1. Stocks try to regain their footing, metals up
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Good Weds Morning! Gold is up 5.5 to 1252, while Silver is up 16 to 16.75. Crude is down 16 to 4408. The USD is down .09 to 9600
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Week of 6/24/2017 Closing prices & Chg Over Last Wk---- Gold $1256.40 Silver $16.64 Oil $43.01 USD $96.94
  4. "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"
    Dismiss Notice

Dr Bones & Nurse Amy: The Survival Medicine Hour Of Doom & Bloom

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by searcher, Mar 16, 2014.



  1. michael59

    michael59 heads up-butts down Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    5,572
    Likes Received:
    2,327
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    20 years logging
    Location:
    on the low side of corporate Oregon
    Guardia. Or as it is known to me Beaver Fever.
    This is one nasty parasite and the part about "hearty" is so true. Picked up my little friends in Tahoe national forest while pumping creek water 100 feet to a water barrel then pumping from barrel to trailer.

    Different forest needed the water barrel again but forgot about them critters. Was heading home, damm near wrecked the truck getting stopped held on to bumper and cut loose-both ends. It was then I remembered, sure screwed up my weekend.
     
    searcher likes this.
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Storing Medications
    November 9, 2016


    [​IMG]
    Storing Medications

    Being prepared for disasters means storing food, but it also means putting together a stockpile of medical supplies. While bandages and instruments may keep acceptably in a variety of environments, medications are another story.

    How medicines are stored can affect their potency over time. To maintain the effectiveness of the drugs, there are several factors that deserve your attention:

    Heat: Most medications are meant to be stored at room temperature. Insulin and some antibiotic elixirs are an exception, and should be stored in the refrigerator. A good rule of thumb is that, unless the bottle contains labeling that says otherwise, it’s unnecessary (and in many cases, harmful) to freeze or otherwise diverge from the advice given by the manufacturer.

    Excessive heat is another factor in losing drug potency. Given the choice, somewhat cooler is probably better than hotter. It’s thought that drug effectiveness fades twice as quickly if stored at 90 degrees Fahrenheit than if stored at 50 degrees.

    Moisture: Most folks store medications in the bathroom medicine cabinet, but you might be surprised to know that the moisture from showers and baths can degrade the drug significantly. Instead, consider a high shelf in a closet or a dedicated storage box.

    Light: Much like excessive exposure to the sun could damage skin, light sometimes could have an ill effect on certain drugs. These meds are commonly stored in brownish-colored bottles. Keep all medicines in their original containers. It might be a good idea, however, to remove the cotton ball commonly placed with the drug as it could pull moisture into the container.

    Many times, it might be hard to tell if a drug has been affected negatively, but some others are pretty obvious. Aspirin pills, for example, can develop a vinegar-like smell (even before the expiration date). Besides smell, a change in color or consistency may signal that a medication has degraded. If pills or capsules are harder or softer than normal or stick together, be wary.

    Some people get their meds through the mail. If so, choose overnight shipping whenever possible to avoid prolonged travel time. ABC news reported recently that a 1995 FDA study found that a standard black mailbox can reach 136 degrees in the summer heat. Excessive time in the hot sun or extreme cold for a long period of time causes drug deterioration. A better alternative may be to send them to where you can take possession personally and immediately. For many, this might be their workplace as opposed to their home.

    One of the questions I’m often asked is whether drugs will benefit from vacuum sealing. Although you’ll find opinions everywhere, there doesn’t seem to be any hard data on the issue. I would expect that more drugs would be vacuum packed by the manufacturer if it was that important to maintain potency. Having said that, pharmaceutical companies want you to discard older meds so they might not be motivated to do so.

    Vacuum packing would affect moisture but wouldn’t affect important preservation aspects like temperature or light. As meds do best in their original containers, it seems that, with the possible exception of powder packets, it wouldn’t be an essential storage method.

    So, consider storing all meds in cool, dark, dry conditions. It’s especially important to be sure that all medications are kept out of the reach of children. Childproof lids are meant to help you achieve this goal, but consider a storage box with a lock as well.

    The wise family will keep a good medical kit and a supply of over-the-counter and needed prescription medicines stored safely in their home. In a disaster, attention to proper storage methods might just save a life.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/storing-medications/
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Storing Meds, Respiratory Infection, Pt. 1
    November 11, 2016


    [​IMG]
    How to store meds

    The Survival Medicine Hour (November 11, 2016) exposes the issues we all face when looking at an uncertain future. If you prepare for long-term survival due to man-made or natural disasters, one looming problem is how to keep your much needed medications in the best condition possible. Nurse Amy. aka Amy Alton, ARNP and Dr. Bones, aka Joe Alton, MD cover some techniques and methods to help you solve this medication storage problem.

    Part 1 of respiratory infections is also covered in this episode, plus a discussion of the reappearance of the respiratory virus that originates in the intestine, Enterovirus D68.

    [​IMG]
    Medic Memorial

    On this Veteran’s day, Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy want to say thanks to all of our military staff new and old; we greatly appreciate your service to our country!

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/11/11/survival-medicine-hour-storing-medications-longterm-respiratory-infections-pt1

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/surviv...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Post-Trump Fever, Hypothyroidism, Prepping over 60 and More!
    ThePatriotNurse



    Published on Nov 15, 2016
    Last night he had our first Facebook live event where I answered a selection of view questions. What can we expect now that Trump is elected? How will healthcare change in the future? What do we do grid-down for hypothyroid issues? How should retirees prep and prepare for SHTF? These questions and more answered!
    Thyroid conversion chart: http://centraldrugsrx.com/pdf/Thyroid...
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Why The Disparity In Zika Affected Newborns?

    November 16, 2016


    [​IMG]
    Zika Virus under the microscope

    Zika virus hasn’t been on the front page much lately, but case numbers continue to rise in many countries. The World Health Organization stated recently that Zika infection has been documented in 75 countries throughout the globe.

    One of the many unusual aspects of Zika virus is that Brazil has, far and away, the most cases of babies born with birth defects. The most prominent of these is microcephaly, a condition where the brain fails to grow normally, causing a striking appearance where the head is much smaller than normal. Brazil has about 2000 cases of this abnormality, while Colombia has the second highest with only 57; the U.S. is third with 31 cases, including miscarriages. Within Brazil itself, the Northeastern part of the country has the highest number of infants affected by the debilitating effects of the virus.

    The American Society of Tropical Medicine, in its annual meeting in Atlanta, discussed this disparity, which has fueled a hotbed of speculation about the disparity.

    A Brazilian health official, Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos, suggests that vaccination against Yellow Fever, a virus in the same family as Zika, may be a factor. In Northeastern Brazil, few receive this vaccine compared to other parts of the country. It’s possible, he says, that the vaccine may give some cross-protection against Zika.

    A number of other theories exist, including effects on humans by certain pesticides used in the epidemic zone and, perhaps, contaminated lots of vaccines. However, no hard data has, as yet, implicated these and other possibilities as part of the equation.

    Another factor may be the growing tendency of women to terminate their pregnancies in the face of a diagnosis of Zika infection. Still another, according to Albert Ko, a Yale professor, relates to the difficulty tracking numbers of abortions for this reason and the fact that many never know they had the infection at all. Zika has no symptoms whatsoever in 80% of patients. The rest experience fever, joint aches, rashes, and eye redness.

    [​IMG]
    Microcephalic Infant

    What is obvious, however, is that there are wide variations in the percentage of Zika infections to birth defects. Puerto Rico recently reported its first case of microcephaly in a newborn, but has catalogued more than 30,000 people infected with Zika.

    Professor Ko says that a new large-scale study will follow thousands of pregnant women with Zika diagnoses. Genetics, prior viral infections, and even the mosquitoes that transmit the virus will be evaluated. It’s possible that, with this information, a more definitive picture of factor involved in Zika-related birth abnormalities will emerge.

    An issue not commonly considered is what effect Zika infection may have long-term in apparently unaffected infants. Will they reach normal milestones like walking and talking at the appropriate time? Down the road, will they perform adequately in school? It will take years to find out.

    Meanwhile, cases continue to accumulate, mostly travel related. A total of close to 36,000 cases have been documented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States and the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico. New cases are still being reported in Florida by the Department of Health, which says that 1,165 total cases (153 in pregnant women) exist in the state as of November 11, 2016. Of these, 225 were transmitted by local mosquitoes.

    Some good news: A vaccine called Zika Purified Inactivated Virus, or ZPIV, seems to be showing promise in research conducted, and human trials have begun at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. In addition, Dr. Michael Diamond of the University of Washington has identified an antibody that might protect the unborn fetus against the effects of the Zika virus on nervous tissue. Research is ongoing on these and other fronts in the battle against what has become a worldwide epidemic.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/why-th...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Heart Attacks and Cardiac Problems in Grid-Down Disaster
    ThePatriotNurse



    Published on Nov 18, 2016
    What should we do to prevent heart attacks now? What elevates a person's risk for heart disease and cardiac problems in general? What are the helpful herbs to keep on hand in case we run out of our conventional medications?
    Hawthorne Syrup: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00B7V8SAK?...
    Cayenne Tinture: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007DGNC4?...
    Herbal Home Health Book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1879436272?...
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Sleep Deprivation
    November 20, 2016


    [​IMG]
    sleep deprivation

    In our roles as preparedness experts for disasters and epidemics, we’re often asked to come on various media outlets to give our opinion, mostly on medical issues. Occasionally, we get the interview request that seems to be a medical topic but has obvious political overtones. Just yesterday, a radio station asked me to comment, as a doctor, on whether Donald Trump’s 4-hour a night sleep habit impacts his ability to make rational and sound decisions.

    As for my opinion on this particular question, I’ll refer you to americansurvivalradio.com, but suffice it to say that he’s actually in pretty good company with regards to sleep habits. Five hours was reported as a good night’s sleep for Bill Clinton while president. Winston Churchill liked naps but slept little at night. Martha Stewart is just one of many business leaders that get less than the recommended 7-8 hours per night. There are, in fact, quite a few highly successful folks who seem to do just fine with little shut-eye.

    Sleep deprivation is a pretty serious issue: Some researchers believe that it can carry a mortality risk approaching that of cigarettes or heart disease. Indeed, sleep deprivation has been used as a torture method in interrogations. The CDC estimates that up to 50-70 million Americans suffer from some kind of sleep disorder. In the aftermath of a major disaster, you can imagine that issues with sleep deprivation will only increase.

    How does sleep deprivation decrease your chances of succeeding in times of trouble? Not getting enough sleep can significantly impair your brain’s function. The parts of the brain involved in alertness and attention (the thalamus) and the area that controls many higher-level thought processes (the prefrontal cortex) are especially vulnerable. If the brain doesn’t get enough rest, you may become incapable of putting events into the proper perspective and taking appropriate action, a pretty big issue whether you’re president of the United States or the survivor of a major disaster.

    Scientific studies bear this out. Indeed, The British Medical Journal equates the effects of 17-21 hours without sleep as the equivalent, in terms of affecting behavior, of having a blood alcohol level close to the legal limit of intoxication. A number of articles that evaluated the performance of medical residents show that those getting less than 4 hours of sleep made more medical errors that residents who slept 7-8 hours a night.

    What about the elderly? Don’t older people naturally sleep less hours and less deeply? Studies show that that the elderly do get less sleep, but it’s not necessarily because they need less. Sleep could be affected for all sorts of reasons: sleep apnea, arthritis pain, heart issues, etc. Those in their later years also might develop something called “advanced sleep-phase syndrome”. These folks’ bodies want to go to sleep earlier and wake up earlier but their minds (and HBO, I expect) keep them from getting to sleep at a reasonable hour. Result: Sleep Deprivation.

    [​IMG]

    In addition to what’s happening in your brain, the failure to get 7-8 hours of sleep every night causes a whole set of symptoms, none of which are particularly good for a survivalist. Here are just some:
    • Irritability
    • Depression
    • Tremors
    • Bloodshot, puffy eyes
    • Headaches
    • Confusion
    • Memory loss
    • Muscle aches
    • Hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms
    • Ill effects on control of diabetes and high blood pressure
    • Blackouts lasting up to 30 seconds (also called “microsleeps”)
    There are a number of people that seem to function just fine with less than the average number of sleep hours. No one is quite sure why this is so, but it appears to involve about 5% of the population and may be related to genetics. For the rest, it rapidly becomes clear that they need more sleep.

    There are things that you can do to get a few more hours of shut-eye each night. The best start is to consider a concept we’ll call “sleep hygiene”. Sleep hygiene involves adjusting your behavior to maximize the amount of restful sleep you get. Consider:
    • Sticking to a standard bedtime and wakeup time
    • Making your nighttime environment as comfortable as possible
    • Avoiding Nicotine, Caffeine, and Alcohol before going to bed.
    • Staying awake from heavy foods for at least 2 hours before going to sleep
    • Exercising regularly, but not right before going to bed
    • Eliminating as much light as possible in the room at bedtime
    • Keeping your mind clear of stressful issues at bedtime
    After a disaster, many of the above strategies are difficult to implement. Of course, there are drugs like Ambien and Halcion that you can use, but a better alternative to start with might be some form of natural sleep aid. Some of the common alternative remedies for sleeplessness include the following teas:
    • Chamomile
    • Kava Root
    • Lavender
    • Valerian Root
    • Catnip
    Good nutrition is important for general health, but some foods are also thought to be helpful in promoting a good night’s sleep. They contain sleep-inducing or muscle-relaxing substances like melatonin, magnesium, or tryptophan. Some examples:
    • Oatmeal – melatonin
    • Milk – tryptophan
    • Almonds – tryptophan and magnesium
    • Bananas – melatonin and magnesium
    • Whole wheat Bread – helps release tryptophan
    Yoga, massage, meditation, sound machines, and even acupuncture might also be effective ways of dealing with sleep deprivation.

    Staying healthy in normal times or in the aftermath of disaster involves, not only maintaining good physical hygiene, but maintaining good sleep hygiene as well. To be at 100% efficiency, get some rest!

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/sleep-...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Dehydration Will Kill Thousands In A Disaster - Recognize The Symptoms To Avoid It!
    FullSpectrumSurvival



    Published on Nov 25, 2016
    Dehydration Kills During A Disaster.

    Recognizing the signs and symptoms of dehydration and finding water immediate following an emergency will save your life or the lives of your group members.

    A special thanks to our Patreon members for helping make this video possible.
    https://www.patreon.com/fullspectrums...
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Respiratory Infections, pt. 3, Foot Care, More

    November 26, 2016


    [​IMG]
    Respiratory Infections

    The Survival Medicine Hour, November 25, 2016, with Joe Alton, MD aka Dr. Bones, and Amy Alton, ARNP aka Nurse Amy explore various respiratory infections and their symptoms. We classify respiratory infections as upper and lower. Upper respiratory infections invlove the troat, nasal passages, sinuses and larynx. Lower respiratory infections invlove the trachea (wind-pipe), bronchi and lungs.

    Discover the common treatments and medications commonly used to treat these infections, and some special tips to help prevent them. What do you do with your toothbrush after you recover from a respiratory infection? Are you still using anti-bacterial soap to wash your hands? Find out what you should be doing to stay healthy and why.

    [​IMG]
    Pick the right shoes!

    Christmas holidays are the time for shopping and lots of walking. Wear the wrong shoes and you may be in a world of hurt. Nurse Amy shares some good advice on what kind of shoes to wear on long walks and how to pick the right shoes for your feet.

    To Listen in, Click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/11/25/survival-medicine-respiratory-infections-pt3-foot-care-happy-thanksgiving

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-respiratory-infections-pt-3-foot-care-more/
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Wildfire Preparedness and Our Gatlinburg Home

    December 1, 2016


    [​IMG]
    The view from my home as I’d like to remember it

    It’s been a very busy year for firefighters, with heat waves, drought, and human malice or carelessness causing large areas to burn from Canada to California. You may have heard me say that you probably won’t be affected by a disaster today, tomorrow, or next week. Over a lifetime, however, the chances aren’t quite as small. Add in your children’s lifetimes, and their children’s, and the odds are greater still. I’ve personally been through hurricanes, tornadoes, civil unrest, and the Mariel Boatlift unscathed other than for some missing roof tiles and a conversion to positive for tuberculosis (thanks, Fidel). We were even stranded in Europe due to a volcanic eruption in Iceland.

    And now wildfire. A particularly intense one recently struck a place I know and love: Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Home to the entrance of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, I’ve had a vacation home there for 20 years and spend Spring and Fall there. I love hiking in the backcountry, and if I cannot say that I’ve walked the entire length of the Appalachian Trail, I can say I’ve walked its entire width.

    With multiple fires spreading through the popular resort town, the mountain that my house is situated on lit up like a match. In the dry, windy conditions, hundreds of homes were burnt to the ground. As of this writing, I have not yet heard of the fate of the home in which I’ve accumulated 20 years of memories. The likelihood is that it no longer exists. Much more importantly, homes of many permanent residents have been destroyed, leaving them homeless; the businesses that employed those people were incinerated.

    Putting my feelings aside for a moment, let’s talk about what you can do in the face of an irresistible force like a wildfire. How can you protect your property (and yourself) from being devastated by fire? Two main principles for property defense are 1) vegetation management and 2) creating a “defensible space”. The main strategy for personal defense is “Get Out Of Dodge”.

    An important factor in wildfire preparedness is what we call “vegetation management”. With vegetation management, the key is to direct fires away from your house. There are several ways to accomplish this, all of which require vigilance and regular maintenance.

    You’ll want to clean up dead wood and leaf piles lying within 30 feet of your building structure. Pay special attention to clearing off the roof and gutters. Although you may have spent time and money putting lush landscaping around your home, you may have to choose between attractive, yet flammable plants and fire protection.

    You’ll want to thin out those thick canopied trees near your house, making sure that no two canopies touch each other. Any trees within 50 feet on flatland, or 200 feet if downhill from your retreat need to be thinned, so that you’re pruning branches off below 10-12 feet high, and separating them by 10-20 feet. No tree should overhang the roof. Also, eliminate all shrubs at the base of the trunks.

    Lawns and gardens should be well-hydrated; collect lawn cuttings and other debris that could be used as fuel by the fire. If water is limited, keep dry lawns cut back as much as possible (or remove them).

    [​IMG]

    From a wildfire perspective, a defensible space is an area around a structure where wood and vegetation are treated, cleared, or reduced to slow the spread of flames towards a structure. Having a defensible space will also provide room to work for those fighting the fire.

    The amount of defensible space you’ll need depends on whether you’re on flat land or on a steep slope. Flatland fires spread more slowly than a fire on a slope (hot air and flames rise). A fire on a steep slope with wind blowing uphill spreads fast and produces “spot fires”. These are small fires that ignite vegetation ahead of the main burn, due to small bits of burning debris in the air.

    Woodpiles and other flammables should be located at least 20-30 feet away from structures. Gardening tools should be kept in sheds, and those sheds should be at a distance from the home. Concrete walkways and perimeter walls may serve to impede the progress of the fire.

    Attic and other vents should be covered with screening to prevent small embers from entering the structure. Additional strategies for the home can be found at firewise.org.

    Of course, once you have created a defensible space, the natural inclination is to want to, well, defend it. Unfortunately, you have to remember that you’ll be in the middle of a lot of heat and smoke.

    The safest recommendation, therefore, would be to get out of Dodge if there’s a safe way to leave. It’s a personal decision but realize that your family’s lives may depend on it. If you’re leaving, have a bag already packed with food, water, extra clothes, batteries, flashlights, and more. Don’t forget to bring your cell phone, any important papers you might need, and some cash.

    As an added precaution, make sure you shut off any air conditioning system that draws air into the house from outside. Turn off all your appliances, close all your windows and lock all your doors. Like any other emergency, you should have some form of communication system established with your loved ones in case you’re not together.

    Medical kits should contain masks, eye and hand protection, burn ointment (aloe vera is a natural alternative) and non-stick dressings. Specialized burn dressings are available that incorporate both. Gauze rolls and medical tape can be used for additional coverage. Round out your kit with scissors, cold packs, and some eyewash (smoke is a major irritant to the eyes).

    If your routes of escape are blocked, make sure you’re dressed in long pants, sleeves, and heavy boots. A wool blanket is very helpful as an additional outside layer because wool is relatively fire-resistant. Some people think it’s a good idea to wet the blanket first: Don’t. Wet materials transfer heat much faster than dry materials and will cause more severe burns.

    If you’re inside a building, stay on the side farthest from the fire and with the least number of windows (windows transfer heat to the inside). Stay there unless you have to leave due to smoke or the building catching fire. If that’s the case and you have to leave, wrap yourself in the blanket, leaving only your eyes uncovered.

    If you’re having trouble breathing because of the smoke, stay low, and crawl out of the building. There’s less smoke and heat the lower you go. Keep your face down towards the floor. This will help protect your airway, which is very important. You can recover from burns on your skin, but not from major burns in your lungs.

    As of this writing, I’m still waiting for public access to my part of the mountain in Gatlinburg to be reinstated. If my home survived, it could have been due to the principles I’ve followed above, but it could also be just the wind direction or some timely rain. I’d like to believe it’s the former, but, heck, I’ll take the latter.

    Joe Alton, MD

    Please take a moment to include firefighters, medical personnel, and the citizens of Gatlinburg in your prayers. Also, a donation to the American Red Cross can be sent to First Tennessee Bank to aid fire relief efforts. The Johnson City Press reports that the First Tennessee Foundation will match donations up to $50,000. Send a check for any amount payable to the American Red Cross to:

    First Tennessee Bank

    P.O. Box 8037

    Gray, TN 37615

    attn: Ms. Teresa Fry

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/wildfi...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Gatlinburg Fires, Stress, More

    December 3, 2016


    [​IMG]

    On this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, your hosts, Joe Alton, MD aka Dr. Bones and Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Nurse Amy discuss the devastating wildfires that have damaged or destroyed more than 400 structures and taken the lives of at least 13 innocent people, with more than 80 injured seeking help at local hospitals. The severity of the entire disaster is still unknown right now, and we will give you an update on the status of our own house in Gatlinburg. We live in South Florida so it has been a maddening few days to find out the results of the fires that spread up Chalet Village and Ski Mountain areas. Please donate to Red Cross to help fund those who need it so desperately and have lost their primary residence. There are so many without so much. Our prayers are with those who need it right now.

    Christmas is almost upon us and the pressure to shop is causing some stress in shoppers. Dr. Alton discusses ways to decrease your stress levels and still have a fun-filled time during the holiday season (one tip: don’t be afraid to ask what they want!). Nurse Amy shares what she wishes for Christmas and what we all really want inside (hint: love, family and kindness). Relax and enjoy your Christmas with friends and family, we are all lucky to be on this beautiful earth together.

    Listen in by clicking below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/12/02/survival-medicine-hour-gatlinburg-fires-and-safety-tips-christmas-stress-more

    Please follow us on social media:

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/doomandbloom/
    YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/drbonespodcast
    Twitter: @preppershow
    Nurse Amy’s Store

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-gatlinburg-fires-stress-more/
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    When to Close a Wound

    December 6, 2016


    [​IMG]

    There are many injuries that a medic will face in a survival scenario, and a common and potentially life-threatening one occurs whenever the skin is broken. Your skin is your body’s armor; when it is breached, infectious organisms enter a highway which can transport them to just about any part of the body. Therefore, it makes common sense that you’d want to close that breach to speed healing and lock out infection. Indeed, that’s exactly what happens thousands of times daily in emergency rooms in normal times.

    The off-grid medic has a dilemma, however: Most wounds in survival will be dirty, and providing a sterile environment for a surgical procedure is a difficult challenge. You could make the work area as clean as possible, but sterile? Not likely. As such, you should wisely choose what wounds should be closed and what wounds should be left open.

    Many medics can’t imagine not closing a tear or cut in the skin (called a “laceration”), but it’s a reasonable way to deal with contaminated wounds in situations where you can’t assure a sterile, or even clean, field on which to work. Lacerations that are kept open must be dressed and cleaned regularly until they’re fully healed.

    Open wounds heal through a process called “granulation”, where new tissue forms at the base and sides until the defect in the skin is fully healed. Essentially, “from the bottom up”. This tissue is somewhat granular in appearance, hence the name.

    [​IMG]
    To Close or Not to Close?

    To paraphrase Hamlet, “To close or not to close? That is the question!” To answer this questions, we must examine what our goals are in closing a wound. Among other reasons, you close wounds to:
    • Repair the defect in the body’s armor, thus preventing infection in a clean wound.
    • Accelerate the healing process. Wound edges that are touching heal faster than those that aren’t.
    • Decrease scarring. Scarring is less of an issue in survival, unless the scar would, say, limit the range of motion of a joint in extremity.
    A note about bleeding: Although closing a wound may apply pressure to bleeding areas, it is not a substitute for hemorrhage control, also known as “hemostasis” before closure. Consider the application of direct pressure first on the bleeding area, a method that succeeds in many cases. Also, for major blood loss, have tourniquets, hemostatic agents like Celox or Quikclot, and pressure dressings as part of your medical storage.

    So what factors come into play when deciding to close a wound or to keep it open? Consider keeping the wound open in these circumstances:

    The wound is dirty. Are the circumstances suspicious for contamination? In survival scenarios, the answer is often yes. In austere environments, even WHO (the World Health Organization) agrees that the safest course of action is to keep it open.

    [​IMG]
    Candidate for closure IF clean

    Here are some circumstances where wounds should be kept open:
    • The wound is infected. Infected wounds have a certain appearance: They are red, swollen (sometimes appearing “shiny”), warm to the touch, and may drain pus.
    • The wound is colonized (infected but not yet showing signs). Even the air has bacteria; you can expect a wound to be colonized within 6-8 hours or so.
    • There is dead tissue in the wound. This tissue won’t bleed when it is cut and often appears discolored or black. No closure should be performed without removing dead tissue first (a procedure known as “debridement”).
    • Puncture wounds, especially from mammalian (including human) bites have lots of bacteria and shouldn’t be closed. Interestingly, snake bites become infected less often than, say, cat or dog bites, but don’t close them either.
    • The wound edges are so far apart that closing them would cause undue pressure. This occurs with injuries like “avulsions”, where entire areas of tissue are missing.
    [​IMG]
    wound infection

    Here are situations where you should consider closing the wound:
    • You’re certain the wound is clean. This usually requires witnessing the injury as it happens.
    • The wound has been open less than 6-8 hours.
    • The laceration is long or deep enough to penetrate the entire thickness of the skin. A deep wound would allow you to see underlying tissue such as subcutaneous fat.
    • The wound is located over a joint. A moving part, such as the knee, will constantly stress a wound and prevent it from closing in by itself.
    • The wound gapes open loosely, suggesting that it can be closed without undue pressure on the skin (and won’t close at all without your intervention).
    In future articles, we’ll explore wound closure materials, techniques, and theory.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/when-to-close-a-wound/
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Oakland Warehouse Fire: Surviving in a Crowd

    December 7, 2016


    [​IMG]

    The fire in an Oakland warehouse that was a refuge for artists and a venue for dance parties has now claimed 36 lives with several persons still missing. In the past, I’ve written about safety in wildfires and also in homes over the years; this time, I’ll explore the issue relating to fires in public venues like concert halls.

    Concerts and theatres have long been areas at risk for fire. In 1903, Chicago’s Iroquois theatre was the site of an inferno which caused 600 deaths. In 1942, the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in Boston claimed 492 lives. In 2003, 100 perished in the Station nightclub in Warwick, R.I. during a concert by the rock band Great White.

    Most public venues have important fire protection strategies such as sprinkler systems, fire exits, and fire extinguishers. Indeed, fire codes have evolved to make most of these places quite safe.

    The phenomenon of “flash concerts”, however, places crowds of people in locations without these safeguards. This puts the onus on concert-goers to become more situationally aware, something few patrons of these events even think about.

    What is situational awareness? Situation awareness involves understanding what’s going on in your immediate vicinity that might be hazardous to your health. I don’t mean second-hand smoke here; I’m talking about knowing what dangers may exist that you can avoid or abolish with your actions. Especially important for soldiers in a combat zone, it’s now become just as important for the average citizen in any large crowd.

    The situationally aware person is in a constant state of what I call “Yellow Alert”, a relaxed awareness of their surroundings. At Yellow Alert, a concert-goer has a much better chance to identify threats than someone with their nose buried in their smart phone. Although many might enjoy the use of recreational drugs, like marijuana or ecstasy, it’s much safer to have your wits about you at these events. Mentally marking nearby exits, fire extinguishers, and alarms when you first arrive will allow you to have a plan of action if the worst happens.

    A good spot at a concert is front and center, but you might be safer at the fringe of the crowd. In the center, your choice of escape route is governed by the crowd rather than good judgment.

    Who’s at fault? Although Derick Almena, the manager of the Oakland warehouse, was understandably distraught during an interview with the TODAY show, he must bear responsibility for the conflagration, as must the owner, Chor N. Ng (whose daughter claims, says the LA Times, that he didn’t know people lived in the building). Here are some reasons why:

    · The 10,000 foot warehouse, also known as the “Ghost Ship”, had no sprinkler system nor fire alarms. No word on the number of fire extinguishers, if any.

    · Piles of discarded furniture dotted the interior.

    · Staircases were partially supported by wooden pallets.

    · Construction and electrical work was performed on an impromptu basis, often without permits or proper inspections.

    · A number of recreational vehicles, presumably with gas in the tanks, were in the warehouse.

    Oakland city officials, however, are also culpable. The LA Times reports that, since 2014, several complaints were lodged for building and fire code violations without apparent action by the city after investigation. The Fire Marshall blames severe understaffing for the shortcomings, the responsibility for which must also be borne by Oakland’s city government. Zac Unger, an official with the firefighter’s union, was quoted as saying “Had a fire inspector walked into that building and seen the conditions in there, they would have shut the place down.”

    Unfortunately, the responsibility for your safety may ultimately lie with the average citizen. Incorporate situational awareness into your mindset when in any public venue, and you’ll stand the best chance to avoid and escape becoming a casualty of a fire or any other calamity.

    For more information on becoming situationally aware and how to deal with building fires, read my articles “How a Fighter Pilot’s Strategy Could Save Your Life: The OODA Loop” and “Surviving a House Fire”.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/oaklan...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Zika Defects More Common Than Previously Thought

    December 16, 2016


    [​IMG]
    microcephalic infant


    A recent U.S. study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found that 6% of 400 babies infected with Zika virus born here had one or more related birth defects. The study pales in comparison, however, to a Brazilian study of 125 women just reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. In that study, 46% of babies had abnormalities or did not survive the pregnancy. Previous studies had shown a risk of defects of 1 to 13 per cent.

    Troubling evidence has now emerged that suggests that babies may still develop issues even as they approach their first birthday. Previously, it was thought that all damage occurred while still in the womb. Now scientists are asserting that the virus may continue to destroy nervous tissue for a time after birth.

    The timing of the infection seemed to have an impact, with 11% of U.S. pregnancies diagnosed with Zika in the first trimester yielding babies with birth defects, less in mid- or late-pregnancy. Although Zika virus lasts only a short time in the blood, it appears to possibly last for months in brain tissue. The overall incidence of 6% in the U.S. was the same for women who experienced symptoms of Zika illness and those who were asymptomatic.

    Most cases in the continental United States were diagnosed in women who had traveled to the epidemic zone, although an epidemic of more than 30,000 locally transmitted cases was seen in Puerto Rico and a local outbreak of more than 200 cases was noted in South Florida. More recently, a case of local transmission was reported in the Brownsville area of Texas.

    Zika virus is known to cause increased numbers of newborns with microcephaly, an abnormality of growth in the brain and fetal head normally seen in less than 1% of all births. In the lab, Zika has been shown to kill brain cells. Other defects in sight, hearing, joints, and elsewhere have also been detected, according to Margaret Honein, lead author of the U.S. study and head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.

    Another troubling aspect is that the Zika virus is completely asymptomatic in 80% of those infected. This means that the actual number of cases may be five times the recorded numbers. Additionally, it is unknown what developmental milestones may be delayed over the first few years of life, and whether school performance may be affected.

    [​IMG]

    The best way to prevent Zika virus is still to prevent mosquito bites by wearing appropriate clothing and using repellent when in at-risk areas (or avoid travel there altogether), Pregnancies should be delayed for 8 weeks in women who have had the virus or traveled to the epidemic zone. Men shouldn’t attempt to impregnate their partner for at least 6 months.


    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/zika-defects-more-common/
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The “Stomach Flu” Virus

    December 16, 2016

    [​IMG]
    Oysters may harbor norovirus

    We often write about disaster situations that we personally experience. We’ve been through hurricanes, tornadoes, and epidemics, just to mention a few. Recently, our home in Gatlinburg, Tennessee was threatened by the wildfires there, which killed 14 and wiped out more than 1700 buildings and over 100 on the mountain where the house is located.

    We’ve written about a number of medical issues that we’ve experienced as well. For example, I converted to positive for Tuberculosis during my work with Cuban refugees during the 1980 Mariel boatlift. I still carry a small walled-off nodule on X-ray, even after months of multi-drug therapy.

    On a recent trip to New York City to visit our daughter, we both experienced a medical issue so common that it surprised us that we haven’t yet written about it: acute gastroenteritis, or the “Stomach Flu”. When this infection hits you, it makes even the healthiest individual miserable. Nurse Amy required an urgent care visit, no small issue in a strange and heavily-populated city. She was just one of nearly 2 million outpatient visits caused by norovirus in the U.S. every year.

    Norovirus is the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans. It was originally called “Norwalk Virus”, after the area where it was first identified in the 1960s. Since then, it’s been blamed for 50% of all gastroenteritis in the U.S. Worldwide, there are more than 200 million cases of norovirus infection a year. It affects people of all ages, but it’s particularly dangerous in the elderly, the very young, and those with weakened immune systems. Winter is the most common time for outbreaks.

    Norovirus is very contagious (just 5-20 viral particles can cause illness) and is easily transmitted through contaminated food or water, close personal contact, and by air droplets from vomit, contaminated food counters, and even toilet flushes. Infection can be passed from person to person for a time even after apparent recovery.

    Here’s how contagious the norovirus is: In one outbreak reported in 1998, 126 people were dining at a restaurant when one person vomited onto the floor. Despite a rapid cleanup, 52 fell ill within three days. More than 90% of the people who later dined at the same table reported symptoms. More than 70% of the diners at a nearby table got sick; at a table on the other side of the restaurant, the rate was still 25%.

    Norovirus is a hardy microbe, and is known to survive for long periods outside a human host. It can live for weeks on countertops and up to twelve days on clothes. It can survive for months in still water. Disinfectants containing chlorine, however, like bleach will quickly eliminate it, as will sufficient heat.

    The symptoms of the stomach flu include nausea and vomiting, watery diarrhea, and (sometimes severe) abdominal pain, usually within 12 to 48 hours of exposure. Along with this, muscle aches, headache, and fever may be seen. Luckily, life-threatening illness is rare, with dehydration being the main danger in those infected with the virus.

    Unlike some viruses, immunity to norovirus is only temporary, maybe six months, after recovery.

    Outbreaks of norovirus infection often occur in closed spaces such as cruise ships, nursing homes, schools, camps, and prisons. Shellfish, such as oysters, and salad ingredients are the foods most often implicated in norovirus outbreaks. In our case, it might have been a kiosk advertising “the World’s Best Hot Dogs”.

    [​IMG]

    As is the case with most viruses, there is no cure for norovirus infection. Antibiotics will not be effective, as they are meant to kill bacteria, not viruses. Treatment involves staying well-hydrated. Dehydration can be noted by these symptoms:

    • · Dry mouth
    • · Decrease in quantity or dark color of urine
    • · Dizziness when standing up
    • · Decreased elasticity of skin (it “tents” when pulled)
    • · No tears when crying or unusual irritability in infants
    Using antidiarrheal meds like loperamide (Imodium) and anti-vomiting drugs like Ondansetron (Zofran) may also help.

    A cure may not be available but prevention is another issue. To decrease the chance of norovirus infection:

    · Wash your hands frequently with soap and water (norovirus is relatively resistant to alcohol), especially after using the restroom or handling food. Be especially sure to do this for 2 weeks after becoming infected (yes, you can be contagious for that long).

    · Wash food before cooking; cook shellfish thoroughly

    · Frequently disinfect contaminated surfaces with a bleach solution (the EPA recommends 5-25 drops of bleach per gallon)

    · Keep sick individuals away from food preparation areas

    · Avoid close contact with others when you are sick, and don’t share utensils or other items

    · Wear disposable gloves while handling soiled items
    · Immediately remove and wash clothes that may be contaminated with vomit or feces. Machine dry if possible.


    It may be difficult to completely eliminate the risk of norovirus infection, but careful attention to hand and food hygiene will go a long way towards avoiding the stomach flu.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/the-stomach-flu-virus/
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Norovirus, Cold Myths, Man Flu?

    December 17, 2016


    [​IMG]
    Norovirus: The Stomach Flu

    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, a bout of acute gastroenteritis, also called “stomach flu” caused by Norovirus sends Nurse Amy to urgent care. Find out about the microbe that sends two million victims to their doctors every year in the U.S., how to prevent it and some other important advice to stay healthy this winter.

    [​IMG]

    Also, top ten myths people believe will prevent a cold. We know there’s one or two in there you think are true! Also, why do men seem to have worse symptoms than women when they get the flu or other viruses? Is there such a thing as the Man Flu?

    All this and more on the latest episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton, ARNP. To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/12/16/survival-medicine-hour-norovirus-cold-myths-man-flu

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad, and Merry Christmas!

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-norovirus-cold-myths-man-flu/
     
  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Surviving Vehicular Terrorism

    December 19, 2016


    [​IMG]


    CNN reports that a man in Berlin used a truck to plow through a group of people at a Christmas market, killing 9 and injuring 50 more. The tractor trailer appeared to deliberately ram through several stalls at what is estimated to be 40 miles per hour; German authorities are treating the incident, at present, as a terror event.

    The attack appears to parallel the cargo truck killing of 86 people and the wounding of 434 others in Nice, France during a fireworks display on a national holiday. On a smaller scale, a Somali student at Ohio State University recently ran down a number of people before leaving his car and stabbing several others with a large knife. A pattern seems to be emerging where a vehicle is used to cause casualties in public spaces.

    This pattern is not occurring by accident. The English-language ISIS magazine “Rumiyah” has recently called for vehicle attacks on the West. An article that discussed which vehicles are best to do the most damage was titled “Just Terror Tactics”. Al-Qaeda has made calls for similar attacks, calling pickup trucks “the ultimate mowing machine”.

    The article was quoted in the Business Insider: “Though being an essential part of modern life, very few actually comprehend the deadly and destructive capability of the motor vehicle and its capacity of reaping large numbers of casualties if used in a premeditated manner…Vehicles are like knives, as they are extremely easy to acquire…”

    Ordinarily, terror attacks are associated with guns, but these items are difficult to come by in most countries. Bombs, another preferred terrorist weapon, require expertise to assemble safely. Owning or renting a vehicle, however, is much more common and requires little skill to operate. Trucks and cars can cause mass casualties if wielded as a weapon; obtaining one elicits no suspicion.

    Therefore, would-be terrorists now have a new blueprint for causing mayhem among an unsuspecting public. There are few who pay much attention to traffic unless they’re in a vehicle themselves or crossing the street. The speed at which a vehicle can accelerate and turn into a crowd leaves little time for reaction. Hence, the “success” rate of this type of terror event may surpass even a gunman’s ability to cause deaths and injuries.

    The increasing number of terror events around the world underlines the increasing need for situational awareness. Situational awareness is the mindset whereby threats are mentally noted and avoided or abolished. Originally a tool for the military in combat, it is now a strategy for the average citizen in these uncertain times.

    The situationally aware person is always at a state of “Yellow Alert” when in crowded public venues. By that, I mean a state of relaxed but vigilant observation of what is happening around him or her. When an action or behavior occurs that doesn’t match the surroundings and situation, it’s an anomaly.

    When a vehicle moves erratically or leaves the normal pattern of traffic, it’s an anomaly that requires rapid action. Mentally noting routes of escape whenever you’re in a crowd will give you the best chance of getting out of the way. Just as knowing the location of exits in a mall or theatre is good policy, a heightened awareness is now important at any outdoor event or popular public area near roadways.

    For vehicular terrorists, the target will be crowds of people near the street. Their objective is mass casualties, and those pedestrians nearest the curb will bear the brunt of the attack. Consider walking on the fringe of a crowd away from the road to give yourself the most options. In the center, the masses, not your own good judgment, will dictate your movement. Take a walk along Times Square and you’ll see what I mean.


    [​IMG]
    retractable bollards

    Municipalities can protect their citizens by constructing barriers known as “bollards” which would stop vehicles from entering pedestrian areas. These can be seen outside many government buildings and airport terminals. Expanding their use to areas that attract crowds would be an important consideration for the future.

    I’ll admit that the likelihood you’ll be in the path of a terrorist using a vehicle, or any other weapon, is very small. Panic isn’t the answer, but these are troubled times; the more situationally aware you are, the safer you’ll be.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/surviving-vehicular-terrorism/
     
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Holiday Blues, More
    December 25, 2016


    [​IMG]

    The Survival Medicine Hour, with Joe Alton, MD aka Dr. Bones, and Amy Alton, ARNP aka Nurse Amy, wish you and your family a wonderful Merry Christmas. May 2017 bring you a multitude of blessings and good health. About 16% of our population is alone and lonely during the Christmas holiday.

    This special episode will help you and others find ways to be a part of this joyous time of year. Helping others, being a listening ear, making home-made presents, visiting the less-fortunate or sick, or joining a helpful cause are just some of the advice to help you and those around you feel more Christmas spirit. Christmas is not about store-bought presents. Merry Christmas and a Happy and Healthy 2017 to you and yours.

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/12/23/survival-medicine-hour-lonely-christmas-survival-tips


    all the best,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/surviv...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Surviving A Hangover

    December 29, 2016


    [​IMG]

    In normal times or times of trouble, New Year’s Eve is a time where many break out the Smoky Mountain Moonshine and end up regretting it the next morning. For you teetotalers, a hangover is a group of symptoms that occur in many people after a night of drinking. Hangovers vary in appearance and severity, but one thing is sure: You’d rather not have one.

    A study in college students found that and 29% reported (not to their parents, though) losing school time for hangover recovery. Close to 10% of American workers report having gone to work with a hangover; Lost work days run in the millions.

    What Causes Hangovers?

    Despite thousands of years of people having hangovers from drinking too much alcohol, the process which causes the condition isn’t very well understood. Dehydration, sleep disturbances, lack of food intake, low blood sugar, the presence of certain by-products of alcohol in the body and other factors are likely involved.

    Substances known as “congeners” found in alcoholic beverages may play a role; one of these, methanol, is metabolized to toxic chemicals like formaldehyde and formic acid. Other congeners, like acetaldehyde, are much more toxic than the alcohol itself, acting like an “anti-antioxidant”.

    Symptoms of Hangovers

    Each person’s hangover is a little different, but you can expect to see some of the following symptoms:
    • Headache due to blood vessel expansion (called “vasodilation”)
    • Sensitivity to light and sound
    • Tremors (possibly due to low blood sugar, or “hypoglycemia”)
    • Dizziness
    • Malaise (general sensation of feeling ill)
    • Irritability, depression, and/or difficulty concentrating
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Stomach discomfort (alcohol increases stomach acid)
    • Fatigue
    • Weakness
    • Thirst
    • Loss of appetite
    • Rapid heartbeat
    Symptoms begin when the alcohol level has dropped down to zero, usually the morning after a bender. They can last several hours, or in the worst cases, a couple of days.

    Treating a Hangover

    [​IMG]

    Doctors actually don’t spend a lot of time researching hangover remedies, simply because they consider hangovers as effective deterrents to frequent alcohol abuse in many people. Although there is no certain cure for hangovers (other than time), there are a number of treatments; some of these have basis in scientific fact and some, well, not so much.

    Consider these options as you try to pick yourself off the floor:

    Drink some fluids. You’re dehydrated, and some water, Gatorade, or juice (without alcohol, please) will help you recover faster. Skip acidic juices like orange juice; they won’t help your upset stomach.

    Go back to bed. The more sleep you can get, the more you’ll sleep through some of the worst part of a hangover

    Take a headache medicine. Ibuprofen can help your headache, but it can irritate your stomach. Tylenol might be a better choice, but is associated with liver disease if you’re a heavy drinker.

    Eat something. You might be nauseous, but a little chicken broth and some crackers will help settle your stomach and give your blood sugar a boost. Some prefer dry toast with a little peanut butter. Pepto-Bismol (Bismuth Subsalicylate) isn’t a bad idea to deal with that stomach upset as well.

    Home Remedies for Hangovers

    The above measures are thought to be of likely medical benefit for hangovers, but there are a lot of home remedies that people swear by. Below are just a few.

    Ice: An icepack to your throbbing noggin might just be the thing to help that headache. A cold, moist washcloth will work just as well.

    Bananas. Bananas are a good source of potassium, something you might be low on after a night of drinking.

    Ginger: Ginger root is a time-honored natural remedy for nausea and vomiting, and many people feel seasick when they have a hangover. Ginger Ale is the easiest way to ingest some, but a ginger tea may be even better.

    Honey and Lemon: Ingredients of a hot toddy (hold the alcohol), mixing some honey and lemon will boost your blood sugar.

    Vitamin B: A 1973 study found that Vitamin B6, in very large doses, can improve a hangover. Later studies, however, found no such benefit and possible risks to the liver and pancreas. Vitamin B-complex, a combination of B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), folic acid, B6 and B12 has also been proposed as a cure. It isn’t, but a dose of a vitamin supplement probably won’t hurt you.

    Vitamin C: A popular ingredient and antioxidant in commercial “hangover supplements”, there’s little scientific data backing up any significant effect on a hangover. Like Vitamin B, however, there’s no reason to think it would hurt to take some Vitamin C.

    Coffee: People like to think that some coffee will help their hangover, and it may do something for your headache. But caffeine is dehydrating, something that’s isn’t helpful when you’re already low on fluids.

    Tomato Juice: While acidic and not so helpful for upset stomach, a non-alcoholic Bloody Mary is thought by some to metabolize alcohol from the body more quickly.

    Exercise: If you can’t even move after a night of drinking, how can you exercise? Some feel, however, that sweating out the toxins will help a hangover. If you do decide to exert yourself, hydrate well beforehand and keep it to low-impact activities or you might be worse off than before. How about trying a walk around the block first?

    Oxygen: Those with access to O2 canisters tout their benefits with regards to hangovers, but little evidence exists to support it.

    The Prairie Oyster: V8 juice with Worcestershire and Tabasco, a little salt, a little pepper and a raw egg stirred together makes a Prairie Oyster, long thought to be a cure for a hangover. Little hard data confirms this concoction works, however, and eating uncooked eggs carries a risk for certain infections. Cooked eggs, however, contain taurine and cysteine, two substances that might help detoxify you. A number of other esoteric elixirs combining several incongruent ingredients also exist, but none have been scientifically shown to work. They will likely help raise your blood glucose, but you’re probably better off with a sports drink to get sugar, electrolytes, and hydration.

    Hair of the Dog: Hair of the Dog is just another name for drinking more alcohol. It works because a hangover is essentially a form of alcohol withdrawal. Getting your drink on again, however, is the worst idea of all in the long run.

    PREVENTION

    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and that is the honest-to-God’s truth when it comes to hangovers. Make sure to:

    Eat before you drink: Drinking on an empty stomach equals big trouble. Beer has calories, but it’s not dinner. Having a full stomach before drinking may help you keep your blood alcohol level down.

    One alcoholic drink, one non-alcoholic: Matching one Old-Fashioned with one glass of water will help keep your alcohol intake down and decrease your chances of a hangover in the morning.

    Pick the right poison: If you’re not picky about your poison, try to stay away from dark liquors like, say, bourbon. These have more congeners and are more likely to cause hangovers than clear liquors like vodka. Clear liquors are less associated with severe hangovers.

    Be Bubble-Free: Alcohol in carbonated drinks, like Champagne, may be absorbed more quickly and lead to worse hangovers.

    Head it off at the pass: Take two aspirin with a full glass of water before going to bed. Fatty acids that reduce inflammation in aspirin can avoid a bad hangover.

    Abstain: Do I really have to say why? If you really don’t want a hangover, don’t drink. Be the designated driver.

    I’ll bet you have a tried and true method to deal with hangovers. If so, let us know on our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/doomandbloom/ or our Facebook Survival Medicine Group page.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/surviv...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Feminine Hygiene On The Homestead And When The SHTF - Natural Pads, Systems Of Use And More
    FullSpectrumSurvival



    Published on Dec 31, 2016
     
  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    WORLD WAR II BRITISH PSYCHIATRY IN ACTION PTSD SHELL SHOCK MOVIE 49544
    PeriscopeFilm



    Published on Jan 1, 2017
    “Psychiatry in Action” is a lengthy circa 1943 black-and-white film opening with a slow crawl explaining how in September 1939, Great Britain’s Ministry of Health organized its medical services to combat the threat of injury and death to its citizens at the start of World War II. From the smallest village to the largest towns, the narrator explains how medical professionals are geared to assist Brits with any healthcare issues including psychiatric. Anyone suffering from neurosis, we are told, must be integrated into society as quickly as possible. Beginning at mark 03:10 we’re told how neurotic or mildly psychotic patients — particularly those who suffer a breakdown as the result of combat — can easily be cured. Specialized treatments include modified insulin, narco analysis, group therapy or electric shock therapy (mark 05:30). in addition to general treatments.

    The film discusses the admission process, including investigation of a patient’s symptoms and developing a plan of treatment, as well as psychometric testing (discussed starting at mark 17:17) or physical treatments (mark 23:10). Some patients, we’re told beginning at mark 35:15, benefit from group therapy when patients have the same symptoms (such as “effort syndrome”). Doctors and nurses regularly meet to discuss patients progress, as is illustrated beginning at mark 39:25, and men confined to a hospital also are prescribed some physical activity (mark 41:25) included marching as they’re prepared for active duty. Educational lectures also are part of the healing process (mark 47:42) as is scheduled free time, as men are shown playing cards at mark 48:24. Beginning at mark 52:42, a physician explain how discharged patients are either returned to their unit for active duty, reassigned, or if there are no alternatives, discharged from the service and returned to civilian life where officials try to find them employment.

    We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

    This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
     
  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Is Broken-Heart Syndrome Real?

    January 1, 2017


    [​IMG]
    image by telegraph.co.uk

    The death of famous actress Debbie Reynolds one day after her famous actress daughter Carrie Fisher makes one wonder how the effect of grief can cause serious physical consequences.

    Carrie Fisher, 60, famous for her role as Princess Leia in the Star Wars movies, passed away shortly after suffering a massive heart attack and subsequent cardiac arrest on a plane. The day after she passed away, her mother, Debbie Reynolds of “Singing in the Rain” and many other movies was killed by a massive stroke at the age of 84.

    Debbie’s son, Todd Fisher, commented that “She wanted to be with Carrie”.

    From time to time, you’ll hear reports about a person who experienced the death of a loved one (usually a spouse) dying of “grief”. Is there, indeed, a “Broken-Heart Syndrome”?

    Yes, there is. It’s a well-known medical issue called stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy is more common in older women and not always fatal. The death of a loved one isn’t always the cause. It could be any other stressful event: Getting bad personal news, a major financial setback, or even having to speak publicly could precipitate symptoms.

    What happens physically in these circumstances? It’s not completely understood, but high levels of stress hormones called “catecholamines” like epinephrine (adrenaline) could possibly cause significant physical symptoms. One of these is an inability of the heart to effectively pump blood. If blood remains in one place for too long, it clots. The clot may travel to the brain, with a stroke as the end result.

    Although “Broken-Heart Syndrome” occurs most often in those with healthy hearts, those with coronary artery disease may be at special risk. High amounts of stress hormone might cause plaques that partially block a blood vessel to break free. Complete blockage of a coronary artery may occur, leading to a heart attack.

    Other factors in play include the increase in blood pressure that occurs in stressful situations. A very high blood pressure is a common cause of strokes, where a clot or hemorrhage in the brain stops blood flow to the organ. Heartrates also rise in the face of an unexpected event; abnormally fast rhythms may cause medical issues.

    Depression also has a role in “Broken-Heart Syndrome”. The grieving survivor might begin to neglect their own health, failing to take prescribed medications or not keeping up with food and fluid intake. Dehydration, loss of control of diabetes or hypertension, and other issues may arise. The shock of a loved one’s death might cause a person to not seek prompt, life-saving medical care.

    I, myself, was in this situation with my son, who was fading after 2 years of dialysis from severe type 1 Diabetes. I found myself less concerned with my own health and was beginning to feel the effects of situational depression. Luckily for both of us, he was able to receive a kidney and pancreas transplant at the last moment, and I was spared Debbie Reynold’s prospect of burying a child.

    Family members who have a death in the family (say, a parent) should watch for physical signs and symptoms in the surviving parent or other affected loved ones. These include chest pain, fast heart rates (also called tachycardia), depression, and lack of attention to hygiene and medical conditions. All are important signs that the grieving party needs extra help staying healthy and some emotional support.

    I can’t say if Debbie Reynolds had other medical problems that contributed to her death. At 84 years old, it might be just a coincidence that she passed away so soon after her daughter. But “Broken-Heart Syndrome” exists, and the importance of family and friends’ roles in providing vigilant support can’t be underestimated.

    Joe Alton, MD


    https://www.doomandbloom.net/is-bro...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  26. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Norovirus: The Stomach Flu Epidemic
    DrBones NurseAmy



    Published on Jan 12, 2017
    The stomach flu can be miserable! Symptoms include cramps, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea lasting many hours or days. What can you do to ease the suffering, and how do you prevent getting it in the first place. Hosted by Joe Alton, MD of https://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Choosing Sutures

    January 11, 2017


    [​IMG]

    As we go around the country teaching the art of suturing pig’s feet to aspiring porcine podiatrists, we are often asked about how to choose the appropriate suture needles and material for different types of injuries. There are a wide variety of choices and, today, we’ll discuss what is available and what is most effective for different types of wounds.

    First, let’s identify some of the qualities of the optimal suture. The suture should:

    · Be sterile

    · Be easily worked with

    · Be strong enough to hold wound edges together while they heal

    · Be unlikely to cause infection, tissue reaction or significant scar formation

    · Be reliable in its everyday use with every type of wound

    It is rare, if not impossible, to find a single suture type that meets all of the above criteria, but there are many that will serve if chosen properly.

    In the United States and many other countries, a standard classification of suture has been in place since the 1930s. This classification identified stitches by type of material and the size of the “thread”. Suture diameters most commonly used in humans (and pigs, I would think) is measured in zeroes, much like buckshot. 2-0 (00) suture, for example, is thicker than 5-0 (00000) suture. The more zeroes, the finer the “thread”. Finer sutures have less tissue reaction and heal faster, but are more difficult to handle for those without experience.

    In addition to size, sutures are classified as absorbable and non-absorbable. An absorbable suture is one that will break down spontaneously over time but not before the tissue has had sufficient time to heal. Absorbable sutures have the advantage of not requiring removal after healing has taken place. This type of suture is commonly used in deep layers, such as muscle, fat, organs, etc. A classic example of this is “catgut”, actually made from the intestines of sheep or cows.

    (Aside: Catgut was once also used in the manufacture of stringed musical instruments and tennis racquets.)

    Catgut is usually found in “plain” and “chromic” varieties. When dipped in a chromic acid salt solution, catgut lasts longer in the body while remaining absorbable.

    Although still popular, catgut has been replaced by synthetic absorbables for many applications. examples of synthetic absorbable suture include “Vicryl” (polyglycolic acid), “PDS” (polydiaxanone), and others. These tend to last longer than catgut sutures, but will eventually be absorbed by the body.

    [​IMG]
    Nylon suture package depicting size, needle shape, and length of “thread”

    Nonabsorbable sutures are those that retain their character for a very long time, and will stay in the body until removed. As such, normal immune response will cause the development of scar tissue, sometimes called “encapsulation”, around these sutures if used in internal body structures.

    Nonabsorbable sutures are best used in skin closures and situations that require prolonged tensile strength. They include monofilaments (such as “Nylon” and “Prolene”) and braided multifilaments (such as ”Surgical Silk”). Monofilaments like Nylon are useful because of less likelihood of harboring bacteria, whereas braided multifilaments have nooks and crannies for these organisms to hide. Monofilament also glide more easily through tissue. In trade, braided Silk is somewhat easier to handle than Nylon for many and often used for teaching purposes.

    I recommend Nylon in most survival situations, with 2-0 or 3-0 Nylon ideal for those new to the suturing skill. This size “thread” is easy to handle and useful for aspiring medics to learn surgical knot-tying.

    The size of the “thread” you’ll use depends on the area of the body being repaired. Slowly healing tissues such as skin and tendons require nonabsorbable sutures; wounds in rapidly healing areas such as the inside of the cheek and vagina (childbirth) are best repaired with absorbables.

    In survival settings, cosmetic results are less important, but surgeons generally use smaller sutures in delicate areas such as areas on the head and face. 5-0 or 6-0 Nylon would normally be the choice here, but require more skill in handling. Skin sutures should be placed, in my opinion, about 1/2 inch or so apart in most instances. This will allow drainage while keeping the wound together. Areas over joints or other moving parts should be closer together. In wounds not near joints, say, the forearm, the sutures may be further apart and could be interspersed with Steri-Strips or butterfly closures.

    [​IMG]
    typical suture needles (chromic catgut)

    The type of needle is also an important factor in choosing suture material. Needles that are less traumatic to sensitive tissues, like the lining of the bowel and other deep structures, are round on cross-section. These are known as “atraumatic” or “tapered”. Needles that are best on tough areas like skin are triangular in shape on cross-section and are referred to as “cutting” needles. Most suture needles that are useful for skin form a 3/8 circle; needles for deep work are often ½ circle in shape.

    Having said all of the above, the choice of suture needles and material will vary depending on the user. Each surgeon will have his or her preferences based on their experience.

    How long skin sutures remain in place before removal is dependent on the body part repaired. Face wound sutures are usually removed relatively soon (5 days) compared to, say, a forearm wound (7-10 days). Thicker skins, such as the sole of the foot should stay in somewhat longer. Sutures placed over the knee or other joints should remain in place longer, 2-3 weeks, in my opinion.

    Remember that the act of suturing is more traumatic than using butterfly closures, Steri-Strips, surgical glue, and others due to the fact that you are making more punctures in an area of skin already injured. Each extra “hole” you create could allow the entry of bacteria into the wound.

    One last relevant point: When you practice suturing on your pig’s foot, you are learning a skill, not a trade. The practice of medicine without a license is illegal and punishable by law; as long as modern medical care exists, seek it out.

    We’ll talk about staples, medical glues, and Steri-Strips/butterfly closures in future articles.

    To see me suture in real time, here’s my YouTube video:



    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/choosing-sutures/
     
  29. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Combat Stress Management on the Nuclear Battlefield | US Army Training Film | 1958
    The Best Film Archives



    Published on Jan 14, 2017
    ★ CHECK OUT OUR T-SHIRTS: https://bravestgeneration.com/collect...
    ✚ Watch our "Military Training Films" PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...
    ►Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheBestFilmArchives
    ►Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TheBestFilmA...
    ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BestFilmArch

    This film is a 1958 U.S. Army training film about the management of combat stress reactions on the battlefield in case of a nuclear attack.


    HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT

    Combat stress reaction is a term used within the military to describe acute behavioral disorganization seen by medical personnel as a direct result of the trauma of war. Also known as "combat fatigue" or "battle neurosis", it has some overlap with the diagnosis of acute stress reaction used in civilian psychiatry. It is historically linked to shell shock and can sometimes precurse post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Combat stress reaction is an acute reaction that includes a range of behaviors resulting from the stress of battle that decrease the combatant's fighting efficiency. The most common symptoms are fatigue, slower reaction times, indecision, disconnection from one's surroundings, and inability to prioritize. Combat stress reaction is generally short-term and should not be confused with acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, or other long-term disorders attributable to combat stress, although any of these may commence as a combat stress reaction. The US Army uses the term/acronym COSR (Combat Stress Reaction) in official medical reports. This term can be applied to any stress reaction in the military unit environment. Many reactions look like symptoms of mental illness (such as panic, extreme anxiety, depression, and hallucinations), but they are only transient reactions to the traumatic stress of combat and the cumulative stresses of military operations.

    In World War 1, shell shock was considered a psychiatric illness resulting from injury to the nerves during combat. The horrors of trench warfare meant that about 10% of the fighting soldiers were killed (compared to 4.5% during World War 2) and the total proportion of troops who became casualties (killed or wounded) was 56%. Whether a shell-shock sufferer was considered "wounded" or "sick" depended on the circumstances. When faced with the phenomenon of a minority of soldiers mentally breaking down, there was an expectation that the root of this problem lay in character of the individual soldier, not because of what they experienced on the front lines during the war. These sorts of attitudes helped fuel the main argument that was accepted after the war and going forward that there was a social root to shell shock that consisted of soldiers finding the only way allowed by the military to show weakness and get out of the front, claiming that their mental anguish constituted a legitimate medical diagnosis as a disease. The large proportion of World War 1 veterans in the European population meant that the symptoms were common to the culture.


    Combat Stress Management on the Nuclear Battlefield | US Army Training Film | 1958

    TBFA_0086
     
  30. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Hypothermia, Nightclub Terror

    January 9, 2017


    [​IMG]

    It’s January, and a cold blast from the North is hitting parts of the Deep South. Hypothermia is a big issue for those not prepared for cold weather, and a number of people die every year from being unready to deal with Nature’s challenges. Find out about hypothermia, how the body loses heat, and some strategies for prevention this winter.

    Also, the Turkish nightclub shooting almost exactly duplicates the blueprint established by last year’s Orlando Nightclub shootings. Along with vehicular terror, Dr. Bones makes the argument that this strategy is going to be repeated again and again, and tells you what you have to do to survive such events.

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/01/06/survival-medicine-hour-hypothermia-nightclub-terror-shootings

    Follow us on twitter @preppershow

    Follow our Youtube Channel at DrBones NurseAmy

    Follow us at Facebook at DoomandBloom or join our Survival Medicine group at Survival Medicine DrBones NurseAmy

    All the best for a happy and healthy 2017!

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-hypothermia-nightclub-terror/
     
  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Hypothermia, Pt. 2, Avalanches, Blizzard Survival

    January 14, 2017


    [​IMG]

    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton: Bees are having a hard time these days and new attention is being given to their plight. The Fish and Wildlife Service have added the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee to the endangered species list, which join seven species of the Yellow-Faced bee that were added in September.

    Hypothermia (part 2) is discussed regarding treatments including: getting the person out of the cold or shielding them from the weather as much as possible, monitoring their breathing, beginning CPR if needed, warming them up with your body heat or warm dry compresses and more. Keep a Winter Car Survival Kit and supplies handy to help when disaster or accidents happen.

    [​IMG]

    Avalanches are dangerous, but only a small percentage of victims die from hypothermia, most perish due to traumatic injury or suffocation before they freeze to death. Snow slides are part and parcel of the winter wilderness experience and it pays to know what to do if you’re caught in one. Blizzards occur every year in the United States, and cause fatalities among the unprepared. In these storms, 70% of deaths occur due to traffic accidents and 25% from being caught outside during the blizzard. Learn safety tips to prevent these deaths and keep you and your family safe and healthy during the winter.

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/01/13/survival-medicine-hour-hypothermia-pt2-avalanches-blizzards

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-hypothermia-pt-2-avalanches-blizzard-survival/
     
  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    1960s MEDICAL INSTRUCTIONAL FILM DELIVERY OF TRIPLETS w/ LOW SPINAL ANESTHESIA 51194
    PeriscopeFilm



    Published on Jan 17, 2017
    Made in the 1950s (or possibly the late 1940s) by Ciba Pharmaceutical Products with the co-operation of the U.S. Air Force and the University of Chicago Medical Center, this film shows the use of Nupercaine (a form of dibucaine) spinal anesthetic in the vaginal delivery of triplets. At the time this type of spinal anesthesia (now commonplace) was fairly new. The first use of similar continuous caudal anesthesia in a laboring woman was on January 6, 1942, when the wife of a United States Coast Guard sailor was brought into the Marine Hospital for an emergency Caesarean section. Because the woman suffered from rheumatic heart disease (heart failure following an episode of rheumatic fever during childhood), her doctors believed that she would not survive the stress of labor but they also felt that she would not tolerate general anesthesia due to her heart failure. With the use of continuous caudal anesthesia, the woman and her baby survived. The first described placement of a lumbar epidural catheter was performed by Pío Manuel María Martínez Curbelo (5 June 1906–1 May 1962) on January 13, 1947.

    The film begins with a picture of normal childbirth. At mark 1:15, is a picture of the internal organs involved in pregnancy stage for a mother carrying triplets. The sensory nerves, the uterus are talked about at mark 1:40. At mark 2:00, is a picture of the anesthetic involvement. At mark 2:44 is the spine. Spinal needle s are seen at mark 2:58. Spinal puncture is seen at mark 3:40. The anesthetic solution is given. At mark 4:48, the solution is given to the patient slowly. Improper speed of injection results to unsatisfactory anesthesia. Clinical studies demonstrate that first blocking the somatic and autonomic component of the central nerves abolishes pain impulses from the cervix, vagina and portions of the bladder and rectum. The thoracic segment is viewed at mark 5:55. At mark 6:15 are the equipment required for the heavy nuptial saddle block anesthesia. The pill is broken open and solution drawn into the syringe. At mark 7:20, the puncture is made as the speed for injection is noted. The patient sits up for 30 seconds. At mark 8:05, the doctor takes the blood pressure. He makes a line on the umbilicus path. At mark 8:40, she moves her leg to ascertain no paralysis. At mark 9:12 is the Bolin air force hospital in Washington DC. At mark 9:28, is a report on the complicated pregnancy the patient has. It then revealed the presence of triplets after 6 weeks and it continued un-complicated. At mark 9:35 is a x-ray picture of the pregnancy showing the head of the triplet. At mark 10:13 is the report. At mark 10:30, 1cc of the heavy nuptial solution is given in the usual routine method of injection. Blood pressure is checked every 5minutes interval. At mark 10:55, the delivery starts. At mark 11:07, a blood bottle is seen at the delivery room for precautionary method. At mark 11:17, a picture of the babies’ position is seen.

    At mark 11:55, traction is begins. At mark 12:53, the first child is delivered as she cries spontaneously. A picture of the other 2position is also seen at mark 13:12. 20minutes after the first delivery, the second starts as the baby is delivered by foot and the back and shoulder follow with ease. The head is delivered by the help of a pressure fluid as the second female is delivered at mark 14:50. The baby cries spontaneously. At mark 15:24 is the picture of the position of the third baby. The membrane is ruptured and the right hand goes into the pelvic. Gentle traction is commenced at mark 15:55. Traction is continued on the anterior leg as the back is rotated. The doctor carefully delivers the arms. The after coming head is then delivered by the morasel munipa. A male is delivered at mark 18:00, 42 minutes after the delivery of baby A. the umbilical is cut. The cords of the babies are seen at mark 18:40 as it is been held to pull out the fetal sac. The repair of the midline is done at mark 19:20. The cord and fetal sac of each baby is seen at mark 19:30. With baby A and B from same placenta and baby C from a separate placenta. At mark 20:10, the babies are seen in an incubator as their weight and mode and time of delivery is stated respectively. At mark 20:40, the babies are seen at their here month checkup. They are seen at mark 21:00 at their 6month playing at home. Their weights are also stated.

    This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com


     
  33. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
  34. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Car Survival in Winter

    January 17, 2017


    [​IMG]

    It’s predicted to be another harsh winter and, for most in the U.S., this means trouble if someone gets stuck out on the road during a blizzard or other extreme conditions. Hypothermia (the effects on the body from exposure to cold) may occur on the wilderness trail, but also right in the driver’s seat of the family car. It’s important to have a plan in case you are stranded in your vehicle.

    Your Car

    Winter conditions don’t just affect people, they affect cars as well. Cold affects rubber and metal; it even decreases the battery’s efficiency. Tires become stiff and flat for the first few hundred yards. Your oil and other lubricants become thicker at cold temperatures. This makes the engine work harder.

    Therefore, vehicles that will be doing duty in extreme cold should be “winterized”. This involves switching to a lighter viscosity oil, changing to snow tires, and choosing the right (anti-freeze) ratio of coolant to water. Gas tanks should never be less than half full.

    Your Life

    You’re not a bear, so you can’t hibernate through the cold weather; you’ll have to live in it, so take measures to avoid becoming a victim of it. Many deaths from exposure are avoidable if simple precautions are taken.

    The first question you should ask before you get in the car in cold weather is: What’s the forecast? Is it possible that you’re driving straight into trouble? Checking the weather beforehand is a lot better than finding out about it on the road.

    The second question should be: “Is this trip necessary?” If the answer is “no”, you should stay home. For most people that work, however, the answer is “yes”. If you have no choice but to hit the road during a winter storm, drive as if your life depends on it (because it does). Brush ice and snow off windshields, side mirrors, or anywhere your view might be blocked. Don’t speed, tailgate, or weave in and out of traffic. Make turns slowly and deliberately; avoid quick stops and starts.

    Notify someone of your travel plans before you head out, especially if you’re in rural areas. Take your cell phone with you but save it for emergencies. Your focus has to be on the road, not on texts from your friends.

    Stranded!

    If you live in an area that routinely has very cold winters, you may not be able to avoid being stranded in your car one day. Your level of preparedness will improve your chances of staying healthy and getting back home. So what should your plan of action be?

    1. Stay calm and don’t leave the car. It’s warmer there than outside and you have protection from the wind. Having adequate shelter is one of the keys to success, whether it’s in the wilderness or on a snow-covered highway.
    2. Ventilation is preferable to asphyxiation. Crack a window on the side away from the wind for some fresh air. People talk about water and food being necessary for survival but, first, you’ll need air to breathe. Wet snow can block up your exhaust system, which causes carbon monoxide to enter the passenger compartment. Colorless and odorless, it’s a deadly gas that kills in enclosed spaces without ventilation. Clearing the exhaust pipe of snow and running the engine only ten minutes or so an hour will help prevent monoxide poisoning.
    3. Group Hug. If you’re in a group, huddle together as best you can to create a warm pocket in the car.
    4. Keep Moving. Rub your hands, put them in your armpits, or otherwise keep moving to make your muscles produce heat.
    5. Don’t overexert yourself. If your car is stuck in the snow, you’ll want to dig yourself out. A lot of sweat, however, will cause clothing to become wet. Wet clothing loses its value as insulation and leads to hypothermia.
    6. Let others know you’re there. If you have flares, use them. Flashing emergency lights on your vehicle will drain battery power, so use them only if you think someone might see them.
    The Winter Car Kit

    [​IMG]

    If you’re going to travel in very cold conditions, there are a certain number of items that you should keep in your vehicle. This is what an effective winter survival car kit contains:
    • Wool Blankets. Wool can stay warm even when wet.
    • Spare sets of dry clothes, including socks, hats, and mittens.
    • Hard warmers or other instant heat packs (activated, usually, by shaking, they’ll last for hours)
    • Matches, lighters and/or firestarters in case you need to manufacture heat.
    • Candles, flashlights (keep batteries in backwards until you need them).
    • Small multi-tool with blade, screwdrivers, pliers, etc.
    • Larger combination tool like a foldable shovel (acts as a shovel but also an axe, saw, etc.)
    • Sand or rock salt in plastic container (to give traction where needed.)
    • Tow chain or rope.
    • Flares.
    • Jumper cables.
    • Water, Food (energy bars, MREs, dehydrated soups, candies).
    • Baby wipes for hygiene purposes.
    • A first aid kit.
    • Medications as needed.
    • Tarp and duct tape (brightly colored ones will be more visible and aid rescue.)
    • Metal cup, thermos, heat source (to melt snow, make soup, etc.)
    • Noisemaker (whistle)
    • Cell phone and charger
    The items above will give you a head start in keeping safe and sound even if stranded. With a plan of action, a few supplies, and a little luck, you’ll survive even in the worst blizzard.

    Joe Alton MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/car-su...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Medical Effects of the Atomic Bomb 1949 US Army Training Film; Blast & Radiation Damage to Humans
    Jeff Quitney



    Published on Jan 18, 2017
    Nuclear Weapons playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

    Summary of atomic bomb nuclear fission explosion medical effects on humans.

    US Army Training Film PFM-5058

    Public domain film from the US Army, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effects...

    The energy released from a nuclear weapon detonated in the troposphere can be divided into four basic categories:

    - Blast—40–50% of total energy
    - Thermal radiation—30–50% of total energy
    - Ionizing radiation—5% of total energy (more in a neutron bomb)
    - Residual radiation—5–10% of total energy with the mass of the explosion

    ...Locations such as submarine, surface, air burst, or exo-atmospheric determine how much energy is produced as blast and how much as radiation. In general, denser media around the bomb, like water, absorb more energy, and create more powerful shockwaves while at the same time limiting the area of its effect.

    When an air burst occurs, lethal blast and thermal effects proportionally scale much more rapidly than lethal radiation effects, as higher and higher yield nuclear weapons are used...

    Energy from a nuclear explosive is initially released in several forms of penetrating radiation...

    Ionizing radiation

    About 5% of the energy released in a nuclear air burst is in the form of ionizing radiation: neutrons, gamma rays, alpha particles and electrons moving at speeds up to the speed of light. Gamma rays are high energy electromagnetic radiation; the others are particles that move slower than light...

    The intensity of initial nuclear radiation decreases rapidly with distance from the point of burst...

    The character of the radiation received at a given location also varies with distance from the explosion. Near the point of the explosion, the neutron intensity is greater than the gamma intensity, but with increasing distance the neutron-gamma ratio decreases. Ultimately, the neutron component of initial radiation becomes negligible in comparison with the gamma component. The range for significant levels of initial radiation does not increase markedly with weapon yield and, as a result, the initial radiation becomes less of a hazard with increasing yield. With larger weapons, above 50 kt (200 TJ), blast and thermal effects are so much greater in importance that prompt radiation effects can be ignored.

    The neutron radiation serves to transmute the surrounding matter, often rendering it radioactive. When added to the dust of radioactive material released by the bomb itself, a large amount of radioactive material is released into the environment. This form of radioactive contamination is known as nuclear fallout and poses the primary risk of exposure to ionizing radiation for a large nuclear weapon...

    Survivability

    ...Death is highly likely and radiation poisoning is almost certain if one is caught in the open with no terrain or building masking effects within a radius of 0–3 km from a 1 megaton airburst, and the 50% chance of death from the blast extends out to ~8 km from the same 1 megaton atmospheric explosion.

    To highlight the variability in the real world, and the effect that being indoors can make, despite the lethal radiation and blast zone extending well past her position at Hiroshima, Akiko Takakura survived the effects of a 16 kt atomic bomb at a distance of 300 meters from the hypocenter, with only minor injuries, due mainly to her position in the lobby of the Bank of Japan, a reinforced concrete building, at the time...

    With medical attention, radiation exposure is survivable to a 200 rems acute dose exposure. If a group of people is exposed to a 50 to 59 rems acute (within 24 hours) radiation dose, none will get radiation sickness. If the group is exposed to 60 to 180 rems, 50% will become sick with radiation poisoning. If medically treated, all of the 60-180 rems group will survive. If the group is exposed to 200 to 450 rems, most if not all of the group will become sick. 50% of the 200-450 rems group will die within two to four weeks, even with medical attention. If the group is exposed to 460 to 600 rems, 100% of the group will get radiation poisoning. 50% of the 460-600 rems group will die within one to three weeks. If the group is exposed to 600 to 1000 rems, 50% will die in one to three weeks. If the group is exposed to 1,000 to 5,000 rems, 100% of the group will die within 2 weeks. At 5,000 rems, 100% of the group will die within 2 days...
     
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Unique Awareness to Help You Prepare to Survive | Jason Flowerday
    Reluctant Preppers



    Published on Jan 29, 2017
    This guest takes being “Aware and Prepared” to a futuristic and uniquely personal level: he is developing the ability for individuals and their doctors to predict and map their personal medical treatment needs & response with unprecedented acuity. Jason Flowerday is the founder and CEO of 3D Signatures Inc., a novel personalized medicine company with a proprietary software platform based on the three-dimensional analysis of a patient’s individual chromosomal arrangement – or signature, enabling personalized treatment of disease and success monitoring of drug effectiveness.

    In this Interview:

    ——————— Since Reluctant Preppers’ mission is to help our viewers be aware and prepared, how does 3D Signatures improve people's awareness and preparedness for increased survival and well-being? What range of conditions and diseases does your technique address and expect to help with? Can you describe any proven examples yet, or still in concept or research stages? If people's access to the modern medical system became disrupted by any major emergency, how might awareness gained from your technique prior to the interruption assist them in managing their treatment through the crisis? Why is this technology different than conventional diagnostics? Is there any other company studying 3D telomere analysis? The platform is technology driven. Is the intellectual property (IP) protected? You mentioned there are currently no effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. How does 3D Signatures plan to help real people in this difficult case? If business execution is critical to making a real impact, does 3D Signatures have a scientific and business team capable of building a successful business? Can you tell us more about a brief history of the company, so people understand the facts of your profile better? How can interested viewers find out more? www.3DSignatures.com, traded on Toronto (TSX-V: DXD)

    Subscribe (it's FREE!) to Reluctant Preppers for more ► http://bit.ly/Subscribe-Free

    Channel graphics by http://JosiahJohnsonStudios.com
    Promotion by http://FinanceAndLiberty.com
     
  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Dang, It’s Cold! Treating and Preventing Hypothermia

    January 15, 2017


    [​IMG]
    hypothermia (and bad judgment)

    This winter has already seen deadly cold snaps where people have found themselves at the mercy of the elements. Whether it’s on a wilderness hike or stranded in a car on a snow-covered highway, the physical effects of exposure to cold (also called “hypothermia”) can be life-threatening.

    Hypothermia is a condition in which body core temperature drops below the temperature necessary for normal body function and metabolism. Normally, the body core is between 97.5-99.5 degrees Fahrenheit (36.0-37.5 degrees Celsius). Cold-related illness occurs once the core temperature dips below 95 degrees (35 degrees Celsius).

    When it is exposed to cold, the body kicks into action to produce heat. Muscles shiver to produce heat, and this will be the first symptom you’re likely to see. As hypothermia worsens, more symptoms will become apparent if the patient is not warmed.

    Aside from shivering, the most noticeable symptoms of hypothermia will be related to mental status. The person may appear confused, uncoordinated, and lethargic. As the condition worsens, speech may become slurred; the patient will appear apathetic, uninterested in helping themselves, and may lose consciousness. These effects occur due to the effect of cooling temperatures on the brain: The colder the body core gets, the slower the brain works. Brain function is supposed to cease at about 68 degrees Fahrenheit, although there have been exceptional cases where people (usually children) survived even lower temperatures.

    Prevention of Hypothermia

    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. To prevent hypothermia, you must anticipate the climate that you will be traveling through; include windy and wet weather into your calculations. Condition yourself physically to be fit for the challenge. Travel with a partner if at all possible, and have more than enough food and water available for the entire trip.

    It may be useful to remember the simple acronym C.O.L.D. This stands for: Cover, Overexertion, Layering, and Dry.

    Cover. Your head has a significant surface area, so prevent heat loss by wearing a hat. Instead of using gloves to cover your hands, use mittens. Mittens are more helpful than gloves because they keep your fingers in contact with one another, conserving heat.

    Overexertion. Avoid activities that cause you to sweat a lot. Cold weather causes you to lose body heat quickly; wet, sweaty clothing accelerates the process. Rest when necessary; use those rest periods to self-assess for cold-related changes. Pay careful attention to the status of the elderly and the very young. Diabetics are also at high risk.

    Layering. Loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in layers trap pockets of warm air and do the best job of insulating you against the cold. Use tightly woven, water-repellent material for wind protection. Wool or silk inner layers hold body heat better than cotton does. Some synthetic materials, like Gore-Tex, work well also. Especially cover the head, neck, hands and feet.

    Dry. Keep as dry as you can. Get out of wet clothing as soon as possible. It’s very easy for snow to get into gloves and boots, so pay particular attention to your hands and feet.

    [​IMG]
    Pet the Dog, Skip the Booze

    One cold-weather issue that most people don’t take into account is the use of alcohol. Alcohol may give you a “warm” feeling, but it actually causes your blood vessels to expand; this results in more rapid heat loss from the surface of your body.

    Alcohol and recreational drugs also cause impaired judgment. Those under the influence might choose clothing that might not protect them in cold weather.

    Treating Hypothermia

    If you encounter a person who is unconscious, confused, or lethargic in cold weather, assume they are hypothermic until proven otherwise. Immediate action must be taken to reverse the ill effects of hypothermia. Important measures to take are:

    Get the person out of the cold. Move them into a warm, dry area as soon as possible. If you’re unable to move the person out of the cold, be sure to place a barrier between them, the wind, and the cold ground.

    Monitor breathing. A person with severe hypothermia may be unconscious. Verify that they are breathing and check for a pulse. Begin CPR if necessary.

    Take off wet clothing. If the person is wearing wet clothing, remove gently. Cover the victim with layers of dry blankets, including the head, but leave the face clear.

    Share body heat. To warm the person’s body, remove your clothing and lie next to the person, making skin-to-skin contact. Then cover both of your bodies with blankets. Some people may cringe at this controversial notion, but it’s important to remember that you are trying to save a life. Gentle massage or rubbing may be helpful. Avoid being too vigorous.

    Give warm oral fluids if awake and alert. If, and only if, the affected person is alert and able to swallow, provide a warm, nonalcoholic, non-caffeinated beverage to help warm the body. Coffee’s out, but how about some warm apple cider?

    Use warm, dry compresses. Use a first-aid warm compress (a fluid-filled bag that warms up when squeezed), or a makeshift compress of warm, not hot, water in a plastic bottle. Apply to the neck, armpit, and groin. Due to major blood vessels that run close to the skin in these areas, heat will more efficiently travel to the body core.

    Avoid applying direct heat. Don’t use hot water, a heating pad or a heating lamp directly on the victim. The extreme heat can damage the skin, cause strain on the heart, or even lead to cardiac arrest.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/dang-its-cold-treating-and-preventing-hypothermia/
     
  39. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Survival Medicine Hour: Hypothermia Pt. 3, Frostbite, Winter Hazards

    January 22, 2017


    [​IMG]
    Frostbite with gangrene

    The Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton, MD, aka Dr. Bones and Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Nurse Amy discusses altitude sickness, winter car survival, falling through the ice or into very cold water and more. Car Survival equipment should include wool blankets, instant hand warmers, flashlights and extra batteries (fresh), small tool with blade, screwdrivers, pliers etc, foldable shovel, sand or rock salt, flares and reflective large triangles, tow chain or tough rope, jumper cables, water and food, a first aid kit (Doom and Bloom makes a grab and go bag), tarp, noisemaker and more.

    [​IMG]
    Winter car survival

    To increase your chances of survival in cold water you should wear a life jacket whenever you are on a boat. It enables you to stay alive longer by keeping you afloat without burning too much energy. A built-in whistle is a great item to have on the life jacket also. Keep your clothes on while you are still in the water. Button or zip up to retain some body heat. The layer of water between your clothing and your body is slightly warmer and will help insulate you from the cold.

    To listen in, click the link below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/01/20/survival-medicine-hour-hypothermia-pt3-frostbite-winter-hazards

    Wishing you all the best in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-hypothermia-pt-3-frostbite-winter-hazards/
     
  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    114,435
    Likes Received:
    35,501
    Trophy Points:
    113

Share This Page