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Care to share some of your long term food storage meals/recipies?

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by RunningScared, Aug 3, 2011.



  1. RunningScared

    RunningScared Seeker Seeker

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    Howdy all,

    I'm about half way through getting my long term food storage preps done. Learning a lot. It's kind of fun too, but I'm also ready to BE DONE with it, so I can focus on other areas of life that are important as well.

    Anyway, when calculating how much stuff I'd need, I kept it simple -- had a couple recipes in mind. But I'm realizing that with just a few more things (the right veggie, or spice) I can make a LOT more VARIETY of things than I originally planned.

    So, I'm just trying to get some more ideas here....

    Before I finish buying the rest of my preps, I thought I'd see if anyone cared to share what kind of meals they had in mind for using their long term food storage.

    I found some recipes on line, but not many -- so thought I'd try here.

    Thanks,

    -Nathan
     
  2. Nickelless

    Nickelless If coffee is gold, I own Fort Knox Midas Member

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    You can make literally thousands of different soup recipes using rice and beans as your bulk ingredients--just add different meats, veggies and spices. This might help:

    http://hungrythirstystranger.blogspot.com/2011/03/cheap-but-good-food-share-your-favorite.html

    I'm adding mostly rice and beans to my food storage at the moment, although I'm also buying at least a few pounds (yes, pounds) of spices from Sam's Club every week to change up the soup varieties. I've also been buying sale-priced canned tomatoes and tomato products by the case. I use two different Kroger discount cards to get the store discounts, but neither card has my name or addressed attached to them--I've never been told I need to fill out the customer information forms, I won't do so anyway, and I get huge markdowns on products and walk out the store with a ton of stuff I've paid cash for. Last week I bought about 15 cases of Kroger tomato sauce at 59 cents for a 28-ounce can courtesy of my nameless Kroger discount card. You can do a heck of a lot with tomatoes and tomato sauce when it comes to soup recipes.
     
  3. Merlin

    Merlin Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    I'm curious to know, Nathan, what your food storage pantry looks like now. You say you kept it simple, and I wonder if, indeed, it might be too simple. We have a broad range of wet canned soups, meats, gravies and sauces, dehydrated foods, Mountain House type freeze-dried meals, green coffee beans and spices and I'm sure my menus will only repeat if I want them to repeat.

    For instance, I ate baked salmon from my freezer with steamed fresh cabbage and cauliflower for dinner today. If TSHTF, I have freeze dried salmon, cabbage and cauliflower waiting in the basement.

    A little imagination helps too. I encountered the concept of breakfast popcorn as a substitute for commercial breakfast cereal. Imagine that! Popcorn with honey and milk and perhaps a splash of cinnamon or freeze dried fruit to start your day. It's darn good :)
     
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  4. Claimjumper

    Claimjumper New Member

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    FWIW
    Looking back over the last three years of my preps, I realize that I have to many canned goods. I knew "store what you eat, eat what you store" to cycle through cans before the date on the can. But, I didn't realize that as I built up a large variety, just how long it would take to cycle through that many cans. Now I am getting that worked down & replacing with #10 cans of dehydrated vegetables. You can get #10 cans of dehydrated tomato powder that will reconstitute to anything from tomato juice to thick tomato paste.
    I will still keep fresh canned goods, just not as many as I ended up with, now that I know how long it takes to use them.
     
  5. southfork

    southfork Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

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    Aside from my costco and MH , I'm around 30 pounds overweight, that will last a few months and help keep down the eating on my part.
     
  6. RunningScared

    RunningScared Seeker Seeker

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    Good question Merlin.

    I don’t cook, so I have no “pantry”.

    = )

    Day-to-day, the majority of my calories come from fresh fruits and vegetables. On my lunch break (at work), I go out and eat a cooked meal, but on average, that is my only cooked meal on a daily basis.

    So, to answer your question, I don't have a "pantry" at home... Except for a 2 week emergency pile of stuff I put together a while ago, for earth quake preparedness, or whatever. But I wont eat that stuff unless I have to.

    Here's what I have already, but plan to get more of:
    • For long term food storage/SHTF scenario, my plan is to store LOTS of rice (various "white" blends), beans (and lintels), and freeze dried (or regular dried) veggies.

    Need to get:
    • I figured on a LOT of powdered eggs, powdered milk, dried/powdered potatoes, and quick rolled oats, as well.
    • Also going to get a bunch of spices, bullions, chili powder, garlic seasoning, dried onions, powdered cheese, etc.


    That’s the basics, I guess.


    I also have:
    • 8 #10 cans of freeze dried fruits (need more – but dayum they cost a fortune)
    • Lots of sugar
    • Lots of salt
    • Some pasta (~1 month’s worth -- will probably get more)
    • Pasta sauce
    • Quinoa as an "experiment" (don't think it normally has a real long shelf life, maybe 2-3 years). I will do the mylar bag/oxy absorber thing and store it in the fridge, in hopes to double or triple that. I’m converting a chest freezer into a fridge and I’ll put the more “delicate” items in there to make them last much longer.


    Still looking into:
    • TVP / textured vegetable protein. I’ve never used this stuff. It looks like a good meat substitute for chili and things like that.
    • How long will my unopened spaghetti sauce REALLY last? Not finding an answer on that. Also, spaghetti sauce jars are heavy and bulky in quantity. Not real fond of that. Is there a better way?
    • How long will canned goods REALLY last (like canned sweet corn)?

    So far, I’ve probably spent about $1300 and will probably end up spending about another $1300-2000, after it’s all done. That will give me about a year’s worth of supplies for 2 people.

    Thoughts?
     
  7. RunningScared

    RunningScared Seeker Seeker

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    Can you make spaghetti sauce with that too?

    I'm thinking that might be a better option for me as well.

    Thanks,

    -Nathan
     
  8. Claimjumper

    Claimjumper New Member

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    Yes, I'm sure you can. I think with your spices & some TVP you could get by with it as a sauce.
    You might want to get some #10 cans of "dehydrated scrambled eggs". They are like the "whole egg" but have a little powdered milk & whatever thrown in to make them scramble better. Again, with a little TVP, or my favorite, "Yoders canned bacon". It is real good bacon. I got mine at http://www.mredepot.com as they had the best price then.
     
  9. Merlin

    Merlin Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    You probably have more experience with TVP than you think. Have you ever eaten Bacos at the salad bar? TVP.

    Spaghetti sauce in glass jars is heavy; but at least the acids in the tomatoes won't leach chemicals from can linings like sauce in cans. For some insight into the shelf life of canned veggies consider:

    A Food and Drug Administration Article about a shelf life test that was conducted on 100-year old canned foods that were retrieved from the Steamboat Bertrand can be read at the following link:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20070509153848/http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/CONSUMER/CON00043.html

    Following is a brief summary of a very small portion of the above article:

    "Among the canned food items retrieved from the Bertrand in 1968 were brandied peaches, oysters, plum tomatoes, honey, and mixed vegetables. In 1974, chemists at the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) analyzed the products for bacterial contamination and nutrient value. Although the food had lost its fresh smell and appearance, the NFPA chemists detected no microbial growth and determined that the foods were as safe to eat as they had been when canned more than 100 years earlier. The nutrient values varied depending upon the product and nutrient. NFPA chemists Janet Dudek and Edgar Elkins report that significant amounts of vitamins C and A were lost. But protein levels remained high, and all calcium values 'were comparable to today's products.'"

    "NFPA chemists also analyzed a 40-year-old can of corn found in the basement of a home in California. Again, the canning process had kept the corn safe from contaminants and from much nutrient loss. In addition, Dudek says, the kernels looked and smelled like recently canned corn."
     
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  10. Nickelless

    Nickelless If coffee is gold, I own Fort Knox Midas Member

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    There's no such thing as too many canned goods, IMO. You can have too high a proportion of canned goods relative to other stored foods, but I don't think it's possible to have too many canned goods. If you think you have "too many" canned goods, just round out your pantry with more of other items. I probably have somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,000 cans of spinach, carrots and various tomato products in my deep pantry, and I don't regret for a minute that I bought them.
     
  11. RunningScared

    RunningScared Seeker Seeker

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    Damn, I love this forum. Thanks for all the great input guys!
     
  12. slackercruster

    slackercruster Seeker Seeker

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    Survival food should not be that hard. Just stock what you eat and eat what you stock...just more of it!

    If nothing else, gets lots of dry cereal and powdered milk, rice, dry beans some water and beer. You could live on that for a while if nothing else.

    Here is my basic bulk food list. Have lots of other food stored. But this is the very hi vol stuff.

    Pasta Sauce
    Pasta
    Tom Paste
    Dry beans: Garbanzo, Lentils, G.Northern, Pinto, Split Peas

    Grains: Rice, Millet, Quinua, Wheat, Rye, Barley, Buckwheat, Oats (I use about 3 1/2 cups of wheat berries to grind for 1 loaf of bread)

    Dry Cereal
    Powdered Milk

    Dry mushrooms
    Dry Apples
    Raisins
    Dates
    Pnuts / Almonds
    Cornmeal
    Sugar
    White Unbleached Flour (impossible to make at home and good to mix in pancake batter to lighten it up.)
    Honey
    Maple Syrup
    Choc chips (Milk choc for eating and Semi sweet for baking)
    Yeast
    Bake Soda
    Spices
    Salt (Iodized, Canning, Sea)
    Powdered Eggs (Possibly? Have an old can I'm aging to see how long it stores. Never tried them)
    Vitamins

    Some meat and salmon canned. (I am mostly vegetarian)

    Drinking Water
    Beer
    Wine
    Welchs Grape Juice

    http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=134304


    [​IMG]
     
  13. Claimjumper

    Claimjumper New Member

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    Yep, that is probably true after reading what merlin posted. But I have had some bad experiences with select items that may shed some light.
    Beer goes skunky after 6 months or so. I think it depends on many things like heat for one. In the 60's I had a marina & mom & pop store. The beer distributor would exchange out any cases of beer that were near 100 days old, & move them to a larger market somewhere.
    Canned peanuts go stale after a year or two. I think it is the oil that just gets a strong taste & smell.
    Canned coke will swell & blow up after a year or two. This really makes a sticky mess around & below them.
    We don't use our motor home much anymore but did have some cans (veg, pork & beans) puff up & some leaked, making a mess. We exchanged most of the food with fresh stuff, as we like to keep it ready to go on a moments notice.
    We've had to through away evaporated milk (sweetened condensed milk will last quite awhile), olive oil, peanuts, coke, even the oil in ground coffee goes rancid eventually.
    That's all I can think of right now, but I'm sure there has been more losses that my old grey cells can't recall.
    I'm just suggesting that we have to be careful that our preps will be edible when we Really Need Them, because if they aren't, it is To Late to do anything about it then.
     
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  14. mnmom

    mnmom Seeker Seeker

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    I've been prepacking meals into mylar bags. It makes thing easier for me as I won't realize too late that I've forgotten something in my storage preps. My goal is to have 1 years worth of Breakfast,lunch, dinner, dessert at all times. I just took meals that we liked already and changed them up to make it possible to store.

    I'll share a few recipes that are our favorites.

    Baked Oatmeal
    2C Old fashioned oats
    1/3C brown sugar/turbinado sugar
    1/4C raisins or cranberries
    1tsp baking powder
    1tsp cinnamon
    (this is in the mylar bag)'
    to this add
    1 1/2C milk (or dried reconstituted)
    1/2C applesauce (I can applesauce from our trees, but any will work)
    1T butter
    1 large egg

    Combine all ingredients and pour into 8inch square pan. Bake at 375* for 25min. Add milk to leftovers for better texture.

    I did test this out in our solar oven and the baking time was slightly longer about 35minutes and I would suggest covering with foil if you bake it that way.


    Fruit and Oat Squares
    2C flour
    2C oats
    1 1/2C sugar ( I use turbinado sugar)
    1tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 tsp cinnamon
    (this is in mylar bags)

    2/3C butter
    2- 1/2 pint or 1 pint jar of fruit preserves ( I canned blackberry, raspberry, and strawberry rhubarb for this)

    Grease 9x13 pan. place dry mix in bowl and add butter mixing well. Reserve 1C crumb mixture and press remaining into bottom of pan. bake 7-8min at 350* (again a solar oven might take longer as ours does) spread preserves over crust and top with reserved crumb mix. Bake 25min at 350*


    Country soup
    1/2C Red beans
    1/2C navy beans
    1/2C pinto beans
    1 C kidney beans
    1 C northern beans
    I have this in a mylar bag with the following in a small size ziplock bag.
    2 bay leaves
    2T onion flake
    1T parsley flake
    2tsp bouillon granules
    1tsp garlic powder
    1tsp thyme
    1/2 tsp oregano
    1/2tsp black pepper
    also needed
    1 28oz can of tomatoes
    5C water
    meat if desired

    Soak beans overnight and rinse. Combine beans, water, tomatoes, meat, and seasoning packet. Bring to boil, cover and reduce heat. Simmer 2 hours until beans are tender. I've cooked this over a fire while camping and it takes closer to 4 hours to get the consistency we like for soup (more like a stew with some beans smashed)
     
  15. RunningScared

    RunningScared Seeker Seeker

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    Thanks mnmom,

    Awesome recipes, much appreciated!
     

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