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Bartering And Horse Trading

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by agnut, Jul 20, 2014.



  1. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    “Yo Agnut,
    That sounds like a good parking spot for the thread.
    Go ahead and crank it up if you want and if you dont like where it is,
    By golly, we will move it.
    Feel free and cut and paste anything you want there.
    Old, new, doesn't matter friend.
    There are 1100 active members and gosh knows how many infrequents
    PLUS the visitors / passers through.
    It WILL be read and make a difference.
    I forgot to mention to you, your east coast disciple, my now young 20s year old step daughter,
    ( see the my projects thread....the one with the green hair )
    told me today that she might be keen to join here to share with you what she has been doing on the
    thrift store circuit.
    Ya see, years ago, when you and I first started yacking, I shared with her your
    Bartering and Horse Trading thread and she seems to have taken some of your techniques to heart.
    Talk a little later,”
    Hystckndle

    Hi hystckndle, great to be here. I was heartwarming to hear that your daughter is getting into bartering and horse trading. I remember that for years we have been watching , waiting and hoping she would come around in her own way. Sounds like she has, like a rite of passage from being a rebellious teenager to a young adult. I know, I have 4 grown children of my own. It has been said that insanity is heredity; we get it from our kids. Been there, had that done to me. HaHa

    I would enjoy discussing the fine art of deal making with your daughter. This opens the door for growth in so many aspects of our lives. For the life of me I can’t understand why it has taken so long for folks to wake up to the “gotta have new stuff” Mad-ison Avenue propaganda.

    With that said, isn’t it interesting that antiques and classic cars are revered and sought after while some of the items we find are not old enough to be considered antique or classic but nevertheless will become collectible in the future. Sometimes I find an item that I just have to have because they were made in an era and either were improved through the years or they were discontinued when a better item came on the market. For instance I found an edger that has a sharp disc for the edging combined with a 8 inch wide reel mower. It is truly a weird edger and was obviously superceded by a radically different edger. When a radical departure form an item takes place, it is the end of the line for the older type and defines an end of a way of doing and looking at things, no matter how big or tiny. I have an old oak three door icebox and sometimes think of what must have been going through the minds of the populace as they were replaced with refrigerators. And the ice man cometh no more, like buggy whip manufacturers, relegated to the laborers’ scrap heap of bygone skills due to “progress”.

    We still have refrigerators but they have been improved to the current state of engineering. The ice boxes are gone and the few remaining examples are curiosities and often made into liquor cabinets. Well, I’m not sure about the word improved because the new refrigerators are frost free ( perhaps not such an advantage) and don’t seem to last as long as the ones made in the fifties and sixties. In 1959, they would have put fins on the new refrigerators if they could have. Big fins were the craze then. On the cars, you had to watch out in backing up not only for hitting an object but also stabbing a pedestrian.

    It seems to me that we used to build things to last a lifetime and beyond. Nowadays things are built to get beyond the warrantee, if even that. Sure, we have all the latest gadgety features but what happened to the rock solid reliability ?

    Frugality is the new cool.

    Perhaps that quote will become a byword after folks are forced by necessity to drop the unaffordable higher and higher prices. Leave your ego at the door and get practical. Years ago I wrote that we as a people are moving from form to function. The form/shape of a new car doesn’t get you where you are going any faster that a five year or older used car. Folks, the ticket price to what we have been told is a middle class life long ago exceeded sound financial management of our resources. It was foolish and that is why so many folks are so deeply in debt that they have allowed themselves to become enslaved.

    For example, I have owned hundreds of cars and have never owned a new car. I always thought that the new price was crazy with the attendant multi thousand dollar value dump as soon as you drove it off the car lot. I buy used cars and usually later sell them for as much or more than I paid in the first place. One doesn’t have to be a professional mechanic to do this but it helps. All you need to do is keep an open mind as to asking price versus general resale price. If you bought this car could you sell it right away for a profit ?

    Here is where y’all can read the past bartering and horse trading from May 21, 2010 to present :


    I’ll post this in the GIM2 Survival And Preps section and continue posting as time permits.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 20, 2014
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Agnut

    Been a while since I've read your "Bartering And Horse Trading" thread. Good to see you back.
    Since you mentioned "thrift stores" I thought I'd post this for anyone interested in Goodwill : http://www.shopgoodwill.com/

    Search

    Edit: Thrift Store Listings | Find Local Thrift Stores: http://www.thriftstorelistings.com/
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2014
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  3. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Number one rule in horse trading is to always get boot. You can always trade the boot up to make for any screw ups in the initial trade.
     
  4. glockngold

    glockngold Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Is that canuckian or something? What does getting boot mean?
     
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  5. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Boot is the extra you get from the tradee. If I swap you horses , I'll ask for something as boot like a saddle, bridle, wife, pair of boots or something. Definitely not just canuckian as I've read about your horse traders of old in the Firefox books[amongst others] and they did it too. Them books taught me a thing or three and should be mandatory reading for any prepper.
     
  6. Silver

    Silver Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    'Horse trading' has gotten so much easier and abundant because of craigslist. I used to scour the classifieds and beat the back alleys to find deals, but now I search craigslist. He's a tip for searching the entire US on craigslist - type in the item you are interested in followed by site:craigslist.org

    I recently bought some several hundred years old church doors from England (2 double pairs that span 60", all mortise and tenon, hand planed, etc) that I'm going to incorporate into a courtyard wall on a building restoration project I'm starting - I've never seen any doors like them, and I've bought and used 100- 200 year old mesquite Colonial Mexican doors in other projects.

    I find great materials on a regular basis at a fraction of their value without beating anyone down. Example, picked up 30 - 4"x6"x 16' 100+ year old longleaf pine timbers for $300, his asking price. I have paid $3 a board foot many a time for this kind of material.

    Another recent find - 12 - 2nd phase tooled Navajo silver conchos made from US silver dollars with coin edge, with the buckle. This is stuff I found in my local area - I used to have to travel to find stuff like this.

    edit: The pics are of a front and back of the doors, the arch side is the front and the square side are the backs.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014
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  7. Argent Dragon

    Argent Dragon Site Support Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    I admit it..........I myself am a CL junkie of sorts..........also have sold many an item through this avenue.
     
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  8. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Searcher. Thanks for the Goodwill and thrift store listings websites. I am amazed at all the resources for finding what we want.

    Lately I have been focusing on estate sales; from my experience the items offered can be things we have never seen before and often these items are higher dollar merchandise. While we may not see items such as antique riding saddles at garage sales, the estate sales are fascinating in my opinion. We should realize that these items were collected by someone who may have been a world traveler or an art aficionado. And now that person is gone and has no need for what he or she cared about. So other than what grieving relatives have taken, everything is up for grabs.

    These estate sales can be held by the family or by a professional. I want to say auctioneer but this is not accurate. There is a specialty in which some professionals offer their services for a fee or percentage of sales. They set up the sale, price the items, advertise and hold the sale themselves. I know such a lady who does this and have been to a couple of her sales. She is a doll and such a hard worker. The first time I loaded a 1 ton truck and trailer with all the goodies. I even had to return for more. I turned down a free player piano because there was a mover there who would have charged me $200 to get the heavy thing out of the house. My barn is already full of items that I have been accumulating for the last decade. Sometimes the item is too large for the potential benefit. I must admit that I think about that player piano from time to time.

    I’m sure if we look hard enough we can find people who hold these types of estate sales and get on their mailing lists and websites. I can only do so much, realizing that the bartering and horse trading world is much larger than I had originally thought. I have only scratched the surface, so to speak, and invite all to seek in their own way. It is a personal journey and if you are the adventurous type, this may be your cup of tea.

    I’m still setting up this thread and will hopefully soon better know the protocols at GIM2. I don’t want to step on any toes since it is complicated.

    I have a lot of past buys and their prices that I could post that may be useful as reference as well as encouragement to get out there and find items for yourself.

    You are not going to miss the boat; there are many sailing all the time. You just have to decide to get aboard; the tickets are free. And who knows ? You may find friends among fellow passengers. And even a life partner. I can dream, can’t I ?

    Best wishes,

    Agnut

    P.S. A warning :

    Once you step through the door, there is no turning back. Once you lose your ignorance, you can’t get it back. Are you sure you want to enter and then someday ask yourself what the hell you were doing before you learned ?

    I hope you will join me; I went through the door over 50 years ago. The view is spectacular and the livin’ is easy.
     
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  9. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Pitw. Must have been where the expression comes from “and to boot, I got this extra item with the deal”.

    A while back I was at a moving sale and saw many items I wanted. So I went to the seller and asked for a discount if I bought a pile of her items. She said yes and I quickly proceeded to piling items on the lawn, away from other sellers. By the way, keep an eye on your pile since other buyers will want to pick through it since they don’t know that it has been set aside. It may be a good idea to have a paper that says SOLD on it that you can put on the pile. Anyway, I got 10% off the total price and saved about $20. In some instances it is not the best choice to bargain individually but rather to do as I have above. Goes al lot smoother this way.

    The Firefox books are great; I have some somewhere in my library in the barn. I also have several years of the Mother Earth News, a good idea reference.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut
     
  10. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Silver. Or is that Hi-Ho Silver ? Hey, what did you expect from someone named agnut ? Some folks think the ag part is some abbreviation for agriculture and not the letter symbol for silver. Yeah, I’m a silver nut and cannot believe the concealment of silver’s beauty and value to mankind. Silver, the Cinderella of precious metals. Someday we will have a ball with it.

    Wow ! Your work is fascinating. I would love to see some pictures. I can see that you are more sophisticated in procuring materials for your restoration projects. Me ? I’m happy finding rolls of barb wire and lumber. My hat’s off to you.

    Reminds me of a sandblaster I got a few years ago. It was a military surplus piece and was so large that three people could get inside. I advertised it on Craigslist and only one buyer came out . He specialized in restoring Italian coffee roasters and needed a large sandblaster for the large pieces. We made the deal and he hauled it off in a huge rollback truck. So without Craigslist I may not have found such an interested buyer.

    I also buy and sell on Craigslist. It’s a Godsend. I have learned that it is best to sell items in the $100 plus range since the time and distance may not be worth it for a buyer to seek a $10 item. I haven’t tried to sell any of my enamel on copper paintings on Craigslist because there is a limited number of folks who even know that they are. EBay has been the best in the past but now what with the economy being what it is (and becoming) I’m not sure. Besides, I have loved and collected enamel on copper paintings since about 1974.
    I may keep them for a few more years; maybe to pass on to my children.

    When we collect something we should collect for our own personal pleasure with the realization that we may not get what we paid for it in the future. This thinking keeps things in perspective regarding our personal finances. And diminishes disappointment if we do decide to sell.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut

    God is in gold and lives is in silver.
     
  11. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Argent Dragon. Yeah, that Craigslist is like the song “Alice’s Restaurant” where you can get anything you want…’ceptin’ Alice. Pssst.. I heard that even Alice IS available in the personal section.

    I have the best luck in selling cars, motors and transmissions through Craigslist. Also I have bought several cars there. I have had better luck in selling a Snap On valve grinding machine and a brake lathe through people I know. I suppose someone could make a living buying and selling automotive items there also.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    As for Estate Sales here's a start: Estate Sales.Net http://www.estatesales.net/
     
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  13. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    If you are of an age to remember the show "Green Acres" then you will know that Hainey[sp.] was the best of the best.
     
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  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rather than start a new thread I thought this was a good spot to post this:

    How to Plan for Survival on a Small Budget, by N.G.


    It’s no secret that being prepared takes time and money. These days, with the questionable economy, most people believe that they have to win the lottery or inherit a small fortune to begin preparing for an unforeseen disaster. Since I am married to a wife who is a full-time student and we have a small child and combined income of thirty thousand dollars per year, I also thought it was impossible to get started. However, whether it be supplies, equipment, training, or home modifications, anyone can get started just by starting on a smaller scale. The key is to minimize the things that are not necessary. All of the following methods are tools I have personally used to come up with extra cash or have used to save money. I’ve learned that the smallest budget can go a long way towards survival preparedness.


    Tax Season

    My personal favorite is when tax season comes along. Most people get tax money back, and then they start spending it on things they don’t really need, such as televisions, sound systems, video games, and the list goes on and on. Trust me; I used to be the same way. Now, getting five thousand dollars back is a nice amount to go towards my survival readiness. This past tax season, I was able to use the money I got back to purchase everything I needed for a couple of well-equipped bug-out bags, weapons, ammo, books, MRE’s, and I still had some money to spare. I have prepared my family for short-term survival by just using our tax money.


    Pawn Shops, Auctions, and Yard Sales

    Pawn shops are an excellent place to find a wide variety of items at a fraction of the original cost. I have purchased nice tool sets, fishing gear, and knives from the local pawn shops. They are also a good place to practice your haggling skills. Another good use of pawn shops is selling your unneeded and unwanted items from home. I have sold old videogame systems, DVD’s, televisions, and more to get rid of useless clutter and put extra cash in my pocket. On par with pawn shops, some specialty shops can be a doorway to extra cash. There’s a shop in my town that sells and buys used books and movies. I have sold many DVD’s and taken home hundreds of dollars from this one shop.

    Auctions are a personal favorite, due to the fact that everything must go. I have bought all kinds of good stuff for next to nothing, just because I was the only one who bid on it. My best example is from one auction, where I purchased an entire bundle of gardening tools including rakes, shovels, hoes, and spades for only five dollars. Remember, you’re there to save money. Bidding can get a little intense and before you know it, you’re paying retail for a used item.

    Another good way of saving and making money is yard sales. When I was younger, my mother would spend one day out of the week going to yard sales. That’s where a lot of my clothes came from as a kid. Along with clothing, you can find anything at a yard sale. I have purchased pots and pans, lanterns, and canning supplies very inexpensively on multiple occasions. One set of pots and pans were unused, still in the box, and only cost me eight dollars. I talked them down from ten dollars. Having a yard sale of your own is an easy way of putting extra money in your pocket. Teaming up with family and friends to have a large yard sale is best for attracting the most people. I have always made more money by having a multi-family sale opposed to doing it on my own.


    The Internet

    Internet websites, such as eBay, Amazon, and Craigslist, have always been a good way for me to save and make money. With eBay’s auction-style bidding, I have received excellent amounts of cash for electronics, books, and toddler clothing. In about a year and a half, I was able to make three thousand dollars on stuff around the house that I no longer needed. Selling on Craigslist is easy. Just be cautious of scams and shady people. Make sure you meet a buyer in a public place and never go alone. Most of the stuff I have sold through Craigslist are things my son has outgrown. Especially with Craigslist, people are not expecting new items. Think of it as an online yard sale. Amazon, along with eBay and Craigslist, are some of the biggest money savers I have found. I would say 99% of the books I buy are from Amazon. Amazon has just about anything you’re looking for, and their customer reviews are very helpful. On saving money alone, these three websites have saved me hundreds of dollars.


    Scrap Metal, Cans, and Bottles

    I made my first trip to the scrapyard a couple of years ago to dump off an old riding mower that had been sitting in the garage. I was surprised when I was given thirty-two dollars just for a junk mower. Since then, I have cleaned out my garage of all junk metal. Also, anytime friends or family are throwing out junk metal, I take it home and turn it in, once I have enough for a truck load. If you have any pieces of copper lying around, it’s selling at high prices right now. Instead of throwing an old stove out on the curb, take it to the scrap yard and get some extra cash.

    Cans and bottles are a good way to pull in extra cash, as long as you live in a state that has can deposits. I’m always surprised when I learn that people just toss their cans and bottles into the garbage. They’re just throwing money into the garbage, because they don’t want to take ten minutes out of their day to turn them in. If you have friends or family who do this, ask them to set the cans and bottles aside in a trash bag; you’ll be happy to pick them up. My mother saves her glass bottles for me, because she doesn’t want to lug them around. That’s as good as free money.


    Friends and Family

    Friends and family can be very helpful in saving you money. Recently, my mother and stepfather were cleaning out their garage and throwing away perfectly good tools. I was able to sort through a random box of sockets and wrenches and create three full socket sets and one full wrench set. A few years ago, they were cleaning up their garage and gave me two disc grinders that were still in the box and had never been used. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

    Over the years I have learned many skills from friends and family. I started hunting with my stepfather when I was young. Because of his teaching, I can hunt, kill, and process the wild game that my area has to offer. My friends taught me everything I know about fishing and have given me the confidence in knowing I can use that skill to provide for my family. Gardening is a valuable skill that has been passed down from my grandfather to my mother and to me. These are all excellent skills to have in your toolbox of knowledge. Another skill that would be useful is welding. My stepfather is a welder by trade and would be the perfect person to teach me. Friends and family have a lot of knowledge to share. All you have to do is ask.


    Live Off the Land

    Living off of the land is another great way to save money. Start hunting, fishing, gardening, and canning to lower the amount of money you spend at the grocery store. At the same time you would be strengthening these skills for a time you may have to depend on them.

    In my family, deer hunting is very popular. Most of my childhood, if we had steaks, roast, hamburger, sausage, and jerky, it came from a deer. If you process your own meat, it costs a whole lot less than buying it at the grocery store, especially with the currently rising prices.

    Fishing is another strong staple in my family and a delicious money saver. We fished so much that we would have large, fish fry dinners for every summer holiday. We would feed 50 to 100 people every time. Eating fish two to three times per week makes our deer last longer and cuts the cost at the grocery store even more.

    Gardening and canning really saves my family trips to the store. My parents have a large property in town, and we plant three large gardens every year. Tomatoes, green beans, jalapeños, potatoes, onions, and cabbage are some of the items regularly planted and utilized. Pickled tomatoes, tomato juice, spaghetti sauce, and salsa are some of the items that we can or freeze. Time spent in the garden and a little money on canning supplies will highly minimize your need for the grocery store’s produce aisle. We have also planted fruit trees that are common to our area but still have a couple of years before they start producing. Another benefit of gardening that I have noticed is that it has brought us closer as a family. That alone is worth all the money in the world.


    Minimize and Rationalize

    I’ve learned that on a small budget, you have to minimize your wants and rationalize your needs. Today, we are made to believe that we need so much more than we actually do. We don’t need a cabinet full of DVD’s or a 90-inch television. Most of that stuff will be useless in the event of a survival situation and could leave you unprepared. If you are serious and dedicated to survival planning, anyone can get started on the smallest of budgets.



    http://survivalblog.com/how-to-plan-for-survival-on-a-small-budget-by-n-g/
     
  15. Argent Dragon

    Argent Dragon Site Support Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    IF you have the room or able to acquire a piece of bug-out property (which I did last year), then something to consider is acquiring raw materials. Some items are easier than others to re-purpose but I've been stocking up on a few things as time permits. All these items come from other peoples discards, scraps, donations, etc. My focus has chiefly been on wood (for greenhouse building, etc), but other items proved to be just as valuable. For example, a thrown out pool cleaning handle (net was gone) I re-purpose for plant supports to the roof (2-sections)...........and my wife complained that I didn't need it !

    Other items include a few old tires (could serve as individual planters), masonry units of various sizes, metal scrap, old pallets (multi-uses of these), and whatever else peaks my attention if it's free. I do tend to shy away from plastics only because their not easily transformed (at least for me)..........so for now it's wood, glass, metals, and products I can build with.
     
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  16. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Thanks for posting that article Searcher. Lots of important ideas here as well as discussion material.

    We all are on limited budgets whether we are rich or not. Some can afford 12 cases of food while some can afford 12 cans; what is important is that those with small budgets accumulate over a long time period while someone with a lot of money can accumulate overnight. The tortoise and the hare. I’m still filling in gaps such as different jellies and more peanut butter, a staple around our place. Can you imagine having a currency collapse and then going into your food storage and realizing that what you have is all you will have for a long time ? This thought motivates me to put away more long term storage food items, no matter whether they are favorites or something different that we don’t often eat. When you are starving anything looks good. Even a can of Spaghettios.

    Last Friday I picked up a 3/8 socket ratchet, a 3/8 socket flexhead ratchet and a ½” socket flexhead ratchet for 25 cents each. They were in excellent condition and will be useful when I make up tool kits for cars. I have tons of sockets but not enough ratchets. Putting sets together can be fun if you are not in a hurry. I may not see something I would like to have for months or sometimes years but eventually darn near everything shows up.

    I try to find American made items first but there are some foreign items that should not be passed by. Some tools will withstand a lifetime’s use; you need to know the brand and what its quality is. This is also true for many, many other items. Coats, pants, shoes, kitchen appliances, tires; the list goes on and on.

    I may buy something and not have a use for it. Probably looks silly to some observers. This item may sit around for a couple of years and then either I suddenly have a need for the item or someone asks for it. It has happened to me many times.

    I also picked up 20 DVD movies; paid from 25 cents to $2 each. I watch the movies, sell them, loan them to friends and/or give them as gifts. I shut off Comcast cable almost a year ago, saving about $120 a month and find that I don’t miss it. Plus I could buy a buttload of DVDs every month and still come out way ahead.

    Yesterday I picked up 8 gallons of clear deck sealer for $7. We have a thrift store branch that sells all kinds of building materials. I also picked up a riding mower and 4 power mowers for parts for free; there are lots of good parts there that would cost a fortune if new.

    Gotta go; much work awaits. Being busy and interested keeps you young.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut

    P.S. Thanks also for the estate sale website. I could spend all my time finding bargains here. I looked at some of the local sales and many of the estate sales had rather expensive items. These sales are a whole level above garage and moving sales which are a good place for the novice to start. These estate sales have potential for the knowledgeable barterer and horse trader to make a killing if the prices are right. I noticed that the quantity of items for sale was enormous in some cases and wondered just how many buyers showed up. Would I have to park three blocks away ? And what happens with the unsold merchandise ? Tons of items in some of these auctions. It would be most interesting to attend some of these larger estate sales just to watch the sellers and buyers to get a feel for how it all flows through the sale hours.

    As for Estate Sales here's a start: Estate Sales.Net http://www.estatesales.net/
     
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  17. Weatherman

    Weatherman In GIM since 2006 Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Judging from the few estate auctions I went to, there is very little left after the sale. The auctioneer will try to get the most money for the items, but there is no second plan for items that did not sell during the estate sale so the auctioneer will go to great lengths to sell almost everything. If there are no bids for the lowest price the auctioneer will offer, he may put the item aside for an hour or two, but then he will put it back up sale again, and he may combine with other items to be sure they sell. Estate sales are fun, but the standard auction strategy applies: Get there early and carefully inspect everything you might be interested in buying. Then set the maximum price you are willing to bid for each, and do not second guess that maximum just because other people are willing to pay more.
     
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  18. glockngold

    glockngold Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Did somebody say ratchets...:bear_laugh:

    2 snap-On Ratchets 002.jpg

    Today I was making the Friday morning round of neighborhood yard sales & ended up in trailer court hell.
    Most everything was junky & dirty & I was kicking myself for wasting my time.
    In the middle of a pile of Harbor Freight junk were these 2 Snap-On puppies.
    I picked them up & an Estwing hammer for $10.00 (their price, I didn't even haggle)
    Snap-On is a little rich for my blood so I'll probably flip them to add the profit to my tractor fund.

    also at yard sales, I've been doing well on mens blue jeans. (womens clothes aren't worth messin with my 2 cents)
    I always ask if there are any available & that I'll pay a buck apiece.
    I've had people actually go inside & search their drawer & bring out a few.
    I keep the sizes that fit me, & I sell the other sizes at fleamarket for $3. to $5.00


     
  19. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Argent Dragon. My sons and I have been living in our bug-out place for 7 years now and we love it. Snug as a bug in a bug-out.

    Glad to hear that you have a bug-out place of your own. Have you moved there or are you preparing it for when you need it ? All of the things you have been accumulating will come in handy. I had a huge stack of wood pallets and we used them for many things as well as heating the house the first winter. Now we cut our own firewood for the long winters here. I like burning Alder wood; we have lots of this type of wood growing on our property. A nearby friend has offered free wood if we will just pick it up and cut it to stove
    length; he has about 60 cords worth.

    Have you considered getting used sliding glass doors and framing them in to make a greenhouse ? I have 4 doors set aside and could find more if I would only take the time. Some are free and some are $10 for a pair. Don’t know what I will do or how but I still pick up more doors as they show up. Maybe only glass doors facing the sun would save a lot of money. I figure I could build a greenhouse thirty feet by ten feet for under a thousand dollars if my sons and I do the work ourselves. And since we are in the Pacific northwest a couple hours from the Canadian border, we should have a greenhouse to extent the season to grow veggies and additionally save enough money to recoup the cost of materials within a year or two, especially with the veggie prices going through the roof. I’m sure you know how much tastier and healthier home grown veggies are.

    Funny, but not until I have an adequate quantity of like materials can I clearly envision how it can all go together to make something in my dreams. When I reach what I call critical mass in acquiring the materials I get itchy to get the job done. These projects don’t get done by themselves….or do they ? At least it seems to me that the gathering of the parts takes on a life of its own after a while.

    When you have a Volkswagen beetle and are driving it down the road, you see all the other Volkswagen beetles too. Same is true for focusing on what we are looking for at the GEM sales (that’s garage, estate and moving).

    Plastic buckets from the local bakery or empty buckets that held Kitty Litter are free and useful for many applications. We have filled about 60 buckets full of redwood pieces I dug out of the ground….so far. Free for the digging; probably saved a couple of hundred bucks. The redwood is going all around the house with brick borders. Mostly done now and it makes the place look like people live here instead of Neanderthals (we‘ve got ‘em fooled now). We recently discovered that 50 or more years ago our area was logged. It must have included redwoods because we are finding old trunks and stumps in the woods. We even have a stump that is over 6 feet across. It is probably rotten and would fall apart if I were to hit it with a shovel. It is so beautiful that I have decided to clear the area around it so that we and visitors could see it by as we drive in and out.

    Having acreage in the country is a heckuva lot more work than tending a suburban home but it is worth every drop of blood, sweat and tears. Reminds me, I gotta get the stereo hooked up; three thousand LP albums stacked away are crying to be appreciated.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut
     
  20. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Buying off season and selling in season is a great way of making things more valuable. I picked up a couple rakes[one of which I showed on here] for $100 and now that it has rained every other day for 10 days, everyone needs a rake to pull their hay swaths outta the new growth. I sold both rakes for $500 a piece and coulda sold 8 of them.[gonna look for more cheap ones now]. Also good investments are 40 year old toys[like cycles, snow mobiles and such] as the 45-75 year old crowd now has money to spend on reliving their upbringing.
    Bought a Suzuki RV90 cycle at an auction last Saturday for $300 that didn't run[probably hasn't since 85] and my boys and I stripped off all the fuel lines and carburetor for a thorough cleaning. After which, Voila
    [video=youtube_share;HAh6ItpTs4M]http://youtu.be/HAh6ItpTs4M[/video]

    Need to tinker a bit more and then put her up for $1500.
     
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  21. Solo

    Solo Midas Member Midas Member

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    Turned in $55 worth of scrap Al today at the yard today (cost < $10 in gas to acquire and at most a couple hours of time), but sold a weight set that my neighbors had pushed to the curb a few nights ago for $40 on CL the very next morning:banana:.

    I had a friend at work a few years ago who had access to cheap boat storage so every winter he would buy 10 to 20 boats and come spring/summer time he would flip every last one of them for substantially more. If you've got the space and knowledge, buying stuff off-season can be a real money maker if you know what you're doing :cool:.
     
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  22. rte

    rte Silver Member Silver Miner

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    I bartered some paper for plastic and then took 30% profit off a BlackJack table :36_2_36:

    3 hours play credit and free drinks.
     
  23. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Weatherman. There are at least two types of estate sales that I am aware of. The first is with an auctioneer getting bids from buyers in a rapid fire style. I have been to these and prefer the second type because the first often is bid up too high by emotional buyers, like a piranha feeding frenzy.

    The second type of estate sale is the one I am most familiar with. The prices are all marked by the professional selling team. When I spot an item I ask for a better price sometimes if I think it is worth it. Otherwise I pay what they are asking; it is then my decision and I am in control. By the way, the unsold items from this second type of auction end up being hauled off by the party holding the auction and then they sell them in their store. I don’t know the details as to who gets paid what.

    Years ago I was at the Denver auto auction and they were running three lines of cars through at the same time. Talk about crazy busy ! You really had to get there early and check out the cars since there was zero time at the auction. Otherwise you were buying the paint job and tires !

    I used to buy my cars from private parties because there was so much opportunity to get a better deal. I remember having a convertible VW that I couldn’t sell to the public for $1400 in San Diego. I took it up to an auction in L.A. where it went through at midnight and sold for $2100 wholesale.

    It’s a wild and wooly world out there and a great place to learn, become proficient and profit from. We are capable of more than we believe we are. Trying is a step in expanding our horizons. Ya gotta be in it to win it.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut
     
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  24. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Glockngold. Yeah, those Snap On ratchets were a steal. Mine are more rat chits and therefore cheap; hope I don’t bust a knuckle if they fail.

    Proto and Mac and some others are earlier good quality tools. Of course, everyone is familiar with the Craftsman tools. They are standard quality for a good price and should hold their value in the future; maybe even increase with the flood of Asian tools. The Japanese measuring tools are excellent, like Mitutoyo and others.

    Best wishes,

    Agnut
     
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  25. RichG

    RichG GIM Radio Host Platinum Bling

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  26. Canadian-guerilla

    Canadian-guerilla hunter-gatherer Gold Chaser

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    is there any way we can .PDF this thread maybe once a month ?
     
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How I get tons of free stuff to sell

    [video=youtube_share;tkg6gqCbofU]http://youtu.be/tkg6gqCbofU[/video]

    http://youtu.be/tkg6gqCbofU
     
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  29. Hystckndle

    Hystckndle Daguerreotype Fanatic Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    Yo ! Hiya Agnut,
    The kid applied to get thru the gate here.
    I will see her tonight as she is coming here to claim some haystack bartered furniture.
    Hopefully she can have a conversation with you soon.
    Regards,
     
  30. RichG

    RichG GIM Radio Host Platinum Bling

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    This will be a very informative show.
     
  31. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Occupation:
    Custom pesticide applicator.
    Location:
    Eastern Alberta.
    Had a good week selling old iron I've picked up for near nothing at different spots the last few years. I also went to an auction two weeks ago with my 13 year old and bought this
    [​IMG]

    for $650 dollars cause he said we could make it run.:vollkommenauf:

    Dambed if we didn't
    [video=youtube_share;HAh6ItpTs4M]http://youtu.be/HAh6ItpTs4M[/video]

    I listed it on a craigs type list up here for $1500 and a fellow called wanting it for $1200 but I countered with $1300[Doubling your money is always good] cash and he bring something as "boot" that was automotive collectable as well. He showed up at noon with
    [​IMG]

    and
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    That is boot for those who never knew. No idea what the steering column is out of or the hoops are off of but I'll make a few more bucks on them.
     
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  32. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Steering colum is a Ford Model T with spark advance & throttle lever. Throttle was like a tractor.
     
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  33. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    I agree with it being from an older vehicle but how do you tell it's a "Ford Model T"?
     
  34. CrimsonGuardJay

    CrimsonGuardJay Silver Member Silver Miner

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    Probably the same way I can tell that a part as obscure as fuse box cover or MAF is off a 20+ year old Lexus SC400, I'm an enthusiast, and so is this guy.
     
  35. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    That would be great and I'm hoping it's the case. I was trying to figure out how to distinguish it.
     
  36. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Cuz I gots 3 of them laying in the shead. Under the steering wheel it's brass.
     
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  37. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Eastern Alberta.
    It's nice to know what one is selling before selling so as not to look to bigga fool. I once sold an old friend a 1917 truck and a year later I found a wooden steering wheel at auction that had never been put together[I paid $2], gave it to the old boy and it's been steering that truck for some 25+ years now. He said he would have happily paid $200 for the wheel. Can you guys tell what vehicles different wooden spoked wheels came off?
     
  38. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi all. A post on another website made me stop and reflect my own life with a cautionary tale. I hope you will take it to heart.

    How old are you guys ? The reason I ask is that as we get older we lose the ability to react as quickly, our sense of balance isn’t as good and our bones are more brittle. When getting on a roof or ladder our ego and pride says that we can do the job. But reality is a hard teacher. Let me tell you a story.

    Back in the 1930s my father who as a young man had the rare ability to walk a tightrope without any balance pole. His father ran the equipment for a logging company and would run a line high in the trees so that my father could walk it. This was during the depression era. Circuses wanted him but his father said that working in a circus was not for decent folk. Probably right, as I have seen in some movies lately which depicted what a traveling circus was like. See the movies Water For Elephants and Carnivale.

    The war came along and my father went back into the U.S. Navy. He said that he could show off and do handsprings on a steel ship deck and also could walk on his hands up and down stairs.

    My father spent 26 years in the Navy, running the airplane repair facilities around the U.S. Places like Norfolk where he was flight deck officer on the Valley Forge aircraft carrier. I can recall the times he took me to tour the ship and how enormous everything was.

    My father had been through the entire battle of Okinawa during WWII. He said that he was on a ship and had been transferred to another ship wherein the ship he had left was blown up the next day and most hands lost. That had to have an effect on him. He said that the kamikazes were attacking constantly and seeing some of the old timers having nervous breakdowns and being taken to the rear and being patched up. As soon as it was determined that they were able, they were brought up to the front again because there was a shortage of experienced men; there was no other option. War doesn’t wait.

    As a child and young man I traveled with my family to the military bases around the country. Norfolk Virginia, Millington Tennessee, Adak Alaska, Miami Florida, Willow Grove Pennsylvania, Barbers Point Hawaii. Lots of interesting characteristics in each locale and pretty wild for a kid growing up. This continual pulling up stakes and moving every year or two must have had an effect on me because I moved many times through the decades that followed. Wanderlust doesn’t perfectly describe it; you’d have to live it to feel the fullness.

    My father finally retired after a second career as a civil service metal corrosive engineer for the Navy. He was now what we call a triple dipper, receiving three retirement checks. Besides that, he was in real estate for years and was already wealthy by most standards.

    So where is this story going ? Well, in the 1990s he was fully retired and had plenty of money. What does he do ? He wants to sweep the flat roof over the garage. His wife said to not go up there and he said to her, “What are you trying to do, make a cripple out of me ?” That was the last thing he said before he fell backward off the roof. Ironic.

    He also said the last thing he did was kick off the roof so that he didn’t land on his head. Instead, he landed flat on his back.

    He was rushed to the hospital where he was in intensive care and recovery for a long time. The doctors said that his spinal injuries would make him a quadriplegic for life. I was told that the medical care cost a million dollars before he got out of the hospital. He did learn to walk, although with great effort. It took years until he was able to hold a spoon to feed himself.

    After the accident, I can’t count the number of times he told me to not get on the roof without safety devices.

    I moved from southern California about 10 years ago to help take care of him. More important to me was to be close to him to enjoy time together, time that the demands of his career had all too often taken precedence over our father-son relationship. Hopefully, you who have children are well aware of this.

    I’m relating this story to tell anyone who reads it to never, never, NEVER put yourself in a situation before thinking of the possible consequences. Pay a professional to do the job.

    We work hard all our lives so that we can retire and enjoy the fruits of our labor: our newly found free time and most important, our family and friends. So falling off a roof is an example of just one of the life damaging things we can do.

    A few years ago I was at a garage sale loading items while standing on the tailgate of my pickup truck. It was wet and I slipped and fell to the concrete below. It was only a few feet but I was going head first. Incredible, a tall huge stranger caught my head before it hit. My left shoulder hit hard and still gives me a little reminder of that day. The bruise from knee to ankle faded in time. By the way, this stranger and his girlfriend became friends and have visited me and my family many times. You never know what will happen out there; good and bad. You just need the courage to do rather than only dream. I didn’t mean to turn this into a bartering and horse trading story but there it is. Threads of activities weave a most fascinating pattern throughout our lives. Sometimes we need to sit back and reflect until all the colors and designs become clear.


    Best wishes,

    Agnut

    “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.”
    Albert Einstein


    "To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better; whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is the meaning of success. "
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
     
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  39. Solo

    Solo Midas Member Midas Member

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    Agnut you should start a thread with that to ensure as many people here see that as possible. It's kinda ironic that I was up on my roof yesterday with a sawzall trimming back limbs from an oak tree (redneck style I know...) and one of my feet slid unexpectedly a few inches. I was already close to the edge and when that happened I put the saw down, took a minute to collect myself and consider just how close to a hospital run I had just came. Though I'm still younger than most here, I have no doubt a fall from a roof would result in more than just a bruise or two and I was thinking about it for hours yesterday even after the work was done. Man, now that I've read this it's going to be eons before I get on that roof again :p.

    Thanks again for sharing that :thumbs_up:
     
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  40. agnut

    agnut Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hi Solo. Do you realize that there is no graceful way to fall off a roof ? And after a fall you are never better off than you were before you fell ? It’s sorta like self imposed accelerated entropy. Be careful; we need all the good folks we can find.

    Thought y’all might find this interesting :

    Your surfing story brings back fond memories of my surfing back in the early sixties in Hawaii. Once I was surfing alone, stupidly, and a huge shark took interest in me. I caught the next wave in and never went out there again. It was like living a scene from the movie Jaws.

    Tempting fate is like looking into the abyss, not realizing that the abyss is looking back at you.

    I once body surfed at the southeast part of Kawai by Nawiliwili harbor. There were several others out that day and I can still recall looking to the right and seeing all the joy filled faces as we all rode near the crest of the wave. It was a memory that few are blessed to have ever experienced. I also recall how we could look down ahead and see the sea bottom exposed as we bodysurfed in. Damn dangerous if we pearled or went over the falls; crashing into the coral and then being hit by the wave would have been like being tumbled in a cement mixer. I got my first and only “tattoo” there; I stepped on a spiny purple sea urchin and had purple spots on my heel for a loooong time.

    It is all my experiences through life that sometimes make me feel so thankful as well as a bit selfish to have lived the equivalent of three lives in only one (so far). Do you know what I mean ?

    My best friend who owned Insanity body boards and I were surfing in Ocean Beach at the end of Hill street. There had been a storm and the waves were huge. Later we always referred to this day as “Big Wednesday” like the movie. I got caught in a bad one and was dragged under and scraped along the bottom until I could regain my bearings. It tore off a couple of fins from my board but otherwise I was okay. I was never very good at surfing and that was the last time I went surfing. I still have two his the body boards in my barn; I keep them as memory of my deceased friend and the times we had. By the way, he was like a cross between Jack Nicholson and W.C. Fields. What a wonderful and wild friend to have. He worked with me off and on for two years in converting my 35’ Greyhound bus into a motor home. We even took it for a shakedown cruise from San Diego to Seattle and back. But that is a story for another time.

    And now getting back to bartering and horse trading, I took the above trip and bought auto parts along the way for a core program . I probably made 15 or 20 thousand bucks which more than covered the diesel and grub. It was a pleasure/business vacation. I still have the videotapes I made of the trip but haven’t the heart to look at them. Someday.

    We all pass through this life not realizing the effect we have on others we encounter. Some are small and some are life changing, whether we intend it or not. I am writing this bartering and horse trading thread in belief that it will help others. Through all my life’s difficulties I always seemed to easily recover and move on. Perhaps it was because I had a positive view of the future; there were always opportunities out there to discover and where they led me. The world is your oyster if you will but open the shell.

    If any of you were to visit me and take the time to look over the mountain of stuff that I have accumulated through the years you would be astounded. I’m not bragging; as they say “it ain’t braggin’ if it’s true”. Sometimes I find a box of some items I had bought years ago and forgotten about. It is a funny feeling; a mix of Christmas morning and Alzheimer’s. Admittedly, I haven’t organized the tons of stuff here but as Ponce says, “If you don’t hold it, you don’t own it.” I would add “And if you can’t find it, you might as well not own it.” HaHa

    There may seem to be no difference between a hoarder and what I have done but this is not true by a long shot. A hoarder compulsively collects things that may have little to no future value. I collect things that I believe will have a better future value as well as will be desirable trading material. A good shovel bought now for a dollar ? What will this fiat debt ridden dollar be worth in a year ? Five years ? Ten years ? It’s headed toward colored toilet paper as we speak. What I do is a defense against the devaluing dollar, whether it is buying a shovel, a car part, a pair of jeans, a blender or a million other items out there begging for a home that knows their true value.

    Ponce and I were talking this morning and he stated something that I have been doing for years. Buying quality used American made items. I would add that I also buy quality items no matter where they are made, especially Europe and Japan. I have many new hacksaw blades made in Sweden, I got them in a package deal. Probably paid a few pennies (zinc about that) each. I don’t use them because I have others and will trade them when they are appreciated for what they are. Ponce was visiting family in Cuba several years ago and had a pack of hacksaw blades that he gave to a neighbor who did metal work. This man had only one hacksaw blade and it had only four teeth still working. When Ponce gave him the blades, the man cried; he was so overjoyed.

    What will be the future value of quality items when they are no longer available ? Something to think about.

    I know people who have many thousands of dollars in their bank accounts. I told Ponce and he said that they were stupid. I think stupid on multiple levels. A sitting duck being eaten through time, until the day of being gobbled whole. At least they could take the money out of the bank as a first step. Second, find something that will hold or increase in value through time. And here’s the rub; time. Nobody knows for sure how the future will unfold. We all have to place our bets and take our chances. But this is not like rolling dice or playing roulette. This is like playing poker or blackjack and being able to count the cards as they are played in order to calculate the odds of the outcome.

    In my opinion, the future for America is either being overtaken or being marginalized. In the first, it would be chaotic and terrible. Americans will not allow that to happen without a fight. In the second case, imported manufactured goods would either become prohibitively expensive or unavailable. What we have here will be used up in time until there is a deficit of items to be had or we will domestically make the items as time passes. It won’t be easy what with our having shipped so much of our factory machinery out of the country. It is this time period in which we will be somewhat like what Cuba has been going through for several decades. So the items we have stored away will become valuable.

    Years ago I quit buying silver except at sales. I don’t have much silver but I believe enough with my other assets included. I bought very little silver since most everyone knows that silver is valuable and therefore the price spread is almost negligible compared to the spot price. Instead I concentrated on things I needed and would need in the future. This included putting away many, many items that others would need. Clothing is an item that wears out and must be replaced. One exception to buying used is that I would buy new men’s socks. They are cheap per pair, wear out quickly and would look like gold to a man whose last pair was worn out.

    I write mostly about small value items because this is what I believe will be best to have. It is no different than buying silver dimes rather than ten ounce bars. My items are like change in comparison to having cars or boats for future sale. And several small deals sold equal one large deal being sold. Much easier in my opinion.

    Best wishes and cowabunga, dude,

    Agnut

    We can own nothing in this world but only have use of it for a time, for we are mortal.
    agnut
     

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