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Dr Bones & Nurse Amy: The Survival Medicine Hour Of Doom & Bloom

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by searcher, Mar 16, 2014.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Ticks and Lyme Disease, Foot Fungus, Rodent Proofing
    May 9, 2017


    THE SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR PODCAST #231

    [​IMG]
    Tinea Pedis, aka Athlete’s Foot


    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe Alton,MD and Amy Alton,ARNP discuss what’s behind the increasing population of ticks and the record number of Lyme Disease cases being reported in the United States, plus how to avoid tick bites and recognize and treat Lyme Disease early. Also, how to deal with fungal infections like Athlete’s foot with conventional and natural remedies in austere or remote settings.

    [​IMG]
    Tick Bite

    Rats!!! Rats and mice in your retreat will contaminate your survival food stores and transmit disease and otherwise lower your chances of survival in times of trouble. Find out how to rodent-proof a retreat with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/05/05/survival-medicine-hour-lyme-disease-foot-fungus-rodent-proofing


    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/surviv...and-lyme-disease-foot-fungus-rodent-proofing/
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    YouTube Changes: What is the Future of My Channel?
    ThePatriotNurse



    Published on May 10, 2017
    Lots of changes with YouTube channels lately that are affecting large channels with political and nonpolitical bents. What am I going to do?
    Website: http://www.thepatriotnurse.com
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Wrap your loved ones in ICE PACKS to save their brain after cardiac arrest, new guidelines advise
    • Body cooling is now advised by medical professionals for cardiac arrest patients
    • Experts say it will limit brain injury from those who suffered a heart arrest
    • Therapeutic hypothermia lowers the body temperature to 89.6F to 93.2F
    • Cooling is done by placing packs and blankets on the body or through devices
    • Forms of this method can be used to help save the lives of gunshot victims


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4493618/Experts-advise-families-ask-body-cooling-method.html#ixzz4gila1BfH
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Study: Expired EpiPens Still Effective
    May 11, 2017


    Study: Expired EpiPens Still Effective
    [​IMG]
    EpiPen and EpiPen Jr.

    An expiration date is defined as the last day that a medicine is warranted to be safe and effective when stored properly. I’ve written for years that this date is often arbitrarily determined, and that the idea all medicines somehow “spoil” very soon after their expiration dates is incorrect.

    I’m not alone in this opinion: A new study now reports that an important medical product that prevents deaths from severe allergic reactions (also called”Anaphylaxis“) can still be used effectively years after the expiration date on the package.

    The California Poison Control System in San Diego tested 40 unused, expired Epipens and found that all (yes, all) of them retained at least 80% active epinephrine, the main ingredient. Â This was true even for Epipens that closed in on the four-year expired mark. The least potent device was found to be at 81 percent 30 months past its expiration date. Most were at 90% or above.

    Epipens are expensive items that are sometimes in short supply. F. Lee Cantrell, lead researcher of the California study, concludes that those unable to replace the product should hold onto it for use past the expiration date.

    “There’s still a dose that would be therapeutic in there…” Cantrell also said: “if an expired EpiPen is all that I have, I would use it.” He suggests that it might be appropriate for the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and Mylan, the company that distributes Epipen, to consider adjusting the expiration dates. Currently, the drug”expires” 12-18 months from the date of manufacture.

    Of course, in normal times, the recommendation is to replace expired EpiPens. This new information, however, if of use to those who cannot afford to replace Epipen often and, also, to those in the preparedness community who store medical items in case of disaster.

    The recommendation given by the California Poison Control System is a rare departure from standard conventional medical wisdom, which states that drugs should be disposed of as soon as they become expired. However, even the Department of Defense has determined that many medicines are 100% effective and safe to use even if expired. This data can be found in the July 2006 issue of the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

    [​IMG]
    many drugs remain potent after expiration

    The “Shelf Life Extension Program” (SLEP), which initially evaluated 122 drugs commonly stored for use in peacetime disasters, determined that most drugs in pill or capsule form were therapeutically effective for 2 to 10 years beyond the written expiration date. This led to the government issuing “emergency use authorizations” for various expired medicines when a shortage occurred. One example is the antiviral drug Tamiflu: During the 2009 Swine Flu epidemic, existing supplies of Tamiflu were authorized for use up to five years after the expiration date.

    Drugs in liquid form did not fare as well in SLEP studies, which makes the Epipen (which uses a liquid solution of epinephrine) data so interesting. Granted, 100% potency would have been better, but 80-90% would still have a beneficial effect on an allergic reaction.

    Given the 2016 Mylan scandal where the company increased the price from about $100 per two-pack to $600, an extended shelf life would be welcome news. (Mylan recently released a “generic” version for $300 per two-pack).

    It should be noted that potency of a drug is affected by storage conditions. Most medicines should be stored in dry, cool, dark conditions. Allowing Epipens to be exposed to high heat or freezing could adversely affect effectiveness.

    Many physicians are greeting the study’s findings skeptically, but I consider it more evidence that expiration dates are sometimes artificially determined, and that those storing medications for use in disaster settings might get more longevity out of their supply than expected. Get fresh medicine if available, but think twice before throwing out your last Epipen. Sometimes, something is better than nothing.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/study-expired-epipens-still-effective/
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Expired EpiPens, Hepatitis C, Rodent Control 2
    May 14, 2017


    [​IMG]
    expired epipens still effective?

    This week’s Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discusses a new study from the California Poison Control System that indicates that EpiPens may be therapeutically effective even years after their expiration dates, welcome news given that a two-pack costs $300, even in generic form. Plus, part 2 of rodent control, this time how to get rid of rats and mice that already infest your retreat.

    [​IMG]
    Hep C rising in opioid injecters

    Plus, Joe and Amy discuss the increasing epidemic of Hepatitis C in people who are using or abusing opioids like heroin and other drugs. Learn the obstacles to controlling this deadly disease and what might be done to help.

    All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour! To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/05/12/survival-medicine-hour-expired-epipens-hepatitis-c-rodent-elimination

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-expired-epipens-hepatitis-c-rodent-control-2-2/
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Video: Azithromycin as Survival Antibiotic
    May 18, 2017


    AZITHROMYCIN AS SURVIVAL ANTIBIOTIC
    [​IMG]
    Azithromycin as Antibiotic in Survival Settings

    One of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics is Azithromycin, known in the U.S. as Z-Pak, is now in a new veterinary version known as Bird-Zithro. In survival situations where you’re off grid and there no modern medical care for the foreseeable future, the medic for the family must stockpile medical supplies, and this includes antibiotics.

    See how Azithromycin in the form of “Bird-Zithro” might fit into you survival plans to treat your, well, sick birds. Uses, dosages, precautions, and more are more are discussed in this video by medical preparedness writer Joe Alton, MD.

    To watch, click below:



    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe Alton MD aka “Dr. Bones”

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/video-azithromycin-as-survival-antibiotic/
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Eye Issues, Fractures, TENS units
    May 20, 2017


    THE SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR: EYE ISSUES, FRACTURES, TENS UNITS

    [​IMG]
    Pink Eye, aka Conjunctivitis

    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss how to deal with various eye issues that can confront a medic in an off-grid survival setting, like Pink Eye, foreign objects, styes, and more. Plus, our hosts impart some basics on how to deal with broken bones.

    [​IMG]
    Ouch!

    Dr. Bones also answers a question from Jack Spirko’s Survival Podcast Expert Council, of which he’s a member, regarding the potential for use in survival scenarios of TENS units. TENS units are battery-powered items that deliver electrical stimulation to muscles and nerves to help with pain relief.

    All this and more in the latest Survival Medicine Hour! To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/05/19/survival-medicine-hour-eye-issues-fractures-tens-units

    Hey, do ol’ Dr. Bones a big favor and follow us on twitter @preppershow, YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy, and Facebook at Doom and Bloom(tm). You can also join our Facebook group at Survival Medicine DrBones NurseAmy!

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-eye-issues-fractures-tens-units/
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Mass Casualty Triage Basics
    May 23, 2017


    [​IMG]
    mass casualty incidents

    Given the horrific events surrounding the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, UK, we have come to realize that we may never be safe in today’s world. The bombing is new evidence, however, that no target is off limits to the terrorists in our midst. We can expect more episodes of terror in the western world in the future, and many will involve mass casualties.

    The Mass Casualty Incident
    The responsibilities of a caregiver is usually one-to-one; that is, the healthcare provider will be dealing with one ill or injured individual at a time. This encounter usually falls within their expertise and resources. There may be a day, however, when you find yourself confronted with a scenario in which multiple people are injured. This is referred to as a Mass Casualty Incident (MCI).

    A Mass Casualty Incident is any event in which your medical resources are inadequate for the number and severity of injuries incurred. MCIs can be quite variable in their presentation.

    Types of Mass Casualty Incidents
    MCIs can be quite variable in their presentation:
    • Doomsday scenario events, such as a nuclear weapon detonation
    • Terrorist acts, such as occurred in Manchester
    • Consequences of a storm, such as a tornado or hurricane
    • Consequences of civil unrest or battlefield injuries
    • Mass transit mishaps (train derailment, plane crash, etc.)
    • A car accident with, say, four people injured (and only one ambulance)
    Responding to a Mass Casualty Incident
    The effective medical management of any of the above events required rapid and accurate triage. Triage comes from the French word for “to sort” (trier) and is the process by which medical personnel can rapidly assess and prioritize a number of injured individuals and do the most good for the most people. Note that I didn’t say: “Do the best possible care for each individual victim”.

    Let’s assume that you were at the concert in Manchester, the Christmas market in Berlin, or the Boston Marathon when a bomb went off. You are the first one to arrive at the scene, and you are alone. There are twenty people on the ground, some moaning in pain. There were probably more, but only twenty are, for the most part, in one piece. The scene is horrific. As the first to respond to the scene, you are “Incident Commander” until someone with more medical expertise arrives on the scene. What do you do?

    Your initial actions may determine the outcome of the emergency response in this situation. This will involve what we refer to as the 5 S’s of evaluating a MCI scene:
    • Safety
    • Sizing up
    • Sending for help
    • Set-up of areas
    • START – Simple Triage And Rapid Treatment
    Safety Assessment: An insidious strategy on the part of terrorists when they target crowds is to set off primary and secondary bombs. The main bomb causes the most casualties, and the second bomb is timed to go off or is triggered just as the medical/security personnel arrive. This may run counter to your instinct to help, but your primary goal is your own self-preservation. Keeping the medical personnel alive is likely to save more lives down the road. Therefore, you do your family and community a disservice by becoming the next casualty.

    As you arrive, be as certain as you can that there is no ongoing threat. Do not rush in there until you’re sure that the damage has been done and you and your helpers are safe entering the area. In the immediate aftermath of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, various medical personnel rushed in to aid the many victims. One of them was a heroic 37-year-old Licensed Practical Nurse who, as she entered the area, was struck by a falling piece of concrete. She sustained a head injury and died five 5 days later.

    [​IMG]
    Scene at the Boston Marathon bombing

    Sizing up the Scene: Ask yourself the following questions:
    • What’s the situation? Is this a mass transit crash? Did a building on fire collapse? Was there a bomb?
    • How many injuries and how severe? Are there a few victims or dozens? Are there “walking wounded” that could assist you?
    • Are they all together or spread out over a wide area?
    • What are possible nearby areas for treatment/transport purposes?
    • Are there areas open enough for vehicles to come through to help transport victims?
    Sending for Help: If modern medical care is available, call 911 and say (for example): “I am calling to report a mass casualty incident involving a multi-vehicle auto accident at the intersection of Hollywood and Vine (location). At least 7 people are injured and will require medical attention. There may be people trapped in their cars and one vehicle is on fire.”

    In three sentences, you have informed the authorities that a mass casualty event has occurred, what type of event it was, where it occurred, an approximate number of patients that may need care, and the types of care (burns) or equipment that may be needed.

    Set-Up: Determine likely areas for various triage levels (see below) to be further evaluated and treated. Also, determine the appropriate entry and exit points for victims that need immediate transport to medical facilities, if they exist. If you are blessed with lots of help at the scene, assign triage, treatment, and transport team leadership roles.

    S.T.A.R.T.: Triage uses the acronym S.T.A.R.T., which stands for Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment. The first round of triage, known as “primary triage”, should be fast (30 seconds per patient if possible) and does not involve extensive treatment of injuries. It should be focused on identifying the triage level of each patient. Evaluation in primary triage consists mostly of quick evaluation of respirations (or the lack thereof), perfusion (adequacy of circulation), and mental status. These are known as “RPMs” and are a (very) basic indication of the level of injury.

    Other than controlling massive bleeding and clearing airways, very little treatment is performed in primary triage. Controlling hemorrhage is best done with commercial tourniquets, for example, the SOF-T, CAT, or SWAT. It’s a sad sign of the times that I recommend carrying one of these if you have to go to areas where there are large crowds and little security. Tourniquets can be improvised with belts, bandannas, and other items, but are more difficult to apply effectively.

    Although there is no international standard for this, triage levels in the U.S. are usually determined by color:

    Immediate (Red tag): The victim needs immediate medical care and will not survive if not treated quickly. (for example, a major hemorrhagic wound/internal bleeding) Top priority for treatment.

    Delayed (Yellow tag): The victim needs significant medical care within 2-4 hours. Injuries may become life-threatening if ignored, but can wait until Red tags are treated. (for example, an open fracture of the femur without major hemorrhage)

    Minimal (Green tag): Generally stable and ambulatory “walking wounded”, but may need some medical care. (for example, broken fingers, superficial burns)

    Expectant (Black tag): The victim is either deceased or is not expected to live. (for example, a large open fracture of cranium with brain damage, multiple penetrating chest wounds

    Patients may be identified with colored tape or triage casualty cards, but you’re unlikely to have these on hand. In that case, simply mark the victims’ foreheads with the numbers 1,2,3, and 4 indicating the priority for urgent care

    [​IMG]
    casualty card produced by sos products

    Knowledge of this system allows a patient marking system that easily allows incoming medical personnel to understand the urgency of a patient’s situation. It should go without saying that, in a power-down situation without modern medical care, a lot of red tags and even some yellow tags will become black tags. It will be difficult to save someone with major internal bleeding without surgical intervention.

    The surviving victims of the Manchester bombing were “fortunate”, if I may use the word, that emergency personnel were on the scene in minutes. Although the death count is currently at 22, many more of the 60 wounded would not have survived without their assistance and transport to modern medical facilities.

    We live in a more dangerous world these days, something I call “The New Normal“. In the New Normal, increased vigilance and situational awareness will be needed if you want to stay safe in crowds. In future articles, we’ll explore further how to deal with mass casualty incidents as a medical asset, and also how to avoid becoming a victim of those who want to disrupt civilized society.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/mass-casualty-triage-basics/
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    To Close or Not to Close a Wound
    May 29, 2017


    To Close or Not to Close a Wound?

    [​IMG]
    typical laceration

    When a laceration occurs, our body’s natural armor is breached and bacteria, even species that are normal inhabitants of our skin, get a free ticket into the rest of our body. Microbes that are harmless outside the body could be life-threatening inside the body.

    It only makes common sense that we want to close a cut (also known as a “laceration”) to speed healing and prevent infection. There is controversy, however, as to whether or not a wound should be closed. When and why would you choose to close a wound, and what method should you use?

    A laceration may be closed either by sutures, tapes, staples or medical “superglues” such as Derma-Bond or even industrial “Super-Glue” (the prescription product tolerates getting wet better).

    After rendering first aid, which includes controlling the bleeding, removing any debris, flushing debris out of the wound (known as “irrigation”), and applying antiseptic, you will have to make a decision.

    What are you trying to accomplish by closing a wound? Your goals are simple. You close wounds to repair the defect in your body’s armor, to eliminate “dead space” (pockets of air/fluid under the skin which could lead to infection), and to promote healing. Although less a consideration in normal times, a well-approximated wound also has less scarring.

    It sounds, you’d think, as if all wounds should be closed. Unfortunately, closing a wound that should be left open can do a lot more harm than good, and could possibly put your patient’s life at risk. Take the case of a young woman injured some years ago in a fall from a “zipline”: She was taken to the local emergency room, where 22 staples were needed to close a large laceration. Unfortunately, the wound had dangerous bacteria in it, causing a serious infection which spread throughout her body. She eventually required multiple amputations (including her hands!).

    We learn from this an important lesson: Namely, that the decision to close a wound is not automatic but involves several considerations. The most important of these is whether you’re dealing with a clean or a dirty wound.

    Most wounds you’ll encounter in an off-grid setting will be dirty. If you try to close a dirty wound, such as a gunshot, you have sequestered bacteria, bits of clothing, and dirt into your body. Within a short period of time, the wound may show signs of infection. An infected wound appears red, swollen, and hot. In extreme cases, an abscess may form, and pus will accumulate inside. The infection may spread to the bloodstream, a condition known as “septicemia”, and become life-threatening.

    [​IMG]
    wound infection

    It may be difficult to fight the urge to close a wound. Leaving the wound open, however, will allow you to clean the inside frequently and directly observe the healing process. It also allows inflammatory fluid to drain out of the body. The scar isn’t as pretty, but it’s the safest option in most cases. In addition, if you’re truly in a long-term survival scenario, the suture material or staples you have aren’t going to be replaced. It’s important to known when a closure is absolutely necessary and when it’s not.

    Other considerations when deciding whether or not to close a wound are whether it is a simple laceration (straight thin cut on the skin) or whether it is an avulsion (areas of skin torn out or hanging flaps). If the edges of the skin are so far apart that they cannot be stitched together without undue pressure, the wound should be left open.

    [​IMG]
    avulsion

    Another reason the wound should be left open if it has been open for more than 6-8 hours. Why? Even the air has bacteria, and there’s a good chance that they have already colonized the injury by that time.

    Let’s say that you’re certain the wound is clean. It’s less than 8 hours old. Here are some other factors that would suggest that closure is appropriate:
    • The laceration is long or deep. The exception would be a puncture wound from an animal bite. These bites are loaded with bacteria and should be kept open in austere settings, in my opinion.
    • The wound is located over a joint. A moving part, such as the knee, will constantly stress a wound and prevent it from closing in by itself.
    • The wound gapes open, but loosely enough to suggest that it can be closed without undue pressure on the skin.
    [​IMG]
    An item unlikely to be found after the you-know-what hits the fan

    It’s important to realize that you will only have a limited supply of staples and sutures. Feel free to mix different closure methods like alternating sutures and Steri-Strips, or even adding duct tape improvised into butterfly closures when you’ve run out of medical supplies. You’d be surprised to see what qualifies as medical supplies when the chips are down.

    If you are unsure, you can choose to wait 48 to 72 hours before closing a wound to make sure that no signs of infection develop. This is referred to as “delayed closure”. Some wounds can be partially closed, allowing a small open space to prevent the accumulation of inflammatory fluid.

    [​IMG]
    Penrose Drain

    Drains, consisting of thin lengths of latex, nitrile, or even gauze, might be placed into the wound for this purpose. Although these can get quite expensive, “Penrose” drains are a reasonably priced version of these that are still used in some operating rooms. Drains have a tendency to leak, so place a dressing over the exposed area.

    Many injuries that require closure (and some that don’t) also should be treated with antibiotics in oral or topical form to decrease the chance of infection. Natural substances with antibiotic properties, such as garlic or raw, unprocessed honey, may be useful in survival scenarios.

    The decision to close a wound involves developing sound judgment, something that takes some training and experience. For that reason, we’ve taught wound care classes throughout the country, not just to teach the mechanics of how to “throw” a stitch, but to impart the knowledge of just what makes for a “close-able wound”.

    Injuries are part and parcel of survival. Make sure that you can handle them, as well as infectious disease and all the other problems that will confront the medic in times of trouble.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/to-close-or-not-to-close-a-wound/
     
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    Dangerous Things are Dangerous: The Importance of Medical Training
    InRangeTV



    Published on May 30, 2017
    We recently experienced a rather catastrophic failure that resulted in Ian being injured at our desert shooting location.

    While everything ultimately worked out ok in the end, it was a reminder of how important medical training is and that the things we work with and deal with every day can be truly dangerous.

    The percentage of gun owners that actually train and become skilled with their firearms is disturbingly low, but even amongst those of us in the community who do that, an even smaller minority consider getting something far more important and relevant to our daily lives: medical training.

    Luckily we had some of that skill and gear on hand during this unfortunate event and this is our discussion of that situation, lessons learned and a call to action to our viewers to get trained. The life you save may be yours or someone else's.

    We heartily recommend Independence Training and their Dirt Medicine courses in particular:
    http://www.independencetraining.com/

    I am personally familiar with two reputable medical gear suppliers, so I can recommend them here. While there definitely others, these two are vendors that I personally depend on:

    http://shop.thetacticalmedic.com/

    https://www.chinookmed.com/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Nailbed Injuries, Wound Closure, Mass Casualties
    June 5, 2017


    American Survival Hour #340

    [​IMG]
    Nailbed Injuries


    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton discuss small injuries like those to the nail bed, and large, massive injuries like those seen in mass casualty events. What do you do if you’re the first on the scene of a bombing or other multi-injury event? These days, as the recent events in England have taught us, a mass casualty incident (MCI) can occur anytime and anyplace there’s a crowd.

    Plus, Joe and Amy talk about the factors to consider before deciding to close a wound. Wounds should only be closed in certain circumstances in off-grid settings. Find out how to use the best judgment in this week’s Survival Medicine Hour with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy!

    [​IMG]
    When to close a wound?

    To Listen in, click the link below:
    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/06/02/survival-medicine-hour-nailbed-injuries-wound-closure-mass-casualties

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-nailbed-injuries-wound-closure-mass-casualties/
     
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    Survival Strategies for Safe Summer Camping
    June 15, 2017


    SURVIVAL STRATEGIES FOR SAFE SUMMER CAMPING



    [​IMG]

    Camping Safety


    The kids are out of school, the weather’s great, and families are planning this summer’s camping trip. Camping is a great way to create bonds and memories that will last a lifetime. A poorly planned outdoor vacation, however, becomes memorable in the worst way, especially if someone gets hurt. A little planning will make sure everyone enjoys themselves safely, and some of these plans are similar to survival strategies.

    KNOW YOUR LIMITS

    [​IMG]
    Not the best choice for a family camping trip

    If you’re not a veteran camper, don’t start by attempting to climb Yosemite’s El Capitan. Start by taking day trips to National Parks or a local lake. Maybe you could start using that firestarter tool, setting up your tent, and making a campfire in your backyard to get through the learning curve. See how things work out when you don’t have to stay in the woods overnight. If the result is a big thumbs-up, start planning those overnighters.

    Whatever type of camping you do, you should always be aware of the capabilities and general health of the people in your party. Children and elderly family members will determine the limits of your activities. The more ambitious you are, the more your plans may be beyond the physical ability of the less fit members of your family. This leads to injuries as the end result in normal times or in survival scenarios.

    PLANNING

    An important first step to a safe camping trip is knowledge about the weather and local terrain you’ll encounter. Talk with park rangers, consult guidebooks, and check out online sources. Some specific issues you’ll need to know:
    • Temperature Ranges
    • Rain or Snowfall
    • Location and Status of Nearby Trails and Campsites
    • Plant, Insect, and Animal Issues
    • Availability of Clean Water
    • How to Get Help in an Emergency
    COMMON MEDICAL RISKS

    [​IMG]

    Probably Not Dressed for Success in the Snow

    A very common error campers make is not bringing the right clothing and equipment for the weather and terrain. If you haven’t planned for the environment, you have made it your enemy.

    Although Spring and Fall have the most uncertainty with regards to temperatures and weather, storms can occur in any season. Conditions in high elevations lead to wind chill factors that could easily cause hypothermia. Here’s the thing with wind chill: If the temperature is 40 degrees, but the wind chill factor is 20 degrees, you lose heat from your body as if the actual temperature were 20 degrees. Be aware that temperatures at night drop precipitously. Even summer rain can lead to a loss in body temperature if you get soaked.

    In cold weather, you’ll want the family clothed in layers. Use clothing made of tightly woven, water-repellent material for protection against the wind. Wool holds body heat better than cotton does. Some synthetic materials work well, also, such as Gore-Tex.

    That’s all well and good in cool temperatures, but if you’re at the seashore or lakefront in the summer, your main problem will be heat exhaustion and burns. Have your family members wear sunscreen, as well as hats and light cotton fabrics. Sunscreen should be placed 15 minutes before entering a sunny area and re-applied to skin that gets wet or after, say, a couple of hours.

    [​IMG]
    If you don’t take the environment into account, you have made it your enemy

    In hot weather, plan your strenuous activities for mornings, when it’s cooler. In any type of weather, keep everyone well-hydrated; dehydration will cause more rapid deterioration in physical condition in any climate.

    The most important item of clothing is, perhaps, your shoes. If you’ve got the wrong shoes for the activity, you will most likely regret it. If you’re in the woods, high tops that you can fit into your pant legs will provide protection against snakebite and tick bites. Tick populations are on the rise in the Northeast and Midwest, so beware of signs and symptoms of Lyme Disease. If you choose to go with a lighter shoe in hot weather, Vibram soles are your best bet.

    Special Tips: Choosing the right clothing isn’t just for weather protection. If you have the kids wear bright colors, you’ll have an easier time keeping track of their whereabouts. Long sleeves and pants offer added protection against insect bites and poison ivy.

    YOUR CAMPSITE

    Real estate agents’ motto is location, location, location and it’s true for survival retreats and camping safety too. Scout prospective campsites by looking for broken glass and other garbage that can pose a hazard.

    Look for evidence of animals/insects nearby, such as large droppings or wasp nests/bee hives. If there are berry bushes nearby, you can bet it’s on the menu for bears. Berries that birds and animals can eat are often unsafe for humans to eat. Advise the children to stay away from any animals, even the cute little fuzzy ones. Even some caterpillars are poisonous.

    [​IMG]

    Bear Droppings! Camp somewhere else!

    Learn to recognize poison ivy, oak, and sumac. Show your kid pictures of the plants so that they can look out for and avoid them. The old adage is “leaves of three, let it be”. Fels-Naptha soap is especially effective in removing toxic resin if you suspect exposure. The resin can stick to clothes, so cur chips off and use for laundering.

    Build your fire in established fire pits and away from dry brush. In drought conditions, consider using a portable stove instead, like the EcoZoom. In sunny open areas, the Sun Oven will give you a non-fire alternative for cooking. About fires: Children are fascinated by them, so watch them closely or you’ll be dealing with burn injuries. Food (especially cooked food) should be hung in trees in such a way that animals can’t access it. Animals are drawn to food odors, so use re-sealable plastic containers.

    If you camp near a water source, realize that even the clearest mountain stream may harbor Giardia, a parasite that causes diarrheal disease and dehydration. Water purification is basic to any outdoor outing. There are iodine tablets that serve this purpose, and portable filters like the Lifestraw and the Mini-Sawyer which are light and effective. Boiling the water first is a good policy in any situation, although time-consuming. Remember to add one minute of boiling for each 1000 feet of elevation above sea level. Water boils at lower temperatures at higher altitudes, and takes longer to kill microbes.

    GETTING LOST

    [​IMG]
    Glen Martin’s Book on Navigation

    Few people can look back to their childhood and not remember a time when they lost their bearings. Your kids should always be aware of landmarks near the camp or on trails. A great skill to teach the youngsters is how to use a compass, a skill you can find in Glen Martin’s new book “Prepper’s Survival Navigation“. Besides a compass, make sure children have a loud whistle that they can blow if you get separated. Three consecutive blasts is the universal distress signal. If lost, kids should stay put in a secure spot instead of roaming about. Of course, if you have cell phone service….

    INSECT BITES

    Even if you’ve clothed the kids in protective clothing, they can still wind up with insect bites. Carry a supply of antihistamines, sting relief pads, and calamine lotion to deal with allergic reactions. Asking your doctor for a prescription “EpiPen” is a good idea if anyone has ever had a severe reaction to toxins from insect bites or poison ivy. They’re easy to use and effective, and few doctors would refuse to write a script for it.

    Citronella-based products are helpful to repel insects; put it on clothing instead of skin (absorbs too easily) whenever possible. Repellents containing DEET also can be used, but not on children less than 2 years old. Don’t forget to inspect daily for ticks or the bulls-eye pattern rash they often cause. If you remove the tick in the first 24 hours, you will rarely contract Lyme disease.

    YOUR CAMPING FIRST AID KIT

    [​IMG]
    Get a Medical Kit!

    Besides appropriate clothes, insect repellants, and a way to sterilize water, you will want to carry a medical kit to deal with common problems. This should contain:
    • Antiseptics to clean wounds (iodine pads are good)
    • Bandages of different types and sizes: butterfly, roller, pads, moleskin, elastic (Ace wraps)
    • Cold packs to reduce swelling
    • Splints (splints and larger conforming ones)
    • Burn gel and non-stick dressings like Telfa pad
    • Nitrile gloves (some people are allergic to latex)
    • Bandannas or triangular bandages with safety pins to serve as slings
    • A bandage scissors
    • tweezers (to remove splinters and ticks)
    • topical antibiotic cream
    • Medications:
    Oral antihistamines (such as Bendadryl)

    Pain meds (Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Aspirin, also good for fever)

    1% hydrocortisone cream to decrease inflammation

    BZK (Benzalkonium Chloride) wipes for animal bites

    Your personal kit may require some additional items to handle special problems with members of the family that have chronic medical issues. Take the above-listed items and add more to customize the kit for your specific needs. Maybe adding a tourniquet, hemostatic gauze, and an Israeli dressing for more significant injuries? Perhaps some antibiotics for longer backcountry outings? The more you add, the more it approximates a survival medical kit.

    [​IMG]
    Grab and Go Deluxe Trauma Kit, made by Doom and Bloom Medical with quality first aid supplies

    One suggestion for a quality, custom designed kit is our Grab and Go Deluxe Trauma Kit, which weighs less than 3 lbs. and is stocked with first aid and trauma supplies. Another smaller kit that weighs less than 1 lb, is our Ultimate Compact First Aid Trauma Kit, newly redesigned and perfect for short trips outdoors.

    In an emergency, the most important thing to do is to simply stay calm. If you have the above supplies, you can handle a lot of medical issues in the wilderness. Gain some knowledge to go along with those supplies, and you’ll have the best chance to have a safe and fun outing with your family.

    Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/safe-summer-camping/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Survival Navigation w/Glen Martin, Thyroid Issues
    June 17, 2017


    [​IMG]
    by Glen Martin

    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, welcome Glen Martin, owner and founder of the 50-show strong Preppers Broadcasting Network to talk about his journey and to discuss his new book on Amazon, Prepper’s Survival Navigation. One way to put your health in jeopardy is not knowing where the heck you are, so listen in as Amy finds out secrets on how to stay grounded and pointed in the right direction in the wilderness.

    [​IMG]
    Effects of low thyroid levels on left, normal on right

    Also, a question about thyroid problems with the Expert Council with Jack Spirko, with Joe Alton MD answering questions about what to do about thyroid issues in survival scenarios. All this and more on the Survival Medicine Hour!

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/06/16/survival-medicine-hour-survival-navigation-with-glen-martin-thyroid-issues

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-survival-navigation-wglen-martin-thyroid-issues/
     
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    Benadryl as a Local Anesthetic in Survival?
    June 19, 2017


    Benadryl as a Local Anesthetic in Survival?

    [​IMG]
    diphenhydramine (Benadryl)

    A major obstacle in the ability of the survival medic to deal with the issue of wound closure is the lack of an easily available (and stockpile-able) form of anesthesia. With the most popular local anesthetic, lidocaine, a prescription item, it may be difficult to obtain enough to adequately fill the need in long-term disaster scenarios.

    We often mention in our podcast that we learn as much (really, more) from our readers and listeners than they do from us. Now, we are informed that diphenhydramine (Benadryl) may serve, in its injectable form, as a reasonable alternative for local anesthesia.

    You won’t find this information at drugs.com or other general medical information sites. Ordinarily, you’ll read that diphyenhydramine (DPH) is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body. Diphenhydramine is used to treat sneezing, runny nose, itching, watery eyes, rashes, and some cold or allergy symptoms. It also serves as a remedy for motion sickness, a hypnotic (sleep-inducer), and even to treat certain aspects of Parkinson’s disease.

    Benadryl comes in oral form as well as an injectable solution. Although controversial, the injectable has been used as a local anesthetic since 1956. It has been used in minor skin, dental, and podiatric procedures, especially in those allergic to lidocaine. This comment from a pharmacist’s emergency medicine blog:

    “In one validation study for its use as a dermal anesthetic, a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to assess both the degree of anesthesia (in square millimeters) and pain associated with injection in 24 subjects who received 0.5-mL injections of 1% DPH, 2% DPH, 1% lidocaine, and 0.9% sodium chloride placebo. Subjects who received 1% DPH achieved equivalent level of anesthesia relative to 1% lidocaine (p = 0.889); in addition, 1% DPH more effective in this outcome compared to 2% DPH. However, subjects did experience greater perception of pain at injection with both concentrations of DPH relative to 1% lidocaine (more pain perceived with 2% DPH), with some subjects experiencing persistent discomfort in the injected area for up to three days following injection. In another study evaluating other concentrations of DPH for local anesthesia, although a concentration of 0.5% DPH was deemed similar in perception of pain by patients upon injection compared to 1% lidocaine and a viable alternative to 1% lidocaine in maintaining local anesthesia, it was less effective than lidocaine when used for repairing minor skin lacerations in the face. In other head-to-head comparisons of 1% DPH and 1% lidocaine, similar levels and depths of local anesthesia were achieved.”

    Like all drugs, there are possible adverse effects. The use of DPH as a local anesthetic may be associated with local necrosis (tissue death) at the site of injection. This usually occurs from the use of excessively high concentrations of the medication. As such, you will see it contraindicated as a local anesthetic on most medical websites. At normal dosages, sedation may be noticed, as well as local soreness. Be aware that it might burn as it is administered and that its safety is not confirmed in distal areas like fingers, toes, ears, and nose.

    [​IMG]
    Injecting local anesthetic

    The recipe is as follows, again from our pharmacist’s blog:

    “Steps:

    Draw up entire contents of vial containing 50 mg/mL diphenhydramine into the syringe. This should measure to a volume of 1 mL.

    Dilute the contents of the syringe with 4 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride to yield a final volume of 5 mL.

    Clearly label the contents of the syringe with the medication label as “Diphenhydramine 1% (10 mg/mL).”

    Usually, the appropriate effect can be achieved with 2 ml or so of the injectable Benadryl. Use as little as possible to achieve the desired effect.

    From the standpoint of availability, I was able to order the product as a private citizen (as opposed to a physician) from at least one veterinary website. That doesn’t mean that it is widely available, however.

    The survival medic’s job is a difficult one. Searching for additional tools in the medical woodshed isn’t easy, but necessary if the medic is to be effective in an austere off-grid setting. Of course, in normal times, seek modern and standard medical care from qualified professionals.

    Some additional support from conventional medical journals for the anesthetic effect of diphenhydramine:

    Green SM, Rothrock SG, Gorchynski J: Validation of diphenhydramine as a dermal local anesthetic. Ann Emerg Med 1994; 23:1284-1289.

    Ernst AA, Marvez-Valls E, Mall G, et al. 1% Lidocaine versus 0.5% diphenhydramine for local anesthesia in minor laceration repair. Ann Emerg Med 1994; 23:1328-1332.

    Dire DJ, Hogan DE. Double-blinded comparison of diphenhydramine versus lidocaine as a local anesthetic. Ann Emerg Med 1993; 22:1419-22.

    Ernst AA, Anand P, Nick T, et al. Lidocaine versus diphenhydramine for anesthesia in the repair of minor lacerations. J Trauma 1993; 34:354-7.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/benadryl-as-a-local-anesthetic-in-survival/
     
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    Tooth Abscesses in Austere Settings

    June 22, 2017


    Tooth Abscess in Austere Settings

    [​IMG]
    dental extractor

    Many readers of our Survival Medicine Handbook are surprised to find entire chapters devoted to the treatment of dental problems. Visitors to our store are likewise surprised to find dental supplies in some of our medical kits. Why is it important for the survival medic to be “dentally” prepared as well as medically prepared?

    A standard first aid kit will usually suffice for most short-term disasters. When you’re talking about a long-term survival setting, however, you’ll need a more varied set of supplies. Dental issues probably won’t be of major concern if the power’s out for a few days; if you’re off the grid for a few months or longer, though, dental care will become an important part of your role as survival medic.

    The effects of dental disease can be severe, and, at the very least, impacts negatively on work efficiency. Have you ever gone to work with a toothache? It’s fair to say you probably weren’t at 100% efficiency, which is where you need your people to be if you’re off the grid long-term.

    [​IMG]
    tooth abscess

    There are many dental problems, but today we’ll talk about a potentially life-threatening one: Tooth abscesses. In long-term survival, problems maintaining good dental hygiene will make tooth abscesses a challenge for every medic.

    A tooth abscess is a collection of pus that’s caused by a bacterial infection. Pus is comprised of dead and live bacteria, white blood cells, and debris.

    Most abscesses are related to tooth decay, poor hygiene, dental trauma, gingivitis (gum infections) or problems related to previous dental work. The abscess can occur in different areas, either at the tip of the root (periapical), or in the gum next to a tooth root (periodontal). Periapical abscesses are more common, although both can occur together.

    An abscess first forms when bacteria enter through a defect in enamel, the tooth’s armor; a cavity or a chipped tooth is usually where it begins. The bacteria spread all the way down to the root, causing damage to the nerve, which causes pain. Once the nerve is dead, pain in the tooth might cease, but significant painful swelling, inflammation, and accumulation of pus can develop at the base of the root or in nearby gums, soft tissue, and even bone. Left untreated, the bacteria may enter the bloodstream, causing a life-threatening infection called “septicemia“.

    [​IMG]
    tooth abscess (wiki)

    It’s important for the medic to be able to recognize an abscess when it forms. It is commonly seen as a swelling in the tissue at the base of the tooth. It may have a pimple-like head. Other signs and symptoms include:
    • Severe throbbing toothache, sometimes spreading to the jaw or ear
    • Sensitivity of the tooth to hot and cold
    • Sensitivity when biting down on food or gnashing teeth together
    • Red, swollen gums
    • Fever
    • Facial swelling on the side of the diseased gum/tooth
    • Tender, swollen lymph nodes under the jaw or in the neck
    • Foul smelling breath
    Without modern diagnostic imaging, it may be difficult to tell the difference between a periapical abscess and a periodontal abscess. There are, however, low tech ways to tell the difference: In periodontal abscesses, the swelling usually comes before the pain; in periapical abscesses, the pain often comes before the swelling.

    Tapping on the tooth may also give you a hint: If you tap vertically on the tooth and elicit pain, it’s probably periapical. If you tap laterally and get pain, it’s generally periodontal. If the tooth has no obvious crack or decay, it’s probably periodontal. Sensitivity of the tooth to hot and cold may point to a periapical abscess.

    The differences between the types of abscesses matter in modern dentistry: An abscess mainly in the gum, for example, might have a relatively healthy tooth nearby which could be saved via root canal surgery or other modern procedures. In survival, however, this is not an option, so extraction of the tooth to eliminate the pain and infection is likely to be the end result. Extraction will be the answer, in my opinion, for the majority of dental emergencies in grid-down scenarios.

    Although drainage usually occurs via the tooth socket after an extraction, an incision with a sterile scalpel may be needed to drain the entirety of the abscess. This procedure is called “incision and drainage“ or “I & D“. Thorough flushing of the area with warm salt water or hydrogen peroxide (called “irrigation“) afterwards is helpful. Give pain meds and apply warm moist compresses.

    [​IMG]
    antibiotics are useful to prevent infection

    Although extraction, drainage, and irrigation may be all that’s required, it is prudent to begin a course of antibiotics, especially for those with fevers or facial swelling. Options include penicillin (Fish-Pen), amoxicillin (Fish-Mox), clindamycin (Fish-Cin) and/or metronidazole (Fish-Zole). A course of treatment should last 5-7 days. Dosing for each of the above antibiotics can be found in various articles at doomandbloom.net.

    Medical preparedness for long-term events involves having dental supplies and some knowledge of dental anatomy. If you believe a major event is coming, consider a good dental kit to go along with the rest of your medical storage.

    [​IMG]
    Some of the supplies in our dental kit

    Joe Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/the-tooth-abscess-in-austere-settings/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Dental Abscess, Local Anesthetic, Pathogens
    June 24, 2017


    Survival Medicine Hour #243

    [​IMG]
    Dental Abscess

    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton discuss the alternative to lidocaine for local anesthesia: injectable Benadryl (diphenhydramine). The pros and cons and its potential use in survival scenarios are explored. Also, dental issues will be a major problem for the medic in any long-term event; Dr. Bones talks about tooth abscesses and how they might be life-threatening if ignored in off-grid settings.

    [​IMG]
    Injectable Benadryl (diphenhydramine)

    Lastly, a discussion of the different pathogens that cause disease with Nurse Amy and Dr. Bones. All this and more on the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton!

    To Listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/06/23/survival-medicine-hour-dental-abscess-local-anesthesia-pathogens

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad!

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-dental-abscess-local-anesthetic-pathogens/
     
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    Dental Abscess Symptoms and Treatment in Survival
    DrBones NurseAmy



    Published on Jun 29, 2017
    Pain in your mouth can make you miserable. One cause may be a tooth abscess, which is serious. But what if there is no dentist? Learn what a tooth abscess may look and feel like, plus some possible emergency treatment methods during long-term disasters where there is no dental care available. Hosted by Joe Alton, MD of https://www.doomandbloom.net/
    Pro Dental Kit : http://store.doomandbloom.net/medical...
    Medical and First Aid Kits: http://store.doomandbloom.net/
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/preppershow
     
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    Dakin’s Solution for Wound Care
    June 28, 2017


    Dakin’s Solution

    [​IMG]
    Dakin’s Solution by Century Pharm.

    One of the challenges facing the caregiver in austere settings is how to prevent infection in open wounds. After a disaster, people may be forced to perform activities of daily survival to which they are not accustomed. Injuries may occur as a result. Infections will be more likely in areas where hygiene and sanitation are questionable; without advanced medical care, a bad outcome may be the end result.

    A simple and affordable method that was used as far back as World War I may be the answer for the medic: Wound care with Dakin’s solution.

    Dakin’s solution is the product of the efforts of an English chemist, Henry Drysdale Dakin, and a French surgeon named Alexis Carrel. In their search for a useful antiseptic to save the lives of wounded soldiers during WWI, they used sodium hypochlorite (household bleach) and baking soda to make a solution that had significant protective effect against infection. The chlorine in the solution had a solvent action on dead cells, which prevented the accumulation of bacteria in open wounds.

    (As an aside, both sides in the war were also using chlorine in gaseous form as an anti-personnel weapon!)

    Today, Dakin’s solution is still considered effective enough to be used after surgery and on chronic wounds, like bedsores, by many practitioners. It’s easily prepared and can be made stronger or milder by varying the amount of bleach used. Use it simply to clean the wound during dressing changes by pouring onto the affected area, or to moisten dressings used in an open wound.

    Dakin’s Solution Recipe

    [​IMG]
    pan with lid (image by pixabay)

    To make Dakin’s solution, you’ll need just a few items. This recipe is from Ohio State University’s Department of Inpatient Nursing:

    • Unscented household bleach (sodium hypochlorite solution 5.25%, avoid more concentrated versions).
    • Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)
    • A pan with a lid
    • Sterile measuring cup and spoon (sterilize by boiling)
    • Sterile canning jar and lid
    Of course, wash your hands beforehand, just as you would with any medical procedure. Then:

    1. Put 4 cups (32 ounces) of water into the pan and cover with the lid.

    2. Boil the water for 15 minutes with the lid on.

    3. Remove from the heat source.

    4. Use the sterile spoon to add ½ teaspoon of baking soda to the water.

    5. Add bleach (sodium hypochlorite 5.25%) in the amount needed (see below).

    6. Pour into sterile canning jar and close with a sterile lid.

    7. Label and store in a dark place.

    The amount of sodium hypochlorite to add:

    Full Strength (0.5%): 95 ml (about 3 oz. or 6 tablespoons)

    Half Strength (0.25%): 48 ml (3 tablespoons plus ½ teaspoon)

    !/4 Strength (0.125%): 24 ml (1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons)

    1/8 Strength (0.0625%): 12 ml (2 ½ teaspoons)

    Note: 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon = 14.7 ml; 2 tablespoons = 1 US ounce = 29.5 ml

    Once canned, it’s been said that Dakin’s solution will remain potent for about 30 days. For survival purposes, however, I would make it as I need it for wounds or maybe have just make just a few jars at a time. Once open, discard the remainder after a day or so. You may also consider Century Pharmaceutical’s buffered version of Dakin’s that is thought to last about a year.

    Using Dakin’s Solution on Wounds

    [​IMG]
    dressing an open wound

    Pour into wound once daily for mildly infected wounds, twice daily for heavily infected wounds with drainage of pus. Alternatively, moisten (not soak) dressings used inside the wound (not on top of the skin) with a mild strength solution and observe progress. I would prefer using it as a cleanser as opposed to a regular component of a wet dressing. Some studies show that use in this manner may be injurious to developing cells. Having said that, if you’re dealing with a severe infection (as opposed to preventing one), it may be reasonable to incorporate Dakin’s into the dressing.

    Dakin’s solution can be used as a mouthwash for infections inside the oral cavity, but must never be swallowed. Swish for about a minute before spitting it out no more than twice a week.

    Full strength may irritate skin, so consider protecting skin edges with petroleum jelly or other skin protectant/moisture barrier. Look for evidence of skin rashes, burning, itching, hives, or blisters. If irritation occurs, drop down to a milder strength or discontinue. Do not use in those allergic to Chlorine.

    It should be noted that not all practitioners agree about the benefits of Dakin’s solution. Certainly, there may be other options with regards to regular wound care, including sterile normal saline and sterilized tap water. Antibiotics also play an important role in treating infected wounds, and a good supply is important for any medic in a remote setting. However, Dakin’s is well tolerated by patients and is simple to make with affordable ingredients. It’s another tool in the medical woodshed for scenarios where modern medical help is not on the way.

    Joe Alton MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/dakins-solution-for-wound-care/
     
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    Counterfeit Medical Gear
    InRangeTV



    Published on Jul 1, 2017
    While taking a Dirt Medicine/Trauma course from Independence Training I was astonished to hear about counterfeit medical gear, and in particular, toruniquets.

    Certainly we're all familiar with knock-off Aimpoints, EoTechs and other firearms related accessories, but the idea of counterfeit medical gear which can (and does) fail when needed the most to save a life is reprehensible.

    We discuss counterfeit tourniquets in this video and provide a little insight into how to identify and avoid accidentally acquiring them.

    I am personally familiar with two reputable medical gear suppliers, so I can recommend them here. While there definitely others, these two are vendors that I personally depend on:

    http://shop.thetacticalmedic.com/

    https://www.chinookmed.com/

    Indepdence Training:
    https://www.independencetraining.com/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Dakin’s Sol’n, Shock, HPV, Garlic
    July 2, 2017


    Survival Medicine Hour #344

    [​IMG]
    Bleeding wounds need long-term care. Are you ready?

    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, tackles a number of tough topics like, what can you put in an open wound to prevent and treat infection if a disaster happens and all you have is household items? Here’s how to use bleach and baking soda to make Dakin’s solution, used for over 100 years to prevent death from infected wounds.

    Also, Nurse Amy discusses the uses of garlic, it’s not just for cooking! It’s got great antibiotic properties and more…

    [​IMG]
    garlic

    Plus, there are a variety of types of shock, and we’re not talking about the emotional kinds. Dr. Bones discusses hypovolemic, hemorrhagic, and cardiogenic shock in this ongoing series about dealing with a life-threatening event.

    Finally, Joe Alton MD answers a question for the Survival Podcast’s expert council about whether the HPV exam is worthwhile to give to preteens. Find out more about this virus and the controversy surrounding it.

    All this and more on the Survival Medicine Hour! To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/06/29/survival-medicine-hour-dakins-solution-garlic-shock-hpv-more

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-dakins-soln-shock-hpv-garlic/
     
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    Wound Debridement in Survival
    July 6, 2017


    Wound Debridement in Remote Settings

    [​IMG]
    Maggot debridement of open wound

    Injuries in remote settings like a wilderness trail or survival homestead pose challenges to the medic not experienced in long-term wound care. Ordinarily, a system exists to evacuate victims of such injuries to modern medical facilities. In situations where that option doesn’t exist for the foreseeable future, however, the average person may be medically responsible from the point of injury to full recovery.

    This is a novel (and sobering) thought for most, and the tools needed to provide regular wound care and the medications to prevent and treat infection may not be at hand. For this reason, I have spent years writing articles on the importance of antibiotics as part of a prepared individual’s medical supplies.

    Although I’ve written extensively on antibiotics in survival settings, I’ve written less on wound debridement. Originating from the French “desbrider (to unbridle), debridement is the act of removing dead or foreign material in and around a wound.

    Debridement was likely first discovered to be a useful medical tool in wartime, where grossly contaminated wounds were common. The horrific wounds incurred in armed conflict seemed to do better if damaged and dead tissue was aggressively removed. This tissue may be on the edges or throughout the injury. It usually appears discolored, often blackish with a foul odor, although it could also appear white.

    By removing dead tissue that, by definition, will not heal, you eventually reach a level where live tissue exists. After debridement, the remaining tissue can recover in a cleaner environment or might, in certain circumstances, be a candidate for wound closure.

    Why Should You Debride a Wound?

    [​IMG]
    Sharp debridement

    Despite the benefits of debridement, some less-trained survival medics might (understandably) be reluctant to intervene. It is important for them, therefore, to understand the detrimental effects of allowing non-viable tissue to remain in an open wound.

    The first is lack of exposure. An open wound is best evaluated when all the dead tissue is removed and the amount of viable material is known.

    Next is the suppression of the healing process. Tissue that is no longer viable serves as a place for bacteria to grow, especially the nasty ones that cause serious issues like gangrene. These bacteria slow the healing process in open wounds by competing with growing cells for nutrients.

    Necrotic (dead) tissue also causes inflammation in nearby tissues and increases the chance of sepsis (a body-wide infection).

    Finally, failure to remove non-viable tissue interferes with the ability of live tissue to naturally close an open wound (a process called granulation).

    Removal of non-viable tissue by debridement and treatment with antibiotics helps a wound to heal, but either treatment alone does not give you the best chance of avoiding infection, according to studies cited in a recent issue of Wilderness and Environmental Medicine (2017; Vol. 28, #2S).

    The above article referenced an evaluation of open fractures, a severe injury found in both wilderness and survival settings. The results seem to show that surgical intervention and antibiotics given within 2 hours is associated with the lowest rate of infection. When antibiotics are given on time but surgery is delayed, higher rates of infection are seen. When surgical intervention occurs on time but antibiotics are delayed, even higher rates are noted, although signs of infection may not appear for three days or so.

    Wound Debridement in Survival Settings

    There are various ways to debride a wound, but only the following, in my opinion, would be options in a survival scenario:

    Sharp Debridement: Using a scalpel and scissors, dead tissue can be quickly removed. Some surgical skill is useful for the best results.

    Mechanical Debridement: Aggressive wound irrigation helps remove debris and leads to a cleaner wound, but results aren’t as complete or as rapidly seen as with sharp debridement. Less skill is required, however, to achieve the end result.

    Biological Debridement: Maggot therapy. The larvae of the green bottle fly is used to digest dead tissue and bacteria. One way to collect maggots is to place, say, a dead rat or squirrel in a bag with small holes at the bottom and hang it over a plate or pan to collect the maggots that fall out after a few days. More on maggot therapy in a forthcoming article.

    Here is a video from “authority guide”‘s YouTube Channel demonstrating the technique of sharp debridement:



    Your goal in debriding a wound is to have clear margins of live healthy tissue on all sides. This tissue will bleed somewhat (a sign of life!), but is unlikely to hemorrhage. Moist dressings should then be used to cover the wound and changed regularly.

    Debridement takes place at modern facilities in normal times. In survival scenarios, the procedure should take place where there is good lighting (and the bulk of your medical supplies). Having an assistance to help is always a good idea. In the inexperienced, the anatomy of a deeply necrotic wound may be unclear; the medic should have a good textbook on anatomy in their survival library and learn as much as possible before a long-term disaster takes place.

    Bottom line: Live tissue heals, dead tissue doesn’t. Debridement allows you to remove the dead material so the live tissue can heal.

    Joe Alton MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/wound-debridement-in-survival/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Wound Debridement, Shock Treatment, More
    July 9, 2017



    THE SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR #345

    [​IMG]
    Wound Debridement

    In this episode of The Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss the Wilderness Medical Society’s special edition on combat casualty care guidelines applied to survival settings, where they coincide and where they diverge. Also, some basics on an important part of wound care, wound debridement, the removal of dead skin from a healing open wound. Studies show that antibiotics are important to prevent and treat wound infections, but debriding dead tissue from a wound is important to aid recovery as well.

    [​IMG]
    People in shock lose heat quickly

    Also, more on the different types of shock, and what to do if you have to treat someone deteriorating rapidly from some of the various types. All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD, and Amy Alton ARNP!

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/07/07/survival-medicine-hour-shock-wound-debridement-more

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-wound-debridement-shock-treatment-more/
     
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    Snake Bites in Austere Settings
    July 12, 2017


    [​IMG]
    rattlesnake (image by wiki)

    Off the grid, you will find yourself outdoors a lot, with activities like gathering wood for fuel, foraging, and hunting required to keep body and soul together. In warm weather, you just might find yourself face-to-face (or maybe face-to-ankle) with a snake.

    Most snakes aren’t poisonous, but a few are, including some species common in North America. The term “poisonous snake” is probably incorrect, as venoms and poisons are not the same thing. Poisons are absorbed in the gut or through the skin, but venom must be injected into tissues or blood via fangs or a stinger. Interestingly, it’s usually not dangerous to drink snake venom unless you have a cut or sore in your mouth. Having said that, please don’t test this out at home.

    Venomous snake bites have a distinct appearance due to the hollow fangs at the front of the mouth. This differs from non-venomous snakes, which have a more uniform appearance.

    Since snakes are most active during the summer, most bite injuries occur then. Not every bite from a venomous snake transmits toxins to the victim, however; indeed, 25-30% of these bites will be “dry” and show little or no ill effects. This could be due to the short duration of time the snake has its fangs in its victim or whether the snake had bitten another animal shortly beforehand. Many other snake bites are only slight “envenomations” and resolve without major intervention.

    In most cases, it’s not hard to tell whether there’s venom in the bite. Snake bites containing venom tend to cause a painful burning sensation almost immediately. Swelling at the site may begin as soon as five minutes afterwards, and may travel up the affected area towards the body core.

    Venomous Snakes in North America: Pit Vipers and Elapids

    [​IMG]
    Many snakes have enough venom to deliver more than one bite

    The two to worry about in North America are the pit vipers and the elapids. Of these, the pit vipers are responsible for the grand majority of venomous bites in the United States.

    Pit vipers like rattlesnakes and water moccasins are identified by the presence of a heat-sensing “pit” organ between the eye and nostril on both sides of the head. They are, perhaps, more easily recognized by their triangular-shaped heads and slit-like eyes. Rattlesnakes will, of course, have rattles that make noise when they’re threatened.

    Pit viper bites tend to cause bruising and blisters at the site of the wound. Numbness may be noted in the area bitten, or perhaps on the lips or face. Some victims describe a metallic or other strange taste in their mouths. Serious bites might cause spontaneous bleeding from the nose or gums, irregular heart rhythms, or difficulty breathing.

    [​IMG]
    Red touches yellow, kill a fellow…

    The elapids include cobras and mambas, but the main North American representative is the colorful coral snake. Coral snakes appear very similar to their look-alike, the non-venomous king snake. They both have red, yellow, and black bands and are commonly confused with each other. The old saying goes: “red touches yellow, kill a fellow; red touches black, venom it lacks”. In other words, if the red band is next to the yellow band, it’s a deadly coral snake. If the red band touches the black band, it’s a non-venomous king snake. It should be noted that this old saying only applies to coral snakes in North America.

    [​IMG]
    red touches black, venom it lacks…

    Coral snake bites are “neurotoxic” and will cause mental and nerve issues such as twitching, confusion, and slurred speech. Later, nerve damage may cause difficulty with swallowing and breathing, followed by total paralysis. Luckily, only 73 coral snake bites were reported in the U.S. in 2013.

    Preventing Snake Bites

    [​IMG]
    Wear high tops in snake country

    An ounce of prevention, they say, is worth a pound of cure. High-top boots and long pants are always a sound strategy when hiking in the wilderness. It’s important to be aware of where you’re putting your hands and feet. Be especially careful around areas where snakes might like to hide, such as hollow logs, under rocks, or in old shelters. Wearing sturdy work gloves would be a wise precaution if you can’t avoid these places.

    If you let snakes know you’re near, they tend to leave the area. Snakes have no outer ear, so treading heavily creates ground vibrations much more easily “heard” by them than, say, shouting.

    In warm weather, many snakes like to be active at night. This means that nocturnal outdoor activities are inadvisable without a good light source.

    Treating a Snake Bite in Austere Settings

    [​IMG]
    Pit viper bites often have bruising, sometimes blisters

    The standard treatment for a venomous snake bite is “anti-venin”, also called “anti-venom”. Anti-venin is an animal or human serum with antibodies capable of neutralizing a specific biological toxin. Any hospital will have it, but in survival scenarios, this product will be a scarce commodity. If there’s no help coming, consider these steps:
    • Keep the victim calm. Stress increases blood flow, thereby endangering the patient by speeding the venom into the system.
    • Stop all movement of the injured extremity. Movement transports the venom into the circulation faster, so do your best to keep the limb still.
    • Clean the wound thoroughly to remove any venom that isn’t deep in the wound.
    • Remove rings and bracelets from an affected extremity. Swelling is likely to occur.
    • Position the extremity slightly below the level of the heart; this slows the transport of venom.
    • Wrap with clean, loose bandages further up the limb than usual. Pressure bandaging is thought to be helpful for elapid bites, but may be risky for pit viper bites, as it may cause tissue damage.In any case, keep the wrapping somewhat less tight than when dressing a sprained ankle. If it is too tight, the patient will reflexively move the limb, and spread the venom around.
    • Avoid tourniquets, which do more harm than good.
    • Draw a circle around the affected area. As time progresses, you will see the area shrink if it improves or grow if it worsens. By the way, this is a good strategy to follow for any local reaction, infection, abscess, or hematoma.
    The limb should then be rested and, perhaps, immobilized with a splint or sling. The less movement there is, the better. Keep the patient on bed rest, with the bite site lower than the heart, for 24-48 hours. This strategy also works for bites from venomous lizards, like Gila monsters.

    [​IMG]
    Snake bite kits aren’t always recommended anymore

    It is no longer recommended to make an incision and try to suck out the venom with your mouth. The amount of venom removed is thought to be very little and oral bacteria could introduce an infection. Snake bite kits are available for your backpack, but are out of favor with most wilderness medical professionals. The Sawyer Extractor (a syringe with a suction cup) is modern and compact, but ineffective in eliminating more than a fraction of the venom. These methods fail, mostly, due to the speed at which the venom is absorbed by the body.

    You may wonder why I haven’t suggested antibiotics as a treatment for snake bite. Interestingly, snake bites don’t cause infections as frequently as bites from cats, dogs, or humans. As such, antibiotics are used less often.

    Parting Thoughts on Snake Bite

    A snake doesn’t always slither away after it bites you. It’s likely that it still has more venom that it can inject, so move out of its territory or abolish the threat in any way you can. To many, this entails killing the snake. Even severing the head from the body may not render it harmless, however: it can reflexively bite for a period of time.

    Elapids and pit vipers may respond differently to an encounter with a human. Coral snakes are not as aggressive as pit vipers and prefer fleeing to attacking. Once they bite you, however, they tend to hold on. Rattlesnakes prefer to bite and let go quickly. Unlike elapids, though, pit vipers may be reluctant to relinquish their territory to you, so leave the area as soon as possible.

    Snakes can be dangerous, but they want to avoid you as much as you want to avoid them. Keep an eye out, wear decent gear, and both you and the snake will be the happier for it.

    Joe Alton MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/snake-bites-in-austere-settings/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Wilderness Safety, Snake Bite, More
    July 14, 2017


    Survival Medicine Hour #347

    [​IMG]
    wilderness safety


    In this episode of the The Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton, MD, aka Dr. Bones, and Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Nurse Amy, discusses how to make those summer outdoor outings with your family, as well as off-grid survival scenarios, safer for all involved. To make a wilderness experience memorable (in a good way), you’ll need to know what factors will make the environment friendly or not-so-friendly, with injuries as the end result. Amy and Joe tell you what you need to bring in your medical kit.

    [​IMG]
    Pit vipers!

    One thing you might not bring is that old snake bite kit! Dr. Bones talks about current thinking regarding the old standard, and what to do if you have a group member suffer a venomous snake bite when modern facilities are not an option.

    All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with the Altons! To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/07/14/survival-medicine-hour-wilderness-safety-snake-bites-more

    Hey, do us a huge favor and….

    Follow us on: Twitter @Preppershow Facebook at DoomandBloom(tm) YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy Instagram at DoomandBloomMedical

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-wilderness-safety-snake-bite-more/
     
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    All About Urinary Tract Infections
    July 19, 2017


    Urinary Tract Infections

    [​IMG]
    Urinary Anatomy

    Medics in survival scenarios have to deal with major injuries and serious infections, Sometimes, infections aren’t serious to begin with, but worsen if not treated. Some of these infections involve the urinary tract.

    Urine directly from the bladder is generally sterile, but most women have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) at one point or another. The areas most commonly contaminated are the bladder, which holds the urine, and the urethra, the tube that drains the bladder. Although men can also get bladder infections (called “cystitis”), their urethra is much longer and bacteria are much less likely to reach the bladder.

    If untreated, bladder infections may ascend to the kidneys via tubes called ureters, causing an infection known as “pyelonephritis”. Once in the kidneys, it can make its way to the bloodstream and lead to shock or worse.

    Symptoms of UTIs

    Each type of UTI manifests in more or less specific signs and symptoms, depending on which part of the urinary tract is infected.

    Inflammation of the urethra (urethritis) may be caused by E.Coli, Gonorrhea, Herpes, and other bacteria and viruses. Sufferers will feel a burning sensation with urination; males may also have a urethral discharge, while women with certain sexually transmitted infections may notice a foul discharge from the vagina.

    Bladder infections are characterized by pelvic pressure, lower abdominal pain, and frequency of urination. Some people may feel an urgent need to go without warning (urgency) but notice that the stream of urine is slow to start (hesitancy). The urine itself may be cloudy or red-tinged with blood and have a strong smell.

    [​IMG]
    Kidney Infections signs include one-sided flank pain with fever

    Once the infection reaches the kidney (pyelonephritis), other signs and symptoms will become apparent. Fever and chills are common, with pain on the flank (the side of your back). Normally, it will be noticeable only on one side by tapping the flank lightly at the level of the lowest rib with the side of a closed first. This will elicit no response in a healthy patient, but someone with an infection will grimace and flinch. Kidney stones may be mistaken for a kidney infection, as they also cause tenderness in this region. They are, however, less likely to cause fever.

    Treating a UTI

    Treatment revolves around the vigorous administration of fluids. Lots of water will help flush out the infection by decreasing the concentration of bacteria in the affected organs. Some feel relief with a heating pad or compress in the area of discomfort.

    [​IMG]
    various antibiotics work to treat UTIs

    Antibiotics are another standard of therapy. The following are commonly used for UTIs (brand names and veterinary equivalents in parenthesis):
    • Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Bactrim, Septra, Bird-Sulfa, Fish-Sulfa)
    • Amoxicillin (Amoxil, Fish-Mox)
    • Ampicillin (Fish-Cillin)
    • Cephalexin (Keflex, Fish-Flex)
    • Azithromycin (Zithromax, Z-Pak, Aquatic Azithromycin)
    • Doxycycline (Vibramycin, Bird-Biotic)
    • Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Fish-Flox)
    For dosages, days taken, side-effects, and warnings, use the search engine on this website for the particular antibiotic.

    To eliminate the pain that occurs with urination in UTIs, stockpile over-the-counter medications like Phenazopyridine (also known as Pyridium, Uristat, Azo, etc.). Don’t be alarmed if your patient’s urine turns a reddish-orange color; it is an effect of the drug and is only temporary.

    Natural Remedies for UTIs

    There are a number of natural remedies to treat someone with a urinary infection. Vitamin C supplements, for example, are thought to reduce the concentration of bacteria in the urine.

    Others include:
    • Garlic or garlic oil (preferably in capsules).
    • Echinacea extract or tea.
    • Goldenrod tea with vinegar (1 to 2 tablespoons),
    • Uva Ursi (1 tablet).
    • Cranberry tablets (1 to 3 pills).
    Take any one of the above remedies three times per day.

    Another home remedy is to take one Alka-Seltzer tablet and dissolve it in 2 ounces of warm water. Pour directly over the urethral area.

    One more alternative that may be helpful is to perform an external massage over the bladder area with 5 drops of lavender essential oil (mixed with castor oil) for a few minutes. Then, apply a gentle heat source over the area; repeat this 3 to 4 times daily. The combination of lavender/castor oil and warmth may help decrease bladder spasms and pain.

    I’m sure you have a tried-and-true strategy of your own. As with many home remedies, however, your experience may vary. In normal times, consult your physician.

    Preventing UTIs

    Preventative medicine plays a large role in decreasing the likelihood of urinary tract infections. Basic hygienic method, such as wiping from front to back after urinating, is important for women. Also, emptying the bladder right after an episode of sexual intercourse is a wise choice.

    Wear cotton undergarments to allow better air circulation in areas that might otherwise encourage bacterial or fungal growth. Adequate fluid intake, especially cranberry juice if available, is also a key to flushing out bacteria and other organisms. Lastly, never postpone urinating when you feel a strong urge to go.

    Off-grid medics may have to deal with gunfights at the OK corral, but it’s how well they handle everyday problems like UTIs that gauges their day-to-day contributions to their community.

    Joe Alton, MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/all-about-urinary-tract-infections/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Bears, UTIs, Kratom for Pain?
    July 22, 2017


    Survival Medicine Hour #348

    [​IMG]
    American Black Bear

    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss the controversial non-ban of a natural pain reliever, Kratom, the only non-opiate that seems to give major benefits to many, as evidenced by numerous YouTube testimonials. Also, bears love the summer, and they’d love to stay out of your way. If they don’t, however, it can mean trouble for both you and the bear. Here’s some safety tips from Dr. Alton, whose home in Gatlinburg, Tennessee is home to many a black bear.

    [​IMG]
    Kratom may help with pain

    Also, the medic in survival scenarios may have to deal with gunshot wounds, but he/she’s more likely to deal with common infections, like those that affect the urinary tract. Learn how to identify, treat, and prevent UTIs, which can travel to the kidneys, and eventually become life-threatening if not treated.

    All this and more on The Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP!

    To Listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/07/21/survival-medicine-hour-bears-pain-relief-with-kratom-utis

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-bears-utis-kratom-for-pain/
     
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    How to Make Dakin's Solution for Wound Care: Part 2
    DrBones NurseAmy



    Published on Jul 23, 2017
    Demonstration of making Dakin's Solution by Nurse Amy (FF if you viewed part 1). Recipes and expiration dates reviewed. It is used for wound cleaning and daily care of ulcers, poor healing wounds and more. Part 1 explains what Dakin's Solution is : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6_Ii...
    By Nurse Amy Alton and Dr. Joe Alton of
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    Having at least basic first aid as a prepper how important is it?
    preppernurse1



    Published on Jul 23, 2017
    Having at least basic first aid if you are a prepper is very important. How to remove a tick. Basic medical knowledge can safe your life.
     
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    Medical monday at the Homestead part one.
    preppernurse1



    Published on Jul 24, 2017
    On Mondays from now on we will be doing medical videos for you. I am now cancer free for two years.
     
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    Poison Ivy, Oak, and Others
    July 27, 2017


    POISON IVY AND SIMILAR PLANTS

    [​IMG]
    From Left: Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac, Poisonwood (UFAS)

    Whether you’re outdoors due to a major disaster or just on a wilderness hike, it’s possible that you’ll run afoul of poisonous plants. If you live in the continental United States, expect to find poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, and others in the environment. 350,000 cases of poison ivy alone are recorded in the United States every year.

    POISON IVY AND SIMILAR PLANTS

    [​IMG]
    Poison Ivy

    The typical “tri-foliate” appearance of poison ivy and another poisonous plant, poison oak, has led to the saying: “Leaves of three, let it be”. Poison ivy’s leaves appear almond-shaped, while poison oak looks like, well, oak leaves. There are various subtypes: Some are vinelike, others short and shrubby, still others appear as ground cover.

    [​IMG]
    Poison Oak

    There are, of course, plants that are perfectly harmless that come in “leaves of three”. Other poisonous plants, like poison sumac, have a different look. Poison sumac has 7-13 pointy leaflets and can grow into a small tree upwards of 20 feet in height. Poisonwood is a relative that prefers subtropical areas like the Florida Keys. It is thought that inhaling smoke from burning sumac and poisonwood can cause life-threatening respiratory distress.

    [​IMG]
    Poison Sumac

    WHAT CAUSES POISON IVY RASH

    [​IMG]
    Poison Ivy rash can appear “streaky”

    The common factor that makes all of the above plants dangerous is the compound “urushiol”. Urushiol is an oily resin that can be found on just about every part of the plant, including vines, leaves, and roots. The chemical irritant sticks to the skin on contact and causes symptoms in 85% of those exposed.

    As poison ivy rash is essentially an allergic reaction, it is not, in and of itself, contagious. However, any clothing or body parts that have urushiol on them can cause symptoms when touched by others.

    As an aside, the presence of urushiol in poison ivy and other plants appears not to be a defense mechanism; instead, it serves to help them retain water. Deer, birds, and other wildlife can eat poison ivy without ill effects.

    DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    [​IMG]
    Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac rash is caused by the compound “Urushiol”



    The rash of poison ivy, oak, and sumac causes itching and a red, bumpy rash within a day or two of exposure. The rash continues to spread for a few days and lasts for up to three weeks (more in some cases). Breaks in the skin from itching can cause secondary infections that can become serious.

    It’s sometimes difficult to make the diagnosis. Most don’t realize they were exposed during their time outdoors. Exposure may also occur indirectly, for example, by petting the fur of a pet that has been outside. The rash might appear in winter and confuse health providers, but even plants that are dormant can cause reactions.

    Therefore, a red, bumpy, itchy rash in anyone who has been in the Great Outdoors or near others who have (including pets) should raise your suspicions. Either poison oak, ivy, or sumac exist just about everywhere in North America except perhaps mountaintop and desert environments. As such, it should always be on the list of possibilities in wilderness settings.

    [​IMG]
    Touching kids and pets that have been outside could cause exposure to poison plant toxins

    Once you have determined that there has been exposure to poison ivy, it’s important to wash the exposed area and clothing with soap and water as quickly as possible. Urushiol isn’t easy to remove, however, so you might consider soaps that are effective against resins or oil, such as Fels-Naptha or Tecnu.

    Common treatments for poison ivy, oak, and sumac rashes include hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion, capsaicin cream, and antihistamines like diphenhydramine (Benadryl). Some recommend the use of rubbing alcohol on the exposed areas. Cool compresses may are thought to be soothing.

    There are many home remedies that are also thought to be effective to treat poison ivy rash. Here are just a few:

    • Apple cider vinegar (burns at first)
    • Baking soda paste
    • Epsom salt or oatmeal baths.
    • Chamomile tea bag compresses
    • Aloe Vera gel mixed with various essential oils, such as tea tree, lemon, lavender, peppermint, geranium, and chamomile.
    • Jewel weed (mash and apply)
    There are many others. Natural or commercial creams and ointments should be dabbed on as opposed to rubbed, which may cause more irritation and slow healing. In the worst cases, prescription medications like Medrol (Methylprednisolone) may be needed to speed recovery and prevent complications.

    The good news is that, even if you don’t treat the rash, it will go away by itself over 2-3 weeks in most cases.

    PREVENTION

    [​IMG]
    Long pants and sleeves will help prevent contact with poison plants

    The best prevention is to avoid getting the toxin on your skin. If you can’t avoid exposure, make sure to wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts, work gloves, and boots if you’re doing work in areas known to harbor poison plants.

    Some recommend an over-the-counter lotion called IvyX as a preventative. Apply it like you would a sunblock to likely areas of exposure. Theoretically, it prevents the oil from being absorbed by your skin.

    The effects of poison ivy, oak, or sumac can make you miserable and even cause secondary infections, something that will decrease your work efficiency in the Great Outdoors. If you know how to identify these plants and be aware of your surroundings, you’ll have less headaches off the grid.

    Joe Alton MD

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/poisonous-ivyoakothers/
     
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    MUST-HAVE Medical Items with Special Forces Medic Jay Paisley, ret.
    John Lovell



    Published on Jul 29, 2017
    Special Forces veteran Jay Paisley (18z) ret. 5th special forces group and founder of Crisis Application Group (CAG) discusses what medical items you need to get and a host of other subjects such as TCCC, IFAKs, bleeder kits, and medical accessories you need, i.e, tourniquets, gauze, chest seals, pressure dressings.

    Follow Jay Paisley http://instagram.com/jay_paisley http://facebook.com/crisisapplication... http://cagmain.com

    Get Medical Items CAT Tourniquet - http://amzn.to/2h6aT5a NAR Medical Supplies - http://amzn.to/2vMTi5A Hyfin Chest Seals - http://amzn.to/2eQUZLm Trauma Shears - http://amzn.to/2u2eKl7 NPA - http://amzn.to/2u25iOx Gauze - http://amzn.to/2eRCx59 Celox - http://amzn.to/2h6yNOa Medical Pouches - http://amzn.to/2vbEd0r

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Poison Plants, Setting a Fracture, More
    July 28, 2017



    [​IMG]
    various fracture types; note open fracture 2nd from left

    SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR #349

    In the this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, our hosts discuss what you would do with a fractured bone off the grid or after a disaster where modern medicine is just not an option. Dr. Alton’s take on the subject might shock modern medical professionals, but you have to do what you can, with what you have, where you are, in tough times. Topics including placing a cast, open fractures, re-aligning bones (known as “reductions”) and more.

    [​IMG]
    typical rash of poison ivy

    Also, the Altons talk about what to do when you’re outdoors and surrounded by poison plants like poison ivy, oak, and sumac. How to identify plants, diagnose and treat the rash, plus natural remedies that might help.

    All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton! To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/07/28/survival-medicine-hour-poison-plants-setting-a-fracture-more

    Hey, do us a big favor and follow us on twitter @preppershow, Facebook: Doom and Bloom or join our group at Survival Medicine Dr Bones Nurse Amy, and YouTube at DrBonesNurseAmy!

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-poison-plants-setting-a-fracture-more/
     
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    10 Critical Principles of Tourniquet Use: What to Know First
    DrBones NurseAmy



    Published on Jul 28, 2017
    Training to properly use a tourniquet involves knowledge of more than application steps. When and why to apply a tourniquet, monitoring of re-bleeding and why this might happen, when and how to transition a tourniquet off a victim safely and more. Hosted by Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton, ARNP of
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    What You're Not Being Told About Lyme Disease (ENCORE) | Dr. Jay Nielsen, MD
    Reluctant Preppers



    Published on Jul 30, 2017
    COMING SOON in late August will be an ALL NEW EXPOSE by Dr Nielsen of Big Pharma's CORRUPTION, COLLUSION with the FDA, and COVERUP that they are the cause of many of the top serious diseases in the US, and what you need to know to opt out and protect your family!

    This is an ENCORE presentation of one of our classic interviews for the benefit of recent subscribers!
    ==============

    If you or anyone you know suffers from fatigue, unexplained aches, brain fog, memory lapses, neck & joint stiffness, sleep troubles, night sweats, or heart palpitations.. did you know the #1 contracted pest-borne illness in the US is Lymes disease, and today’s Lymes has become a more virulent and destructive strain that can wreak havoc on your body and mental faculties while hiding from your immune system and remaining severely undetected and under-diagnosed using conventional medical tests? Worse yet, Lymes can spread to your spouse and even babies in the womb!

    What can you do to get aware and protect yourself and your family from this real and present epidemic? Off-Grid doctor Jay Nielsen, MD returns to Reluctant Preppers to lay out the hard-hitting truths and ground-breaking protocol capable of achieving real healing - and you won’t hear this from most conventional doctors. Don’t delay while real damage is done: get aware and start on the road to healing today!

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    Signs and symptoms of Hypothermia and treatment for it.
    preppernurse1



    Published on Jul 31, 2017
    Medical Monday knowing signs and symptoms of Hypothermia and treatments for it.
     

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