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Dr Bones & Nurse Amy: The Survival Medicine Hour Of Doom & Bloom

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by searcher, Mar 16, 2014.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Amputation, Insomnia, more[/h]

    September 27, 2015




    [​IMG]


    What if you were the medic in a long-term survival scenario and came upon an injury that won’t get better with the usual treatment? What if you had to make an extreme decision like whether to perform an amputation? Joe Alton, MD steps out on a limb to talk about considerations that would be necessary in these circumstances. Also, Amy Alton, ARNP, discusses a common problem and how to deal with it: Insomnia! All this and more in the latest Survival Medicine Podcast.


    [​IMG]


    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2015/09/28/survival-medicine-hour-amputation-insomnia


    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,


    Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=3]Topical Skin Glue in Survival[/h]

    September 30, 2015





    [​IMG]



    There are many ways to skin a cat, but how many ways are there to close a cat’s skin? Pretty much, the same number of ways that you can close a human’s skin. Sutures, staples, and tape butterfly closures like steri-strips are common methods, but there’s another one: topical skin adhesive glues.

    Topical glues have been around since the 1940’s, but it took more than 3 decades for them to be approved for human use. Since that time, they have become the favorite method of closure for some surgical procedures.

    This article will discuss the properties and uses of skin adhesives, especially as they apply to survival scenarios. Therefore, we will forego a discussion of cosmetic results, as they would be less important in austere settings.

    Topical skin adhesives (or glues) are liquids made from a mixture of cyanoacetate and formaldehyde called cyanoacrylate. These glues become solid upon contact with skin, thus holding wound edges together.

    The original cyanoacrylates (methyl-cyanoacrylate) comprise what is now industrial Super Glue. Medical versions were then developed (octyl- and butyl-cyanoacrylate) that were meant specifically for human skin. Some brands include Dermabond, Surgiseal, Liquiband, and others. These are mostly by prescription only, and are roughly ten times the cost of regular Super Glue.


    Benefits of Topical Skin Adhesives

    Topical skin adhesives are useful in a number of specific circumstances, and have some benefits not seen with some other methods of wound closure:

    • They are quick to apply.
    • They are a relatively painless method of closure.
    • They don’t leave the “hatch marks” seen with sutures and staples.
    • They don’t require removal. Skin glues slough off by themselves spontaneously after 5-10 days.
    • They don’t require anesthetic injections, which makes them less problematic to use in children or those afraid of needles.
    • They create an environment which speeds healing.
    • They decrease the risk of wound infections with certain bacteria (gram-positive like Staph).


    Indications for skin closure with glue

    Topical skin adhesives are best used for simple cuts such as some traumatic lacerations. Use them for:

    • Wounds that are completely dry (no longer bleeding).
    • Areas where there is no skin tension (not difficult to pull together manually).
    • Hair-free areas .
    • areas not inside the mouth.
    • children, to avoid pain of local anesthetic injection.
    • Short-medium length lacerations

    Topical adhesives are not helpful or may be dangerous if used:

    • Inside the mouth or other internal cavity.
    • In other high-moisture areas such as the groin or armpit.
    • Around the eyes without extreme caution.
    • On joints (unless immobilized with splints).
    • Very long lacerations
    • On avulsions (areas where skin flaps have been torn off due to trauma) or very jagged lacerations.
    • Infected wounds.
    • Wounds with dead tissue, like gangrene.
    • In those with known hypersensitivity to the chemical compound.


    Comparing skin adhesives to sutures and staples


    [​IMG]


    Traditional methods of skin closure include sutures and staples. The following are considerations when comparing these to topical skin glues:

    • The wound strength with glues is less than with staples or sutures, probably only 10 per cent or so in the early going. After several days, the healed skin strength with glue is nearly equal to other methods, especially if used in conjunction with butterfly closures.
    • Although anti-bacterial ointments can be applied on top of suture/staple closures, they weaken the strength of skin adhesives.
    • Blood or fluid may collect under the adhesive. Although drainage from the wound is acceptable with suture or staple closures (and may be preferable to collection under the skin), infection risk may be increased with glues or even prevent skin healing.



    How to use topical skin adhesive glue:


    [​IMG]


    Before using any method of skin closure, meticulous care must be taken to completely flush out debris and bacteria in the open wound. This should be done with an antiseptic solution like betadine or sterile saline. Any bleeding must be completely controlled. If deep layers are needed to close dead space, sutures can be used for this purpose as well as to decrease any tension on the wound edges.

    When you are ready to close the skin:

    • Approximate the wound edges carefully (best done by an assistant).
    • Gently brush the glue over the laceration, taking care not to push any below the level of the skin.
    • Apply about three layers of the adhesive over the wound, preferably widening the area of glue to increase strength of closure.

    • Once completely dry, consider adding steri-strips to increase the strength of the closure.

    It should be noted that some people experience a sensation of heat to the area when the glue is first applied. Encourage your patient to avoid picking at the closure or scratching it.



    What about Super Glue for skin closure?


    [​IMG]


    Many underdeveloped countries may not be able to afford the expensive medical glues. In some, like Cuba, emergency rooms have had to resort to industrial Super Glue. As a closure method, it is comparable, but it should be noted that Super Glue closures must be kept dry as they may break down more easily that medical glue.


    Some people will experience skin irritation or even mild burns from the industrial version. You can test for this beforehand by having those in your group place a drop of Super Glue on the inside of their forearm. If there is a significant reaction such as redness or itching, avoid this method of closure on that person, or use the prescription version.


    In my experience, gel versions of Super Glue are easier to handle due to less dripping.


    Of course, standard medical texts will tell you to avoid Super Glue altogether. In a survival setting, you will have to make decisions based upon what you have available. The medic will often have to “make do” with suboptimal methods and equipment, but something is better than nothing. It will be easier to stockpile commercial glue than the more expensive medical skin adhesives.


    As the survival medic, you should know how to use all the tools in the medical woodshed. If you learn the pros and cons of every method of skin closure, you’ll be better able to succeed, even if everything else fails.

    Joe Alton, MD



    http://www.doomandbloom.net/topical...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Kermit Jones of Prepper Pete, Skin Glues, More




    October 3, 2015



    [​IMG]
    Navy Chaplain Kermit Jones



    Teaching the youngsters about preparedness isn’t easy, but Navy Chaplain Kermit Jones is helping with his great series of children’s book on self-reliance, Prepper Pete and Friends. In Nurse Amy’s interview, you’ll hear how Kermit is helping forge a new generation that will be resilient in the face of adversity. Also, Joe Alton, MD,,aka Dr. Bones, discusses the pros and cons of skin glues to close wounds, and how to use them.



    [​IMG]

    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...-kermit-jones-of-prepper-pete-skin-glues-more


    [​IMG]



    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,


    Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton, ARNP


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-kermit-jones-of-prepper-pete-skin-glues-more/
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Surviving a Flood




    October 4, 2015




    [​IMG]
    Flood, Johnstown, Pennsylvania



    We have often discussed preparedness for natural disasters such as hurricanes and tornadoes, but not as much about the complications that go along with them. Flooding is one of the most common disasters to affect the United States and is the reason for almost 75% of presidential disaster proclamations. As such, it’s important to know how to keep your family safe during these events.


    Typical Flood Hazards



    A flood is defined as an overflow of water that submerges land which is normally dry. In the United States, there are various causes for flooding. They are:

    Flash Floods: Flash floods usually develop shortly after a nearby heavy rain. I say nearby because it doesn’t have to be raining at your location for rising water to endanger you. These floods create a rapid rise of water, especially in low-lying areas like floodplains. Causes of flash flooding include heavy rain, ice jams, and levee or dam failure. This is especially common in the western United States where normally dry low lying areas next to steep terrain become filled with rushing water.


    River Flooding: River flooding can be caused by heavy rainfall, dam failures, rapid snowmelt and ice jams. Normally calm flow can become turbulent rapidly as in a flash flood or water levels may rise slowly but steadily. The result in either case threatens structures and populations along its course.


    Storm Surges: Tropical (or even non-tropical) storm systems can bring heavy winds, but most damage occurs as a result of flooding due to the storm surge. Storm surge is the rise in water generated by the storm above normal tide levels. When the storm approaches the coast, high winds cause large waves that can inundate structures, damage foundations, and cause significant loss of life.

    Burn Scars: The Western U.S. has had significant wildfire activity in the last few years. When these occur, the bare ground can become hardened to the point that water can’t get through. This is known as a burn scar. Burn scars are less able to absorb moisture, leading heavy rains to accumulate water wherever gravity takes it. Mudslides, essentially a moving river of wet concrete, can occur.


    [​IMG]
    An Ice Jam



    Ice Jams
    : Northern areas of the continental U.S. and Alaska may have flooding as a result of ice jams. When moving ice and debris are blocked by an obstruction, water is held back. This causes flooding upstream. When the obstruction is finally breached, flash flooding occurs downstream. Many ice jams occur at bends in a river.

    Snowmelt: Snowmelt flooding is not uncommon in Northern states and mountainous areas . Snow is essentially stored water until temperatures rise above freezing. The soil does not absorb the water until this occurs. When temperatures finally rise, the snowmelt acts as if it came from rain. When there is more water than can be contained in the soil, rivers, and lakes, flooding occurs.

    Barrier Failures: When a dam or levee breaks, it can be due to excessive rainfall, erosion, landslides, earthquakes, and many other natural causes. Some dams fail as a result of man-made issues, such as negligence, improper maintenance, and even sabotage. As a result, water level can “overtop” the barrier or water can seep through the ground beyond it.


    Flood Preparedness


    Most people have heard of hurricane or tornado watches and warnings, but the U.S. weather services also tries to warn the populace of flooding. A “flash flood watch” means that flash flooding is possible in the near future; a “flash flood warning” means that flooding is imminent in the area.

    If you live in a low-lying area, especially near a dam or river, then you should heed warnings when they are given and be prepared to evacuate quickly. Rising flood waters could easily trap you in your home and you don’t want to have to perch on your roof waiting for help.


    Flood Safety Tips

    [​IMG]



    To make it safely through a flood, consider the following recommendations:

    Get Out Of Dodge Early

    Make the decision to leave for higher ground before flooding occurs and roads are blocked.

    Be Careful Walking Through Flowing Water

    Drowning is the most common cause of death during a flood, especially a flash flood. Rapidly-moving water can knock you off your feet even if relatively shallow. Even cars can be carried away by water just one foot deep.

    Don’t Drive Through a Flooded Area

    As many people drown in their cars as anywhere else. Cars stall and roads/bridges could easily be washed out. Try to figure out if there is a “high road” to safety before a flood occurs.



    [​IMG]
    Downed Power Line



    Beware Of Downed Power Lines


    Watch for downed power lines; electrical current is easily conducted through water. You don’t have to touch the downed line to be electrocuted, only step in the water nearby.

    Don’t Drink The Water

    Flood water is not clean water. It is contaminated by debris and water treatment plants may even have been compromised by the disaster. Have a reliable way to sterilize water and a good supply of clean water in your storage.

    Have Supplies Handy

    Flood waters may not recede quickly. Besides water as mentioned above, have non-perishable food, heat and light sources, batteries, tools, a medical kit, a cell phone, and a NOAA weather radio available.

    Turn Off The Power

    If you have reason to believe that water will get into your home, turn off the electricity. Don’t use appliances or motors that have gotten wet unless they have completely dried. You might have to take some apart to clean debris out of them.


    [​IMG]
    Typical Home Intruders



    Watch Out For Intruders


    Critters that have been flooded out of their homes may seek shelter in yours. Snakes, raccoons, and other unfriendly creatures may decide your home is now their territory. Human intruders may also be interested in your property.

    Watch Your Step

    After a flood, watch where you step; there is debris everywhere. The floors of your home may be covered in mud, causing a slip-and-fall hazard.

    Check for Gas Leaks

    Don’t use candles, lanterns, stoves, or lighters unless you are sure that the gas has been turned off and the area has been well-ventilated.

    Exhaust Fumes Can Kill

    Only use generators, camping stoves or charcoal grills outside. Their fumes can be deadly.

    Clean Out Saturated Items Completely


    As mentioned earlier, don’t use floodwater as drinking water or to cook food unless you have thoroughly sterilized and filtered it. Make sure you have food stored in waterproof containers, and thoroughly wash utensils and other items for personal use.

    Floods are just one of the many natural disasters that can endanger your family. With planning and some supplies, you’ll be able to keep your family safe.


    Joe Alton, MD


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviving-a-flood/
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Nutrition: Our Food and Our Health 1947 US Army Training Film
    (Jeff Quitney)



    https://youtu.be/n_PDeiTx0mU

    Published on Oct 7, 2015
    more at http://food.quickfound.net

    US Army Training Film TF8-1476

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutrition

    Nutrition (also called nourishment or aliment) is the provision, to cells and organisms, of the materials necessary (in the form of food) to support life. Many common health problems can be prevented or alleviated with a healthy diet.

    The diet of an organism is what it eats, which is largely determined by the perceived palatability of foods. Dietitians are health professionals who specialize in human nutrition, meal planning, economics, and preparation. They are trained to provide safe, evidence-based dietary advice and management to individuals (in health and disease), as well as to institutions. Clinical nutritionists are health professionals who focus more specifically on the role of nutrition in chronic disease, including possible prevention or remediation by addressing nutritional deficiencies before resorting to drugs. While government regulation of the use of this professional title is less universal than for "dietician", the field is supported by many high-level academic programs, up to and including the Doctoral level, and has its own voluntary certification board, professional associations, and peer-reviewed journals, e.g. the American Society for Nutrition, Nutrition Society of India, Food Scientists and Nutritionists Association India, Indian Dietetic Association and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

    A poor diet may have an injurious impact on health, causing deficiency diseases such as scurvy and kwashiorkor; health-threatening conditions like obesity and metabolic syndrome; and such common chronic systemic diseases as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and osteoporosis...

    Overview

    Nutritional science investigates the metabolic and physiological responses of the body to diet. With advances in the fields of molecular biology, biochemistry, nutritional immunology, molecular medicine and genetics, the study of nutrition is increasingly concerned with metabolism and metabolic pathways: the sequences of biochemical steps through which substances in living things change from one form to another.

    Carnivore and herbivore diets are contrasting, with basic nitrogen and carbon proportions being at varying levels in particular foods. Carnivores consume more nitrogen than carbon while herbivores consume less nitrogen than carbon, when an equal quantity is measured.

    The human body contains chemical compounds, such as water, carbohydrates (sugar, starch, and fiber), amino acids (in proteins), fatty acids (in lipids), and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). These compounds in turn consist of elements such as carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese, and so on. All of these chemical compounds and elements occur in various forms and combinations (e.g. hormones, vitamins, phospholipids, hydroxyapatite), both in the human body and in the plant and animal organisms that humans eat.

    The human body consists of elements and compounds ingested, digested, absorbed, and circulated through the bloodstream to feed the cells of the body. Except in the unborn fetus, the digestive system is the first system involved. In a typical adult, about seven liters of digestive juices enter the digestive tract. These digestive juices break chemical bonds in ingested molecules, and modify their conformations and energy states. Though some molecules are absorbed into the bloodstream unchanged, digestive processes release them from the matrix of foods...
     
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  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival: "Living Off The Land" 1955 US Navy Training Film
    (Jeff Quitney)



    https://youtu.be/BEBcNkwlDQU

    Published on Oct 8, 2015
    more at http://outdoor-gear.quickfound.net/

    "Survival in North Temperate Regions: Living Off The Land"

    US Navy training film aimed at downed pilots telling how to hunt or harvest and prepare food, including animals, plants, fruits, berries, and nuts, between 45 degrees and 70 degrees north latitude (although much of the advice would apply anywhere).

    "How to survive under emergency conditions in the north temperate regions."

    US Navy training film FN-9202-A

    Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound.

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    from US Army Survival Manual Field Manual FM 21-76
    http://www.ar15.com/content/manuals/F...

    After water, man's most urgent requirement is food. In contemplating virtually any hypothetical survival situation, the mind immediately turns to thoughts of food. Unless the situation occurs in an arid environment, even water, which is more important to maintaining body functions, will almost always follow food in our initial thoughts. The survivor must remember that the three essentials of survival--water, food, and shelter--are prioritized according to the estimate of the actual situation. This estimate must not only be timely but accurate as well. Some situations may well dictate that shelter precede both food and water.

    ANIMALS FOR FOOD
    Unless you have the chance to take large game, concentrate your efforts on the smaller animals, due to their abundance. The smaller animal species are also easier to prepare. You must not know all the animal species that are suitable as food. Relatively few are poisonous, and they make a smaller list to
    remember. What is important is to learn the habits and behavioral patterns of classes of animals. For example, animals that are excellent choices for trapping, those that inhabit a particular range and occupy a den or nest, those that have somewhat fixed feeding areas, and those that have trails leading from one area to another. Larger, herding animals, such as elk or caribou, roam vast areas and are somewhat more difficult to trap. Also, you must understand the food choices of a particular species.

    You can, with relatively few exceptions, eat anything that crawls, swims, walks, or flies. The first obstacle is overcoming your natural aversion to a particular food source...

    Birds
    All species of birds are edible, although the flavor will vary considerably. You may skin fish-eating birds to improve their taste. As with any wild animal, you must understand birds' common habits to have a realistic chance of capturing them. You can take pigeons, as well as some other species, from their roost at night by hand. During the nesting season, some species will not leave the nest even when approached. Knowing where and when the birds nest makes catching them easier. Birds tend to have regular flyways going from the roost to a feeding area, to water, and so forth. Careful observation should reveal where these flyways are and indicate good areas for catching birds in nets stretched across the flyways. Roosting sites and waterholes are some of the most promising areas for trapping or snaring.

    Nesting birds present another food source--eggs. Remove all but two or three eggs from the clutch, marking the ones that you leave. The bird will continue to lay more eggs to fill the clutch. Continue removing the fresh eggs, leaving the ones you marked.

    Mammals
    Mammals are excellent protein sources and, for Americans, the most tasty food source. There are some drawbacks to obtaining mammals. In a hostile environment, the enemy may detect any traps or snares placed on land. The amount of injury an animal can inflict is in direct proportion to its size. All mammals have teeth and nearly all will bite in self-defense. Even a squirrel can inflict a serious wound and any bite presents a serious risk of infection. Also, a mother can be extremely aggressive in defense of her young.

    Any animal with no route of escape will fight when cornered. All mammals are edible; however, the polar bear and bearded seal have toxic levels of vitamin A in their livers. The platypus, native to Australia and Tasmania, is an egg-laying, semiaquatic mammal that has poisonous glands. Scavenging mammals, such as the opossum, may carry diseases.

    US Navy training, training film, survival, food, cooking, hunting, trapping, harvesting, survival food, edible plants,
     
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  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Canadian Prepper : Apocatalk With Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy



    https://youtu.be/7nFbXhaKLxA

    Published on Oct 11, 2015
    I was fortunate enough to have some questions answered by Dr. Joe Alton M.D. and Amy Alton ANRP

    Subscribe to their channel! Drbonespodcast or Dr bones nurse Amy, I will update with links ASAP
     
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  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Weather: "Know Your Clouds" 1966 US Army Meteorology Cloud Identification
    (Jeff Quitney)



    https://youtu.be/-fLoeEHLnqA

    Published on Oct 11, 2015
    More at http://scitech.quickfound.net/weather...

    "DEVELOPMENT OF THE TEN BASIC TYPES OF CLOUDS, THEIR PRINCIPAL CHARACTERISTICS, THEIR RELATIVE POSITIONS AND AVERAGE ALTITUDES, AND THEIR FLIGHT HAZARDS."

    US Army training film TF46-3724

    Meteorology playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

    Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound.

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://www.crh.noaa.gov/lmk/?n=cloud_...

    Clouds are classified according to their height above and appearance (texture) from the ground.

    The following cloud roots and translations summarize the components of this classification system:

    1) Cirro-: curl of hair, high.
    2) Alto-: mid.
    3) Strato-:layer.
    4) Nimbo-: rain, precipitation.
    5) Cumulo-: heap.

    High-level clouds:

    High-level clouds occur above about 20,000 feet and are given the prefix "cirro-". Due to cold tropospheric temperatures at these levels, the clouds primarily are composed of ice crystals, and often appear thin, streaky, and white (although a low sun angle, e.g., near sunset, can create an array of color on the clouds).

    The three main types of high clouds are cirrus, cirrostratus, and cirrocumulus.

    Cirrus clouds are wispy, feathery, and composed entirely of ice crystals. They often are the first sign of an approaching warm front or upper-level jet streak.

    Unlike cirrus, cirrostratus clouds form more of a widespread, veil-like layer (similar to what stratus clouds do in low levels). When sunlight or moonlight passes through the hexagonal-shaped ice crystals of cirrostratus clouds, the light is dispersed or refracted (similar to light passing through a prism) in such a way that a familiar ring or halo may form. As a warm front approaches, cirrus clouds tend to thicken into cirrostratus, which may, in turn, thicken and lower into altostratus, stratus, and even nimbostratus.

    Finally, cirrocumulus clouds are layered clouds permeated with small cumuliform lumpiness. They also may line up in streets or rows of clouds across the sky denoting localized areas of ascent (cloud axes) and descent (cloud-free channels).

    Mid-level clouds:

    The bases of clouds in the middle level of the troposphere, given the prefix "alto-", appear between 6,500 and 20,000 feet. Depending on the altitude, time of year, and vertical temperature structure of the troposphere, these clouds may be composed of liquid water droplets, ice crystals, or a combination of the two, including supercooled droplets (i.e., liquid droplets whose temperatures are below freezing).

    The two main type of mid-level clouds are altostratus and altocumulus.

    Altostratus clouds are "strato" type clouds (see below) that possess a flat and uniform type texture in the mid levels. They frequently indicate the approach of a warm front and may thicken and lower into stratus, then nimbostratus resulting in rain or snow. However, altostratus clouds themselves do not produce significant precipitation at the surface, although sprinkles or occasionally light showers may occur from a thick alto-stratus deck.

    Altocumulus clouds exhibit "cumulo" type characteristics (see below) in mid levels, i.e., heap-like clouds with convective elements. Like cirrocumulus, altocumulus may align in rows or streets of clouds, with cloud axes indicating localized areas of ascending, moist air, and clear zones between rows suggesting locally descending, drier air. Altocumulus clouds with some vertical extent may denote the presence of elevated instability, especially in the morning, which could become boundary-layer based and be released into deep convection during the afternoon or evening...
     
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  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Avalanche Hazards Part 1 1965 US Army Training Film for Ski Troops in Snow Covered Mountains
    (Jeff Quitney)



    https://youtu.be/VlUUMXLGwOU

    Published on Oct 11, 2015
    more at http://quickfound.net

    "FORCES THAT CAUSE SNOW AVALANCHES; CHARACTERISTICS OF VARIOUS TYPES OF SNOW AVALANCHES; AND HOW TO COPE WITH POTENTIAL HAZARDS."

    US Army Training Film TF21-3478

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avalanche

    An avalanche (also called a snowslide or snowslip) is a rapid flow of snow down a sloping surface. Avalanches are typically triggered in a starting zone from a mechanical failure in the snowpack (slab avalanche) when the forces on the snow exceed its strength but sometimes only with gradually widening (loose snow avalanche). After initiation, avalanches usually accelerate rapidly and grow in mass and volume as they entrain more snow. If the avalanche moves fast enough some of the snow may mix with the air forming a powder snow avalanche, which is a type of gravity current.

    Slides of rocks or debris, behaving in a similar way to snow, are also referred to as avalanches (see rockslide). The remainder of this article refers to snow avalanches.

    The load on the snowpack may be only due to gravity, in which case failure may result either from weakening in the snowpack or increased load due to precipitation. Avalanches that occur in this way are known as spontaneous avalanches. Avalanches can also be triggered by other loads such as skiers, snowmobilers, animals or explosives. Seismic activity may also trigger the failure in the snowpack and avalanches. A popular myth is that avalanches can be triggered by loud noise or shouting, but the pressure from sound is orders of magnitude too small to trigger an avalanche.

    Although primarily composed of flowing snow and air, large avalanches have the capability to entrain ice, rocks, trees, and other material on the slope, and are distinct from mudslides, rock slides, and serac collapses on an icefall. Avalanches are not rare or random events and are endemic to any mountain range that accumulates a standing snowpack. Avalanches are most common during winter or spring but glacier movements may cause ice and snow avalanches at any time of year. In mountainous terrain, avalanches are among the most serious objective natural hazards to life and property, with their destructive capability resulting from their potential to carry enormous masses of snow at high speeds.

    There is no universally accepted classification of avalanches—different classifications are useful for different purposes. Avalanches can be described by their size, their destructive potential, their initiation mechanism, their composition and their dynamics...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Avalanche Hazards Part 2 1965 US Army Training Film for Ski Troops in Snow Covered Mountains
    (Jeff Quitney)



    https://youtu.be/Xs2ogyv68VI

    Published on Oct 12, 2015
    more at http://quickfound.net

    "TROOP OPERATION ON SNOW COVERED MOUNTAIN TERRAIN - HOW TO AVOID OR TRAVERSE CRITICAL AREAS, HOW TO COPE WITH SUDDEN AVALANCHE, AND RESCUE OPERATIONS."

    US Army Training Film TF21-3479

    part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlUUM...

    US Army Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avalanche

    An avalanche (also called a snowslide or snowslip) is a rapid flow of snow down a sloping surface. Avalanches are typically triggered in a starting zone from a mechanical failure in the snowpack (slab avalanche) when the forces on the snow exceed its strength but sometimes only with gradually widening (loose snow avalanche). After initiation, avalanches usually accelerate rapidly and grow in mass and volume as they entrain more snow. If the avalanche moves fast enough some of the snow may mix with the air forming a powder snow avalanche, which is a type of gravity current.

    Slides of rocks or debris, behaving in a similar way to snow, are also referred to as avalanches (see rockslide). The remainder of this article refers to snow avalanches.

    The load on the snowpack may be only due to gravity, in which case failure may result either from weakening in the snowpack or increased load due to precipitation. Avalanches that occur in this way are known as spontaneous avalanches. Avalanches can also be triggered by other loads such as skiers, snowmobilers, animals or explosives. Seismic activity may also trigger the failure in the snowpack and avalanches. A popular myth is that avalanches can be triggered by loud noise or shouting, but the pressure from sound is orders of magnitude too small to trigger an avalanche.

    Although primarily composed of flowing snow and air, large avalanches have the capability to entrain ice, rocks, trees, and other material on the slope, and are distinct from mudslides, rock slides, and serac collapses on an icefall. Avalanches are not rare or random events and are endemic to any mountain range that accumulates a standing snowpack. Avalanches are most common during winter or spring but glacier movements may cause ice and snow avalanches at any time of year. In mountainous terrain, avalanches are among the most serious objective natural hazards to life and property, with their destructive capability resulting from their potential to carry enormous masses of snow at high speeds.

    There is no universally accepted classification of avalanches—different classifications are useful for different purposes. Avalanches can be described by their size, their destructive potential, their initiation mechanism, their composition and their dynamics...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Preventing a Cold: Myths vs. Facts




    October 13, 2015





    [​IMG]


    We often talk about infections that would cause avoidable deaths in disasters, but minor illnesses that negatively affect work efficiency in times of trouble are also major problems for the family medic. When everyone has to be at 110% just to survive, anything that limits the ability to perform activities of daily survival puts the whole group at risk.

    One of these issues is the common cold. Known variously as a head cold, naso-pharyngitis, coryza, or just a cold, it is the most common illness on the planet, and 75-100 million Americans present to a medical professional for treatment every year. A small percentage of these people go on to have secondary respiratory infections such as pneumonia, which can lead to a life-threatening condition.


    [​IMG]
    typical virus



    The common cold is an infection caused, usually, by a virus in the Rhinovirus or Coronavirus family, although a number of others have been implicated. Affecting the upper respiratory system (nose, throat, sinuses), it’s a (very) rare individual that hasn’t dealt with a cold at one point or another.

    Like many viral illnesses, there is no cure for the common cold, and attention should be paid to methods that might prevent it. Many people have their own strategies for prevention, but some of these methods are ineffective and have little basis in fact. Here are time-honored (but false) ways that you can (can’t) prevent a cold:

    Dress warmly and you won’t get sick: Dressing warmly for cold weather is a smart move to prevent hypothermia, but it won’t prevent colds. A cold is an infectious disease caused by a virus. Regardless of what you wear, you can be infected in any type of weather.


    Stay inside during the winter to avoid catching a cold: Staying inside actually increases your chances of getting infected. Enclosed spaces can expose you to a higher concentration of the virus.


    Take antibiotics to prevent colds: Antibiotics kill bacteria. Colds are caused by viruses, an entirely different organism. Therefore, antibiotics are ineffective against them as a preventative or a cure. Although many people ask their doctors for antibiotics to prevent or treat colds, this is a practice that has contributed to an epidemic of resistance in the U.S. Indeed, one out of three Americans leave their doctors’ offices with a prescription for antibiotics to treat an illness that is completely unaffected by them.


    [​IMG]



    Keep your head dry. A wet head will cause a cold:
    Having a head full of wet hair is thought by some to predispose you to a cold, but it just isn’t so. You may feel a chill, but it won’t make you more likely to catch a virus.

    A weakened immune system will cause a cold: Certainly, having a strong immune system is a good thing, but even the healthiest person can catch a cold if exposed to the virus.


    Vitamin C will prevent colds: Although supplements like Vitamin C and Zinc may decrease the duration of a cold, they don’t do anything to prevent your catching one.

    Turning down the heat in the house will prevent a cold: Many feel that central heating causes the nose to dry up and make them more susceptible to a cold. A virus can colonize the mucus membranes, regardless of the level of humidity.


    [​IMG]


    Prevention is only an issue in the winter. You can only catch colds then:
    In reality, colds occur most often in the Spring and Fall. Many viruses actually become dormant in cold weather.

    Wearing Garlic or other herbs will prevent your getting sick: What? Wearing garlic may repel vampires (and everyone else), but its health benefits mostly derive from being ingested.

    Avoid kissing to prevent colds: Interestingly, relatively small quantities of virus reside on the lips or in the mouth. Most of it is found in the nasal cavity. Then again, it’s hard to be kissed without being breathed on as well.

    Those are some myths, but here’s a fact: Hand washing is an effective way to decrease your chances of catching a cold. Viruses are transmitted less often if hands are washed regularly and frequently throughout the day. This is especially true if you want to prevent colds in children. Instill hand-washing as a part of daily routine in kids, just as you would teach toilet training.


    Natural remedies would include one of my favorites: Green tea with Lemon and Honey. Drinking the tea and breathing in steam helps the hair follicles in the nose to drain germs out. Lemon is known to thin out mucus and honey is a great natural antibacterial agent.


    Don’t forget that viruses can live on surfaces for a period of time, so have some disinfectant around to clean countertops, work surfaces, and doorknobs.

    There are as many myths about treating a cold as there are about preventing one. “Feed a cold, starve a fever” is one. We’ll discuss these in detail in a future article.


    Joe Alton, MD

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/preventing-a-cold-myths-vs-facts/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Mudslide Survival




    March 25, 2014





    [​IMG]
    MUDSLIDE AFTERMATH




    With the grim news of at least 14 dead in the mudslide that occurred in the state of Washington, I realized that I had never written about mudslide survival. This surprised me, as I, myself, could easily be a victim of one. We’re part-time residents of beautiful Gatlinburg, Tennessee, with a home on a mountain overlooking the town and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. As such, we live on a slope. How much of a slope? Let’s just say you wouldn’t want to fall off our deck (and not just because of our resident black bear).

    The mudslide in Washington was huge, about a mile wide with an extensive debris field. In some places, the debris is 30 feet thick. Our thanks, by the way, to the emergency personnel who tirelessly dug survivors from the wreckage.

    A mudslide, sometimes called a “debris flow”, is a landslide with a high water content. Mudslides act like a river that, if the mud is thick, has the consistency of wet concrete. Mud, rocks, trees, and other large objects are carried along and can cause homes to collapse and a huge amount of traumatic injury to residents. In the U.S., 25-50 deaths occur on average as a result of landslides.

    Periods of heavy rainfall or snow melt saturate the ground and cause instability in sloping areas. Areas prone to earthquakes, hurricanes, wildfires, and other natural disasters are especially susceptible. Humans contribute to this susceptibility with poor planning: Roads cut into hills and mountains and scenic mountain retreats (like ours!) make mudslides more likely. River or brookside retreats at the base of a hill or mountain (in the “holler”, as we say in Tennessee) are also vulnerable.


    PREVENTATIVE MEASURES


    [​IMG]
    HOMES ARE VULNERABLE EVEN IF THEY’RE NOT ON SLOPES




    Before building that dream home:


    • -Beware of steep slopes, natural or man-made runoff conduits, or eroded areas.
    • -Have the county Geological Survey specialist assess your property for possible mudslide risk.
    • -Consider flexible pipe fittings (installed by pros) less prone to gas or water leaks.
    • -Consider building a retaining wall in likely mudslide channels.
    • -Avoid areas that have experienced mudslides in the past.
    • -Plan out an evacuation route.
    • -Have a battery-powered NOAA weather radio.
    • -Have a medical kit with items to deal with both traumatic injury and water sterilization.


    WARNING SIGNS

    Mudslide prone areas will begin to show signs that trouble is on the way:


    • -Cracks develop in walls, flooring, paving, driveways, or foundations.
    • -Outside structures (for example, stairs) begin to separate from buildings
    • -Doors and windows start becoming jammed.
    • -Utility lines start breaking.
    • -Fences, trees, and utility poles start tilting.
    • -Water starts accumulating in strange places
    • -Roads and embankments along slopes start breaking off at the edges.
    • -The Terrain starts to “bulge” or starts slanting at the base of the slope.



    DURING THE EVENT

    [​IMG]



    • -Turn on the NOAA radio and listen to warnings as they are reported.
    • -Warn your neighbors!
    • -If a mudslide is imminent, get the heck out of there if at all possible with the understanding that roads may be washed out. Stay away from mudslide areas; further mudslides may still occur.
    • -If you stay home, get to the second story if you have one.
    • -Watch for and avoid downed power lines.
    • -As the slide passes through, get under a table and curl into a ball, protecting your head.
    • -If you’re trapped in the mud, survival rates go up if you can form an air pocket around you. You can survive without water for 3-4 days if you had to.



    Mudslides are just another reason why it’s important to be prepared, in every way, for the slings and arrows that the uncertain future may hold for you and your family.

    Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/mudslide-survival/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Vincent Von Doom of Disaster Survival, Tracheotomy, More[/h]


    October 18, 2015





    [​IMG]


    On this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour, Nurse Amy (Amy Alton, ARNP) welcomes Vincent Von Doom of Disaster Survival Magazine and disastersurvivalnetwork.com. Vince moved from an urban lifestyle to a small town after his experiences led him to a preparedness lifestyle. Listen to his story and some good advice regarding “continuity of community” as a motto for success, even if everything else fails. Also, Dr. Bones (Joe Alton, MD) talks about airway obstruction and (gulp!) how to perform a tracheotomy (don’t try this at home, kids)…


    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...on-doom-of-disaster-survival-tracheotomy-more


    Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton, ARNP


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Metronidazole as a Survival Antibiotic



    October 22, 2015




    [​IMG]


    Antibiotics are an important part of any medical arsenal in tough times. Many infections easily treated today would possibly be life-threatening in an off-grid survival setting. Indeed, if such a thing occurred, you can bet that these drugs would no longer be produced. There would be a lot of otherwise avoidable deaths due to simple cuts that become infected or dehydration from diarrheal disease. We only have to look at mortality statistics from pre-antibiotic times like the Civil War to know that this is true. More soldiers died then from infectious disease that from bullets or shrapnel.


    This article is part of a series on antibiotics and their use in survival settings. Today we’ll talk about an antibiotic that would be useful to deal with some organisms that can cause a number of major problems. Metronidazole (aquatic equivalent: Fish-Zole) 250mg is an antibiotic in the Nitroimidazole family that is used primarily to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria and protozoa.

    “Anaerobes” are bacteria that do not depend on oxygen to live. “Protozoa” have been defined as single-cell organisms with animal-like behavior. Many can propel themselves randomly from place to place by the means of a “flagellum”; a tail-like “hair” they whip around that allows them to move.



    [​IMG]
    Giardia (Protozoal Parasite)




    The antibiotic Metronidazole works by blocking some of the functions within bacteria and protozoa, thus resulting in their death. It is better known by the U.S. brand name Flagyl and usually comes in 250mg and 500mg tablets. Metronidazole (Fish-Zole) is used in the treatment of these bacterial diseases:


    • Diverticulitis (an intestinal infection seen in older individuals)
    • Peritonitis (an inflammation of the abdominal lining due to a ruptured appendix, ruptured cysts, and other causes)
    • Certain pneumonias (lung infections)
    • Diabetic foot ulcer infections
    • Meningitis ( an infection of the spinal cord and brain lining)
    • Bone and joint infections
    • Colitis due to a bacterial species known as Clostridia (sometimes caused by taking Clindamycin!)
    • Endocarditis (a heart infection)
    • Bacterial vaginosis (a very common vaginal infection)
    • Pelvic inflammatory disease (an infection in women which can lead to abscesses, often in combination with other antibiotics)
    • Uterine infections (especially after childbirth and miscarriage)
    • Dental infections (sometimes in combination with amoxicillin)
    • H. pylori infections (a bacteria that causes peptic ulcers)
    • Some skin infections

    And those are just the bacterial infections that metronidazole can deal with. It also works with these protozoal infections:

    • Amoebiasis: dysentery caused by Entamoeba species (contaminated water/food)
    • Giardiasis: infection of the small intestine caused by Giardia Species (contaminated water/food)
    • Trichomoniasis: vaginal infection caused by parasite which can be sexually transmitted

    Amoebiasis and Giardiasis can be caught from drinking what appears to be the purest mountain stream water, and these infections are seen right here in the Great Smoky Mountains and elsewhere. Never fail to sterilize all water, regardless of the source, before drinking it.

    Metronidazole is used in different dosages to treat different illnesses. You’ll find detailed information in our book “The Survival Medicine Handbook” and in other standard medical references such as the Physician’s Desk Reference. You’ll also find this information at drugs.com or rxlist.com.

    Here are the dosages and frequency of administration for several common indications:

    • Amoebic dysentery: 750 mg orally 3 times daily for 5-10 days. For children, give 35 to 50 mg/kg/day orally in 3 divided doses for 10 days (no more than adult dosage, of course, regardless of weight).

    • Anaerobic infections (various): 7.5 mg/kg orally every 6 hours not to exceed 4 grams daily.

    • Clostridia infections: 250-500 mg orally 4 times daily or 500-750 orally 3 times daily.

    • Giardia: 250 mg orally three times daily for 5 days. For children give 15 mg/kg/day orally in 3 divided doses (no more than adult dosage regardless of weight).

    • Helicobacter pylori (ulcer disease): 500-750mg twice daily for several days in combination with other drugs like Prilosec (Omeprazole).

    • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): 500 mg orally twice daily for 14 days in combination with other drugs, perhaps doxycycline or azithromycin.

    • Bacterial Vaginosis: 500mg twice daily for 7 days.

    • Vaginal Trichomoniasis: 2 g single dose (4 500mg tablets at once) or 1 g twice total.

    All drugs have the potential for side effects, also known as adverse reactions. These are different from allergies, where your body actually mounts an immune response to a drug, such as in a penicillin allergy.

    One particular side effect has to do with alcohol: drinking alcohol while on Metronidazole will very likely make you vomit.

    Metronidazole should not be used in pregnancy. but can be used in those allergic to Penicillin.

    Having antibiotics will give you an additional tool in the medical woodshed that just might, one day, save a life. They’re not toys, however, and should only be used when absolutely necessary.

    Joe Alton, MD

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/metronidazole-as-a-survival-antibiotic/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Metronidazole, Prepper Stores, Interviews, More



    October 25, 2015




    [​IMG]


    What antibiotics should you have in your medical storage in case of disaster? In their continuing series, Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, talk about Metronidazole (Flagyl, Fish-Zole) and its potential for use in survival settings. Dr. Bones talks about Hurricane Patricia, the latest floods in Texas, and more, plus a visit to Carolina Readiness Supply, an actual brick-and-mortar Prepper Store in Waynesville, NC, and interview owner Jan Sterrett. Plus, Nurse Amy talks about freeze-dried foods and a couple of short interviews with famed prepper author Jim Cobb of survivalweekly.com and Aroundthecabin.com founder Rich Beresford, the first videocast channel for preppers.



    [​IMG]
    Carolina Readiness Supply



    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...-metronidazole-prepper-stores-interviews-more


    [​IMG]


    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad…


    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Bear Attacks



    November 1, 2015




    [​IMG]
    Black Bear



    The Great Outdoors is, well, great, but there’s also danger in them thar hills, and it pays to know what to do when you encounter it.


    I’ve talked about animal bites in videos, but I haven’t shown you any actual animals. Although we’re here at the Birdhouse Inn, the best bird’s eye view of the mountains in the Great Smokies, we’re not talking about birds today. We’re talking about bears.


    Bears are mammals of the family Ursidae, and I’ll bet you don’t know what their closest living relative is: It’s seals. There are a number of species of bear but the one around here is the American black bear. 1800 bears live in the Smoky Mountains and many of them have become very accustomed to humans.


    There are several in the area around this property, mostly youngsters that have decided that Halloween pumpkins are a tasty treat. I guess we should have known, because bears, indeed, eat more plant matter than meat, taking in opportunistically whatever they can find, like acorns. Poor crops of such foods, called mast, result in bears moving out of their back country territory to look for alternative food sources, like your trash. Even though black bears are only 8 ounces when they’re born, males (also known as boars) can wear 500 pounds or more. This puts you in danger, no matter how “cute” you think these critters are.


    [​IMG]
    Newborn black bears



    To prevent injuries from bear encounters, situational awareness is the order of the day. Watch for disturbed trash, fresh tracks, and of course, actual bears.


    [​IMG]
    Probably from an actual bear…



    Some basic advice: Don’t hike alone. Whenever possible you should hike in groups, 90% of people injured by bears (mostly grizzlies, I suspect) in Yellowstone National Park were alone or with only one other hiking partner.


    Avoid hiking at dawn, dusk, or at night, times that bears are out in warm weather months. You’re just as likely to come upon a bear as it is to come upon you.


    You might think it’s not too smart to yell “Hey, Bear!” or sing “The Star Spangled Banner” on the trail but, actually, bears don’t like noise and it’s actually a pretty good strategy, especially when traveling near babbling brooks or other settings where normal hiking noises might be muffled. Just don’t do it with a hamburger or hot dog in your hand.


    When you encounter a bear, it will, hopefully, be at a distance: If so, and the bear doesn’t see you, keep out of sight and go slowly behind and downwind of the bear. If the bear does see you, slowly retreat the way you came. A bear in defensive mode will huff, hiss, or slap the ground with its paws, telling you that you’re too close. So put some distance between you and the bear. However, don’t run, it might activate a chase response in the animal.


    If the bear follows you quietly, ears erect, and its attention is clearly directed at you, it is likely in predatory mode and not acting defensively. Make yourself appear larger, louder, and threatening. Groups should stay together to look like a bigger threat. A bear that is initially curious or testing you may become predatory if you appear meek. A deterrent like pepper spray, at least, or other items of personal defense will become very handy. Pepper spray is most effective at close range, say 5-10 feet.


    If the bear attacks, don’t run. You can’t outrun a black bear. Don’t climb a tree unless you’re a squirrel, you’re not 10 years old anymore, it takes longer than you think, and your pursuer is a very good climber. Use your deterrent and fight for your life, because that’s what’s at stake. Kick, punch or hit the bear on the face, eyes, nose, with whatever you have.


    [​IMG]
    Probably a better tree climber than you



    You also should not play dead. Bears will feed on carrion like deer carcasses, so why pretend to be one? If you do, however, keep your backpack on, lie face down and clasp your hands over the back of your neck with your elbows protecting the sides of your face. A bear that’s just protecting its cubs may decide you’re no longer a threat.


    Which leaves you with bite and claw injuries that may be bleeding, so make sure that backpack has dressings, tourniquets, antiseptics, and other supplies needed for treating wounds. Here’s an article on dealing with animal bites and one on active bleeding from sharp trauma.


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/treating-an-animal-bite/


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/stab-wound-management/


    Studies have shown that bears accustomed to humans never live as long a life as truly wild bears. Bear lose their fear of people by being fed by them. As a result, many of these are hit by cars or end up euthanized. Remember this: A bear that’s fed is a bear that’s dead.


    Joe Alton, MD

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/bear-attacks/
     
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    Emergency and Survival Food in Mylar and Bucket Demonstration
    (DrBones NurseAmy)



    https://youtu.be/PjDspJShiCc

    Published on Nov 2, 2015
    Step by step instructions for storing cornmeal and other dry foods in Mylar bags inside food-grade buckets with oxygen absorbers. Carolina Readiness Store shows you a DIY method to keep food safe for many years. Hosted by Joe Alton, MD of http://www.doomandbloom.net/
    Demo by Bill Sterrett of http://carolinareadiness.com/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
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    FACTS ABOUT FALLOUT "3 FEET OF DIRT FOR SURVIVAL" 83304
    (PeriscopeFilm)



    https://youtu.be/n5whFwc382g

    Published on Nov 3, 2015
    Produced by Byron for the Office of Civil Defense, this 1955-vintage film illustrates some of the FACTS ABOUT FALLOUT from nuclear explosions. It was originally screened at community meetings and a pamphlet with the same name handed out. The film includes the infamous statement at the 7:15 mark that "3 feet of dirt" above your fallout shelter is all you need to survive. In an era before the hydrogen bomb, such a statement was not altogether ludicrous but once the H-bomb was a reality, death was all but certain. Still, for a brief time, assurances such as these spurred many Americans to construct shelters in their backyards and underneath their homes.

    The film does concede that radiation can make a person sick and even kill them. The three best defenses as illustrated in the film are distance, mass, and time. In other words, get as far from the fallout as possible, which may mean going to the middle of a large building rather than near its outside; have concrete and other materials between you and fallout; and, allow for the fact that radioactive material loses its potency over time: e.g., two weeks after an explosion, it's at 1/1000th of its initial strength. Fallout shelters are the best civil defense: the federal government has a program to ensure adequate fallout shelters for all.

    In the United States, the sheer power of nuclear weapons and the perceived likelihood of such an attack, precipitated a greater response than had yet been required of civil defense. Civil defense, something previously considered an important and common sense step, also became divisive and controversial in the charged atmosphere of the Cold War. In 1950, the National Security Resources Board created a 162-page document outlining a model civil defense structure for the U.S. Called the "Blue Book" by civil defense professionals in reference to its solid blue cover, it was the template for legislation and organization that occurred over the next 40 years.

    Perhaps the most memorable aspect of the Cold War civil defense effort was the educational effort made or promoted by the government. In Duck and Cover, Bert the Turtle advocated that children "duck and cover" when they "see the flash." Booklets were also common place such as Survival Under Atomic Attack, Fallout Protection and Nuclear War Survival Skills. The transcribed radio program Stars for Defense combined hit music with civil defense advice. Public service announcements including children's songs were created by government institutes and then distributed and released by radio stations to educate the public in case of nuclear attack.


    The United States and Soviet Union/Russia nuclear stockpiles, in total number of nuclear bombs/warheads in existence throughout the Cold War and post-Cold War era. However total deployed US & "Russian" strategic weapons(ready for use) were far less than this, reaching a maximum of about 10,000 apiece in the 1980s.
    The US President Kennedy(1961-63) launched an ambitious effort to install fallout shelters throughout the United States. These shelters would not protect against the blast and heat effects of nuclear weapons, but would provide some protection against the radiation effects that would last for weeks and even affect areas distant from a nuclear explosion. In order for most of these preparations to be effective, there had to be some degree of warning. In 1951, Control of Electromagnetic Radiation was established. Under the system, a few primary stations would be alerted of an emergency and would broadcast an alert. All broadcast stations throughout the country would be constantly listening to an upstream station and repeat the message, thus passing it from station to station.

    We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

    This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: E. Coli Outbreak, Bear Attacks, Making Saline, more




    November 7, 2015





    [​IMG]
    Type of Bear Unlikely To Attack You



    Bears are about on the Alton property in Tennessee, filling up for their winter sleep. We’ve come upon them a few times, but would YOU know what to do if confronted by one? Find out the best and safest way to handle either a defensive or a predatory bear, and much more about these amazing creatures. Also, Chipotle closes 43 stores when linked to an outbreak of E. Coli bacteria; find out how this common and needed bacteria turns into a pathogen (disease-causing organism) and how to identify and treat it. All this and more from Joe Alton, MD, and Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.


    [​IMG]

    To Listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...ival-medicine-hour-bear-attacks-e-coli-saline

    Wish you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-e-coli-outbreak-bear-attacks-making-saline-more/
     
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    Survival Fish Antibiotic Metronidazole, Fish-Zole
    (DrBones NurseAmy)



    https://youtu.be/mKzMGnEjSrM

    Published on Nov 7, 2015
    Dosages, uses, and precautions of METRONIDAZOLE, FISH-ZOLE OR FLAGYL. Antibiotics are SURVIVAL MEDICINE storage items in case of disasters or long term survival scenarios. Host: Joe Alton, M.D. aka Dr. Bones, for more information:
    http://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
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    Chemical Warfare: Nerve Agents 1964 US Army Training Film
    (Jeff Quitney)



    https://youtu.be/vsfUEgoFA6o

    Published on Nov 7, 2015
    more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_...

    "FEATURES AND TACTICAL USE OF GA, GB, AND V NERVE AGENTS - HOW AGENTS ENTER BODY AND SYMPTOMS OF POISONING - PROTECTIVE AND FIRST-AID MEASURES AGAINST THEM ."

    US Army Training Film TF3-3432

    Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound.

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerve_agent

    Nerve agents are a class of phosphorus-containing organic chemicals (organophosphates) that disrupt the mechanism by which nerves transfer messages to organs. The disruption is caused by blocking acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that normally relaxes the activity of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter.

    As chemical weapons, they are classified as weapons of mass destruction by the United Nations according to UN Resolution 687 (passed in April 1991) and their production and stockpiling was outlawed by the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993; the Chemical Weapons Convention officially took effect on April 29, 1997.

    Poisoning by a nerve agent leads to contraction of pupils, profuse salivation, convulsions, involuntary urination and defecation, and eventual death by asphyxiation as control is lost over respiratory muscles. Some nerve agents are readily vaporized or aerosolized and the primary portal of entry into the body is the respiratory system. Nerve agents can also be absorbed through the skin, requiring that those likely to be subjected to such agents wear a full body suit in addition to a respirator...

    Biological effects

    As their name suggests, nerve agents attack the nervous system of the human body. All such agents function the same way: by inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase which is responsible for the breakdown of acetylcholine (ACh) in the synapse. ACh gives the signal for muscles to contract, preventing them from relaxing.

    Initial symptoms following exposure to nerve agents (like sarin) are a runny nose, tightness in the chest, and constriction of the pupils. Soon after, the victim will then have difficulty breathing and will experience nausea and drooling. As the victim continues to lose control of his or her bodily functions, he or she will involuntarily salivate, lacrimate, urinate, defecate, and experience gastrointestinal pain and vomiting. Blisters and burning of the eyes and/or lungs may also occur. This phase is followed by initially myoclonic jerks followed by status epilepticus. Death then comes via complete respiratory depression, most likely via the excessive peripheral activity at the neuromuscular junction of the diaphragm.

    The effects of nerve agents are very long lasting and cumulative (increased by successive exposures) and survivors of nerve agent poisoning almost invariably suffer chronic neurological damage. This neurological damage can also lead to continuing psychiatric effects.

    Mechanism of action

    When a normally functioning motor nerve is stimulated it releases the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which transmits the impulse to a muscle or organ. Once the impulse is sent, the enzyme acetylcholinesterase immediately breaks down the acetylcholine in order to allow the muscle or organ to relax.

    Nerve agents disrupt the nervous system by inhibiting the function of acetylcholinesterase by forming a covalent bond with the site of the enzyme where acetylcholine normally undergoes hydrolysis (breaks down). The structures of the complexes of soman (one of the most toxic nerve agents) with acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica have been solved by X-ray crystallography (PDB codes: 2wfz, 2wg0, 2wg1, and 1som). The mechanism of action of soman could be seen on example of 2wfz. The result is that acetylcholine builds up and continues to act so that any nerve impulses are continually transmitted and muscle contractions do not stop.

    This same action also occurs at the gland and organ levels, resulting in uncontrolled drooling, tearing of the eyes (lacrimation) and excess production of mucus from the nose (rhinorrhea).

    Antidotes

    Atropine and related anticholinergic drugs act as antidotes to nerve agent poisoning because they block acetylcholine receptors, but they are poisonous in their own right...
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Survivalist Author James Rawles



    November 11, 2015




    [​IMG]
    James Wesley, Rawles



    Famed survivalist James Wesley, Rawles joins Amy Alton, ARNP, aka Nurse Amy, for an interesting and informative interview regarding all aspects of preparedness, from starting out to barter to needed skills and supplies. James also talks about his new book “Island of Promise”, about the formation of a Christian sanctuary state with libertarian principles. Also, Joe Alton, MD, aka Dr. Bones, answers some question from a listener of Jack Spirko’s Survival Podcast as part of his expert council.



    [​IMG]

    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2015/11/10/survival-medicine-hour-james-rawles-of-survivalblog

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-survivalist-author-james-rawles/
     
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    Keeping The Medic Healthy: Survival Medicine
    (DrBones NurseAmy)



    https://youtu.be/_QIH61JqQew

    Published on Nov 12, 2015
    When the hospital is closed, will you know how to stay alive and healthy? If you are the Medic for others, make sure you are ready and able to perform medical care anytime. Hosted by Joe Alton, MD, Medical Preparedness, of http://doomandbloom.net/
     
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    Videocast: Bear attacks, E. Coli, more



    November 14, 2015




    [​IMG]
    bear



    What would you do if you came upon a full-grown bear on the trail? There’s black bears all over the place here in the Great Smokies, and you should know how to stay safe in a encounter with one of these beautiful, but potentially dangerous, animals. Also, Joe and Amy Alton discuss the latest E. Coli outbreak, this time originating in some Northwest Chipotle restaurants.


    [​IMG]
    Not a bear


    To watch, click below:


    http://aroundthecabin.com/show-archives/wednesdays/


    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,


    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/videoca...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Infectious Disease in the TEOTWAWKI World- Part 1, by Militant Medic
    http://survivalblog.com/infectious-disease-in-the-teotwawki-world-part-1-by-militant-medic/

    Infectious Disease in the TEOTWAWKI World- Part 2, by Militant Medic
    http://survivalblog.com/infectious-disease-in-the-teotwawki-world-part-2-by-militant-medic/

    Infectious Disease in the TEOTWAWKI World- Part 3, by Militant Medic
    http://survivalblog.com/infectious-disease-in-the-teotwawki-world-part-3-by-militant-medic/

    Infectious Disease in the TEOTWAWKI World- Part 4, by Militant Medic
    http://survivalblog.com/infectious-disease-in-the-teotwawki-world-part-4-by-militant-medic/

    Infectious Disease in the TEOTWAWKI World- Part 5, by Militant Medic
    http://survivalblog.com/infectious-disease-in-the-teotwawki-world-part-5-by-militant-medic/

    Infectious Disease in the TEOTWAWKI World- Part 6, by Militant Medic
    http://survivalblog.com/infectious-disease-in-the-teotwawki-world-part-6-by-militant-medic/
     
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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Paris Terror, Prepper Author Jim Cobb, more[/h]
    November 14, 2015




    [​IMG]


    What’s the new normal? It’s certainly not what is was just a few days ago for the French, that’s for sure. Nurse Amy gives her opinion and Prepper Author Jim Cobb of Preppers Survival Hacks joins in to discuss the news of the day, and talk about his new book that’s guaranteed to turn you into the next MacGyver. Also, Joe Alton, MD, aka Dr. Bones discuss some emergencies that cause a person to collapse, this week: heart attacks. All this and more on the Survival Medicine Hour.


    [​IMG]


    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...ine-hour-paris-terror-prepper-author-jim-cobb

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe Alton, MD, and Amy Alton, ARNP
     
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    Self Preservation In An Atomic Attack - 1950 American Military AFSWP Training Film - WDTVLIVE42
    (wdtvlive42 - Archive Footage)



    https://youtu.be/NCzUcwS_rPI

    Published on May 19, 2012
    WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.
     
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    Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs


    November 17, 2015





    [​IMG]



    The wise medic will store antibiotics to deal with infections in survival scenarios, but what happens when a bacteria becomes resistant to them? In other words, a “Superbug”?

    In the U.S., 2 million people are infected annually with bacteria resistant to standard antibiotic treatment. At least 23,000 of these will die as a result. In an increasingly overburdened health system, resistant microbes are responsible for a huge increase in the cost of caring for the sick.

    This article will discuss antibiotics and the epidemic of resistance that has spawned a growing number of superbugs.


    Antibiotics

    Antibiotics are medicines that kill micro-organisms in the body. Amazingly, the first antibiotic, Penicillin, was discovered entirely by accident in 1928 when Alexander Fleming returned to his lab from a vacation. He noticed that a lab dish with a bacterial culture had developed a mold known then as Penicillin Notatum. Around the mold, an area had developed that was clear of bacteria. Further study proved the potent germicidal effect of the compound processed from the mold.

    By the 1940s, penicillin was in general use and credited with saving many lives during WWII. Since then, more than 100 different antibiotics have been identified and developed into medicines.


    Antibiotic Overuse

    The huge success that antibiotics had in eliminating bacterial infections caused them to be used excessively. Liberal employment of antibiotics is a bad idea for several reasons:


    • Overuse fosters the spread of resistant bacteria.
    • Allergic reactions can occur, sometimes severe.
    • Antibiotics given before a diagnosis is confirmed may mask some symptoms and make identifying the illness more difficult.


    Antibiotics will kill many bacteria, but they will not be effective against viruses, such as those that cause influenza or the common cold. They are also not meant as anti-fungal agents.



    [​IMG]
    Viruses are largely unaffected by antibiotics




    Most will be surprised to hear that almost 80% of the antibiotics used in the U.S. don’t go to people, but to livestock. This is not to treat sick livestock but to make healthy livestock grow faster and get to market sooner. No one knows for sure why antibiotics have this effect, but the gross overuse on food animals is a big reason for the epidemic of resistance seen today.


    The Superbug List Grows Longer

    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has compiled a list of close to 20 bacteria that have shown a tendency towards antibiotic resistance. They include various organisms that cause severe diarrheal disease, respiratory issues, wound infections, and even sexually transmitted disease.

    The CDC’s list:


    • Clostridium difficile
    • Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)
    • Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae
    • Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter
    • Drug-resistant Campylobacter
    • Fluconazole-resistant Candida
    • Extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLs)
    • Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE)
    • Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    • Drug-resistant Non-typhoidal Salmonella
    • Drug-resistant Salmonella Typhi
    • Drug-resistant Shigella
    • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)
    • Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae
    • Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis
    • Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA)
    • Erythromycin-resistant Group A Streptococcus
    • Clindamycin-resistant Group B Streptococcus



    There have been no effective treatments identified for some of the above microbes, as in the case of multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis. MRSA, Methicillin-Resistant Staph. Aureus, was responsible for more deaths than AIDS in recent years.

    Although this is the CDC’s list of superbugs that affect the United States, they aren’t the only ones. A new type of Malaria, a very common parasitic disease of warmer climates, is turning up that is resistant to the standard drugs.

    Viruses are “resistant” to antibiotics by nature (in other words, they are unaffected by them) and include Influenza A, Swine Flu, Ebola, Bird Flu, SARS, and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). These will be discussed in detail in a future article.
    An Effective Strategy


    [​IMG]
    Strategy #1




    Many believe that antibiotic-resistant Superbugs listed are exotic diseases that could never affect their community. With the ease of commercial air travel, however, cases of antibiotic-resistant diseases from afar can easily arrive on our shores.

    Recently, a case of multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis was identified and then isolated at the high level isolation unit at the National Institute of Health in Maryland. Although we have increased our capacity for handling this type of patient significantly since the arrival of Ebola in the U.S. last year, it wouldn’t take much to overwhelm our facilities.


    Therefore, the medic must have a plan to decrease the chances for antibiotic-resistant infections. The main strategy is to hold off on dispensing that precious supply of antibiotics until absolutely necessary, but other strategies include:



    • Establishing good hygiene practices: Everyone should be diligent about washing hands with soap and hot water or hand sanitizers. Good respiratory hygiene includes coughing or sneezing into tissues or the upper arm, but never the bare hands.
    • Supervising sterilization of water, preparation of food, and disposal of human waste and trash. Contaminated water and food will lead to many avoidable deaths in survival scenarios. Make sure that food preparation surfaces (counter tops, etc.) are disinfected frequently.
    • Dedicating personal items: Personal items like towels, linens, utensils, and clothing may be best kept to one person in an epidemic setting.
    • Cleaning all wounds thoroughly and covering with a dressing. Skin is the body’s armor, and any chink in it will expose a person to infection.
    • Social distancing: When a community outbreak has occurred, limiting contact with those outside the family or survival group may be necessary to stay healthy.
    • Keeping a strong immune system: Getting enough rest, eating healthily, and avoiding stress will improve a person’s defenses against disease. Unfortunately, it may be difficult to achieve these goals in times of trouble.
    • Going natural: Allicin, a compound present in garlic, is a natural antibiotic that is thought to have an effect against some resistant bacteria like MRSA. Crush a clove and eat it.



    Preventing the spread of infections, especially antibiotic-resistant ones, is important to maintain the viability of a survival community. If you’re the medic, have antibiotics in your storage but use them wisely. If you do, you’ll help prevent not only resistance, but a lot of heartache if things go South.


    Joe Alton, MD


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/antibiotic-resistant-superbugs/
     
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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: GMO Salmon, Medical Emergencies[/h]
    November 23, 2015




    [​IMG]


    What’s for dinner? Well, it could be Frankenfish, as the FDA gives final approval for genetically modified salmon to hit the supermarket shelves. This story and more about dealing with a person physically collapsing in front of you are part of this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy. Also, a visit to the Urban Farming Institute…

    To listen in, click here:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...-medicine-hour-gmo-salmon-medical-emergencies

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,


    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Something a little different............

    AIR EVACUATION OF WOUNDED U.S. TROOPS WWII DOCUMENTARY "PERISHABLE RUSH" 77744
    (PeriscopeFilm)



    https://youtu.be/Lh0UF5viiQA

    Published on Nov 27, 2015
    Made in 1945 by the U.S. Treasury Department, PERISHABLE RUSH shows how the Army Air Forces during World War II flew wounded men from Pacific battle areas to mobile army surgeons hospitals, hospital ships, and finally major hospitals and eventually home towns in the United States. Uses a mix of actuality footage and fictional reenactments to follow a soldier from being wounded in action, cared for by medics on the battlefield, undergoing surgery in a mobile hospital near the front lines, recuperating in Guam, being shipped back to the United States, and convalescing in hospital near the soldier's home town. The film ends with a plea to buy bonds as part of the Victory Loan.

    The film shows footage at :30 of cremated Japanese war dead, being brought back to Japan in boxes.

    The film contains a great deal of footage of the Douglas C-54 Skymaster, which was used during the war as a flying hospital transport. it also includes at the 3 minute mark, very rare footage of one of the first helicopter combat rescues ever attempted. The chopper shown is a Sikorsky R-4. L-4 Bird Dog aircraft are also shown at the 3:22 mark, and DC-3's and PBYs as well. The heart of the film is about the C-54 however. At 4:30, a Skymaster is shown flying from Okinawa to Guam (7 hours) and then transiting to Pearl Harbor.




    On 22–23 April 1944, U.S. Army Lieutenant Carter Harman of the 1st Air Commando Group conducted the first combat rescue by helicopter using a YR-4B in the China-Burma-India theater. Despite the high altitude, humidity, and capacity for only a single passenger, Harman rescued a downed liaison aircraft pilot and his three British soldier passengers; two at a time. On 22–23 January 1945, another rescue by the R-4 involved several legs for refueling and navigating through passes between mountains nearly 10,000 feet (3,000 m) tall, to reach a weather station located at an elevation of 4,700 feet (1,400 m). The higher than normal altitude required a downhill run of 20 ft (6.1 m) to get airborne.

    Royal Air Force Hoverfly I in use by Fairey Aviation in late 1945
    While the R-4 was being used for rescues in Burma and China, it was also being used to ferry parts between floating Aviation Repair Units in the South Pacific. On 23 May 1944, six ships set sail with two R-4s on board each vessel. The ships had been configured as floating repair depots for damaged Army Air Forces aircraft in the South Pacific. When the helicopters were not being used to fly the parts from one location to another, they were enlisted for medical evacuation and other mercy missions.

    We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

    This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
     
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    Malaria Prevention (1967)
    (Nuclear Vault)



    https://youtu.be/d3vt9eovygY

    Published on Nov 27, 2015
    This Army film explains procedures that soldiers used to combat malaria, including protection from mosquito bites. - DVD Copied by IASL Scanner Jeremy Baron. - ARC 657291 / LI 263.2099

    National Archives - Malaria Prevention - National Security Council. Central Intelligence Agency. (09/18/1947 - 12/04/1981). -
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Nosebleeds, Flu Vaccines, Natural Diabetes Remedies, More



    November 28, 2015




    [​IMG]
    Last year’s vaccine was 20% effective, is next year’s any different?



    What do you know about FLUAD, the latest flu vaccine? How is it different from older versions? Also, are there any natural remedies that might have a beneficial effect on diabetes (more than you think)? Joe Alton, MD discusses these topics plus using Afrin for nosebleeds, and how to approach head trauma. All this and more on Amy and Joe Alton’s Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour.


    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...ine-nosebleeds-natural-diabetes-remedies-more



    [​IMG]


    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Survival Fish Antibiotic Keflex, FishFlex
    (DrBones NurseAmy)



    https://youtu.be/S-lqtpD2-O0

    Published on Nov 30, 2015
    Dosages, uses, and precautions of Keflex, FISH-FLEX (Forte) OR Cephalexin. Antibiotics are SURVIVAL MEDICINE storage items in case of disasters or long term survival scenario first aid. Host: Joe Alton, M.D. aka Dr. Bones, for more information:
    http://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
  39. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Active Shooters, SWAT-T, Superbugs[/h]
    December 5, 2015




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    Would you know the right plan of action if you were caught in an active shooter situation? Having a plan of action in advance may mean the difference between life and death? Joe Alton, MD gives his take on what to do in a mass casualty incident. Also, Dr. Alton discusses antibiotic-resistant superbug CRE, as well as Dr. Brock Blankenship’s SWAT-T, a tourniquet that might be a good addition to many workplace and schools’ first aid kits.


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    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2015/12/06/survival-medicine-hour-active-shooters-swat-t-new-superbug

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,


    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-active-shooters-swat-t-superbugs/
     
  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=3]The Active Shooter: Staying Alive[/h]

    December 7, 2015




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    It’s hard to read the news without seeing reports of the latest shooting by terrorists or the deranged and disgruntled. Few believe that they could possibly wind up in the crosshairs of a gunman’s sight, but it can happen anytime, anywhere. What would be your response?

    The natural response for most people is not to do anything. You’ve heard me talk about “normalcy bias” before. That’s the tendency for people to believe everything follows a pattern and that the day will proceed normally; they’re usually right. When a terrorist event breaks that pattern, however, the unprepared brain takes time to process the new situation. People will think that the sound of gunfire is fireworks, or anything less threatening than an assassin out to kill them.

    Another thing most citizens believe is that law enforcement and homeland security are on the case. While these agencies do the best they can to counter situations like this, most mass shooting events end in a few minutes. There is little or no chance that help will be there at the moment you need it, so you should have a plan of action.


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    A person without a plan of action follows the herd. If fifty people around you drop to the floor, your natural tendency is to do the same. Cowering in fear under a table in plain view of the shooter isn’t a recipe for a good outcome. By having a plan, you will have a better chance of getting out of there in one piece.

    You’re at the mall; what would your plan be if you heard gunfire nearby? What would you do first? Run? If so, where? If you couldn’t run, what would you do? These are things you should be thinking about, calmly and rationally, whenever you’re in an area where there are a lot of people. It may seem extreme to have to think of these things, but that’s what I call the “New Normal”.

    With an active shooter, what you do in the first few seconds may determine your final outcome. Give yourself a head start by always knowing what’s happening around you. We call this situational awareness. Know where exits are. Know where the gunshots are coming from. Know who appears nervous or suspicious in your immediate area.

    Sounds simple, doesn’t it? But in this era of people immersed in their smartphones, few are situationally aware and are easy targets for the active shooter.

    Here’s an example: Have you ever seen a patron enter a restaurant through the door marked “employees only”, or a movie theatre through the fire exit? This is a person you’ll want to observe. In most cases, it means nothing. In rare instances, though, it could be someone that’s up to no good.

    By the way, those same little-used exits might save your life: Most people will be trying to leave by the front door, just where the gunman expects them to go. Find an exit away from the direction of gunfire.



    Run, Hide, and Fight


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    If you find yourself in the middle of a terrorist event, you should remember these three words: Run, Hide, Fight. Just as “Stop, Drop, and Roll” can save the life of someone on fire, “Run, Hide, Fight” might save the life of someone under fire. This is the order of the actions that you should be taking in an active shooter scenario.


    Run


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    Most people will hide as their first course of action. You, however, should run away from the direction of gunfire as soon as you hear it, leaving through those exits you’ve been mentally marking. This will make it less likely you and the shooter will cross paths. Forget about collecting your stuff, it will only slow you down and, face it, it’s just stuff.

    If you’re in the line of sight of the shooter, run away at an angle or zig zag to make yourself a more difficult target. I know it’s not a natural action you’d think of doing, but most shooters aren’t marksmen and will miss a moving target.

    A good citizen would yell for others to follow and prevent others from entering the kill zone. Don’t try to move or otherwise help the wounded, however, despite your natural tendency to want to do so. You have to get out of there and becoming the next casualty does no one any good. Even the police will leave the injured for after the shooter has been neutralized.

    (One very important note: If you see law enforcement, don’t run up and hug them. Get your hands in the air, fingers spread, where officers can see them. They need to know you’re not the threat. Follow any instructions given and leave in the directions the officers came from.)

    Once you’re in a safe area, call 911 if rescuers have not yet arrived.


    Hide


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    If there’s only one exit and the shooter is standing in front of it, running might not be an option. Your next choice is hiding.

    You first want to get out of the shooter’s line of sight. We call this “concealment”, but it isn’t necessarily “cover”. If you’re concealed, you can’t be seen but a bullet might penetrate to hit you. If you have found cover, it means that you are both hidden and protected from projectiles hurled your way. Foliage is good concealment, but a thick tree trunk might be better cover.

    In a building, hiding under a table in the same room as the shooter is a death sentence. Get into another room, preferably one with a door you can lock. If there is no lock, put together a barrier with desks and chairs. Turn off the lights, silence your cell phone, and stay quiet behind an additional barrier like a table or in a closet. If you can quietly alert authorities, do so. Don’t respond to voice commands unless you’re sure the danger is over; sometimes the gunman will try to lure you out of a safe place.

    By accomplishing the above, you’ve just made yourself a harder target to acquire for the shooter, and he wants to do his damage as fast as possible. He’ll likely pass you by to find easier targets.


    Fight


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    What if you can’t run, and there is no reasonable hiding place? You just might have to fight yourself out of there. This strategy isn’t always doomed to failure. You still might be able to subdue an attacker even if unarmed. Three young and unarmed men were able to do it to a shooter on a train in Paris. It’s a last resort, but it can end without a fatality as it did there.

    If you don’t fight, the shooter will have a clear shot to your head and death is likely. If you fight, it might just be harder to be hit with a fatal shot.

    Of course, it would be great if you knew martial arts, but any type of aggression against the gunman would disrupt their “flow” and possibly put you at an advantage. If you can, approach him from the side or rear, and go for his weapon. If you have help, all should attack at the same time from different directions while hurling objects that he has to dodge. This guy is probably not James Bond: he’ll be disconcerted and not be able to handle multiple threats at once.

    If you’ve disrupted the shooter or, better, gotten the weapon out of his hands, inflict damage on him until he is dead or has stopped moving. Tough, I’ll admit, but these are tough times; commit to your actions.

    Luckily, few people will find themselves in the midst of a terrorist attack like the one at San Bernardino, but I honestly believe that more are coming. Needing a plan for active shooter situations is galling to some, but it’s part of life in the New Normal. Those with a plan will have a better chance to survive this event and many other disasters in the uncertain future.

    Joe Alton, MD


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/the-active-shooter-staying-alive/
     

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