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Alternative Living Spaces: Off Grid Cribs, Tiny Houses, Underground Homes, Etc.

Discussion in 'Projects, Builds, Woodworking, Metalworks' started by searcher, Nov 6, 2016.



  1. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Eagle Point Cabin of Washington’s San Juan Island | Prentiss Architects | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jun 24, 2017
    A meandering path leads to Eagle Point Cabin where it sits nestled between a rock outcrop and a thicket on the windswept west coast of Washington’s San Juan Island. The semi-sheltered building location was chosen to provide some protection from the winter winds and to block out views of the neighboring houses.

    Designed by Prentiss Architects, Eagle Point Cabin is a squat rectangular building with unfinished wood siding and a sod roof that merge with the natural landscape. From a distance, it almost passes for a simple homesteader’s cabin. However the interior is anything but basic, with extensive wood windows, custom cabinetry and high-end finishes.

    The small cabin has a nice layout that looks bigger than its actual 688 ft2 (63.9 m2) size. The kitchen along the back wall doubles as a passageway to the spacious bedroom and four-piece bath. The living room, bedroom and bathroom all have large corner windows, with the living room offering views of the ocean and Olympic mountains while the bedroom and bath focus on the nearby vegetation.

    The cabin is well-insulated with its green roof, 8″ of insulation in the walls, and triple-glazed windows on the north side. Because it also gets good winter sun exposure, there is little need to use the radiant heaters or the small woodstove in the living room.

    The chosen finishing materials probably made this cabin quite expensive, but substituting standard-sized windows or sliding doors and flat-pack cabinets would turn it into a fairly economical home. With a simple rectangular floor plan and single-slope roof, it could be relatively easy and inexpensive to build.

    Thank you for reading this article. Have a good day!

    Photographs by Rob Skelton/Anacortes Estates Media, Michael Skott and Geoff Prentiss. Via Home Crux.
    http://www.anacortesestatesmedia.com/
    http://www.prentissarchitects.com/
    http://www.homecrux.com/2014/08/26/19...
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    CA automated container home on a budget obeys voice commands
    Kirsten Dirksen



    Published on Jun 25, 2017
    As co-founder of Oakland’s shipping container live/work commune, which we dubbed “Containertopia” in 2014, Luke Iseman has been pushing the limits of container living for years. For his most recent experiment, he attached an Raspberry Pi and a relay board to his ever-evolving “Boxouse” and with voice automation (specifically Amazon Alexa), he created a very affordable “smart home”. By investing in a window coating, he can even “tell” the windows to go opaque or translucent.

    He admits that these hacks aren’t life-changing, but they hint at a more-connected future where windows could incrementally adjust to a changing day, lights could track our motion through a space or heating could shift with our location.

    “These are things that you can buy individual devices to do,” explains Iseman. “What’s cool for me is it’s, especially with a tiny house, when you stop worrying about the cost per square foot, when you think about it as, ‘oh, this isn’t that big of a house, if I want 3 or 4 smart systems I might as well just spend the 20-40 hours to learn how to glue these together with open sourced things’. I mean it’s basically a container-based smart cabin.”

    "Containertopia" 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfqun...
    "Containertopia" 2015: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWIJc...

    Boxouse: https://boxouse.com/
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Small House of Actor Vincent Kartheiser’s Hollywood | Funn Roberts | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jun 25, 2017
    A few months ago we posted a couple photos of Mad Men actor Vincent Kartheiser’s Hollywood home on our facebook page, generating quite a lot of interest. Now the small house is for sale so we can get the full tour courtesy of listing agent Tregg Rustad.

    When Kartheiser bought the 1912 bungalow, it was a divided into several small rooms. After living in it for several years, he began a complete renovation of the 603 ft2 (56.0 m2) house with designer and craftsman Funn Roberts. They gutted the interior and remade it as a loft-like space with what Kartheiser calls a “Japanese industrial” aesthetic. Many of the fixtures and furniture pieces were designed and built by Roberts.

    Removing the interior walls resulted in a floor plan that is open from the custom steel entry door to the back wall. The space is divided into three zones, a sitting area just inside the front door, the teak kitchen and dining area in the middle, and a multi-use space at the far end. The multi-use space is primarily used as a bedroom but the bed can be hoisted to the ceiling to free up more living space. A system of pulleys and a 300 lb counterweight hanging in the closet make it easy to raise and lower the bed. The headboard, a slab of redwood hinged to the wall, becomes a desk when the bed is up.

    Storage closets and the bathroom facilities are arranged along one side, concealed behind shoji-inspired sliding screens made from translucent fiberglass panels in steel frames. The black slate bathroom features a sink that was carved from a large boulder.

    Steel and glass patio doors lead out to a private courtyard between the house and what used to be a single-car garage. Since Kartheiser rarely drives and the bungalow is in a walkable area of Hollywood, he turned the garage into a spa with a dry sauna, steam room and showers. It also houses the laundry facilities and a half bath.

    The sauna ceiling is composed of 2,500 short pieces of wood. It was likely time-consuming to assemble but provides a rich look using humble materials. Anyone with moderate DIY skills could use this technique to dress up a room, either on the ceiling or a feature wall.

    Photographs © Tregg Rustad and Peter J. Maurice, courtesy of Tregg Rustad.
    http://treggrustad.com/
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Urban Tree Housem is Very Unique | Baumraum | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jun 25, 2017
    A pair of treehouses make for a leafy vacation retreat in Berlin. The Urban Treehouse, as they are collectively named, was developed by a grandfather/grandson team who wanted to allow visitors to connect with nature and experience a different way of living. They were designed by architect Andreas Wenning of treehouse specialist baumraum.

    Despite the “urban” description, the treehouses are located in a low-density suburban area adjacent to the Grunewald, a forest near the edge of Berlin. Both treehouses face into the forest and are just a few minutes walk to both the Schlachtensee and Krumme Lanke lakes within the Grunewald. However they are also not far from a subway station, restaurants and a beer garden.

    Though raised up 4 meters (13′) into the tree canopy, the treehouses are not supported by the trees themselves. Instead, each rests on a wood-clad pedestal reminiscent of a large tree trunk, a structural decision that likely made it easier to get building department approval.

    The treehouses are near-identical with mirror image floor plans. Galvanized steel stairs take you up to a covered balcony where French doors lead into the efficient 28 m2 (301 ft2) living space. There is a closet and bathroom with shower at one end, a compact but complete kitchenette, and a seating area defined by corner windows. At night the custom-built couches can be pushed together to form a double bed. Storage drawers built into the couches store the bedding during the day.

    If you’ll be visiting Berlin and want an out-of-the-ordinary type of accommodation, a stay at the Urban Treehouse can be booked through Homeaway

    Photographs by Laura Fiorio, courtesy of the Urban Treehouse. Via Inhabitat.
    http://www.laurafiorio.com/
    http://urban-treehouse-berlin.com/
    http://inhabitat.com/berlin-baumraum-...
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Maringotka, A Contemporary Version of The Traditional Wagon Dwelling | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jun 30, 2017
    For those looking for something a little bit different, Maringotka is a contemporary version of the traditional wagon dwelling. Created by Prague studio Miramari Design, Maringotka can be used as a vacation home, for housing workers, as a hotel/resort unit or as a full-time residence. However it isn’t meant to be a travel trailer; while it can be moved occasionally, it does exceed the standard vehicle width limit on European roads.

    The stylish caravan is available in two standard configurations. Both 24 m2 (258 ft2) floor plans have a full kitchen and three-piece bath. The one shown in these photos has a large built-in sleeping platform at one end. The other version has an enclosed sleeping alcove plus a corner dining banquette that converts into a second bed.

    Maringotka is built on a steel chassis with a spruce structure and interior wall finish. The large round window over the bed and a porthole window in the bathroom echo the curve of the roof. With double-glazed windows, insulation and a choice of several heating options, it is ready for year-round living.

    More Videos: #tinyhouse #tinyhouses #smallhouse #cottage #cabin #tiny #tinyhome
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Contemporary lakeside Cottage, Petra Gipp Arkitektur | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jun 30, 2017
    This small dwelling was designed by architect Petra Gipp for herself. It sits at the edge of a rocky bluff overlooking Lake Vättern, Sweden’s second largest lake. Visitors arriving at the cottage get a sneak glimpse of the lake through the glass entry door.

    The 116 m2 (1,249 ft2) floor plan is essentially on one level, but does adjust by a few steps to follow the contours of the rock. The three bedrooms were kept small, allowing more space to be given to the open plan living area. A concrete wall/chimney cuts through the house, separating the bedroom side from the public spaces. It incorporates two fireplaces, one in the living room and one outside on the deck. The unfinished concrete wall, still showing marks from the plywood formwork, is a prominent design element that gives the cottage a real feeling of solidity.

    Window walls give an unimpeded view of the lake. However the steeply sloped ground is hard to see, giving the impression that the house is suspended over the edge of the precipice. The concrete wall serves as a reminder that the house is still firmly attached to the rock. The floors are also concrete, but the other walls and ceiling are finished with white painted boards to keep the concrete from overwhelming the space.

    Photographs by Åke E:son Lindman, courtesy of Petra Gipp arkitektur AB. Via gBlog.

    http://www.lindmanphotography.com/
    http://www.gipparkitektur.se/
    http://blog.gessato.com/2013/08/13/a-...
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    SummerHouse Skåne, a Renovated Farmhouse | LASC Studio | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 1, 2017
    An abandoned farmhouse was given a new life as a contemporary Swedish summerhouse. The owners were attracted by the traditional look and nostalgic feel of the old building. However it needed some changes to adapt to its new role. The owners asked architects LASC Studio to restore and modernize the home while retaining the heritage qualities that made the house special to them.

    The architects began by removing most of the interior walls to create an open living area. The new 105 m2 (1,130 ft2) floor plan also includes two bedrooms on the main level, and a third bedroom plus an open loft upstairs. The passage to the bedrooms was turned into a small library, with bookshelves and an extra-wide windowsill that serves as a desk.

    The existing windows were retained but new openings were cut in the walls to bring in more natural light and allow views of the pastoral landscape. Rather than make a futile attempt to copy the detailing of the original windows, the new glazing was instead left unadorned with hidden frames and no trim, emphasizing the distinction between new and old. Likewise, a section of new concrete floor complements the original wood floors.

    Concrete was also used to form the kitchen counter and sinks, and a heated bench in the bathroom. The walls and ceilings are finished with pine boards and white plaster. The pale materials are enlivened by the splashes of turquoise and golden yellow that highlight the transitions between the public and private spaces. Those colors were chosen to evoke memories of the years that the owners spent living in China, as well as to reference the bright colors of beach towels.

    Photographs by Stamers Kontor, courtesy of LASC Studio. Via Dwell.
    http://www.stamerskontor.dk/
    http://www.lascstudio.com/
    http://www.dwell.com/house-tours/slid...
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    MY HOUSE TOUR! SOLD $126,000.00 | METAL DETECTING & LIVING INSIDE HISTORIC HIGH SCHOOL [NOW CONDO]
    JD's Variety Channel



    Published on Jul 1, 2017
    Join me on my house (condo) tour as I show everyone where I lived for a couple years. This was originally a high school that has been on historic register since 1983. In this video I metal detect the back of the property too. :)

    My massive library of YouTube videos is now compiled into the playlist below! New uploads added automatically.
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

    JD's FaceBook Page:
    https://www.facebook.com/JDsVariety/
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The One Bedroom Home | ON Design Partners | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 1, 2017
    “Rooms that follow the landscape” consists of a series of room strung in an arc across a small hillside in Japan. Studio ON Design Partners angled each room 15 degrees from the next to create a plan that follows the path of the sun. As the rooms rotate, they also rise and fall with the natural grade of the site.

    The main social spaces are all open to each other but they are defined as separate rooms by the changes in floor level, varying ceiling heights, and a mix of different ceiling and floor finishes. The windows, however, were all kept aligned with each other, giving the occupants a continuous view of the scenery. As a result, the height of the window above the floor also varies by room. The window is right at desk height in the study space but drops lower in the living room and is down to the floor level in the “Japanese-style” room, where it is customary to sit on the tatami mat floor.

    The one-bedroom home has 95.2 m2 (1,024 ft2) of floor space. Normally we wouldn’t feature a one-bedroom house that large, but this one has a particularly unique design and it could be changed to two bedrooms fairly easily. By relocating the main entrance to the middle of the house, the existing entry and storage room (at the carport end of the house) could become a second bedroom.

    Photographs by Koichi Torimura, courtesy of ON Design Partners. Via DesignBoom.
    http://www.ondesign.co.jp/
    http://www.designboom.com/architectur...
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Restoration of A Traditional House on Mykonos | Werner Maritsas | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jun 27, 2017
    This house is situated on the island of Mykonos within the South Aegean Sea. It was in ruins when purchased by new owners who asked Athens-based architect Werner Maritsas to supervise the restoration and design a new interior layout, staying true to the island’s architectural heritage.

    The stone house, built in 1890, was a typical family home for that time period with one room for cooking, a second room for sleeping and socializing, and the bathroom in a small outbuilding.

    The old kitchen became the new master bedroom with the original oven turned into a fireplace. A narrow addition along one side of the floor plan added a second bedroom and brought the bathroom inside, bringing the home’s living space to 78 m2 (840 ft2). The main room was previously on a single level but the new kitchen was lowered, making room for a mezzanine loft above that is used as a study and additional sleeping space.

    The architect created terraces and rock gardens around the side and back of the house. A shaded outdoor dining area extends the living space and has views of the neighboring fields. At the far end of the garden, discreet stone steps and a wood plank provide access to a sunny rooftop terrace.

    Photographs by Werner Maritsas and Solon Paisios, courtesy of Werner Maritsas.
    http://wernermaritsas.wordpress.com/
     
  13. Irons

    Irons Deep Sixed Site Supporter Mother Lode

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    I'm hanging out in my deer blind right now! I love it out here.
    Nice and shady with a light breeze from the west this evening. Very quiet and pleasant.
    My internet is a little slow because there are so many tourists around this weekend but hell, not bad!

    FCAM2.jpg

    FCAM3.jpg
     
    Hystckndle and searcher like this.
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Love the pics. Thanks for sharing.
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Van Life - Woman Living in a Van for 3 Years to Save Money & Travel the World
    Exploring Alternatives



    Published on Jul 2, 2017
    L.J. has been living in her vintage 1977 GMC Vandura camper van conversion for 3 years while working a 9-5 job in HR. She bought the van for just $500 and enjoys the van life because it allows her to save money and live on a budget, but mostly she loves the freedom of parking wherever she wants, and of being able to travel on weekends.

    She's recently quit her job and is planning to travel for a year in the van, and overseas to the Philippines and Indonesia.

    We love how simple L.J.'s van is — no power, no heat, just the basics like a bed, a swivel seat, a cooler, and some books. She makes the lifestyle look easy although she does splurge during a couple of the coldest winter months to sublet an apartment.

    Thanks for watching!

    Mat & Danielle
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Small And Simple House for A Retired Couple | Studio GAON, Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 3, 2017
    A couple transitioning into retirement asked Studio GAON to design their new home in a semi-rural area, specifically requesting a “small and simple house”. In carrying out their assignment, the architects looked to the past for inspiration:

    " The land on which this house now stands brought to mind a house called Do-San Seodang, which belonged to a philosopher of the 15th century by the name of Yi Hwang, and so we suggested a house of a style that reflected his to the clients. Although Do-San Seodang is small, simple, and linear, its design is conceptually rich. Yi Hwang embraced a theory called Gyung, which called for humility in oneself and respect for others, as well as a simple, practical, and rational lifestyle.

    The small house has 43 m2 (463 ft2) of inside space on the ground floor, plus a small loft. There is also a large porch that almost doubles the size of the house. The porch at the entry end is followed by two main living rooms in a row, and then the tiny kitchen and the bathroom at the far end. The loft, accessed by ladder, is used as a study.

    Borrowing from traditional Korean architecture, the ground floor plan is designed to allow for flexible and overlapping use of space. The two main rooms open to each other and the porch with folding doors. The room just off the porch is intended for receiving visitors, while the middle room is more of a private living area and doubles as the couple’s bedroom. It’s an unusual arrangement, at least by Western standards, but if you are building a home in which to live out the rest of your life, you might as well design a floor plan that works for you.

    Photographs by Youngchea Park, courtesy of Studio GAON. Via ArchDaily.
    http://www.studio-gaon.com/
    http://www.archdaily.com/155829/house...
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Compact Modular Home | Appleton & Domingos | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 2, 2017
    Treehouse Riga is a small modular dwelling with two bedrooms in a compact 44 m2 (474 ft2) floor plan. The tiny house was designed by architects Appleton & Domingos for modular home builder Jular. Treehouse Riga is delivered in two modules, one housing the kitchen and living spaces, and the other containing two bedrooms and a bathroom.

    The two modules are offset, creating sheltered spaces for two small patios on opposite corners of the house. A door leads from each patio into opposite ends of the open plan living space, with the main entrance going into the kitchen end. Open shelving eases the transition from the kitchen to the adjacent dining area. Open shelving is less visually intrusive than cabinets, helping to keep a narrow room from feeling even more constricted. Large windows spanning from wall to wall allow the rooms to visually expand into the outdoors, removing any sense of confinement.

    The architects devised a sliding wood wall panel that opens the second bedroom to the living area. That greatly increases the versatility of the room, allowing it to be used as an extension of the living room during the day and turned back into a private bedroom at night. In the open “daytime” position, the sliding wall also shields the bathroom door from direct view.

    To learn more, please visit the Treehouse website.

    Photographs by FG+SG, courtesy of Jular. Via Architizer.
    http://www.ultimasreportagens.com/
    http://www.jular.pt/
    http://architizer.com/projects/treeho...
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Cottage in Norway Modeled on Traditional Boatsheds | Kolman Boye Architects | Small Houae Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 2, 2017
    The island of Vega, on Norway’s northern coast, is located just 100 km from the Arctic Circle. While home to about 1,200 people, it’s an unlikely place for Oslo residents to build a summerhouse, given the travel distance and the how short the summers are that far north. However the three sibling owners of this new cottage had family roots going back to the island and, having spent summers there as children, they wanted to return with their own families.

    The Vega Archipelago has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, recognized for “the way generations of fishermen/farmers have, over the past 1,500 years, maintained a sustainable living in an inhospitable seascape near the Arctic Circle”. The number of fishermen has dropped significantly, but the shoreline is still dotted with clusters of weathered boatsheds.

    Paying tribute to the area’s fishing legacy, Kolman Boye Architects designed the cottage to resemble two boatsheds sitting side by side. Differing roof pitches and offset façades contribute to the appearance of two smaller structures. Eliminating roof overhangs is one strategy you can use to reduce construction costs, but some people feel that the resulting look will be too modern for their tastes. This project shows that doesn’t necessarily have to be the case. Many areas have vernacular barns, sheds and cottages that could serve as a model for a new home without overhangs.

    To conform to the rocky site, one “shed” sits a few steps higher than the other. The lower one contains the living areas arranged around a central concrete hearth combining cookstove and fireplace. The other half has the bathroom, three small bedrooms, and a loft space that is probably meant for storage but could also be used for sleeping. Presumably the upper rooms are reached by ladder, though it isn’t shown in the photos. Altogether the floor plan comes to 140 m2 (1,507 ft2).

    Complementing the exterior, the inside is relatively spartan with whitewashed pine paneling and birch trim used throughout. Large picture windows provide distinct views in three directions: rugged mountains with cascades of scree, nearby exposed bedrock surrounded by hardy subarctic vegetation, and, the sea and approaching storms. To avoiding spoiling the view, the driveway ends about 40 meters from the cottage and the access path from there is concealed within a natural ravine. Other than that, the landscape surrounding the cottage was left undisturbed.

    Photographs by Åke E:son Lindman. Via gBlog.
    http://www.lindmanphotography.com/
    http://blog.gessato.com/2014/03/03/no...
     
  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Small House Made of Traditional Stone and Slate | Rural Design | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 3, 2017
    This traditional stone and slate barn stands on the south shore of Loch Duich in the Western Highlands of Scotland. It was originally built to shelter the farm’s working horses, and later used to store machinery. New owners bought the semi-derelict barn with an eye to using it as a family vacation home. They asked architect Alan Dickson of Rural Design to oversee the conversion.

    From the outset, the owners and architect were determined to retain the barn’s character. The main façade facing the loch and the road was kept true to the original appearance, so it still looks very much like a working barn. The entire roof structure had to be replaced and windows were installed in the three existing door openings, with wood shutters replacing the original wood doors. On the side gable, the stone wall was rebuilt around a large new picture window giving the living area views of the mountains to the east. A wood-clad extension was added onto the back side of the barn, where it would be least visible.

    Contrasting with the traditional outer appearance, a contemporary white living space was created inside. The main entry in the new wood extension leads into a central stair hall. From there, the large master bedroom is to the left in the west end of the original barn, the compact bathroom is straight ahead, and the open plan living area is to the right, taking up the east half. There is also a utility and laundry room in the extension.

    The living area is open to the roof and exposed trusses, while the other half of the barn has an open loft above that is easily big enough to be shared by a few kids. But if more privacy is preferred, the stairs divide the loft into two distinct spaces, so it would be fairly easy to convert it into two enclosed bedrooms.

    Photographs by Nigel Rigden, courtesy of Rural Design.
    http://www.nigrig.com/
    http://www.ruraldesign.co.uk/
     
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The world's most isolated family: How the Atchleys fled the modern world and now live 200 miles by snowmobile from the nearest Alaskan town... with bears and wolves for local neighbors
    • David and Romey Atchley and their son Sky are the only people living along their 250-mile stretch of the Nowitna River in central Alaska
    • Apart from a month’s holiday each year and John’s twice yearly expedition to restock their supplies, they never see anyone else
    • On their first night in their 10.5ft by 13ft cabin, a bear raided their supplies
    • Power is provided by solar panels and a bank of large golf buggy batteries while heating comes from two wood-burning stoves


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4676130/How-world-s-isolated-family-fled-modern-world.html#ixzz4mCHGkmFu
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
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    A Beautiful Craftsman style Home in Montana, United States | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 7, 2017
    Reader Marion Kello has sent us photos of her fabulous house and matching garage with loft apartment. We’ll have a look at the garage loft tomorrow. Today, Marion takes us on a virtual tour of her home.

    My husband Jim and I fell in love with our not-so-big-house the minute we saw it while relocating to Hamilton, Montana in late 2006. It was much smaller than the typical new house in the Bitterroot Valley. The house was about 90% complete and was being built as a spec house by local craftsman builder Ben Stoddard. The architect was Lee Kierig, also of Hamilton.

    I’ll never forget pulling up to the house located in what we consider a very eclectic, downtown neighborhood of older houses. We were blown away by the cedar sided, beautifully crafted gem with the high peak and almost A-frame or lodge type feel. It was actually the first house our agent showed me (my husband Jim had done some house hunting without me), and I knew the second I saw it that I wanted it. I also knew as soon as Jim saw it, he’d feel the same.

    As I walked up to the spacious and inviting front porch, the detailed and unique style of the columns caught my attention immediately. Each had four wood pillars shooting out of concrete block and stone leading to a board and batten, well lit overhang. All this before I even hit the front door!

    I loved the beautiful woodwork and the obvious attention to detail everywhere, as seen in the trim pieces that fit together like a puzzle. Plus, when Ben the builder referred to the house as “she” as in “she’s going to be a beauty when the stone on the front is all finished,” I knew he loved it too, and that was a very good thing in my mind.

    I entered the home into a big great room with gorgeous rough sawn fir flooring, five huge windows in the living room to my right, hickory kitchen cabinets with walnut inlays to my left and a custom bar made of recycled barn wood that nicely separates the kitchen from the living room. Straight ahead was a sliding glass door that served as the “back door” and would later lead out to a small deck and our lovely backyard.

    I immediately noticed the incredible use of space. Even with three bedrooms in 1,250 square feet, it didn’t feel small. It felt right. We quickly put our offer down, and told Ben to keep going in terms of finishing the home within the style and the manner he had created. We loved his style, and he loved us for trusting him and giving him full artist’s license to complete the house.

    The master suite located behind the kitchen is cozy and nice. We have a bed with drawers underneath to maximize the space, and the bathroom is appointed with lovely stone tile floors and huge shower, and the same beautiful hickory cabinets used in the kitchen. I didn’t even realize (nor do I care today) that the master bath has a single vanity. Our room also has three large windows that match the ones found in the living room.

    The other two bedrooms are small, only about 100 square feet each, but offer great space with the same huge windows found in the living room offering great natural light. We use one bedroom as an office and the other as a guest room, which fits our needs perfectly.

    The other thing we love about our house is our backyard that we built after the house was complete. We call it our “oasis” with stamped and stained concrete, trees, shrubs and flower beds, flower boxes all with automatic sprinklers, plenty of room for our hot tub and tables and chairs for relaxing. We chose to not put any grass in the backyard, as the lawn in front is plenty for us to maintain given our active lifestyle.

    It was finding the house that helped us fall in love with small house living. We loved the idea of getting rid of furniture we didn’t need and using/finding furniture with a purpose and storage when possible. Like our bed for instance, and our stacked washer and dryer that fits snugly in a utility closet at the center of the house. We saw the potential for living blissfully in a small, contained, smartly designed house. And, one that is warm, inviting, unique and well-built.

    There is one thing we’d change about this house—we don’t have a fire place and would really love one. We know exactly where we’d put it, and some day we just might.

    This is our small house bliss story! Thanks for reading.

    Photographs by Marion Kello.
    http://www.leekierigart.com/
     
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    The Small House Was Designed and Hand Built | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 7, 2017
    Stoltz Bluff Eco-Retreat sits on 40 acres of private forest land overlooking a river valley on Vancouver Island in British Columbia. The small house was designed and hand-built by owners Tonya and Leon using natural and recycled materials, and is completely off-grid.

    The home’s thick walls are made of cob, a mix of clay, sand and straw. The clay and sand are typically available from nearby sources, if not from the building site itself, while straw is an agricultural waste product, making cob a very sustainable building material. One of the advantages of cob building is that it is easy to create curved and sculptural forms. The thick walls give cob houses a lot of thermal mass, moderating indoor temperatures and making the house easier to heat and cool. Cob building is easy to learn but very labor-intensive. As a result, it is an inexpensive way to build if you do the work yourself, but is more costly than standard construction if you hire someone else to do the work.

    The floor plan has two bedrooms in 1,000 ft2 (92.9 m2) of interior room. The kitchen, living and dining rooms are open to each other but each is its own distinct space. Salvaged old growth posts and beams set off the kitchen, and the living room is defined by a curving cob bench. The highlight of the space is the Rumford fireplace faced with compacted layers of colored soil. The floors look like concrete but they are actually compacted earth which has been sealed with natural oils and waxes. In the bathroom, the custom shower with cob seat was waterproofed with a natural lime plaster.

    As Stoltz Bluff Eco-Retreat is off-grid, it relies on solar panels for electricity and gets its water from a well, with the roof designed for a future rainwater collection system. Waste water is treated in a constructed wetland, which removes contaminants using the same principles as natural wetlands.

    Photographs courtesy of Stoltz Bluff Eco-Retreat and by David Stanley (made available under a Creative Commons license).
    http://www.stoltzbluffecoretreat.com/
    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/93291528
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
     
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    A Small Modern House In The Top Five of Lily Copenagle & Jamie Kennel Design in Oregon United States
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 7, 2017
    Lily Copenagle and Jamie Kennel designed and built their own studio dwelling. The small modern house gives them 704 ft2 (65.4 m2) of living space, all on a single level. It features a green roof, a rain garden, and a rain water collection system.

    For Copenagle and Kennel, the advantages of a small house were obvious. They wanted a home that would be easy to maintain, that would reduce their environmental impact, and that would leave them with enough time and money to pursue their interests. Their families, however, were bewildered by the couple’s choice. Many of you have likely had similar reactions from family and friends, but one particularly ridiculous argument was new to me: Apparently a large house is needed to demonstrate to society that you have achieved financial success.

    Some neighborhood residents might have shared that view, but others began to see the benefits of living in a small house. One neighbor remarked “On weekends, they actually go places and do things. They’re not tied to the projects most of us are tied to. I’m so charmed by the simplicity of it.”

    The couple built their small dream home for $135,000, which does not include the land. They also did much of the work themselves, and the value of their own labor is not included either.

    Read their story and see more photos at The New York Times.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/23/gar...
     
  24. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    If you want a nice tiny home get a waterfront condo in Florida. I prefer on the intracoastal rather than on the ocean. When I lived directly on the ocean it was always a hassle getting over drawbridges to the mainland. Plus there are less grocery options on the beach side. The salt air really eats everything exposed to it too.
     
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    An Energy Efficient Contemporary Laneway House by Lanefab | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 10, 2017
    Laneway housing continues to grow in popularity wherever it is allowed and Vancouver, Canada is no exception. Over 500 of the accessory dwellings have been built there since Vancouver first approved them in July 2009. This one is a recently completed project by Lanefab Design/Build.

    The small house has a total of 800 ft2 (74 m2), including the space labeled as a garage on the plans. The garage was insulated and finished like the rest of the house and is being used as the living room. That freed up the larger downstairs room to be used mainly for the kitchen and dining area, allowing for inclusion of a large kitchen island. The kitchen cabinetry is bright red, a color that is supposed to stimulate appetite. Whether that’s true or not, it sure makes for a striking love-it-or-hate-it look. The kitchen has a counter-level window to bring in light without sacrificing cupboard space.

    In a unique twist on multi-use spaces, there is a two-person soaking tub in the dining area corner, sunken into the concrete floor and covered by a flip-up floor of one-inch thick clear acrylic panels. Foldaway fir and glass doors open up the room and the tub to the patio, with only a slender steel column providing unobtrusive support for the upper story. The exterior of the small home is dressed up with black pebble stucco, stone veneer and cedar soffits.

    The lower floor was recessed a couple steps into the ground in order to provide more headroom on the upper floor while staying within height limits. The pay-off is a very spacious upstairs bedroom. It also seems to have provided the lower level with a bit more privacy from the neighbors.

    As with their earlier projects, Lanefab took care to build a very energy-efficient structure, using R40 structural insulated panels for the walls and specifying triple-glazed windows and doors. The highly insulated building envelope was a big factor in helping the home attain one of the highest home energy-efficiency ratings in Vancouver.

    Have a nice weekend!
    Photographs by Tordia Images and Lanefab, courtesy of Lanefab Design/Build.
    http://tordiaimages.com/
    http://www.lanefab.com/
     
  26. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    Would it be practical to have a swimming pool at a tiny house?
     
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    If it's your place and that's what you want.

    On a different note...........think resale.

    Me...........I love to swim but would not buy a house with a pool. Too much bull shit to deal with.
     
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    A Small House by the Team Middlebury College Designed and Built | Small House Design Ideas
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 12, 2017
    Solar Decathlon 2013 wrapped up last week and we’ll be taking a look at a few of the entries. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Solar Decathlon is a biannual event in which university teams compete in the design, construction and operation of small energy-efficient houses powered by the sun.

    SHADE (Solar Homes Adapting for Desert Equilibrium) was the entry by team ASUNM from Arizona State University and The University of New Mexico. As the name suggests, SHADE was designed for the Sonoran Desert that covers much of Arizona and New Mexico, and it uses shading as a key strategy.

    A wooden structure supporting climbing plants and a large solar panel array shades the house and south side patio, creating a microclimate that moderates the desert heat. Other walls are shaded by screens of horizontal wooden louvers fastened directly to the walls. Besides using them for shade, raising the PV panels above the roof increases the panel efficiency by allowing them to be cooled by air flow underneath.

    Inside there is one bedroom in 851 ft2 (79.1 m2). The L-shaped living space has the kitchen at one end and a flexible use space at the other end. A folding glass wall lets the living area extend out to the patio, facilitating an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. The flex space can function as a sitting area or home office. With a sliding partition wall and a wall bed hidden behind a bookcase, it easily transforms into a private guest bedroom.

    Natural clay on the interior walls gives SHADE a modern desert aesthetic. The clay helps to keep relative humidity at a comfortable level. By absorbing and releasing water vapor, it reduces the need for mechanical humidification and dehumidification. On a more hi-tech front, SHADE uses melting ice for cooling. Water is frozen and stored in an insulated tank at night when lower temperatures allow the cooling unit to run more efficiently. The ice is used to cool the refrigerant that is pumped through tubes in the ceiling for radiant cooling.

    Learn more about SHADE at the team ASUNM website. If you’d like to build your own version, the plans for the Solar Decathlon houses are in the public domain. Very detailed plans for this small house can be downloaded from the Solar Decathlon website.

    Photographs by Jason Flakes, courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon.
    http://www.solardecathlon.gov/
    http://www.asunm.org/
     
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    A Matched Pair of Cozy Stone Cottages | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 11, 2017
    Defining the border between Devon and Cornwall, the River Tamar flows through lands that were once part of a vast estate owned by the Duke of Bedford. Perched above the river are two near-identical cottages built in the mid-19th century to house families of workers employed by the estate.

    Both cottages had fallen into a state of complete disrepair until they were purchased by the current owners, who saw the potential to use them as vacation rentals. Local craftsmen rebuilt the original stone walls, installed new slate roofs, and created modern living spaces inside. The reborn cottages were named Little Gillyflower and Little Otterling.

    Each cottage has a footprint of 55 m2 (590 ft2), though the thickness of the stone walls reduces the inside living space considerably. They share the same floor plan: The staircase and a woodstove divide the open ground floor in two, with the entry and kitchen at one end and a combination living/dining room at the other. A bedroom and bathroom were created in the attic space, with new skylights added for light and air.

    Despite having the same layout and being virtually identical on the outside, the two cottages are quite different inside. The owners gave Little Otterling a very contemporary black and white treatment while Little Gillyflower has a somewhat more traditional cottage look with cozy window seats, a farmhouse sink and pastel and floral decor.

    To stay in one of these unique cottages, please visit its vacation rental page at either Little Gillyflower or Little Otterling.

    Photographs courtesy of Unique Home Stays Ltd.
    http://www.uniquehomestays.com/unique...
    http://www.uniquehomestays.com/unique...
    http://www.uniquehomestays.com/
     
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    A Small House in Horinouchi | MIZUISHI Architect Atelier | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 11, 2017
    This small house with a triangular floor plan sits on a narrow sliver of lot wedged between a road and a river channel in west Tokyo. Designing the house for a couple and their young daughter, MIZUISHI Architect Atelier maximized the interior space by pushing the walls and roof to the limits of the permitted building envelope. Still, the house has only 55.2 m2 (595 ft2) of floor space over two floors, plus a mezzanine loft. The interior appears larger than that though, thanks to sightlines that extend the length of the house and spaces that borrow from adjacent spaces.

    The reverse floor plan puts the main living space high enough to have a view over the raised walkway alongside the river channel. Tall windows at the very tips of the triangular plan draw the eye to the long views through the house. The living area has large windows on both sides with a built-in wooden bench below the windows on the river side. Those windows slide open to a very narrow balcony overlooking the river. The balcony by itself would be almost too narrow to be useful had the architect not cleverly raised it to the same level as the bench top, allowing the bench surface to supplement the balcony area.

    The master bedroom is on the ground floor. With only curtains defining the bedroom area, it can expand visually and functionally into the adjacent stair hall. The stair risers are open but as they just allow for a view of the washing machine, closed risers might have been a better choice here. The upper floor child’s bedroom is barely big enough for a bed but it does have access to the large mezzanine loft that could be used for sleeping.

    Photographs by Hiroshi Tanigawa, courtesy of MIZUISHI Architect Atelier. Via Architizer.
    http://www.miz-aa.com/
    http://architizer.com/projects/house-...
     
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    A Cottage in the Turkish Countryside | Absolutely Small House Design Ideas
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 13, 2017
    Today Emre Şenoğlu is sharing with us his family’s vacation home in Urla on the Aegean coast of Turkey. The small stone cottage is roughly 8 m by 5 m and was designed by Emre’s father, architect Necdet Şenoğlu.

    “The house I had in mind wasn’t an exact copy of the ‘village house’. It was something that belonged to this land, almost as if it was made out of the earth lying here.” – Necdet Şenoğlu

    We first came across this piece of land during a sightseeing trip. It was apparent that it once had gone through rich and abundant times. But it looked dull and abandoned now. The first thing we set out to do after buying the land was to take care of the trees. We took care of the walnut and olive trees, which cover most of the land. The tall poplar tree was like a beacon that stood out amongst all the trees.

    This 13,000 square meter piece of land we bought soon became our weekend getaway place. We planned a small house in the year 1996, maintaining and preserving the nature of the land we wanted to build on. We gathered stones over the years. We looked out for genuine antique doors, fireplace stones, door handles. We started building the house once we had gathered enough. We tried to be present during the construction as much as we could.

    The walls are made out of a two-layered construction of stone and bricks. This results in a 60 cm thick wall, thus helping regulate the heat inside the house. It allows the house to stay cool in summers, and preserves the heat inside during winters. The roof is carried by a simple wooden truss construction. This allows the space underneath to be used as a sleeping space. The front porch was designed as the main outdoor space, shaded with grape vines. The side terrace was shaped after the existing trees, proving a larger outdoor surface.

    Nowadays, the cottage is more than just a getaway place. We try to keep it well maintained and spend time working in the field. There are approximately 600 olive trees, a 1,500 square meter vineyard and a variety of fruit trees. We produce our own olive oil, pressed at the local factory. And for the past 5 to 6 years, along with the help of other friends, we produce our own wine.

    Another change is that we’ve started opening our house to others, in order to share this piece of land we greatly cherish. So far we’ve had plenty of guests; couples that come for honeymoons or just to relax, friends that want to escape from the urban life, families that want to have a calm weekend. We received great feedback, and it gives us more energy to work with this piece of land.

    As time passes, we realize that we want to do more with our cottage. Surely in the future, we want to increase and refine our production. And perhaps we will achieve this by the help of our future guests. – Emre Şenoğlu

    If you are planning a vacation in the Mediterranean, the Şenoğlu family’s cottage can be rented via Airbnb.

    Photographs by Ümit Yeşildağ and Emre Şenoğlu.
    https://www.airbnb.ca/rooms/570597
    http://www.behance.net/imge
     
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    Astounding Tiny House With Downstairs Master Bedroom
    Living Big In A Tiny House



    Published on Jul 13, 2017
    If you don't like the idea of climbing into a loft to go to bed, this may be the tiny house design for you. At only 24ft, it's amazing what this family have managed to fit into this home. One of the most unique features about this home is the bedrooms, with two available loft areas, this home also has a master bedroom which is located downstairs.

    This tiny house on wheels has everything a young family needs, including full-sized kitchen appliances and even a washer /dryer unit. Best of all, owning the home debt free allows this trio to focus on the things that really matter in life!
     
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    A Cottage in The Redwoods By Cathy Schwabe | Charming Small House Design Ideas
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 14, 2017
    Yesterday we posted a link to a magazine article on our Facebook page, along with a photo of the house discussed in the article. People seemed to really like the house, so we’ve dug up more photos and a floor plan for your enjoyment. The house was designed by architect Cathy Schwabe and has two bedrooms in 840 ft2 (78 m2).

    A couple of followers pointed out that this house was expensive at $335 per square foot. But that is mostly due to the very high-end finishes used, including vertical-grain Douglas-fir wall panelling, ipé floors and custom-built solid maple cabinetry. Another factor is the high cost of building in California. However the basic design of the house is pretty straightforward from a construction point of view, and would be pretty economical to build with more basic finishes. If it appeals to you, the plans for this small house are for sale through Houseplans.com.

    Rather than say anything more about this cottage, we’re instead going to again recommend the excellent article on Fine Homebuilding. Titled Small-House Secrets, it outlines 10 design strategies to consider when designing a small house.

    Photographs by David Wakely Photography, courtesy of Cathy Schwabe Architecture and Houseplans.com.
    http://www.davidwakely.com/
    http://www.cathyschwabearchitecture.com/
     
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    Man Builds Stunning Off Grid Shipping Container Home on Mountain Top
    Exploring Alternatives



    Published on Jul 16, 2017
    Adam from HoneyBox (http://www.honeybox.ca/) built this stunning off-grid shipping container cabin on top of a mountain in British Columbia, Canada.

    The cabin is built with 3 x 20 foot shipping containers. The middle container is bolted to a cement block foundation using twist locks, and the two outer containers are cantilevered using lashing rods.

    He designed the cabin to take full advantage of the panoramic mountain view by covering almost an entire wall with windows, although he admits this is not the most energy efficient design.

    He's got 800 Watts of solar panels to power his 12-volt system for lights, outlets, and a water pump. He has a wood stove for heat, propane for the fridge, hot water, and cooktop, and he has a composting toilet from Sun-Mar.

    For water, he has a well and a rainwater catchment system, and he uses both to fill 2 large water tanks for showering and washing dishes but he doesn't yet have a filter for the rainwater and the well water is ferrous so he brings in drinking water for now.

    One of the main challenges of building with shipping containers is trying to avoid water leaks along the seams where the containers are joined together. Once the clamps are in place, there's a 3 inch gap between containers. Adam installed a mechanical gutter along the seams on the roof to divert water off the roof, and he has a second gutter underneath it to catch any leaks from the first gutter. So far he hasn't had any water issues. You can avoid leaks by building a roof over the containers.

    The cabin is insulated with spray foam insulation, which adheres to the steel walls and helps avoid condensation problems that might arise with fibreglass batts.

    Adam built this structure as a studio to demonstrate one of the many ways that shipping containers can be used to create unique living spaces. He doesn't live in it full-time.

    To learn more about HoneyBox INC., check out their website or send Adam an email:

    http://www.honeybox.ca/
    info@honeybox.ca

    Thanks for watching!

    Mat & Danielle
     
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    A Tiny Stone Cottage in Normandy | Franklin Azzi | Absolutely Small House Design Ideas
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 19, 2017
    This small vacation house overlooks the seaside town of Yport in Normandy. It was created from the remnants of an old stone and brick hunting cabin. The walls of the old structure were restored but everything else is new. Franklin Azzi Architecture designed the restoration, adding space to the small cottage with a wood-clad addition at the rear. The light wood tones of the addition match the colors of the stone and mortar, nicely blending the new with the old.

    With only 18 m2 (194 ft2) on the ground floor of the old cottage, the 13 m2 (140 ft2) addition provides the needed space for a full kitchen. That left the original cottage to be used for a combined living and dining room.

    Wing-like extensions at either side of the cottage provide covered patio areas below and open decks above. The covered patios expand the living area and serve as a transition space between inside and outside, with glass doors allowing for easy flow between the two. The under-deck areas were also designed to be turned into temporary guest rooms by enclosing them with removable canvas walls.

    Access to the upstairs bedroom is via the outside stairs going up to one of the upper decks. There is no inside stair, but there is a ladder and trapdoor in case of bad weather. The bedroom is a cozy space tucked under the roof of the original cottage, with several skylights and a dormer keeping it bright. The bathroom in the roofspace of the addition has two large skylights of its own.

    To save space in the cottage itself, an outside utility closet was built along the retaining wall behind the cottage. A bathroom for the ground floor was also put in a separate little building to the side of the cottage.

    Images courtesy of Franklin Azzi Architecture.
    http://www.franklinazzi.com/
    http://www.franklinazzi.com/
     
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    A Small Cabins Featured in Orcas Island | David Vandervort Architects | Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 19, 2017
    One of the most popular small cabins we featured last year was a cabin modeled after a forest fire lookout tower. Today we have another small cabin in the woods designed by the same architect, David Vandervort. But while the previous project was quite rustic with an unfinished interior, this one features refined finishes and millwork. It was placed on a sunny bluff in Washington’s San Juan Islands, surrounded by madrone trees and towering cedars.

    The Orcas Island cabin is a gable-roofed structure with lean-to extensions on either side. All four corner were notched out to create a cross-shaped floor plan. The corner notches are used for the entry porch, firewood storage and small covered sitting areas. Inside there is 350 ft2 (32.5 m2) on the ground level plus a 150 ft2 (13.9 m2) loft.

    The cross shape creates distinct spaces within the small floor plan. The kitchen, dining nook and bathroom each occupy one of the resulting alcoves. A ladder provides access to the loft bedroom, where shed-roofed dormers add some headroom. The exposed beams supporting the loft were milled on the island from fir trees that came from the site. French doors lead out to a flagstone patio integrated into the landscape with a meandering edge. The same stone was used for a durable floor covering at the entrances and beneath the woodstove.

    If the floor plan intrigues you, Quietude was another featured project that used a cross shape to differentiate spaces in a small house.

    Images courtesy of David Vandervort Architects.
    http://vandervort.com/
    https://smallhousebliss.com/2012/07/0...
    https://smallhousebliss.com/2012/08/2...
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Underground Rock House Construction
    Roy Hayward



    Published on Mar 24, 2016
    Old photos taken during construction, construction tips, look at the finished rock walls inside, exterior views.

    This is a two-story underground rock and concrete house. The house utilizes existing rock bluffs as the walls. It is located on 80 acres of rural timber land. It was designed and built entirely by one person from$28,000. of savings. Construction began in 1975 and took 8 ½ years.

    These particular rock bluffs were chosen because of the location of a spring that could be used as a water source. A 3000 gallon spring-fed water cistern supplies water to the house and a 2000 gallon pool.

    No air conditioning is required. A wood-burning stove supplies heat during the winter. Water is supplied by gravity from a spring above the house. There is no water bill, no sewer bill, no gas bill, and this house has a smaller electric bill than most homes.

    Concrete walls were water proofed by placing a perforated drain pipe at the bottom of the outside trench. It was covered with gravel and rocks to above ground level to keep any water from ever touching the wall. No wall coating or covering of any kind was needed.

    The lower floor is waterproofed with perforated drain pipes located in the hand placed rocks beneath the lower concrete floor slab. There are drain openings filled with gravel at the floor edges adjoining the rock walls.

    Waterproofing the roof was accomplished by designing the concrete roof beams to slide on metal plates embedded in concrete supports. This design minimizes expansion/contraction cracking. The few cracks that developed during curing were sealed with less than one tube of clear silicone caulk.

    The roof was covered with two 6 mil black plastic sheets sandwiching 3 ½” of rigid foam insulation and topped with 1 ½” of concrete and then dirt. The roof still has no leaks after 34 years.

    The dimpled concrete ceiling was formed by placing gravel on homemade concrete forms, covering the gravel with a 6 mm black plastic sheet and pouring the concrete on top of that. The concrete forms and gravel were removed and the ceiling painted white.

    The music is a YouTube selection entitled "Mario Bava Sleeps in a Little Later Than He Expected To" by Chris Zabriskie.

    Here is a link to my previous "Underground Rock House" video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytlFx...
     
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    A Wood Small Cabin in the British Columbia | Great Small House Design
    Tiny House Lover



    Published on Jul 20, 2017
    Monika and Sam built this small cabin of their own design near Horsefly Lake in central British Columbia. They had no real plans but as Sam is a log home builder and Monika has an eye for choosing finishes, it all came together beautifully, wouldn’t you agree?

    It has a classic small cabin floor plan with an open living area, a cozy loft sleeping space accessed by ladder, and a porch running along the front. The structure is post and beam, using logs instead of squared-off timbers. Sizable logs support the roof structure, the loft floor, and the porch. The walls between the log corner posts are of standard 2×6 stick construction.

    The exterior displays an appealing combination of naturally finished logs and board siding painted barn red. There is a cedar board and batten treatment up in the gables with live-edge cedar boards (having a wavy edge corresponding to the irregular outer surface of the tree) installed below.

    The cabin is pretty small with just 320 ft2 (29.7 m2) on the ground floor, and wood finishes inside add to the cozy feel. The floors and ceilings are pine, but the walls are the real eye-catcher. Sam and Monika nailed live-edge boards over painted drywall with gaps between the boards so as to mimic chinked timbers. Look up and you can also see the hefty log that serves as the roof ridge beam.

    The kitchen has hand-built storage and maple countertops. A round wood top added to an old wringer washing machine gave it a new life as the kitchen island. The cabin is grid-connected with electric heat but it is dry — there is no running water. Bathroom facilities are in a massively overbuilt post and beam outhouse that matches the cabin.

    Photographs by Monika Petersen Photography, courtesy of Sam and Monika Petersen.
    http://mpetersenphotography.smugmug.com/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Solar Cribs Episode 1: Peder and Julie Norby - Carlsbad, CA
    Solar Cribs



    Published on Apr 28, 2017
    Solar Cribs presented by SunPower by Stellar Solar and Artichoke Creative tells the stories of the eclectic mix of homeowners who have gone solar and showcases the wide variety of solar homes that exist in San Diego County. The series will provide a new way to show non-solar homeowners why their peers went solar in a format that goes beyond the typical customer testimonial. Solar Cribs will showcase the stories of the interesting folks that make up the SunPower by Stellar Solar customer base. From tree-huggers to CEO’s, accountants to professional athletes, nuns and pastors to bikers…you get the point, solar people go all over the map. We hope you enjoy it.
     
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    Cabin by the ocean: Off-grid Alaskan home hits the market for $249,000 - but you'll need a boat or a plane to get there
    • Located in the Day Harbor the single-family home was built in 1985 and is currently being sold for $249,000
    • The off-grid cabin sits on five acres of land and is just an hour away from Seward, Alaska, by boat
    • It features one bedroom and one bathroom and inlcudes propane lighting and water and septic systems


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4716562/Off-grid-Alaskan-home-hits-market-249-000.html#ixzz4nTLlCPEO
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     

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