Tiny Houses, design, and sustainable, off-grid living.

    Music in this video: http://www.youtube.com/brycelangston

    'Living Big in a Tiny House' © 2017 Zyia Pictures Ltd
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Amazingly Beautiful Sakura Tiny House Has Style
    Tiny House Listings



    Published on Apr 1, 2017
    The Sakura Tiny House was recently completely by Minimaliste Homes in Québec. The house literally has not only everything you'd except in a traditional home, but it's all done beautifully with some pretty darn impressive ways of going about it. I'd like to thanks Phil from Minimaliste for putting together this English version of The Sakura tiny house tour, thanks! See link below to their website.

    Built by Minimaliste: https://minimalistehouses.com

    Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1QoPzmt
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Our fixer Upper, House Renovations, Bathroom. Kitchen, Bedroom. Car Port.
    Astral Auto Repairs



    Published on Apr 2, 2017
    This is our project home where we got a lot to fix up and would love any suggestions you may have, especially when it comes to providing some shade in the back yard.
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Is a Pretty Cottage Better Than a Tiny House?
    Dirtpatcheaven



    Published on Apr 10, 2017
    With a little paint and some old fashioned curtains you can turn an ordinary little house into a cozy whimsical castle. We loved staying in this place while filming and will take some of the ideas used here home with us!
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    From a $12k shack to a palatial family ranch: Fixer Upper's Joanna and Chip Gaines reveal how they turned a crumbling cabin into a dream home in their most ambitious project yet
    • Chip and Joanna Gaines transformed a small decaying shack bought by their producer and his wife
    • The shack cost only $12,000 and included a large parcel of land in Waco, Texas
    • The owners, producer Michael Matsumoto and wife Jessie moved to be closer to the Gaineses


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4403698/From-12-000-Shack-Palatial-Family-Ranch.html#ixzz4e3T9TfW7
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Fantastic Tiny Tree House with Hanging Bridge & Treetop Deck
    Exploring Alternatives



    Published on Apr 14, 2017
    Video tour of an incredible off-grid treehouse with a hanging bridge connecting to a magical treetop deck. It was built by Dior and Sylvain from Les Toits du Monde (http://www.lestoitsdumonde.ca/_en/ind...) which in English means Roofs of the World.

    It is a wooded eco-resort with trails running through the forest and all kinds of neat cabins and green buildings to stay in. They also have a hobbit house, yurts, and a tipi; and they are located in Nominingue, Quebec — a small town that's less than 3 hours from Montreal and Ottawa.

    The treehouse has solar power for the lights, a single-burner propane cooktop in the kitchen, a portable solar shower and composting 5-gallon bucket toilet with sawdust in the bathroom, a woodstove for heat, and they deliver jugs of drinking water to each cabin that are filled from their well at the main house.

    In addition to being sustainable and off-grid, the interior design of the tiny house is quite stunning but simple and minimalist at the same time. They've used wood for a sink, countertops, a table, and more. It all adds to the feeling that your house is a part of the woods. It's minimalist living at it's best.

    The treetop home is a vacation rental that sleeps 4 in a loft, and an extra two on the futon below.

    You can learn more about this amazing eco-resort on their website here:
    http://www.lestoitsdumonde.ca/_en/ind...

    and on Facebook here:
    https://www.facebook.com/lestoitsdumonde

    Thanks for watching!

    Mat & Danielle
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Our fixer Upper, House Renovations, Bathroom. Kitchen, Bedroom. Car Port, PART 2
    Astral Auto Repairs



    Published on Apr 19, 2017
    This is our project home where we got a lot to fix up and would love any suggestions you may have. We are remodeling the bathroom, kitchen, living room, bedroom, and all other rooms in the house. We are also building a carport in the back yard and would like your opinions on every aspect of remodeling this home, THANKS!
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Harry Bennett's Castle
    Kim Retrokimmer



    Uploaded on Nov 1, 2010
    PM Magazine hosted Todd Hissong featured a story on Harry Bennett's Castle just outside Ypsilanti, MI in 1984. For the first time a camera takes us inside the walls of the Castle.

    More here:
    Harder Homes & Gardens – Volume I: Harry Bennett’s castle and cabins
    http://www.commanderzero.com/?p=4091
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Beauty of Dutch ruined defensive bunker turned spartan lodge
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Apr 23, 2017
    Twenty years ago when Ben Spee was looking for a “special” place to live, the Foundation Forteresse was planning to turn an old Dutch fort into a B&B. Spee moved in and spent the next 15 years helping turn a 19th-Century fortress- complete with moat- into a “special” place to spend the night.

    In 1844, the Dutch began to construct Fort Vuren as part of the New Hollandic Waterline (Nieuwe Hollandse Waterlinie) a series of forts stretching 52 miles north-south through the countryside. Part of the country’s largest ever infrastructure investment, the Waterline (the original dates back to the 17th Century) relies on a chain of forts and shallow moats with water that could be strategically deployed to create an impassable muddy mess.

    The Waterline served as more of a deterrent than something actually put to use (Fort Vuren was occupied only by invading Germans) and became obsolete with the introduction of air strikes in World War II.

    Today, the Waterline has been nominated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Regional governments, following ideals of “preservation through development”, are renovating the forts into restaurants, museums and lodging.

    Ben Spee helped oversee a massive renovation of Fort Vuren that began in 2010 that included protection from the area’s high humidity: inserting a vapor barrier in the walls and using geothermal energy to heat the floors. Today, the old fort has 9 rooms within the circular counterscarp (added on in 1878). There are also two “fort lodge” homes for rent inside an old barrack.

    For the truly “adventurous”, there’s a tiny bunker turned bunkhouse for rent by the weekend/week. Just 3 meters by 3 meters, the half submerged structure sleeps four in retractable wooden bunkbeds. It’s also plumbed and wired with a small kitchen, complete with stovetops, sink and mini fridge.

    We tested the converted shelter for one night and found it surprisingly comfortable for all five of us. As a bonus for those with young kids, it’s isolated and soundproof.

    Despite the new accommodations and additional overnight guests, the fort still retains a timeless quiet, and for Ben, and the rest at Fort Vuren, this intimacy remains a core value.

    Fort Vuren lodging: http://www.wff.nl/algemeen.php?sub1=S...

    Drone footage courtesy of Jaap Brunner

    Original video: https://faircompanies.com/videos/beau...
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How the Mississippi shantyboats helped build a culture
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Apr 30, 2017
    “I do not know much about gods; but I think that the river Is a strong brown god—sullen, untamed and intractable” - “Dry Salvages”, T.S. Eliot

    Long before Wes Modes began planning a journey down the Mississippi, he started building a traditional barge-bottom houseboat in a California backyard out of rustic reclaimed materials (e.g. old fences and chicken coops). Once his shantyboat was complete he hatched a plan to transport it across the country from Santa Cruz to Minnesota to begin a “Huck-Finn style” journey down the iconic American river.

    Following in the footsteps of Harlan and Anna Hubbard, whose eight-year journey down the Mississippi and Ohio rivers was chronicled in Harlan’s book “Shantytown”, Modes launched his own float 70 years later. His “Secret History of American River People” is part personal adventure and part research project, collecting stories of “river people” along the banks.

    Complete with lofted bed, compost toilet and full-kitchen (propane-powered camp stove and plumbed sink), his 10-by-8-foot houseboat cabin serves as both floating home and mobile office for his summertime sojourns.

    After two summers on the Mississippi recording stories for his “Secret History of American River People”, Modes (along with first mate Lauren Benz) set out to tackle the 652-mile Tennessee River from Knoxville to Paducah, Kentucky. We caught up with him in Knoxville, which he pointed out is also the setting for Cormac McCarthy’s semi-autobiographical shantyboat novel “Suttree”.

    Nearly everywhere he goes, Modes has discovered that the times of shantyboat living have largely disappeared. “I just finished an interview with somebody,” he explained from Volunteer Landing in Knoxville. “He was saying when he was a kid growing up in the sixties there were people living along the banks of some of the creeks and the river, but by the mid-to-late seventies those people were all gone. And by the eighties they had renewed the riverfront and by the nineties... all those people who used to live along the rivers in little homemade shacks and shanty boats were instead displaced.”

    Modes uses crowdfunding to help pay for his trips where he hopes to tell the stories of people who don’t usually make the history books. “I think that’s kind of like this idea of postmodern history in which you’re examining the little tales of people, the tales of you and I, the relationships in our lives, and the adventures we’d had and the hardships we’ve endured. Those are a form of history that is just as valid and just as legitimate as history with a capital H: history that makes the dominant narrative of the people who generally are the victors and the people who win and the people who write the history books.“

    Secret History of American River People: http://peopleriverhistory.us
    Wes’ crowdfunding for 2017 (live in another week): https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...

    Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/how-...
     
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  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Funky Beach Home Made From Old Streetcars
    HouzzTV



    Published on Jul 20, 2015
    http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/458495...
    Streetcars carried passengers through the streets of Santa Cruz until 1926, when they were decommissioned and replaced by buses. So what happened to the streetcars? Mary and Gerhard Ringel know exactly where two are. They currently live inside them. http://www.houzztv.com
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Goodbye, Skyrocketing Rents; Hello, Waterfront Living
    HouzzTV



    Published on May 2, 2016
    http://www.houzz.com/houzztv

    After more than a year sharing a cramped San Francisco apartment where the view from her bedroom was an air shaft between buildings, Kelsey Lettko needed a change. So she bought a 36-foot boat and made it a home. Even after paying slip fees and regularly hiring a diver to scrape barnacles off the boat, she saves more than $500 a month living on what she calls her floating condo. And her views now? See for yourself.
     
  16. searcher

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    Earthship Home - Young Man's Inspiring Building & Living Experience
    Exploring Alternatives



    Published on May 6, 2017
    Jordan shares great tips and advice on how to build a stunning earthship-style home using recycled tires, and earthen cob made from clay, sand and straw. He built his with a ton of help from his girlfriend and friends.

    To learn more about this earthship on Prince Edward Island in Canada: http://earthshippei.com/

    To learn more about building an earthship, check out the books written by Michael Reynolds here:
    https://earthshipstore.com/Earthship-...

    The green home measures between 800-900 square feet, collects rainwater, treats it's own waste water, heats and cools itself (although there is a wood stove for extra cold nights in the winter), and will soon have solar panels.

    The interior design was decorated with local and reclaimed materials like recycled granite for the countertops, a CD mosaic backsplash, PEI sandstone floor, recycled bottles in the walls, and more.

    An Earthship is the ultimate green building because it heats and cools itself with a passive solar design and strategic thermal mass to store heat like a battery, it has space to grow food indoors, collects and treats rain water, and more.

    We filmed this whole video with a 50mm camera lens because we broke the 16mm lens trying to take a photo on a windy point beside a lighthouse.

    This PEI Earthship in Wellington, PEI is available for rent on Airbnb:
    https://www.airbnb.ca/rooms/6429008

    Earthship PEI: http://earthshippei.com/

    Thanks for watching!

    Mat & Danielle
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Snowboarder Built a Sublime Off Grid Tiny House
    Dylan Magaster



    Published on May 8, 2017
    Mike Basich built a sublime off grid Tiny House, on top of a mountain out of granite with a chair lift right outside
    The Frozen Chase: https://goo.gl/gxWnao

    Become a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/dylanmagaster

    The most helpful book I've ever bought: https://goo.gl/8YEUSL

    Follow
    https://www.facebook.com/Mikeybasich/
    https://www.instagram.com/mikebasich/
    http://www.241-usa.com

    Follow me on Social Media
    https://www.twitter.com/dylanmagaster
    https://www.instagram.com/dylanmagaster


     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How To Have a Home With No House Payments And No Utility Bills 2017
    solarcabin



    Published on May 10, 2017
    This is an update and walk around of my homestead and off-grid cabin built for $2000 in 2009. Many changes over the years that you should like and I explain how my off-grid homesteading vision became a reality and allowed me to retire and live the way I want to live. More info at: www.simplesolarhomesteading.com
     
  19. searcher

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    Fishing for Herself. A fisherwoman’s lonely life on Sakhalin Island
    RT Documentary



    Published on Mar 15, 2016
    Sometimes we all feel like keeping a distance from everyone else, retreating to a remote corner of the world and living like a hermit. Few of us ever actually do it though. This young fisherwoman from the icy island of Sakhalin has opted for a life of solitude but was it really a choice?

    Anna was born on the remote and icy Sakhalin island. She grew up in a children’s home and when she left, decided that fishing would be her livelihood. It is hard work but Anna strives to be independent and rely on no one but herself. She wants to be equal to men in everything she does and refuses to be seen as a weak woman in need of anyone’s help. She works all day and in her free time plays ice hockey for an otherwise all-men team.

    Anna loves her cats and takes care of her new-found relatives, but still doesn’t believe she needs anyone else in her life and thinks she’s better off living alone. She still bears a grudge against the people, mainly women, who caused her harm in her childhood and teens. It’s hard to let go of her past. Perhaps that’s why she has never fully embraced her present reality, still looking and behaving like a child, despite her age. It seems as though Anna lives in a world of her own, carefully guarded against intruders, refusing to get close to anyone, in case she might have to change her ways.

    Sometimes, she thinks she might like to try and start her own family but as she’s never had a positive example to follow, she admits she has no idea where to begin or even what a real family should be like. So she sticks to the life she knows; ensuring her own survival, never trusting anyone completely and fishing, for herself, in the icy lakes of Sakhalin Island.

    However, even a loner like Anna can harbour dreams of a very different life, no matter how improbable that may seem at the moment.
     
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Frontier Home: Living off-grid on a remote island in Skilak Lake, Alaska
    Bonnie Rose Ward



    Published on Jun 12, 2015
    We hope you enjoy our slideshow depicting our life on a remote island. A life of adventure which culminated into a book written by Bonnie Rose Ward.

    Available at: http://www.amazon.com/Winds-Skilak-Su...

    Description follows:
    Winds of Skilak: A Tale of True Grit, True Love and Survival in the Alaskan Wilderness by Bonnie Rose Ward

    Winds of Skilak traces a young couple's adventurous move from the suburbs of Ohio to a remote island on ill-tempered Skilak Lake. As Sam and Bonnie adapt to a life without running water, electricity and telephones, the unforgiving, desolate environment tests their courage early on. Facing sub-freezing temperatures, unfriendly bears, and cabin fever, the Wards find strength in new friends, each other, and the awe-inspiring beauty of "the last frontier." Just when they finally settle in, a freak accident proves to be the ultimate test of their resolve. Will they be able to survive in this isolated wilderness filled with unseen dangers?

    Author Bonnie Ward chronicles an exciting and thought-provoking tale of one couple's faith in God and dedication to each other through all of Alaska's curveballs.
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    D.I.Y. Shipping Container Apartment
    Mike Williams



    Published on Jan 3, 2017
    This video is about D.I.Y. Shipping Container Apartment / Home Office
     
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    Shipping Container House Design Ideas
    homefans



    Published on Jan 28, 2017
     
  23. searcher

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    Multi-Shack: Homeless or emergency Housing (Free Plans)
    solarcabin



    Published on May 11, 2016
    This is a design and plans for a 4x6 structure that can be used for homeless or emergency housing, guest bedroom, playhouse, office, business or many other uses. Plans are free here:
    http://www.simplesolarhomesteading.com
     
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    Function after form: from old auto repair to live/work space
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on May 14, 2017
    Two decades ago, architects David Yocum and Brian Bell were new to Atlanta and looking for an abandoned building that they could “reimagine”. They found their opportunity in a crumbling former auto repair shop. Yocum bought it for $40,000 and spent the next three years working nights and weekends to make it into a home for himself and his wife.

    Most of the roof had already collapsed so Yocum removed what remained over the front half of the building and created an open courtyard. Since the remaining building had no windows, to add light, he installed a wall of glass doors for the front and skylights. To insure that the back of the building- at the time the bedroom and living room- wouldn’t be too dark, he didn’t build any solid walls inside the structure. Instead the rooms in the middle of the space- the kitchen, mechanical room and bathroom- have “slivers” for walls to filter light from the front to the back.

    “If we had solid walls and no skylights it would be quite oppressive,” explains Yocum. “So if you imagine the idea of a skylight where you’re cutting a hole to the sky, the same attitude was taken with these walls. Instead of having solid walls we would have just a series of small slivers.”

    Yocum and Bell began their architecture practice (BLDGS) in the front of the building, but eventually, both the firm and Yocum’s wife wanted more space, so the couple moved out and today the entire space is an office.

    The exterior of the building still retains the abandoned look, mostly due to the sealed-shut windows, and the architects like keeping it anonymous. “It’s in the heart of the city, but it’s also a bit of an oasis”.

    Inside, now that the courtyard is exposed to the elements, the walls change with the years: paints falls off, the metal windows develop more and more patina. For Yocum and Bell, this aging is a beautiful thing.

    “Beauty can be found in a lot of places,” explains Yocum who thinks the reimagining of buildings can be done more often. “It’s no different from a city that’s been around for 600 years, is that you find ways to reuse structures and you discover what you can and you turn it into something new. It’s a very natural approach to things. I think what’s interesting is that it can lead to unexpected situations. ”

    BLDGS Architects: http://www.bldgs.org/

    Photo credit: interior photo- Dwight Eschliman http://eschlimanstudio.com/; all others- BLDGS

    Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/func...
     
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    Norcal veteran coder customizes off-grid home with sensors
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on May 26, 2014
    Loren Amelang once helped code for Silicon Valley companies, but he'd always been sensitive to environment so when his employer installed fluorescent lighting and wouldn't let employees use their own lights, he decided to move to the country and craft his off-grid dream home.

    Today he lives with "clean air, a great view, free hot water and free power, and a decent chunk of free heat". The entire south side of his home is covered in solar capture devices: 1600 watts of photovoltaic power, solar hot water panels, a sunroom/greenhouse and a solar hot air collector. The sunroom/greenhouse provides most of the free heat via the 'solar flue' that moderates it in warmer weather or circulates some of it into the house when needed, and the concrete walls that stabilize the temperature over time.

    Putting his technical skills to use (he's a pioneer in C++ programming), Amelang wrote over 10,000 lines of code so that his home's water and electric systems could be operated remotely, by even just an iPhone.

    Since he built most of the home himself (the person he hired to do it decades ago, spent all the money and built half the house), Amelang has made it very custom. He avoided using aluminum and plastic (except for the insulation on the wiring) and he wired it for pure DC lighting (which makes sense with solar, but Amelang also likes how "peaceful" DC lighting feels).

    Building on his own terms means that Amelang created a home that doesn't look or feel like anyone else's, but it works well and makes sense. For instance, he designed an audio system where you can "walk around in the sound space and feel where you are" and a central locking system for all exterior doors so that when he leaves the house he doesn't have to lock 12 different doors, but just turns one key and they all lock.

    * This is a follow-up story with Loren. The original stories from 2011: -- C++ programming pioneer hacks off-grid, DIY, smart home
    http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/...
    -- 96-square-foot tiny home handbuilt inside century-old barn
    http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/...

    ** Note: Loren has always seen the world differently, in a literal sense and he is hoping to hear from anyone who might experience the same phenomenon. He explains they are "issues are with brain-level perception and my expectations of how the visual world should work". He writes about it more in detail in his blog post "Consumed by the light": http://psychoros.org/lightFrame.html
     
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    Brooklyn crafted, impermanent house gets wiser with owner
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Mar 12, 2013
    Tim Seggerman bought his Brooklyn home (Crown Heights) at an auction in 1987 for $140,000 (his down payment of $14,000 was his entire savings). It had been abandoned for 20 years and had holes in the roof, but Seggerman was trained as a builder and carpenter so he began working on it himself.

    Over the past couple of decades the home has grown with Seggerman's changing needs: a lofted bed became an indoor cabin for kids and when the nieces and nephews had grown, it became a lofted bed again; the bedroom was once divided to provide workspace for his ex-wife, but after the divorce the wall came down; and a once-open corner office became a shuttered workspace and is now- in preparation for Seggerman's retirement- is morphing into an open movie library.

    Seggerman is both architect and builder, as well as a master carpenter, and he's crafted all of the home's furniture, mostly out of scrap materials and local woods.

    He believes in taking his time to build and that a home is never finished. It's an idea embraced by the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi: everything is impermanent, unfinished and imperfect. In Seggerman's home cables and pipes are uncovered and molding has been removed to leave the caulk line visible.

    More info in original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/...
     
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    Artist builds his Savannah studio with shipping containers
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Oct 23, 2016
    Architect, artist, designer Julio Garcia had been designing plans for shipping container homes for a decade before he found the perfect place to build one: on a long, narrow stretch of his property in Savannah, Georgia. “I’m a big believer we should be adapting to the environment… I remember walking out and looking at the yard and thinking oh my god the land is calling for this linear design.”

    He picked up two 40 foot shipping containers from the Port of Savannah and, thanks to much advance planning, he was able to install them without removing one tree from his property. He offset the two boxes, cut out the interior container walls and added I-beams, a shed roof and clerestory windows in the center to provide plenty of daylighting.

    “There’s nothing worse than feeling like you’re inside a container so in the design we had to address that. I’ve been in a couple of projects and they don’t function very well and you’re like, ‘Oh, I still feel like I’m in a metal box’.”

    Garcia believes containers can make for affordable homes: “you could put up a structure like this for about 50K”, but much of the interior was salvaged from other job sites (i.e. the drywall and the kitchen). His Price Street Projects creates plans that are “almost do-it-yourself plans” for shipping container homes and he has installed commercial container spaces, but he’s a big believer that the site should determine the design.

    http://pricestreetprojects.com/

    Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/arti...
     
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    DIY restoration of abandoned 18th century home in Barcelona
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Apr 22, 2013
    When Michele first entered his newly-rented apartment in Barcelona, it had been abandoned for 35 years so looked nothing like the count's residence it once was several centuries ago. Michele didn't have much money for repairs, but he's an artist/carpenter/craftsman who much prefers the old to the new so he set out to restore the space on his own.

    Using only materials that had been recycled, donated or found in the space, Michele slowly turned what had most recently been used as a wherehouse into a home and studio space for himself and his partner Francesca.

    They both believe strongly in respecting the history of a space so instead of installing a modern kitchen and bathroom, they use the 18th century stone laundry sink for both cleaning their dishes and as a shower. They didn't touch anything structural so the bathroom is tiny with just a small sink and toilet and their "library" is a hallway filled with books and a reading nook window.

    Much of the couple's furniture was found in the street and tweaked. Their bed is a DIY-reupholstered sofabed. An old sink stand became a light. The carpentry table found in the space is now their kitchen table.

    Michele crafted the bedroom floor and kitchen ceiling using wood found in the space. He uncovered original ceilings, frescos and Modernist wallpaper.

    The entire restoration process took a year and a half. When asked about why they would invest so much in a rental property, the couple explain that quality of life is more important than cost or time invested.

    Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/...
     
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    $1800 used shipping container as architects' backyard office
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Uploaded on Dec 16, 2011
    Shipping containers are built to carry huge loads and the refrigerated units are very efficient at climate control. So it's unsurprising that when they're retired from the sea, they're being used as the building blocks for homes and offices.

    Given their strength they work well in earthquake country. In Berkeley, California architect Karl Wanaselja and his business partner and wife Cate Leger created their home-office using a shipping container. It cost just $1800.

    Wanaselja and Leger cut their 40 foot long refrigerated unit in half and placed it in a T shape in their backyard (with the help of a crane). They didn't need to add any insulation: they're designed to not have any thermal bridging between the interior and exterior and the polyisocyanurate insulation has the highest R-value of any foam insulation.

    Using a sawzall (reciprocating saw), the couple cut huge windows into the aluminum/stainless steel structure. Wanaselja says he was initially intimidated by the idea of crafting out of aluminum (the exterior material) and stainless steel (interior), but "once I got over my learning curve I actually like working with metal".

    In this video, the couple talk about working in a cargo container, using materials like the soy-based plywood floor (Purebond) and the music made by rain and branches on a metal roof.

    Original story here: http://www.faircompanies.com/videos/v...
     
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    Spectacular 40ft Small Shipping Container Home
    Living Big In A Tiny House



    Published on May 3, 2016
    This 40ft Shipping Container home is packed with clever space-saving features. It's solar powered, collects rain-water and can even sleep up to 7 people! Read More: http://www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com/...

    Help me create more videos: https://www.patreon.com/livingbig

    Follow me on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/livingbiginat...

    Follow me on Twitter: @TinyHouseNZ

    Follow me on Instagram: @livingbiginatinyhouse

    Please subscribe for more videos on Tiny Houses, design, and sustainable, off-grid living.

    'Living Big in a Tiny House' © 2015 Zyia Pictures Ltd
     
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    So off grid, they're even off land! Couple have spent 25 YEARS living on a floating compound called Freedom Cove where they use solar energy, grow their own food and only make trips ashore every two weeks
    • Married artists Wayne Adams and Catherine King began building their floating home off Vancouver Island 25 years ago
    • The compound is always transforming; the couple add structures and repair damage from storms, which can be quite severe
    • Freedom Cove runs on solar energy and generators and a fresh water system Wayne constructed
    • The couple make trips to land every two weeks and joke about feeling 'landsick' when they leave their beloved floating paradise
    • The compound includes gardens, a dance floor, a garage for boats, living and artistic space
    • Wayne and Catherine operate an open-door policy and invite curious tourists into their home, showing them around Freedom Cove and giving them homemade candles as parting gifts
    • They say their lifestyle has been a 'learn by doing' experience - teaching them, for example, to anchor Freedom Cove with weighted ropes during storms
    • Much of their daily routine focuses on maintenance and the couple say they were aware of hardships and risks, but they would not want to live any other way


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4500142/Meet-couple-ve-spent-25-years-floating-home.html#ixzz4hGKikis4
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
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    Dan Price’s underground home, art & philosophy on $5,000/year
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Sep 20, 2015
    When Dan Price returned to his home state of Oregon in 1990 he was determined to avoid mortgages or rent (he and his family had just finished caretaking a mansion with a heating bill of $500/month). He found an unused meadow in Joseph, Oregon and began renting it from his neighbors for $100/year (in exchange for cleaning downed trees and repairing fences).

    His first underground structure was actually built to shelter his home/office, namely his copy machine, essential for publishing his zine “Moonlight Chronicles” which he started in 1992 (it was sponsored by Simple Shoes for a decade).
    www.moonlightchronicles.com

    In his meadow paradise, Price now also has an underground "hobbit hole" style home, as well as, a composting toilet, a propane-powered shower (using river water) and a pine wood propane sauna. He’s not hooked up to city water (he discovered a spring on the property), but he’s hooked up to the grid and it’s been approved by the county and city.

    Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/...
     
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    San Francisco brick boiler room turned industrial tiny house
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Aug 16, 2015
    Architect Christi Azevedo transformed a tiny boiler room in her San Francisco backyard into a compact home crafted like custom furniture. Trained in metalworking and furniture building, everything is tailored to create a home that feels much larger than its 88 square feet (8 feet wide by 11 feet deep).

    Christi Azevedo: http://christiazevedo.com/

    Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/...
     
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    Off-Grid Island Cottage in Sweden, Amazing Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on May 12, 2017
    This old-time summer cottage shares a small island with less than a dozen other cottages. The island is in Karlholm bay on the Baltic Sea, a couple hours drive north of Stockholm.

    The small cottage dates from 1930, and originally consisted of just the middle portion that is now the living room. The two “wings” were added in 1975, giving the cottage its bird-like roof profile and bringing the floor space to 55 m2 (592 ft2). The expansion made room for a kitchen and dining area on one side and two small bedrooms on the other. They are a step down from the original floor level to allow sufficient headroom under the low-sloped roofs. Even so, the roof barely clears the top of the entry door.

    As the island has no services, the cottage is completely off the grid. It didn’t even have electrical wiring until a few years ago, when another renovation saw the installation of a small solar system to power some lights and a compact fridge. Water still has to be brought over from the mainland, although the cottage’s metal roof would be good for rainwater collection. Heat is provided by a wood stove in the living room, and cooking is done on a gas stove.

    A guest cabin behind the cottage has an additional bunkroom and the only bathroom, equipped with a Separett composting toilet. If you wanted to move the bathroom into the main cottage, there are a couple of possibilities. The back end of the living room looks underutilized, and there is probably sufficient room to put in a bathroom next to the kitchen. If not, then one of the bedrooms could be converted to a bathroom, although the lower floor might make it more challenging to install the underfloor plumbing.

    The cottage is currently for sale with an asking price of 1,650,000 Swedish kroner, roughly US$200,000.

    Photographs courtesy of Mäklarhuset.
    http://www.maklarhuset.se/

    More Videos: #tinyhouse #tinyhouses #smallhouse #cottage #cabin #tiny #tinyhome
     
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    A “Surf Shack” Cabin For Two Brothers by WMR Arquitectos, Amazing Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on May 19, 2017
    Two brothers who love to surf purchased a hillside property overlooking the Pacific at Matanzas, one of many places to catch the waves along Chile’s central coastline. They asked WMR Arquitectos to design a small, low-cost cabin for the site.

    The architects created a simple wood and glass box whose dimensions were determined by the sizes of standard building materials. Supported by a pier and post foundation, the cabin sits lightly on the hillside, avoiding the disruption and expense of a full excavated foundation.

    The lower living level is one open space with an L-shaped eat-in kitchen at one end and a sitting area at the other. A steep wooden staircase along the back wall takes you up to the sleeping level, which can be either opened up or closed off with large sliding doors that partition off two bed alcoves. In total the cabin’s floor plan comes to 51.6 m2 (555 ft2).

    Large windows on all sides bring in the beauty of the surroundings, and the bathroom in particular offers the best view from the toilet we’ve ever seen.

    Photographs by Sergio Pirrone, courtesy of WMR Arquitectos. Via Plataforma Arquitectura.
    http://www.sergiopirrone.com/
    http://www.wmrarq.cl/
    http://www.plataformaarquitectura.cl/...
     
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    An Old Stone Tower Becomes A Small House in Hvar, Croatia
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on May 17, 2017
    In 1761, a group of Franciscans built a windmill on a hill overlooking the port on the island of Hvar in the Adriatic Sea. The passage of time took a toll on the structure through, and a couple hundred years later the local residents were calling it the Ruina di Molino a Vento. The ruins passed to new owners who restored the tower’s stone base and converted the interior into a small home. It is now being used as a vacation rental.

    The tower’s living space is spread over five floors. Rooms are defined by changes in level rather than by walls. The entry door opens to the kitchen, with the dining area a few steps lower. A wood staircase curves up to a mezzanine level, used as a bedroom, before continuing up to the living room.

    The only interior walls separate the bathroom from the living room. Above the bathroom is a sleeping loft.

    Because it was never meant as living quarters, the stone tower has only small windows. However there is a great view over the old city from the top-level loft.

    Aside from the shortage of windows, the tower seems to make a fairly comfortable home, once you get used to going up and down all the steps.

    The tower is pretty conveniently located for visitors to Hvar. It is just a few minutes walk from the main square, although it is an uphill walk. You can rent the tower through Airbnb.
    https://fr.airbnb.com/rooms/3542873

    Photographs courtesy of Airbnb.
     
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    Off-Grid Living without Solar or Wind...here's how!
    BealtaineCottage



    Published on May 18, 2017
    Bealtaine Cottage is about 80% Off-Grid...without Solar or Wind Energy...how can this be? Watch and learn!
     
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    From old Belgian water tank to dream tower house with a view
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on May 22, 2017
    Patrick Mets loves “old, industrial buildings” and he’s always been fascinated by water towers. After years of scouting the Belgian countryside he found one for sale (for 30,000 euros or about $43,000 at the time) and began working to convert it into a home.

    “It was quite naive that we bought it because we didn’t have any permit to convert it into something else,” explains Mets. “And so it took us 12 years, 7 years to get the necessary permit and 5 years of renovation work.”

    Working with designer Mauro Brigham (NC & Bham), they tried to leave as much of the tower in its original state. Fortunately the 30-meter-high (90 feet) tower was built with windows- an oddity for a water tower-, but forty of them keep the converted home well lit.

    The water tank itself was kept mainly intact. Brigham and Mets added a floor inside it and cut holes out of the sides for views and it now serves as the kitchen and living room.

    After a couple years using the space as their full-time home, Mets and his partner Valérie Lecherf moved out to be closer to their daughters’ school. Today they rent the “Chateau d’Eau” for special events.

    Chateau d’Eau (rental): http://www.ch2o.be
    NC & Bham (interior design): http://www.nc-bham.be/

    Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/from...
     
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    Tiny Cape Cod Cottage by Christopher Budd | Amazing Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on May 26, 2017
    A lot of us dream of someday building our own small house from the ground up. Unfortunately there are often various obstacles on that path. Limited finances and skeptical lenders, lack of suitable land, and oppressive minimum size regulations can all get in the way. An alternative is to buy an older small house and remodel it to suit your needs. Interior designer Christopher Budd and his partner did that, purchasing a 1940s summer cottage in Provincetown, at the tip of Cape Cod. He then rearranged the 350 ft2 (32.5 m2) floor plan with the help of custom homebuilder Cape Associates, creating a functional and comfortable vacation home that can be enjoyed year-round.

    The owners wanted to have distinct spaces within the downstairs living area, versus one wide-open room. An island was chosen to define the kitchen and sitting areas while keeping them open to one another, and also providing a place to eat. To keep it from consuming too much valuable floor space, the island was kept very narrow using 21″ deep cabinets instead of the standard 24″.

    The living room ceiling is vaulted up to the roof, increasing the perceived size of the small room by the added volume and by the long sightlines up to the loft.

    The kitchen is tiny but fully functional, utilizing the most compact appliances the owners could find. It’s a bit hard to believe but they managed to squeeze in a fridge, a two-burner cooktop, a wall oven, a microwave oven, a dishwasher drawer and even a clothes washer.

    The bathroom is even tinier at under 23 ft2 (2.1 m2), about half the size of a typical full bathroom with bathtub. The toilet and vanity were squeezed in on one side, leaving the other side free for a full-size shower.

    A narrow stair winds up to the bedroom loft. Storage is accommodated by drawers under the bed and low cabinets, keeping the space open.

    Photographs by Dan Cutrona Photography. Via Houzz.
    http://www.dancutrona.com/
    https://www.houzz.com/projects/370730...
     

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