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Dr Bones & Nurse Amy: The Survival Medicine Hour Of Doom & Bloom

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by searcher, Mar 16, 2014.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Vitals, Dakin’s Solution, Fungal Meds, More


    December 12, 2015




    [​IMG]
    Using Dakin’s solution for wound infections



    Is ISIS causing an outbreak of the parasite Leishmaniasis by dumping bodies on the street? Plus, are there fungal meds in veterinary medicine that could be used in survival scenarios for humans? Plus, how to treat wound infections with Dakin’s solution and the simple formula that can save your precious supply of antibiotics. All this and a primer on vital signs for the survival medic with Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton ARNP in the Survival Medicine Hour podcast.

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...-vital-signs-dakins-solution-fungal-meds-more

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-vitals-dakins-solution-fungal-meds-more/
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Active Shooter Survival
    (DrBones NurseAmy)



    https://youtu.be/mTwKqYYq1eU

    Published on Dec 14, 2015
    Surviving an active shooter scene WITHOUT a gun requires situational awareness and planning. This plan of action can help give you the best chance of survival in the face of a terrorist or unhinged gunman. Learn about Run Hide Fight. Hosted by Joe Alton MD of http://www.doomandbloom.net
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Patient Transport, Vitals, Tree Mold, More


    December 20, 2015


    How do you transport an injured person when the ambulance is heading in the other direction? Joe Alton, MD, and Amy Alton, ARNP, explore some of your options when a victim has to be transported and you have to improvise a stretcher (some illustrations to follow with are below). Also, Christmas trees cause increasing mold counts in homes that are leading to some severe allergies, plus a Christmas Eve asteroid fly-by, and some discussion on vital signs in austere settings. All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour. Listen in by clicking below:
    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...icine-hour-patient-transport-vitals-mold-more


    There are many ways to transport someone in austere settings. Below you’ll see some we discuss in this episode:


    [​IMG]
    The Jacket Stretcher


    [​IMG]
    The Blanket Pull



    [​IMG]
    The Blanket Stretcher





    [​IMG]
    The Chair Stretcher


    [​IMG]
    Stretcher improvised out of rope



    [​IMG]
    Pack Strap Carry


    [​IMG]
    Fireman’s Carry



    [​IMG]
    Fore and aft carry



    [​IMG]
    Making a four-handed “seat”


    [​IMG]
    2 man crutch carry




    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-patient-transport-vitals-tree-mold-more/
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    #357 DOLLAR STORE FIRST AID KIT [365 Survival]
    Armed Rogue



    Published on Dec 23, 2015
    Most everything in my new first aid kit came from the dollar store. Their medical supplies are actually really good.
    Get yo'self some alcohol pads: http://www.ebay.com/itm/351450154685?...
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Tornadoes, Lice, Dental Issues
    December 28, 2015

    Comments Off on Survival Medicine Hour: Tornadoes, Lice, Dental Issues

    [​IMG]

    More deaths from late season tornadoes in Texas makes us ask this question: Do you know how to keep your family safe if you were in the path of a twister? Find out what to do to decrease the risk of injury. Also what part does hygiene play in survival success. Dr. Alton talks about a common issue in good times or bad: LICE. Plus, some thoughts on the part dental hygiene plays in the duties and responsibilities of the survival medic, all in this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.



    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2015/12/28/survival-medicine-hour-tornadoes-lice-dental-hygiene-in-austere-settings

    [​IMG]

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,



    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-tornadoes-lice-dental-issues/
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: The Survival Dental Kit
    January 3, 2016


    [​IMG]

    Being medically prepared means being dentally prepared as well. Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton, ARNP discuss what you should have in your storage to deal with dental issues that you might encounter in a long term survival setting. The Altons relate their research into what dental equipment the Special Operations Forces takes to remote locations on humanitarian and field missions.

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/01/04/survival-medicine-hour-dental-preparedness

    [​IMG]

    Note: This episode was recorded on the road, so there’s a little echo on the podcast.

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,



    Joe and Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-the-survival-dental-kit/
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    U.S. AIR FORCE NURSING CORPS TRAINING / MEDICAL CENTER 78874
    PeriscopeFilm



    Published on Jan 5, 2016
    This 1980s USAF promotional film shows male and female nurses volunteering for duty in the USAF nursing corps. Orientation is shown, as well as a some team building exercises. Set to campy music, "when she smiles", this film makes duty in the Air Force look like a summer camp breeze.

    The beginning of the film takes place at Baylor University.

    We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

    This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Survival Dental Kit
    January 5, 2016


    [​IMG]



    Dental Preparedness
    Over the years, we have written hundreds of articles on medical preparedness for short or long-term disasters. Many now include medical kits and supplies to add to survival food storage and items for personal protection. Yet, few who are otherwise medically prepared seem to devote much time to dental health. Poor dental health can cause issues that affect the work efficiency of members of your group in survival settings. When your people are not at 100% effectiveness, your chances for survival decrease.

    History tells us that problems with teeth take up a significant portion of the medic’s patient load. In the Vietnam War, medical personnel noted that fully half of those who reported to daily sick call came with dental complaints. In a long-term survival situation, you certainly will find yourself as dentist as well as nurse or doctor.

    Anyone who has had to perform a task while simultaneously dealing with a bad toothache can attest to the effect on the amount and quality of work done. If your teeth hurt badly, it’s unlikely that your mind can concentrate on anything other than the pain. Therefore, it only makes sense that you must learn basic dental hygiene, care, and procedures to keep your people at full work efficiency. It could easily be the difference between success and failure in a collapse. In normal times, however, you should understand that the practice of dentistry without a license is illegal and punishable by law. Seek modern and standard dental care wherever and whenever it is available.

    The Survival Dental Kit
    The prepared medic will have included dental supplies in their storage, but what exactly would make sense in austere settings? You would want the kit to be portable, so dentist chairs and other heavy equipment wouldn’t be practical. You would want it to be easily distinguished from the medical kit.

    [​IMG]
    different masks

    We’ve mentioned that gloves for medical and dental purposes are one item that you should have in quantity. Don’t ever stick your bare hands in someone’s mouth. Buy hypoallergenic nitrile gloves instead of latex. For additional protection, masks should also be stored and worn by the medic.

    We’ve researched dental items that should be in the dental kit of those that would be medically responsible in a long-term survival community. After consulting with a number of preparedness-minded dentists, we have put together what we believe will be a reasonable kit that can handle a number of dental issues. Items that would be practical for the survival “dentist” include:

    • Dental floss, dental picks, toothbrushes, toothpaste or baking soda.

    • Dental or orthodontic wax as used for braces. Wax can be used to splint a loose tooth to its neighbors.

    • A Rubber bite block to keep the mouth open. This provides good visualization and protection from getting bitten. A large eraser would serve the purpose.

    • Cotton pellets, Cotton rolls, Q tips, gauze sponges (cut into small squares).

    • Compressed air cans or a bulb syringe for drying up saliva on teeth.

    • Commercial temporary filling material, such as Tempanol, Cavit, or Den-temp.

    [​IMG]

    • Oil of cloves (eugenol), a natural anesthetic. Often found in commercial preparations such as:

    -Red Cross Toothache Medicine (85% eugenol)
    -Dent’s Toothache Drops (benzocaine in combo with eugenol)

    It’s important to know that eugenol might burn the tongue, so be careful when touching anything but teeth with it.

    • other oral analgesics like Hurricaine or Orajel (Benzocaine)

    • Zinc oxide powder; when mixed with 2 drops of clove oil, it will harden into temporary filling cement.

    Here’s a video of the procedure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3rTF4c26Po

    • Spatula for mixing (a tongue depressor will do)

    • Oil of oregano, a natural antibacterial.

    • A bulb syringe to blow air and dry teeth for better visualization, and as a diagnostic tool to elicit discomfort in damaged teeth. A can of compressed air may be an alternative.

    • An irrigation syringe to flush areas upon which work is being done

    • Scalpel #15 or #10 to incise and drain abscesses

    • Dental probes, also called “explorers”.

    • Dental tweezers

    • Dental mirrors

    • Dental scrapers/scalers to remove plaque and probe questionable areas.

    • Spoon excavators. These instruments have a flat circular tip that is used to “excavate” decayed material from demineralized areas of a tooth. A powered dental drill would be a much better choice, but not likely to be an option off the grid.

    • Elevators. These are thin but solid chisel-like instruments that help with extractions by separating ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets. #301 or #12B are good choices. In a pinch, some parts of a Swiss army knife might work.

    [​IMG]

    • Extraction forceps. These are like pliers with curved ends. They come in versions specific to upper and lower teeth and, sometimes, left and right.

    Although there are more types of dental extractors than there are teeth, you should at least have several. Although every dentist has their preferences, you should consider including the following in your dental kit:

    -#151 or #79N for lower front teeth
    -#150A or #150 for upper front teeth.
    -#23, best for lower molars
    -#53R, best for upper right molars
    -#53L, best for upper left molars

    • Blood-clotting Agents: There are a number of products, such as Act-Cel, that help control bleeding in the mouth after extractions or other procedures. It comes a fabric square that can be cut to size and placed directly on the bleeding socket or gum.

    [​IMG]
    Chromic Catgut Suture

    • Sutures: A kit consisting of a needle holder, forceps, scissors, and suture material is helpful for the control of bleeding or to preserve the normal contour of gum tissue. We recommend 4/0 Chromic catgut as it is absorbable. It’s small enough for the oral cavity but large enough for the non-surgeon to handle. Don’t forget a small scissors to cut the string. More information on suture materials can be found later in this book.

    • Pain medication and antibiotics. Medications in the Penicillin family are preferred if not allergic. For those allergic to Penicillin, Erythromycin can be used. For tooth abscesses, Clindamycin is a good choice. These antibiotics are discussed in detail in the section dedicated to them in this book.

    Just as obtaining knowledge and training on medical issues likely in a disaster is important, the study of dental procedures and practices is essential for the aspiring survival medic.

    Joe Alton, MD

    [​IMG]

    Nurse Amy has expanded her dental preparedness kit to include almost all the items you see in the list above. Check our her dental kit, and many other kits and supplies for survival medical issues, at her store at store.doomandbloom.net.


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/the-survival-dental-kit/
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: New Sterilization Method, Skin Infections, Ginger
    January 10, 2016


    [​IMG]

    One big issue in remote locations is the sterilizations of instruments and dressings. Now, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Disease has tested a new method that claims 100% sterilization using portable items that won’t break the bank. Joe Alton, MD explains the procedure and talks about infections you’ll find in soft tissues as a result of poor disinfecting practices and dirty wounds. Also, Amy Alton, ARNP talks about one of her favorite natural remedies: Ginger. All on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.

    To Listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/01/11/survival-medicine-hour-new-methods-of-sterilization-ginger-skin-infections

    [​IMG]

    Wishing you the best of health in good times and bad,



    Joe Alton, MD and Amy Alton, ARNP

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-new-sterilization-method-skin-infections-ginger/
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    WWII ARMY and NAVY VENEREAL DISEASE / VD SCARE FILM 21484
    PeriscopeFilm



    Published on Jan 12, 2016
    Note: although it is 70 years old, this video contains some graphic content of the effects of venereal disease, that some persons may find disturbing. Viewer discretion is advised.

    Made during WWII by the U.S. Government, SEXUAL HYGIENE is a disturbing film intended to explain to service personnel how devastating it can be if they contract a venereal disease while in the service of their great nation. As the narrator and title cards explain, for many years in the 1930s and before, the facts of life were not explained to most boys and men. This has left a "vast trail of human wreckage" of blind, and even insane men, who have been devastated by V.D. and especially syphilis. The film encourages abstinence or, if that's not possible, the use of rubbers (preferably obtained from an Army post exchange).

    We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

    This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    All About Bedbugs
    January 13, 2016


    [​IMG]
    Bedbug



    Sometimes it’s the little things that make the difference between a good life and a bad one in a survival setting. The little things I’m talking about are bugs. Of all the creepy-crawlies that raise an alarm in a household, few are worse than bed bugs. Although poor standards of living and unsanitary conditions have been associated with bed bug infestations, even the cleanest home in the most developed country can harbor these parasites.


    Bed bugs were once so common that every house in many urban areas was thought to harbor them in the early 20th century; they declined with the advent of modern pesticides like DDT, but a resurgence of these creatures has been noted in North America, Europe, and even Australia over the last decade or so. Cities such as New York and London have seen 5 times as many cases reported over the last few years. This may have to do with the restriction of DDT-like pesticides or perhaps the general over-use of pesticides leading to resistance. Imagine what the situation would be if a disaster took you off the grid for good.


    The common bed bug (Cimex Lectularius) is a small wingless insect that is thought to have originated in caves where both bats and humans made their homes. Ancient Greeks, such as Aristotle, mention them in their writings. They were such a serious issue during WWII that Zyklon, a Hydrogen Cyanide gas infamously used in Nazi concentration camps, was implemented to get rid of infestations.



    [​IMG]
    Bedbugs in various stages of development and their droppings

    There are a number of species which are found in differing climates. Unlike lice, the subject of one of our recent article, bed bugs are not always species-specific. For example, Cimex hemipterus, a bed bug found in tropical regions, also infests poultry and bats.


    Adult bed bugs are light to medium brown and have oval, flat bodies about 4mm long (slightly more after eating). Juveniles are called “nymphs” and are lighter in color, almost translucent. There are several nymph stages before adulthood; to progress to adulthood, a meal of blood (yours!) is necessary.


    Bed bugs, which are mostly (but not exclusively) active at night, bite the exposed skin of sleeping humans to feed on their blood; they then retreat to hiding places in seams of mattresses, linens, and furniture. Their bites are usually painless, but later on, itchy raised welts on the skin may develop. The severity of the response varies from person to person.





    [​IMG]
    bedbug infestation on a mattress

    Bed bugs can make you miserable and have been known to harbor other disease-causing organisms, but there have not, as yet, been cases of illness specifically caused by them. This is in contrast to body lice or fleas, which has been associated with outbreaks of Typhus, Relapsing fever, and even Plague.


    Strangely, bed bugs don’t like to live in your clothes, like body lice, or on your skin or hair, like fleas. They apparently don’t care much for heat, and prefer to spend more time in your backpack or luggage than your underarm.


    Many confuse the bites of bed bugs with mosquitos or fleas. Most flea bites will appear around the ankles, while bed bugs will bite any area of skin exposed during the night. Flea bites often have a characteristic central red spot. Bed bug bites may resemble mosquito bites; bed bugs, however, tend to bite multiple times in a straight line. This has been referred as the classic “breakfast, lunch, and dinner” pattern.



    [​IMG]
    breakfast, lunch, dinner pattern of bedbug bites

    The most common treatment for bed bug bites is hydrocortisone cream to treat inflammation and the use of diphenhydramine (Benadryl) for allergic symptoms and itching. The cure, however, is to eradicate the bed bug from your shelter or camp; that’s a little harder to do. Some use chlorhexidine (Hibiclens) as a cleansing agent.


    First, find their nests: Look at every seam in your mattress, linens, backpacks, and furniture. Bed bugs will also hide in joints in the wooden parts of headboards and baseboards. You will usually find bed bug “families” of various ages, along with brown fecal markings and, perhaps, even small amounts of dried blood.


    Most people, once bed bugs are identified, will immediately want to treat with chemicals. Pesticides in the pyrethroid family and Malathion have been found to be effective. Propoxur, an insecticide, is highly toxic to bed bugs as well, but is not approved for indoor use in the U.S. due to health risks. If you use chemicals, be sure you cover all areas on the bed, including the frame and slats. Expect several treatments to be required to eliminate the infestation; repeat at least once 10 days after the initial treatment.


    Those concerned with the over-use of pesticides or with lack of availability, as in a long term survival situation, could consider using natural predators, but this is highly impractical, as the bed bug predator list consists of everything else you don’t want in your shelter: ants, spiders, cockroaches, and mites.


    One reasonable option is the use of bedding covers. These are impervious sheets or padding that, essentially, trap bed bugs inside your mattress until they starve. If they can’t reach you to get a meal of blood, they will eventually die out. This method (known as “encasing”) is the least risky, as it doesn’t involve the use of chemicals.


    If you have electricity, make sure to place all bedding and clothes in a hot dryer for, say, an hour. Usually, washing clothes will not kill bed bugs by itself although hot, soapy water over 125 degrees Fahrenheit may work. This strategy, by the way, includes your backpack when you return from a trip out of town or an extended foraging patrol. Extreme cold is also considered an effective treatment. If you live far enough North, 4 or 5 days of temperatures approaching 0 degrees Fahrenheit should kill them.


    If you have access to a working vacuum, use it on flooring and upholstery. A stiff brush is helpful to scrub mattress seams before vacuuming.





    Natural remedies to treat bed bugs include dusting seams with diatomaceous earth; the bugs consume it and it tears up their insides, but it doesn’t kill the eggs. Many people swear by tea tree oil and rubbing alcohol as well. Here’s a time-honored herbal bedbug treatment:



    • 1 Cup Water
    • Lavender essential oil (10 drops)
    • Rosemary essential oil (10 drops)
    • Eucalyptus essential oil (10 drops)
    • Clove bud essential oil (optional)
    • Place in a fine mist spray bottle
    • Shake well before using.


    As bed bugs can live for months without a meal, it’s important to maintain long-term diligence in identifying these pests wherever you hang your hat when things go South. These bugs may not end your life, but they can certainly affect the quality of it.







    Joe Alton, MD


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/all-about-bedbugs/
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Latrine Procedures "Use You Head" 1945 US Navy-USMC Training Film Cartoon; World War II
    Jeff Quitney



    Published on Jan 15, 2016
    more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_...

    "U.S. Navy animated training film by Hugh Harman Productions. Features the character Private McGillicuddy. Used to train U.S. Marines about dysentery & safe latrine practices."

    US Navy Training Film MN-2808g (for the US Marine Corps)

    Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound.

    Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latrine

    A latrine is a communal facility containing one or more (commonly many) toilets which may be simple pit toilets or in the case of the United States Armed Forces (or more specifically, the US Army and US air force) any toilet including modern flush toilets. The term is derived from the Latin lavatrina meaning bath.

    Many forms of latrine technology have been used in the past, from utterly simple to more sophisticated, while newer developments show promise using ecological sanitation (EcoSan).

    Pit toilets are the simplest and cheapest type, minimally defined as a hole in the ground. More sophisticated pit toilets may include a floor plate, a waterproof liner for the pit to avoid contamination of the water table or ventilation to reduce odor and fly/mosquito breeding. Other technologies may be used including Reed Odourless Earth Closet (ROEC) or Composting toilets, Pour-Flush Latrine, popularized by Sulabh International, Cistern-Flush Toilet, Bucket Latrine or Pour-Flush Toilet and Vault.[citation needed]

    The term "Flying Latrine" has been used to describe an unsanitary practice in some urban slums in Africa. With no running water or sewer systems, a person may resort to using a plastic bag as a container for excrement, then throw or sling the bag as far away as possible. This practice has led to the banning of the manufacture and import of such bags in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania.

    In locations with no functioning toilets latrines or trench toilets are typically set up for use by groups of men and/or women. They typically consists of pits or trenches, 4 feet (1.2 m) to 5 feet (1.5 m) deep and 4 feet (1.2 m) to 20 feet (6.1 m) long, dug into the ground. Many Army units, if they stayed in one location long, had primitive shelters and seating arrangements arranged over the pits. The pits are typically kept well away from any water sources to minimize possible disease transmission. After extended use the pits were typically filled in. In the Army each company typically had two soldiers assigned as sanitary personnel (usually personnel who had broken the rules) whose job it was to keep the latrines in good condition. Each Army unit was supposed to fill in its latrines and dig a new one for new arrivals. The use of latrines were a major advance in sanitation over more primitive "every man for himself" sanitation practices and helped control the spread of many diseases. Up to about 1920, when better sanitation practices were adopted, many more soldiers died of disease than from wounds...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pit_toilet

    A pit toilet is a dry toilet system which collects human excrement in a large container and range from a simple slit trench to more elaborate systems with ventilation. They are more often used in rural and wilderness areas as well as in much of the developing world. The waste pit, in some cases, will be large enough that the reduction in mass of the contained waste products by the ongoing process of decomposition allows the pit to be more or less permanent. In other cases, when the pit becomes too full, it may be emptied or the hole made be covered with soil and the associated structure moved or rebuilt over a new pit.

    The pit toilet shares some characteristics with a composting toilet, but the latter combines the waste with sawdust, coconut coir, peat moss or similar to support aerobic processing in a more controlled manner...
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: James Rawles, Chest Trauma, Zika Virus, More
    January 17, 2016


    [​IMG]
    James Wesley, Rawles

    Survival scenarios come with an increased risk of major trauma. Gunshot and knife wounds can lead to life-threatening chest wounds. Joe Alton, MD discusses options with faced with rib fractures and collapsed lungs (pneumothorax) in these situations. Also, a new virus has made its way across the Atlantic and is causing birth defects in thousands of newborns in Brazil and other countries. Find out more in Dr. Alton’s report. Plus, famed author James Wesley, Rawles discusses the idea of a Christian refuge nation in his new novel “Land of Promise”, and discusses the recent stock market woes as they pertain to a possible future economic collapse, all in the latest episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.

    [​IMG]
    Nurse Amy’s Gunshot Wound kit



    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/01/17/survival-medicine-hour-jim-rawles-trauma-collapsed-lungs-more


    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,


    Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Ionizing Radiation Safety (1998)
    Nuclear Vault



    Published on Jan 20, 2016
    Addresses And Instructs Ionizing Radiation Safety Procedures To Personnel Who Work With Medical X-rays, Industrial X-rays, And Permitted Radioactive Material Operations. - Pin 613619

    Department Of Defense
     
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  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Winter Car Survival Tips
    December 27, 2014


    [​IMG]



    It’s predicted to be a harsh winter and, for most in the U.S., this means trouble if someone gets stuck out on the road during a blizzard or other extreme conditions. Hypothermia (the effects on the body from exposure to cold) may occur on the wilderness trail, but also right in the driver’s seat of the family car. It’s important to have a plan in case you are stranded in your vehicle.


    Your Car in Winter





    [​IMG]



    Winter conditions don’t just affect people, they affect cars as well. Cold affects rubber and metal; it even decreases the battery’s efficiency. Tires become stiff and flat for the first few hundred yards. Your oil and other lubricants become thicker at cold temperatures. This makes the engine work harder.


    Therefore, vehicles that will be doing duty in extreme cold should be “winterized”. This involves switching to a lighter viscosity oil, changing to snow tires, and choosing the right (anti-freeze) ratio of coolant to water. Gas tanks should never be less than half full.


    For more info on winterizing your car, here’s an article from dmv.org:
    http://www.dmv.org/how-to-guides/winterize-car.php


    Prevention


    You’re not a bear, so you can’t hibernate through the cold weather; you’ll have to take measures to avoid becoming a victim of it. Many deaths from exposure are avoidable if simple precautions are taken.


    Keep an eye on weather forecasts before you head out; conditions can change rapidly if a cold snap is on the way.


    The first question you should ask before you get in the car in cold weather is: “Is this trip necessary?” If the answer is “no”, you should stay in place, cozy and warm. For most people that work, the answer is “yes”. If you have to hit the road during a winter storm, drive as if your life depends on it (because it does). Brush ice and snow off of windshields, side mirrors, or anywhere that you view might be blocked. Don’t speed, tailgate, or weave in and out of traffic. Make turns slowly and deliberately, and avoid quick stops and starts.


    Notify someone of your travel plans before you head out. Take your cell phone with you but leave it in your pocket or purse. Your focus has to be on the road, not on the latest texts from your friends.





    Stranded!

    [​IMG]



    If you live in an area that routinely has very cold winters, you may not be able to avoid being stranded in your car one day. Your level of preparedness will improve your chances of staying healthy and getting back home. So what should your plan of action be?



    1. Stay calm and don’t leave the car. It’s warmer there than outside and you have protection from the wind. Having adequate shelter is one of the keys to success, whether it’s in the wilderness or on a snow-covered highway.


    2. Crack a window on the side away from the wind for some fresh air. People talk about water and food being necessary for survival but, first, you’ll need a source of fresh air. Wet snow can block up your exhaust system, which causes carbon monoxide to enter the passenger compartment. Colorless and odorless, this is a deadly gas that kills in enclosed spaces without ventilation. Clearing the exhaust pipe of snow and running the engine only ten minutes or so an hour will help prevent monoxide poisoning.


    3. If you’re in a group, huddle together as best you can to create a warm pocket in the car.


    4. Rub your hands, put them in your armpits, or otherwise keep moving to make your muscles produce heat.


    5. Don’t overexert yourself. If your car is stuck in the snow, you’ll want to dig yourself out, but sweating will cause clothing to become wet. Wet clothing loses its value as insulation and leads to hypothermia.


    6. Let others know you’re there. If you have flares, use them. Flashing emergency lights on your vehicle will drain battery power, so use them only if you think someone might see them.


    Winter Car Items


    If you’re going to travel in very cold conditions, there are a certain number of items that you should keep in your vehicle. This is what an effective winter survival car kit contains:




    • Wool Blankets (for warmth; wool can stay warm even if wet)
    • Spare sets of dry clothes, including socks, hats, and mittens.
    • Hard warmers or other instant heat packs (activated, usually, by shaking, they’ll last for hours)
    • Matches, lighters and/or firestarters in case you need to manufacture heat
    • Candles, flashlights (keep batteries in backwards until you need them to extend life).
    • Small multi-tool with blade, screwdrivers, pliers, etc.
    • Larger combination tool like a foldable Chinese Army shovel (acts as a shovel but also an axe, saw, etc.)
    • Sand or rock salt in plastic container (to give traction where needed)
    • Tow chain or rope
    • Flares
    • Starter cables (for jump starts)
    • Water, Food (energy bars, MREs, dehydrated soups, candies)
    • Baby wipes (for hygiene purposes)
    • A first aid kit (every car should have one)
    • Medications (routine meds you take daily, ibuprofen, acetaminophen
    • Tarp and duct tape (brightly colored ones will be more visible and aid rescue)
    • Metal cup, thermos, heat source (to melt snow, make soup, etc.)
    • Noisemaker (whistle)
    • Cell phone and charger





    The items above will give you a head start in keeping safe and sound even if stranded. With a plan of action, a few supplies, and a little luck, you’ll survive even in the worst blizzard.


    Joe Alton, M.D.


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/winter-car-survival-tips-3/
     
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    The SWAT Tourniquet
    January 18, 2016


    [​IMG]
    The SWAT-T

    In these dangerous times, any trip to the mall (or anywhere there are crowds) could be a ticket to an active shooter event. In our recent article on what to do in these circumstances, we specifically mentioned that you shouldn’t attend the wounded until the threat is abolished, and that is still your best strategy; you aren’t doing anyone any good by becoming the next casualty. Even law enforcement won’t treat the injured until the gunman is neutralized.





    ABCDE vs. CABDE




    It stands to reason that those sustaining wounds are going to be bleeding. If emergency medical personnel are not on the way, you will have to take action.


    The initial field assessment of a victim usually involves the mnemonic ABCDE:


    • Airway: Is the airway open?
    • Breathing: Is the victim breathing?
    • Circulation: Is the victim bleeding?
    • Disability: Can the victim feel and move extremities? Can they respond appropriately to questions?
    • Expose: Can you see the full extent of the injury or injuries?





    This sequence changes in the actively bleeding wound to CABDE. In these circumstances, the cause of death is more often hemorrhage, which must be abated quickly. The determination of airway, breathing, and mental status can often be done simultaneously with bleeding control, as many patients will be conscious and talking.


    Direct pressure with a gloved hand is still the most successful method of bleeding control. However, there are many instances where pressure alone won’t deal with the issue. More aggressive methods such as tourniquets were, however, discouraged due to the risk of “necrosis” (tissue death due to lack of blood flow), nerve damage, and more.


    Despite the legitimacy of these issues, the military, through its experience in the Middle East, began to change its thinking. They found that a percentage of preventable deaths were related to inadequate measures to control bleeding. As such, the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) guidelines for our armed forces now actively promote the use of tourniquets as the first step to stop severe hemorrhage.


    This has carried over to civilian emergency care, especially in events like the Boston Marathon bombings and the San Bernardino shootings. Injuries at remote locations, like homesteads where rapid transport is difficult, make tourniquets a required item in the family medical kit.



    The SWAT-T
    [​IMG]
    SWAT tourniquet

    We’ve talked about tourniquets in the past, but we haven’t mentioned what might be an ideal tourniquet for the average citizen: the SWAT-T. SWAT-T stands for Stretch, Wrap, and Tuck Tourniquet, and the instructions are, essentially, all in the name. You can see the simplicity of application in the video below:



    The SWAT tourniquet is a wide elastic band that can serve as a compact, lightweight, and inexpensive tourniquet or pressure dressing. It’s very simple to use, especially with two hands: Stretch it, wrap (at least 2 inches) above the area of bleeding on the extremity, and tuck the end into itself. That’s pretty much all there is to it.


    Some tourniquets are difficult or impossible to place effectively around the thin arms of children, but the SWAT-T gives you the ability to apply it on just about anyone’s extremities, regardless of size.


    The SWAT-T is often carried as a backup to other tourniquets due to its versatility: It can be used as a pressure dressing as well as a tourniquet, or even just as a covering for other dressings without any significant pressure at all. Other non-tourniquet uses include stabilizing a splint or ice pack for orthopedic injuries, holding an abdominal dressing in place, and even as a sling for an injured arm or shoulder.


    For the medic, having a supply of tourniquets is important to save lives that would otherwise be lost due to bleeding. Even if you have other tourniquets, consider adding the versatile and lightweight SWAT-T to your medical storage.





    Joe Alton, MD


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/the-swat-tourniquet/
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Blizzard, Top Natural Remedies, More
    January 24, 2016


    [​IMG]

    26 inches of snow and high winds cost 19 people their lives this weekend on the East Coast. Would you know how to keep warm in a blizzard? Dr. Joe Alton discusses the news and basic strategies that could save your life. Also, What will you do when the pharmaceuticals run out in a survival setting? Do you know the basics of natural remedies like essential oils and herbal medicine? Joe Alton, MD, and Amy Alton, ARNP, discuss what you need to know about the medicinal benefits of various natural substances.

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/01/25/survival-medicine-hour-blizzard-natural-remedies-more


    Joe Alton, MD

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-blizzard-top-natural-remedies-more/
     
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    1945 WORLD WAR II U.S. ARMY NURSE DOCUMENTARY FILM 27454
    PeriscopeFilm



    Published on Jan 27, 2016
    Made in late 1945, THE ARMY NURSE is a short documentary propaganda film commissioned by the US military to highlight the role and contributions of army nurses.

    The film opens with a combat scene in the summer of 1945, when the war becomes a million men old (presumably the Battle of Okinawa) one of the soldiers is show getting wounded and the scene goes woozy. The narrator notes "This is the time for you to decide what you're gonna be: a soldier that gets injured and dies, or a soldier that gets injured and lives." The GI soon realizes that he is no longer on the battlefield but in a hospital, and he is being taken care of by a familiar face, the Army nurse.

    The film then commences a discussion of the army nurse's training and life during the war, beginning with basic training. The nurses had to go through the same BT regiment as the soldiers, learning how to scale walls, survive in the wilderness, and set up a hospital in the bush. They are sent to where ever they are needed, whether at home or overseas. It they are overseas they live in much the same conditions as the soldiers they minister to, sleeping in GI cots, in GI tents, and were the same uniforms and helmets, which they find various practical uses for. They also take the same time out to go to USO shows. The film ends with a short statement from the head of the Army Nurses Service, asking the audience to buy war bonds.

    We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."

    This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
     
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    All About Zika Virus
    January 27, 2016


    [​IMG]



    One of the scenarios we write about is the “Pandemic”. Although we have had success curing many illnesses with antibiotics, we are still struggling with outbreaks of viral diseases. In 2014, thousands died in West Africa during the Ebola epidemic. In 2015, Chikungunya virus crossed the Atlantic into the Western Hemisphere and infected a million people. This year, Zika virus is the latest pandemic, and the first to generate travel warnings specifically for women that are pregnant or of childbearing age.


    A little-known virus of equatorial Africa and Asia, the Zika virus has “jumped the pond” and is wreaking havoc in South America, especially among pregnant women and their newborns. Like its predecessors, it’s a mosquito-borne virus. Citizens of the Americas have little immunity against it.


    Most people experience mild flu-like symptoms, but an infected during a pregnancy can yield a newborn with brain damage. In late 2015, it was mainly a Brazilian problem. A congenital abnormality (once called a “birth defect”) called microcephaly started appearing among newborns. Microcephaly presents as an abnormally small head and is associated with mental handicaps; if severe, it may be incompatible with life.


    Brazil is a large country with a youthful population; in an average year, it sees about 150 cases of microcephaly. Since the arrival of Zika virus in May 2015, there have been 3,500. Now, cases of the virus are being reported in the United States from Virginia to Arkansas to Hawaii (mostly in returning travelers from South America). In total, 25 countries so far are reporting evidence of the virus.



    [​IMG]
    EPIDEMICS VS. PANDEMICS
    Infectious disease can be endemic, epidemic, or pandemic:





    –An Epidemic infectious disease is a community-wide outbreak of an illness that is not always present in an area. Influenza, EnterovirusD68, and Ebola are examples.
    –An Endemic infectious disease is one that is normally found and expected in a certain area. Malaria is endemic in many tropical countries.
    –A Pandemic occurs when an infectious disease crosses various borders and runs rampant throughout a large region, or even the whole world. The Spanish Flu of 1918 is the classic example. Zika has had outbreaks in Africa, Asia, and now, South America. Cases have been reported in Denmark and Sweden as well.


    WHAT IS ZIKA VIRUS?

    [​IMG]
    Zika virus is a member of the Flavivirus family, which contains a number of well-known diseases such as yellow fever, chikungunya, and West Nile virus. Like the others, Zika virus is carried by Aedes mosquitoes, which are the main agent of transmission (human to human transmission can also occur); unlike the others, the virus affects the unborn.


    Symptoms of the virus include headache, rash, fever, and conjunctivitis (pink eye). The grand majority of infected people have no signs of the infection whatsoever. This is ominous for a pregnancy, as the mother doesn’t even know she was at risk.


    TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF ZIKA VIRUS



    [​IMG]
    There is no vaccine or treatment available that is effective against Zika virus. Prevention, however, is simple: Don’t travel to the countries where widespread outbreaks are occurring. If you have to go, use sunscreen, long pants and sleeves, plus mosquito repellant or netting. Standing water near your location in affected areas should be drained.


    Mosquito control efforts are underway in Brazil and other countries at risk. Besides the usual sprays with pesticides, you might be surprised to know that GMOs (genetically modified organisms) are playing a part.


    A male “Franken-mosquito” called OX513A has a gene that kills his offspring. Female mosquitoes only mate once during their lives, so this might have a significant effect. Brazil claims more than a 90% decrease in the population after release. OX513A was also used in the Florida Keys in 2012 (over protests) to combat an outbreak of another Flavivirus, Dengue Fever.







    Joe Alton, MD


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/all-about-zika-virus/
     
  22. searcher

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    Guest Post: Top Ten Things To Know About Ballistic Protection
    January 28, 2016


    [​IMG]
    Covert body armor can be worn under clothes

    (DR BONES SAYS: From time to time, we post articles from aspiring writers in the field of medical preparedness. This time, our guest author is Chris Taylor of SAFEGUARD body armor who gives a top ten countdown of important things to know about ballistic protection. And now, Chris’s article ).

    Preparedness is no easy task; it requires an understanding of the situations you will find yourself in and the methods by which you can survive them. The most important thing to safeguard is your safety, as only by being properly protected can you keep yourself alive.


    Proper protection can mean a number of different things, from first aid, to self-defense. However, an often overlooked method of keeping oneself safe is by employing body armor. Bullet proof vests are more accessible and protective than ever, and yet there are still a number of important things to understand before grabbing the nearest vest. Here are the top ten most important aspects of body armor everyone should know:


    [​IMG]
    10.) Body Armor is Available for Everyone
    Body armor usually conjures up images of high-visibility protective vests worn by the Police, or ultra-protective tactical armor worn by SWAT teams and the Military. Similarly, many assume that these products are difficult to obtain, and are only reserved for these people. While there are some restrictions on how body armor may be purchased and used in some areas (check local regulations before you purchase), body armor is available for anyone to purchase and wear. Indeed, anyone who faces the threat of attack or injury should consider a protective vest, as it could help save their life.


    9.) Body Armor covers a lot of products
    As we’ve seen above, body armor refers to a wide range of protective clothing; everything from stab proof vests to helmets is considered body armor, and it can be difficult to know exactly what you need and what you are getting. The products can be loosely grouped into ‘soft armors’ and ‘hard armors’, depending on the materials they use to offer protection. However, within each of these groupings there are variations that need to be considered.


    [​IMG]
    female body armor

    8.) Different threats mean different protection…
    These variations exist in order to combat different threats, as certain weapons or attacks require different materials to provide protection. For example, bullet proof vests cannot protect against many stab wounds, which cannot protect against spike attacks like ice picks. Similarly, ‘soft’ bullet proof vests cannot protect against high-velocity ammunition. To add to the confusion, many vests meant to protect injury from sharp objects also come with ballistic protection. While this will be discussed later, it is important first to know what threats you need protection against; if you will be facing rifles, you need armor with rigid plates. If you will be facing edged weapons, you need armor with stab protection. If you are facing spiked weapons, you need spike protection. All of these protections can be found in addition to ballistic protection.


    7.) Not completely bulletproof
    However, even a bullet proof vest is not completely bullet proof. There is no such thing as complete protection against a bullet, particularly when bullets come in all shapes and sizes. A bullet proof vest will certainly increase your chances of surviving an attack involving a firearm, but it should never replace caution and diligence.

    (DR. BONES SAYS: EVEN THE BEST VESTS WON’T PROTECT YOU FROM THE FORCE OF THE BULLET. BLUNT TRAUMA FROM IMPACT AGAINST THE VEST MAY BREAK RIBS, COLLAPSE LUNGS, AND CAUSE INTERNAL BLEEDING)

    6.) Levels
    While no vest can offer 100% guarantee against bullets, vests at different levels offer some assurance against certain ammunition types. Ballistic protection is tested and graded by the National Institute of Justice, which assigns ‘levels’ to bullet proof vests. These NIJ Levels outline exactly what threats a vest can protect against. This means that vests at lower levels cannot protect against higher caliber ammunition, whereas higher levels can offer greater protection. The highest level of ‘soft armor’ available is Level IIIa, which will protect against the vast majority of handgun ammunition. The highest level of ballistic protection available is Level IV, which is only achievable with rigid plates, and can protect against even armor-piercing ammunition.

    [​IMG]
    Overt body armor

    5.) How it works
    Many do not know exactly how a bullet proof vest provides protection, and understanding how the materials involved work helps distinguish between the different levels and types available. ‘Soft armor’ uses fabrics like Kevlar, which have an incredibly high strength-to-weight ratio. This allows them to trap bullets and disperse their energy, slowing them to a complete stop. These materials are lightweight and flexible, allowing them to be worn even under clothing. Higher levels, however, need rigid plates that use materials like Ceramics and Polyethylene, which are incredibly strong and even deflect or absorb bullets. These plates are much thicker and heavier, and yet still light enough to be worn in covert vests.


    4.) Different Styles
    In addition to being split along numerous protective lines, body armor can also be found in ‘covert’ and ‘overt’ styles. This means that a vest is designed either to be worn under clothes or over clothes. Covert armor offers discreet protection at all levels, and can even use rigid plates. Some covert vests are even designed to help keep the wearer cool. On the other hand, overt vests are worn over clothing and have more variety in the materials used and the extras available. For example, overt vests can use waterproof and high-visibility covers, and can be equipped with additional pockets and clips, as well as logos and insignia.

    3.) Proper fitting
    It may sound obvious, but ensuring your vest fits you properly is just as important as ensuring you have the right level of protection and style. In a hostile situation, freedom of movement is very important, and you need to be comfortable in order to perform to the best of your ability. Body armor should be comfortable enough to be worn for extended periods, meaning you don’t have to worry about your protection. Armor that does not fit properly may also have gaps in protection, leaving you vulnerable. Many vests are fully adjustable, but making sure you have the right size is very important.


    2.) Keep it clean
    Just as important is keeping your armor well maintained. Many do not realize that body armor and the materials used only have a limited lifespan, and without proper maintenance, this will be reduced dramatically. Vests need to be cleaned regularly and stored correctly, just like all clothing. The carrier, which is the vest itself, can usually be machine washed and often only consists of materials like cotton. The protective inserts, on the other hand, should only be cleaned with a mild cleaning agent and a gentle sponge, to avoid causing damage to the protection. Armor should be stored out of sunlight, should not be crumpled, and should have nothing stored on top of it. Moreover, all vests should be inspected regularly, and if any damage or deformity is found, you should replace your armor immediately. Many manufacturers recommend having multiple carriers to ensure you always have clean armor to wear.


    [​IMG]
    looks great, but not much help against bullets

    1.) Wear it
    The most important thing to know about a vest is that it can only protect you when it is worn. Again, this seems obvious, but all too often people are injured or even killed despite owning body armor. Choosing the right vest and keeping it well-maintained is important, but unless you wear it when it is needed, it cannot protect you.


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/guest-post-top-ten-things-to-know-about-ballistic-protection-2/
     
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    RARE WWII PTSD FILM BATTLE FATIGUE DEALING WITH FEAR 29474
    PeriscopeFilm



    Published on Jan 28, 2016
    This rarely seen U.S. Navy film BATTLE FATIGUE DEALING WITH FEAR was produced during or just after WWII, and attempts to explain the condition known as "Battle Fatigue" or what we now describe as PTSD or Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. It was intended to be shown to those suffering from battle fatigue, including those who were hospitalized.

    As the psychiatrist host of the film explains, fear is a fighting man’s friend, but it can overrun you. A case study named Corporal Edwards is presented. In the case of Edwards, the symptoms are recognized, treated and he recovered, and they want to do the same for you. There is a fine line in exploration of these feelings that never crosses over into calling a man a coward or mentally ill, the focus is on the experience of the battle and how a useful emotion, when used to much can really harm a soldier.

    Film begins with a uniformed officer speaking about being in a hospital and the pain that will come with the upcoming footage as a natural path of healing, physical or emotional.
    Fear is the first emotion explored as rational and necessary.
    1:22 A cat is demonstrated as being in “Condition Red” a fear based position of being on guard, the clip is related to what a soldier experiences on the battle field as they embark on a mission. The cat goes back to a relaxed position after the dog leaves.
    3:15 The problem of remembering and how it makes it difficult to return to a relaxed state. We see a corporal who seems to be having a nightmare, we enter his dream and see he is in a battlefield, marching with a unit through the jungle, a bright something goes off and he wakes up crying.
    5:21 The troops are in the barracks singing together. Talking to pass the time.
    7:39 The corporal is excited, the men are tense, beginning to be afraid and trying to prepare for battle.
    8:20 A live war scene as the soldiers ship out, ready to go, using their fear to make them keep, aware of every danger. The fear is natural and useful in battle.
    9:26 The men assume a position in the jungle as orders are given to hold an area, two men are ordered ahead for security as the remaining troops execute the order and start digging. The troops joke and work diligently as the fear subsides.
    12:00 The fear: The troops are in a downpour, starting to sound agitated, next a pair of troops are in a dugout trench waiting still. The agitation turns to real frustration as a soldier is shot.
    14:10 Troops are raided while eating. Men are dropping to the ground, some in defense some from being shot. The excitement has completely given way to disillusion and fatigue.
    15:26 Soldiers are in a trench, they hear an accented voice crying out Americans to the Beach.
    16:00 The enemy, the Danger is always present so the corporal is never available to rest.
    16:50 The soldiers are taking orders as they are warned that there may be snipers. The scene from Cpl. Edwards dream plays out. He’s visibly nervous as he reminds himself to keep five paces. A bomb goes off, the soldiers are told to spread out, and they move on, another mine goes off and a man is down. Corporal Edwards looks shocked and realizes it could have easily been him. Shooting continues as he aims and takes down a sniper from a tree limb. The bombing and shooting turns to chaos and the corporal slowly moves through the scene.
    20:00 The doctor returns to the scene to explain that the remaining footage is a show of illness reached from Edwards pushing past his breaking point.
    21:00 Edwards is irascible, everything annoys him to anger. His only calm is visiting the friends who are now gone. Every little sound set him to action, he’s hyper-vigilant. His attitude is carried over to an assessment for a shooting that should not have occurred.
    25:40 The doctor explains how the physical traits take over and the fear would not subside. The doctors inviting the patient watching the film to share what they are holding in, reassuring them that it’s normal to feel these things. The troops are encouraged to learn about what’s happening and how to manage the feelings. Fear is a part of living, help, not a handicap. Fear is a fighting man’s friend.

    The End.
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Zika Virus A Mutation?
    January 30, 2016


    [​IMG]

    The Zika virus, the subject of one of our recent articles, is spreading throughout the hemisphere after crossing the Atlantic from Africa and Asia. At present, cases have been reported in every country except for Canada and Chile. News articles regarding the tragic consequences it has on pregnancies are published daily. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has gone so far as to travel advisories warning pregnant women to stay away from countries with widespread outbreaks, like Brazil.

    Interestingly, in Africa, Zika virus is thought to be a mild pest, causing minor illness; in fact, 80% of those infected have no symptoms at all. It is not associated with birth defects like microcephaly where it is traditionally found. Yet, this virus is now becoming an issue that some predict may affect up to 100,000 newborns. It isn’t hard to imagine that this will tax the resources of poor countries that are dealing with it.

    Why is a virus that isn’t a big problem in its original territory suddenly causing these heartbreaking deformities? Zika is an equatorial disease spread by mosquitoes, conditions that are present in both Brazil and Africa. Why should it have so different a presentation in one part of the world than another?

    It is my opinion that we dealing with a viral “mutation”. Viruses are well-known for their ability to change genetically. These changes, or mutations, may either be insignificant or have major consequences. Luckily, most are the former, and this is the reason why influenza vaccines work to prevent illness. This year’s flu is usually similar to last year’s, and flu vaccines are made from components of last year’s virus. If an influenza virus mutates significantly, it usually causes many more cases and, often, deaths as we have less immunity to it.

    Imagine if Ebola, which caused a regional epidemic in West Africa in 2014, had mutated to become easily transmissible through the air? It would have been more challenging to control and could have reached pandemic status.

    Despite this, I can find nothing in the news that mentions the possibility that the virus has mutated. If we are to have success in producing treatment or prevention of this viral illness (none exists at present), we will have to take into account the chance that this Zika virus is not the same as the original.

    Joe Alton, MD


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/zika-vi...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Bleeding Control Kit, Herbal Teas, Zika update, more
    January 31, 2016


    [​IMG]
    Bleeding wound

    Would you have the materials and knowledge to stop heavy bleeding if you were confronted with it? In these violent times, you should be prepared to deal with injuries that could be life threatening and have the equipment that might save a life. Hear Amy Alton, ARNP, explain her thinking in designing a compact med kit that deal with hemorrhage that she believes should be in every workplace, classroom, and homestead. Also, Joe Alton, MD, talks about natural remedies when he goes over some herbal teas. Plus: Why does Zika Virus in Brazil cause birth defects, while no major history of the problem seems to occur with Zika virus in its original territory (Africa and Asia)? Is a mutation the cause? All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.

    [​IMG]

    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/01/31/survival-medicine-hour-bleeding-control-kit-herbal-teas-zika-update-more

    [​IMG]


    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Native Food 1945 US Navy-USMC Training Film; World War II, Private McGillicuddy Cartoon
    Jeff Quitney



    Published on Feb 9, 2016
    more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_...

    "U.S. Navy animated training film by Hugh Harman Productions. Features the character Private McGillicuddy. Used to train U.S. Marines to not eat indigenous food."

    US Navy US Marine Corps training film MN-2808d

    Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound.

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutrition

    Nutrition (also called nourishment or aliment) is the provision, to cells and organisms, of the materials necessary (in the form of food) to support life. Many common health problems can be prevented or alleviated with a healthy diet...

    A poor diet can have an injurious impact on health, causing deficiency diseases such as scurvy and kwashiorkor; health-threatening conditions like obesity and metabolic syndrome; and such common chronic systemic diseases as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis...

    Overview

    Nutritional science investigates the metabolic and physiological responses of the body to diet. With advances in the fields of molecular biology, biochemistry, nutritional immunology, molecular medicine and genetics, the study of nutrition is increasingly concerned with metabolism and metabolic pathways: the sequences of biochemical steps through which substances in living things change from one form to another.

    Carnivore and herbivore diets are contrasting, with basic nitrogen and carbon proportions being at varying levels in particular foods. Carnivores consume more nitrogen than carbon while herbivores consume less nitrogen than carbon, when an equal quantity is measured.

    The human body contains chemical compounds, such as water, carbohydrates (sugar, starch, and fiber), amino acids (in proteins), fatty acids (in lipids), and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). These compounds in turn consist of elements such as carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese, and so on. All of these chemical compounds and elements occur in various forms and combinations (e.g. hormones, vitamins, phospholipids, hydroxyapatite), both in the human body and in the plant and animal organisms that humans eat.

    The human body consists of elements and compounds ingested, digested, absorbed, and circulated through the bloodstream to feed the cells of the body. Except in the unborn fetus, the digestive system is the first system involved. In a typical adult, about seven liters of digestive juices enter the lumen of the digestive tract. These digestive juices break chemical bonds in ingested molecules, and modify their conformations and energy states. Though some molecules are absorbed into the bloodstream unchanged, digestive processes release them from the matrix of foods. Unabsorbed matter, along with some waste products of metabolism, is eliminated from the body in the feces.

    Studies of nutritional status must take into account the state of the body before and after experiments, as well as the chemical composition of the whole diet and of all material excreted and eliminated from the body (in urine and feces). Comparing the food to the waste can help determine the specific compounds and elements absorbed and metabolized in the body. The effects of nutrients may only be discernible over an extended period, during which all food and waste must be analyzed. The number of variables involved in such experiments is high, making nutritional studies time-consuming and expensive, which explains why the science of human nutrition is still slowly evolving.

    In general, eating a wide variety of fresh, whole (unprocessed), foods has proven favorable for one's health compared to monotonous diets based on processed foods. In particular, the consumption of whole-plant foods slows digestion and allows better absorption, and a more favorable balance of essential nutrients per Calorie, resulting in better management of cell growth, maintenance, and mitosis (cell division), as well as better regulation of appetite and blood sugar[citation needed]. Regularly scheduled meals (every few hours) have also proven more wholesome than infrequent or haphazard ones, although a recent study has also linked more frequent meals with a higher risk of colon cancer in men...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Harman
     
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    WWII COMBAT FATIGUE & IRRITABILITY PTSD U.S. NAVY FILM 29504
    PeriscopeFilm



    Published on Feb 11, 2016
    Made during WWII in 1945, this United States Navy training film looks at Combat Fatigue Irritability, or shell shock, now known as PTSD. This is a very rare film, the type of which was, like John Huston's landmark "Let There Be Light", not widely shown due to the effects it could have on morale. Most likely it was only shown to those suffering from combat fatigue, and those who were working to help alleviate it. Oversimplistic in its approach, compared to what we know today, the film provides a fascinating glimpse into how PTSD was perceived in the 1940s, and how primitive the psychological tools were that the "greatest generation" had at their disposal.

    At mark 01:00, we have Navy men in resting rooms and also in sickbays. At mark 02:40, we have an interview between the fireman of the USS Montana, named Lucas, who survived the sinking of the ship, and his doctor, Dr. Bush. Lucas complains to him about being fed up, says no one knows what it feels like to be a fireman except a fireman. He complains of having burning feelings and his hands shaking. At mark 5:15, Dr Bush advises him to fight against his fear and conquer it.

    At mark 6:20, we have Lucas and his friend talking about their fears and things bothering them. At mark 9:50, we have all the men in a discussion with Dr Bush, all putting down how they feel. The doctor advises them on their conditions, their fears. They talk about their 30 day leave which they had. Lucas explains his trip as been lousy.

    At mark 11:57, we see his leave. Lucas alighting from a train, his people were waiting, his parents and fiancé. He was welcomed back from the military with a great lunch. They had some great discussions, where he was been treated as been a stranger. His family were just asking questions about his military life which led to frustration for him. These questions bring back pains, worries and fears.

    At mark 15:43, we see Lucas leaving his family in anger and walking down the street alone. At mark 16:35, we have Lucas drinking at a bar, where he relayed some story to the bar man and ending up making bad remarks. At mark 18:46, we have Lucas thrown out of the bar. He returns home feeling disappointed and uneasy. Eventually his father takes him to the doctor and they later referr him to the Navy.

    Lucas couldn’t share some of his experience during the war. At mark 27:50, we see Lucas being emotional and the doctor taking him to him office. At mark 29:00, the doctor went back to the class, advising the class about how to let go of their memories, their worst fears, memories of their mates killed in the battle using Lucas as a point of reference. He explains to them how to work together as a team, like when Lucas’ ship was blown up, he was glad at first to be out of his misery but when he saw his mates burning he realized how his own joy had caused his mates’ lives. But what could he do about it, because what’s done is done. What he should do is to accept these feelings, understand them and discipline them but he doesn’t, instead, he felt touchy, fed up and confused. When he came back he didn’t open up so as the day went on, he got worse and worse. Then when he got back home, he leashed it all on his family because when they asked questions about his experience, it remembered him of his guilt and unworthiness. He fought with the girl he loves because he thought she couldn’t understand him.

    The doctor explains the reasons for having the group discussion, occupational therapy will help with his emotions and feelings and physical training helps to keep them in shape in the mean while. What goes for Lucas goes for you too, he says to the class. Bad temper is a sign of something, something deeper which had to be faced, understood and dealt with. When you can deal with your entire problem as Lucas did his, you will be free of all your sentiments.
     
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    Injuries to the Nail Bed
    February 12, 2016


    [​IMG]


    Minor injuries can sometimes be a major detriment to the function of a member of your survival group. Although perhaps not as life-threatening as a gunshot wound or a fractured thighbone, nail bed injuries are common; they will be more so when we are required to perform carpentry or other duties to which we’re not accustomed.


    Nail Anatomy

    Your fingernails and toenails are made up of protein and a tough substance called keratin. They are, as you can imagine, similar to the claws of animals. When we refer to issues involving nails, we refer to it as “ungual” (from the latin word for claw: unguis).

    [​IMG]

    The nail consists of several parts:

    The nail plate (body): this is the hard covering of the end of your finger or toe; what you consider to be the nail.

    The nail bed: the skin directly under the nail plate. Made up of dermis and epidermis just like the rest of your skin, the superficial epidermis moves along with the nail plate as it grows. Vertical grooves attach the superficial epidermis to the deep dermis. In older people, the nail plate thins out and you can see the grooves if you look closely. Like all skin, blood vessels and nerves run through the nail bed.

    The nail matrix: the portion or root at the base of the nail under the cuticle that produces new cells for the nail plate. You can see a portion of the matrix in the light half-moon (the “lunula”) visible at the base of the nail plate. This determines the shape and thickness of the nail; a curved matrix produces a curved nail, a flat one produces a flat nail.

    [​IMG]

    In a nail “avulsion”, the nail plate is ripped away by some form of trauma. The nail may be partially or completely gone, or may be lifted up off the nail bed. Ordinarily, depending on the type of trauma, an x-ray would be performed to rule out a fracture of the digit; you won’t have this tool available without modern facilities, but you can do this for an avulsed nail:.

    • Clean the nail bed thoroughly with saline solution, if available, and irrigate out any debris. Paint with Betadine (2% Povidone-Iodine solution) or other antiseptic. If you have local anesthesia, you might want to use some; this area is going to be tender.

    • Cover the exposed (and very sensitive) nail bed with a non-adherent (Telfa) dressing. Some add petroleum jelly for additional protection. Change frequently. Avoid ordinary gauze, as it will stick tenaciously and be painful to remove.

    • If the nail plate is hanging on by a thread, remove it by separating it from the skin folds using a small surgical clamp. You can consider placing the avulsed nail plate on the nail bed as a protective covering; it is dead tissue but may be the most comfortable option. Avoid scraping off loose edges, as it may affect the nail bed’s ability to heal.

    • If the nail bed is lacerated, suture it (once cleaned) with the thinnest gauge absorbable suture available (say. 6-0 Vicryl). Be sure to remove any nail plate tissue over the laceration so the suture repair will be complete.

    • Place a fingertip dressing. You might consider immobilizing the digit with a finger splint to protect it from further damage.

    • Begin a course of antibiotics if the nail bed was contaminated with debris.

    In some crush injuries, such as striking the nail plate with a hammer, a bruise (also called an “ecchymosis”) or a collection of blood may form underneath (a “hematoma”). A bruise will be painful, but the pain should subside within an hour or two. A hematoma, however, will continue to be painful even several hours after the event. A bruise will likely appear brownish or blue, but a hematoma may appear a deep blue-black.

    [​IMG]

    For a bruised nail, little needs to be done other than giving oral pain meds, such as Ibuprofen. For a significant hematoma, however, some suggest a further procedure called “trephination”. In this instance, a very fine drill (or a hot 18 gauge needle or paper clip) is used to make a hole in the nail plate. This opening must be large enough to allow blood that has collected under the nail to escape. Once the pressure is relieved, the pain will abate.



    This procedure should not be performed unless absolutely necessary, as the pain will eventually decrease over time by itself. If you go too deep through the nail, you may further injure the nail bed. The finger must be kept dry, splinted and bandaged for a minimum of 48 hours afterwards.



    [​IMG]



    It’s important to know that damage to the base of the nail (the germinal matrix) may be difficult to completely repair, and that future nail growth may be deformed in some way. In situations where modern medical care is available, a hand surgeon is often called in to give the injury the best chance to heal appropriately. Even then, a higher incidence of issues such as “ingrown” nails may occur over time. A completely torn-off nail will take 4-5 months to grow back, maybe more.


    Joe Alton, MD

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/injurie...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Traumatic Brain Injuries
    February 15, 2016


    [​IMG]

    Most head injuries cause superficial damage and are not life-threatening. Indeed, most head injuries amount to only a laceration of the scalp, a black eye, or a painful bump. These wounds, however, can hide damage inside the cranium, the part of the skull that contains the brain. Injuries that affect the brain are called traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). It’s important for the medic to recognize when trauma to the skull has caused damage that is more than superficial.

    Concussions are the most common type of TBI. A concussion is associated with a variety of symptoms that are often immediately apparent. The presentation differs from one individual to the next. Although you might expect a loss of consciousness, the victim may remain completely alert. Headache is actually the most commonly seen symptom. Other symptoms include:

    • Dizziness
    • Confusion
    • Nausea
    • Loss of motor coordination
    • Blurred or double vision
    • Slurred speech
    • Ringing in the ear (also called “tinnitus”)
    • Difficulty focusing on tasks at hand

    A person with trauma to the head may be knocked unconsciousness for a period of time. In most cases, they will “wake up” in less than 2 minutes. You can expect them to be “foggy” and behave inappropriately (put me in, coach!). They may not remember the events immediately prior to the injury.

    Loss of consciousness is a serious concern. If the victim is “out” less than two minutes, the patient will merit close observation for the next 48 hours. You should examine for evidence of superficial injuries and determine that the patient has regained normal motor function. Make sure they can move all their extremities with normal range and strength.

    Rest is prescribed for the remainder of the day. When your patient goes to bed, it will be appropriate to awaken them every two or three hours, to make sure that they are easily aroused. In most cases, a concussion causes no permanent damage unless there are multiple episodes of head trauma over time, as in the case of boxers or other athletes in contact sports.

    It should be noted that a physical strike to the head is not necessary to suffer a concussion. A particularly jarring football tackle or the violent shaking of an infant can cause a concussion or worse traumatic brain injury. This is because the brain “bounces” against the walls of the cranium. When injury occurs at the site of a blow to the head, it’s called a “coup” injury. Just as often, it can occur on the opposite site of the head, known as a “contrecoup” injury.

    In many cases, evidence of direct trauma to the skull is visible. An “open” head injury means that the skull has been penetrated with possible exposure of the brain tissue. If the skull is not fractured, it is referred to as a “closed” injury. An indentation of the skull is clear evidence of a fracture and the outlook may be grim, due to the likelihood of bleeding or swelling in the brain. A closed injury may still become life-threatening for the same reasons.

    The brain requires blood and oxygen to function normally. An injury which causes bleeding or swelling inside the skull will increase the intracranial pressure. This causes the heart to work harder to get blood and oxygen into the brain. Blood accumulation (known as a “hematoma”) could occur within the brain tissue itself, or between the layers of tissue covering the brain.

    Without adequate circulation, brain function ceases. Pressure that is high enough could actually cause a portion of the brain to push downward through the base of the skull. This is known as a “brain herniation” and, without modern medical care, will almost invariably lead to death.

    There are a number of signs and symptoms which might identify those patients that have a serious TBI. They include:

    • Prolonged loss of consciousness
    • Convulsions (Seizures)
    • Worsening headache over time
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Bruising (around eyes and ears)
    • Bleeding from ears and nose
    • Worsening confusion/Apathy/Drowsiness
    • One pupil more dilated than the other
    • Indentation of the skull

    If the period of unconsciousness is over 10 minutes in length, you must suspect the possibility of significant injury. Vital signs such as pulse, respiration rate, and blood pressure should be monitored closely. The patient’s head should be immobilized, and attention should be given to the neck and spine, in case they are also damaged. Verify that the airway is clear and breathing is regular. In a collapse, this person is in a life-threatening situation that will have few curative options if consciousness is not regained.

    Other signs of a traumatic brain injury are the appearance of bruising behind the ears (Battle’s sign) or around the eyes (raccoon sign). This indicates internal bleeding in the cranium, despite the impact not occurring in those areas. Bleeding from the ear itself or nose without direct trauma to those areas is another indication. The fluid that drains out may be clear; this may represent spinal fluid leakage.

    In addition, intracranial bleeding may cause pressure that compresses nerves that lead to the pupils. In this case, you will notice that your unconscious patient has one pupil more dilated than the other.

    A severe consequence of bleeding in the brain is a stroke, (also known as a cerebrovascular accident or CVA). It represents damage to the brain caused by lack of blood supply. This could occur in a head injury due to a blockage of blood flow to a portion of the brain. This blockage could be due to a clot, a hemorrhage, or anything else that compromises the circulation in the area. Another possibility is a defect in a blood vessel known as an “aneurysm” which could rupture even in the absence of a traumatic event.

    Whatever functions are associated with the part of the brain affected will be lost or impaired. These patients often present with an inability to speak, partial or complete blindness, and paralysis or weakness of one side of the body and face. The stroke is usually heralded by a sudden severe headache.

    Strokes may also occur due to other reasons as well, such as uncontrolled high blood pressure. Although it may not be difficult to diagnose a major CVA in an austere setting, few options will exist for treating it. Blood thinners might help a stroke caused by a clot, but worsen a stroke caused by hemorrhage. It could be difficult to tell which is which without advanced testing.

    Keep the victim on bed rest; sometimes, they may recover partial function after a period of time. If they do, most improvement will happen in the first few days.

    Trauma to the head may have negligible consequences, or it could have life-threatening consequences. In some circumstances, there may be little that you, the medic, can do in a long-term survival situation.

    Joe Alton, MD

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/traumat...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Cleaning Mess Gear 1945 US Navy-United States Marine Corps Training Film
    Jeff Quitney



    Published on Feb 17, 2016
    US Marine Corps playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

    more at: http://quickfound.net/links/military_...

    "U.S. Navy animated training film by Hugh Harman Productions. Features the character Private McGillicuddy. Used to train U.S. Marines to clean their mess gear properly and the consequences of eating from dirty mess gear."

    US Navy - USMC Training Film MN-2808e

    Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound.

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mess_kit

    A mess kit is a collection of silverware and cookware used during camping and backpacking, as well as extended military campaigns. There are many varieties of mess kits available to consumers, and militaries commonly provide and have historically provided them to their troops...

    U.S. Army and Marine Corps mess kit

    In the years prior to World War II, two factors influenced the design of the U.S. Army's M-1926, M-1932, and M-1942 mess kits. First, unlike most other armies of the day, the U.S. mess kit was designed to serve men queuing in feeding lines and served in unit formations from large garrison-type field kitchens when not in actual daily combat operations. Secondly, U.S. soldiers in the field were never expected to either forage or to completely cook their rations, even in daily combat or frontline service. Instead, when not used as a serving tray for company-size or larger units, the mess kit was used to re-heat pre-measured servings of the canned Reserve Ration. After 1938, it was used for the new C-ration, a canned combat ration with several menu precooked or dried food items. (Today, though canned and dried combat rations have further evolved into the MRE, these can now be self-heated, and thus only a containment tray is required for most units).

    The U.S. Army's flat ovoid M-1932 wartime-issue mess kit was made of galvanized steel (stainless steel in the later M-1942), and was a divided pan-and-body system. When opened, the mess kit consisted of two halves: the deeper half forms a shallow, flat-bottom, ovoid Meat Can Body, designed to receive the Meat Ration, the meat portion of the prewar canned Reserve Ration. The Meat Can Body, with its folding handle extended, can double as a crude skillet. The Mess Kit Plate (lid) is even more shallow...

    When stored, the Mess Kit Plate is placed on top of the ovoid Meat Can Body, while the stamped folding handle is folded over the inverse side of the plate's center divider, and latched onto the edge of the Body. It is further secured folding the lid's ring toward the center of the mess kit, which locks onto another latch. In use, each piece may be used individually, or as a unitary three-compartment mess tray, accomplished by sliding the lid-plate's center divider onto the folding handle, and securing it to the handle by the ring-and-latch mechanisms. When latched, the kit can be held in a ready position by the user in one hand to receive U.S. Army's 'A' or 'B' field kitchen rations. As the soldier passed along the mess line, food service personnel would dole out hot items first, often meat followed by vegetables, potatoes and other side dishes, ostensibly separated by the tray dividers. Dessert was piled in the center of the accumulated portions - if the soldier was lucky. While a soldier could use the handled Meat Can Body from his kit to cook raw food, it is really too shallow and thin to serve as an effective skillet, and was usually restricted to heating the canned Meat Ration. After 1938, the Meat Can Body was used to heat the meat and vegetable component of the C-ration, or to reconstitute breakfast items such as C-ration powdered eggs.

    To complement the mess kit, soldiers used a stamped cup especially molded to fit over the bottom of the U.S. Army's standard one-quart (950 ml) canteen. This cup could be used as a boiling vessel, when boiling water for coffee, or for heating or reconstituting soup and other foods. During World War II, units preparing heated combat rations in the Meat Can Body or canteen cup mainly used locally procured combustible materials or Sterno fuel units of jellied alcohol. The latter could be stored within an issued folding stove for deployment when heating food, soup, or coffee in the field.

    After World War II, a specially-designed Esbit stove was issued to fit over the cup-and-canteen unit, similar to designs used in other armies...
     
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    Survival Medicine Hour: Sleep Deprivation, Burns, Zika, More
    February 19, 2016


    [​IMG]

    In survival, getting sleep is important to keep you sharp and make sure that appropriate judgements are made and actions taken. Learn about sleep hygiene from Joe Alton, MD, plus a new study tells you what states in the U.S. are the most sleep-deprived. Also, Dr. Alton discusses first and second degree burns, the difference between sunscreen and sunblock, and what the SPF rating system means. Also, how to identify and treat these common injuries in disasters or other situations where medical help isn’t on the way. Nurse Amy and Dr. Bones also discuss the latest about Zika virus, plus how the Army is so lacking in medical providers that they are offering a rapid path to citizenship for foreign medical graduate volunteers. All this and more on the Survival Medicine Hour with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy.

    [​IMG]

    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/02/20/survival-medicine-hour-burns-sleep-deprivation-more

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-sleep-deprivation-burns-zika-more/
     
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    Understanding Asthma

    February 24, 2016


    [​IMG]

    Asthma is a chronic condition that limits your ability to breathe. It affects the airways, which are the tubes that transport air to your lungs. When people with asthma are exposed to a substance to which they are allergic (an “allergen”), airways become swollen and filled with mucus. As a result, air can’t pass through to reach the part of the lungs that absorbs oxygen (the “alveoli”).

    During an episode of asthma, you will develop shortness of breath, tightness in your chest, and start to wheeze and cough. This is referred to as an “asthma attack”. In rare situations, the airways can become so constricted that a person could suffocate from lack of air.

    Here are common allergens that trigger an asthmatic attack:

    • Pet or wild animal dander
    • Dust or the excrement of dust mites
    • Mold and mildew
    • Smoke
    • Pollen
    • Severe stress
    • Pollutants in the air
    • Some medicines
    • Exercise

    There are many myths associated with asthma; the below are just some:

    • Asthma is contagious. (False)

    • You will grow out of it. (False; it might become dormant for a time but you are always at risk for it returning)

    • It’s all in your mind. (False)

    • If you move to a new area, your asthma will go away. (False; it may go away for a while, but eventually you will become sensitized to something else and it will likely return)

    Here’s a “true” myth: Asthma is, indeed, hereditary. If both parents have asthma, you have a 70% chance of developing it compared to only 6% if neither parent has it.

    Physical signs and symptoms of asthma
    Asthmatic symptoms may be different from attack to attack and from individual to individual. Some of the symptoms are also seen in heart conditions and other respiratory illnesses, so it’s important to make the right diagnosis. Symptoms may include:

    • Cough
    • Shortness of Breath
    • Wheezing (usually sudden)
    • Chest tightness (sometimes confused with coronary artery spasms/heart attack)
    • Rapid pulse rate and respiration rate
    • Anxiety

    Besides these main symptoms, there are others that are signals of a life-threatening episode. If you notice that your patient has become “cyanotic”, they are in trouble. Someone with cyanosis will have a blue/gray color to their lips, fingertips, and face.

    [​IMG]
    cyanosis of the fingertips

    You might also notice that it takes longer for them to exhale than to inhale. As an asthma attack worsens, wheezing may take on a higher pitch. Once the patient has spent enough time without adequate oxygen, they will become confused, drowsy, and possibly lose consciousness.

    To make the diagnosis, use your stethoscope to listen to the lungs on both sides. Make sure that you listen closely to the bottom, middle, and top lung areas.

    In a mild asthmatic attack, you will hear relatively loud, musical noises when the patient breathes for you. As the asthma worsens, less air is passing through the airways and the pitch of the wheezes will be higher and perhaps not as loud. If no air is passing through, you will hear nothing, not even when you ask the patient to inhale forcibly. This person may become cyanotic.

    Here’s what wheezing sounds like when using a stethoscope:




    Sometimes a person might become so anxious that they become short of breath and think they are having an asthma attack. To resolve this question, you can measure how open the airways are with a simple diagnostic instrument known as a peak flow meter. A peak flow meter measures the ability of your lungs to expel air, a major problem for an asthmatic. It can help you identify if a patient’s cough is part of an asthma attack or whether they are, instead, having a panic attack or other issue.

    To determine what is normal for a member of your group, you should first document a peak flow measurement when they are feeling well. Have your patient purse their lips over the mouthpiece of the peak flow meter and forcefully exhale into it. Now you know their baseline measurement. If they develop shortness of breath, have them blow into it again.

    In moderate asthma, peak flow will be reduced 20-40%. Greater than 50% is a sign of a severe episode. In a non-asthma related cough or upper respiratory infection, peak flow measurements will be close to normal. The same goes for a panic attack; even though you may feel short of breath, your peak flow measurement is still about normal.

    In our next article, we’ll discuss conventional and alternative ways to treat asthma.



    Joe Alton, MD
     
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    Treating Asthma
    February 29, 2016


    [​IMG]

    In our last article, we talked about the mechanisms of how asthma affects the body. When exposed to an allergen (an allergy-causing substance), the body responds by the airways swelling, the muscles that surround them tightening and respiration (especially exhalation) becoming an exertion. Without treatment, the attack will often improve after a while, but sometimes it doesn’t, causing a life-threatening condition known as “status asthmaticus“.

    The cornerstones of asthma treatment are the avoidance of “trigger” allergens, as mentioned previously, and the maintenance of open airways. Medications come in one of two forms: drugs that give quick relief from an attack and drugs that control the frequency of asthmatic episodes over time.

    Quick relief drugs include “bronchodilators” that open airways, such as Albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil), among others. These drugs should open airways in a very short period of time and give significant relief. These drugs are sometimes useful for people going into a situation where they know they will exposed to a “trigger”, such as before strenuous exercise. Don’t be surprised if you notice a rapid heart rate on these medications; it’s a common side effect.

    If you find yourself using quick-relief asthmatic medications more than twice a week, you are a candidate for daily control therapy. These drugs work, when taken daily, to decrease the number of episodes and are usually some form of inhaled steroid. There are long-acting bronchodilators as well, such as ipratropium bromide (Atrovent). Another family of drugs known as Leukotriene modifiers prevents airway swelling before an asthma attack even begins. These are usually in pill form and may make sense for storage purposes. The most popular is Montelukast (Singulair).

    Often, medications will be used in combination, and you might find multiple medications in the same inhaler. U.S. commercial product Advair, for example, contains both a steroid and an airway dilator. Remember that inhalers lose potency over time. Expired inhalers, unlike many drugs in pill or capsule form, have less effect than fresh ones.

    It’s important to figure out what allergens trigger your asthma attacks and work out a plan to avoid them as much as possible. Furthermore, make sure to stockpile as much of your asthma medication as possible in case of emergency. Physicians are usually sympathetic to requests for extra prescriptions from their asthmatic patients.

    [​IMG]

    In mild to moderate cases, you might consider the use of natural remedies. There are actually quite a few substances that have been reported to be helpful:

    Ginger: A study published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology indicates that Ginger is instrumental in inhibiting chemicals that constrict airways. Animal tests find that extracts of Ginger helps ease asthmatic symptoms in rodents. Use as a tea or extract twice a day.

    Ginger and Garlic Tea: Put four minced garlic cloves in some ginger tea while it’s hot. Cool it down and drink twice a day. Some have reported a beneficial effect with just the garlic.

    Other herbal teas: Ephedra, Coltsfoot, Codonopsis, Butterbur, Nettle, Chamomile, and Rosemary all have been used in the past to improve an asthmatic attack.

    Coffee: Black unsweetened coffee is a stimulant that might make your lung function better when you are having an attack. Don’t drink more than 12 ounces at a time, as coffee can dehydrate you. Interestingly, coffee is somewhat similar in chemical structure to the asthma drug Theophylline.

    Eucalyptus: Essential oil of eucalyptus, used in a steam or direct inhalation, is well-known to open airways. Rub a few drops of oil between your hands and breathe in deeply. Alternatively, a few drops in some steaming water will be good respiratory therapy.

    Honey: Honey was used in the 19th century to treat asthmatic attacks. Breathe deeply from a jar of raw unprocessed honey and look for improvement in a few minutes. To decrease the frequency of attacks, stir one teaspoon of honey in a twelve ounce glass of water and drink it three times daily.

    Turmeric: Take one teaspoon of turmeric powder in 6-8 ounces of warm water three times a day.

    Licorice and Ginger: Mix licorice and ginger (1/2 teaspoon of each) in a cup of water. Warning: Licorice can raise your blood pressure.

    Black Pepper, Onion, and Honey: Drink ¼ cup of onion juice with a tablespoon of honey, after adding 1/8 tablespoon of black pepper.

    Mustard Oil Rub: Mix mustard oil with camphor and rub it on your chest and back. There are claims that it gives instant relief in some cases.

    Gingko Biloba leaf extract: Thought to decrease hypersensitivity in the lungs; not for people who are taking aspirin or ibuprofen daily, or anticoagulants like Coumadin.

    Vitamin D: Some asthmatics have been diagnosed with Vitamin D deficiency.

    Lobelia: Native Americans actually smoked this herb as a treatment for asthma. Instead of smoking, try mixing tincture of lobelia with tincture of cayenne in a 3:1 ratio. Put 1 milliliter (about 20 drops) of this mixture in water at the start of an attack and repeat every thirty minutes or so.

    Further research is necessary to determine the amount of effect that the above remedies have on severe asthma, so take standard medications if your peak flow reading is 60% or less than normal.

    Don’t underestimate the effect of your diet on your condition. Asthmatics should:

    • Replace animal proteins with plant proteins.
    • Increase intake of Omega-3 fatty acids.
    • Eliminate milk and other dairy products.
    • Eat organically whenever possible.
    • Eliminate trans-fats; use extra-virgin olive oil as your main cooking oil.
    • Always stay well-hydrated; more fluids will make your lung secretions less viscous.

    Finally, various breathing methods, such as taught in Yoga classes, are thought to help promote well-being and control the panic response seen in asthmatic attacks. Acupuncture is thought by some to have some promise as well in treating the condition.

    Joe Alton, MD


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    Antioxidants and Survival, Part 1
    March 5, 2016


    [​IMG]

    Keeping healthy and fighting disease is what your body’s immune system is all about. What does your body use as weapons in the arsenal to stave off the toxins you’re exposed to every day? Antioxidants. This may sound too New Age-y for you, but many in conventional Western medicine acknowledge the importance of getting sufficient antioxidants from your diet or by other means. Human beings have one of the longest lifespans in the animal kingdom due to a lot of antioxidants in our diet. After a major disaster, that lifespan is in jeopardy, and your food storage should contain a lot of different sources of antioxidants.

    This topic is something I’ve haven’t discussed before, and not all the science supports the health benefits of antioxidants (especially supplements), but the medically self-reliant should know about nutrition and what foods are most likely to keep their people healthy in good times or bad. So what the heck are antioxidants, what do they do, and how do you get them?

    Antioxidants are a class of compounds that are capable of preventing the damage caused by oxidation of other molecules in your body by… Oxygen! Yes, the oxygen in the air you need to breathe causes damage. Oxidation, when it affect your car’s chassis, leads to rust, and in your body, oxidation is essentially biological rusting. Antioxidants, some produced in your body naturally and some ingested, inhibit oxidation by fighting free radicals. Free what?

    Free radicals. Free radicals are a waste product you naturally produce as a result of normal living and aging. They’re your biological response to environmental toxins like cigarette smoke, UV rays from the sun, chemicals, radiation, and more. Free radicals also form anytime you have inflammation in your body and with physical exertion.

    Free radical molecules aren’t complete; they’re missing one or more electrons. The incomplete molecules go after other molecules and proteins to steal their electrons. When they do this, they damage cell structures and even your DNA, and form even more free radicals. Cell walls “rust”, so to speak, and become leaky, causing cell death. Without antioxidants, free radicals run rampant, leading to tissue damage, signs of aging, and the inability of your immune system to nip diseases in the bud. Free radicals are linked to many different diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, coronary artery disease, Parkinson’s, and many more.

    How do antioxidants work? Antioxidants donate electrons to these free radicals, rendering them harmless, without becoming free radicals themselves. They serve to defend your cells from damage and resist the effects of exposure to pollutants and other toxins.

    Other important possible benefits of antioxidants include:


    • Assisting in cell repair
    • Processing toxic elements like mercury and arsenic out of your body
    • Increasing your body’s natural defense capabilities by shielding your DNA from free radical attacks
    • Promoting the self-destruction of early cancer cells


    Different Types of Antioxidants


    Antioxidants are classified in different ways, and each protects different parts of your cells. Some, like Vitamins A, E, and alpha-lipoic acid, protect the cell walls, mostly made of fatty lipids, and others like Vitamin C and glutathione, protect the inside of cells, mostly made of water. You’ll need both types to prevent oxidative effects that might lead to biological rust.

    As I said earlier, you make some of these in your body, but you make less and less as you get older. Some of your natural antioxidants are found in just about every cell, with names like catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione.

    You need a wide array of antioxidants to provide you with optimal benefits. Let’s talk about glutathione. This is considered the “master” antioxidant because it maximizes the effect of all the others, including coQ10, Vitamin C, alpha-lipoic acid, plus the antioxidants you ingest in your diet.

    Glutathione helps process toxins from your cells and protects you from the damaging effects of radiation, chemicals, and environmental pollutants. Your body’s ability to produce glutathione decreases with aging. However, there are nutrients that can promote glutathione production, such as high-quality whey protein, curcumin, raw dairy, eggs, and grass-fed meat.

    Another strong antioxidant is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA). It helps reduce inflammation, gets toxic metals out of your system, and even enhances the body’s sensitivity to insulin, something especially important in Type 2 diabetics. It’s also the antioxidant that protects you from developing Alzheimer’s disease. Alpha-lipoic acid might even help regenerate other antioxidants.

    Then there’s CoQ10 (Ubiquinone), an antioxidant converted to ubiquinol and produced in quantity in young people but less so in older folks. It’s used by all the cells in your body, and helps produce energy, as well as maintaining heart health and boosting the immune system. It has other effects as well, like keeping blood pressure in line and slowing the natural aging process. If you’re older, you might consider taking this in supplements.

    Some antioxidants aren’t made naturally and have to be taken in your diet. One is resveratrol, also called a flavonoid. This is found in grapeseed, some vegetables, and red wine. It’s thought to help with blood pressure, heart health, and helps your ability to fight inflammation. It might even help prevent Alzheimer’s.

    Another dietary antioxidant is the family of Carotenoids. These are the substances that give vegetables their colors, like carrots, peppers, and tomatoes. Your body converts them into Vitamin A.

    One antioxidant you all know about is Vitamin C. Not only is it thought to be helpful to decrease the duration of some respiratory infections, it’s a major factor in battling oxidation from free radicals, and helps you maintain normal production of collagen, vital to skin, bones, tendons, and ligaments. You can get vitamin C from raw, organic vegetables and fruits, especially citrus. When taking a vitamin C supplement, many recommend one made with “liposomal technology”, which is thought to make the nutrient more accessible to your cells.

    Finally, there’s Vitamin E. Natural vitamin E is a family of several different compounds. You can get all these vitamin E compounds from a balanced diet composed of wholesome foods, but only one or two from supplements. If you take supplements, make sure you let your doctor know. Taking too much may lead to health issues.



    In Part 2, we’ll discuss what antioxidant-rich foods should be in your storage and supplies, some supplements that might have benefit, and lifestyle changes that help antioxidants in their battle to keep you healthy.


    Joe Alton, MD


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    Survival Medicine Hour: Jim Cobb on Prepper Communications
    March 5, 2016



    In this episode of the Doom and Bloom ™ Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton welcome old friend and prolific author Jim Cobb to talk about his new book: “Prepper Communications”. He’ll talk about communications in survival settings, survival group communications, and the importance of good communications in good times or bad. Also, is there a vaccine in the works that might cure cancer? A study is being conducted in the terminally ill in the United Kingdom that’s showing promise. Also, Kudzu, the invasive vine, may help decrease the amount of alcohol you drink!



    To listen in, click below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2016/03/06/survival-medicine-hour-author-jim-cobb-on-communications



    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,



    Joe and Amy Alton


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    Antioxidants and Survival, Part 2
    March 8, 2016



    [​IMG]



    Last time, we talked about what antioxidants are and how they work to eliminate free radicalsand strengthen your resistance to disease. We made clear the importance of having a variety of antioxidant sources in your diet. It turns out that eating a healthy diet (and providing good nutrition for family and group members) is the best way to keep it together, even when everything else is falling apart.





    Antioxidant Food Sources
    [​IMG]
    You can buy antioxidants by the bottle at the store but, to tell the truth, you should get most of your antioxidants not from supplements, but from your diet. A diet of fresh, raw, unprocessed foods (especially fruits and vegetables) is loaded with them. You should eat fresh, organically-produced food whenever possible, which underscores the importance of learning how to produce food on your own property or by “guerrilla gardening“. Check out resources through your state’s agricultural extension office, such as The Master Gardener Program. Even in survival scenarios, the ability to access fresh food will supplement stored non-perishables and, certainly, provide more antioxidant support.





    Foods that are high in antioxidants include:


    • Vegetables. Most of the vegetables you eat, especially green leafy ones, are loaded with plant compounds that act as antioxidants. Kale, mustard greens, and spinach, for example, are good sources of vitamin E and other antioxidants. Remember that to maximize the antioxidants in vegetables, you have to eat them in a raw, unprocessed, and fresh state.

    Fruit. Fresh berries like raspberries, blueberries, and cranberries are good antioxidant sources. They contain lots of vitamin C and carotenoids, as well as iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, and potassium.


    Nuts. Raw Pecans, walnuts, almonds, and hazelnuts have antioxidants that can boost your heart and overall health. It should be noted that some grocery store nuts are irradiated to prevent germination and should be avoided. Also, you should know that peanuts aren’t on this list. They aren’t even really a nut! They’re legumes, and related more to beans and peas.





    Green tea. Green tea has compounds that lower your risk for heart attack and stroke, plus much more.



    Herbs and spices. Consider putting together a herb garden to go along with those veggies. Herbs and spices are an abundant source of antioxidants. Some options are ginger, garlic, cloves, cinnamon, and turmeric,. Look for fresh products, as they are have higher antioxidant levels than processed and powdered versions. The antioxidant activity of fresh garlic is stronger than dry garlic powder, for example.





    Sprouts are great sources of antioxidants. Live in a high-rise and can’t grow a garden? Well, if you have about a little spare counter space in your kitchen, you can be a successful sprout farmer. You can even grow them in jars.


    What about all those supplements you’ll find online and at the store? The name (“supplement”) is the key, they’re there only to add to a diet and shouldn’t be a sole source. Certainly, it isn’t easy to eat healthily due to today’s hustle and bustle lifestyle. If you choose to take supplements, consider CoQ10, moderate, not high, levels of Vitamin C and E, and acai berry as some options.



    Antioxidant-Friendly Lifestyle Changes
    [​IMG]
    Get some sleep!



    And, speaking of lifestyle, change yours to decrease the number of free radicals that your body has to deal with.


    • Decrease the amount of sugar in your diet. Less sugar in your diet can help the antioxidants you have to work better and last longer. Food items with high-fructose corn syrup like many sodas are especially bad.


    • Exercise. Exercise in moderation can boost your body’s antioxidant production.


    • Manage your stress. Stress can worsen inflammation caused by free radicals. Studies have found links between psychological stress and numerous health issues. Even the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says that most diseases have a psychological component.


    • Avoid smoking. Smoking forms free radicals in your body, which accelerates the aging process, especially in your skin. Oh, by the way, it also has more carcinogens than you can shake a stick at.


    Get some sleep! Sleep deficits can cause severe health problems. Seven to eight hours of sleep per night is the recommended amount for most adults, maybe a little less for oldsters.



    Although antioxidants are considered to be part of the alternative philosophy of healthcare, many Western practitioners believe they have an important role (especially via diet) in keeping your body functioning at 100% efficiency. In a survival setting, that’s where you’ll have to be to stay healthy.

    Joe Alton, MD


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    Minutes to Live
    Nuclear Vault



    Published on Mar 8, 2016
    Minutes to Live - Uncataloged motion picture film production detailing what to do in the case of an iminent gas attack. DVD copied by IASL Master Scanner Timothy Vollmer.
     

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