1. Have a great weekend!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Gold and Silver finish the week down
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Week of 4/29/2017 Closing prices & Chg Over Last Wk---- Gold $1268.30-- DOWN 20.80 Silver $17.19-- down 61 Oil $49.33-- down 0.29 USD $98.89 -- down 0.99

Driverless Cars / Trucks

Discussion in 'Auto, Tractor, Motorcycles, Racing, and Mechanics' started by searcher, Aug 30, 2016.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Though Details Need to be Worked Out, Self-Driving Cars Nearly Here
    VOA News



    Published on Dec 12, 2016
    For many drivers, the era of self-driving cars can't come too soon. The future holds the promise of stress-free, accident-free driving that could save thousands of lives. But don't hold your breath, because the technology still has to catch up with the dream. Still, every day brings us a bit closer to an era when being "behind the wheel" is a thing of the past.
    Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/a/self-driving...
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Riding in Uber’s self-driving cars
    The Verge



    Published on Dec 14, 2016
    Uber is expanding its self-driving pilot to San Francisco, giving Bay Area residents the first taste of a driverless future. Anyone who hails an UberX could find themselves in the backseat of one of Uber’s self-driving Volvo XC90 SUVs.
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    San Francisco, Your Self-Driving Uber is Arriving Now
    Uber



    Published on Dec 14, 2016
    Self-driving cars have been picking up and dropping off riders on the streets of Pittsburgh for the last 3 months, and now we’re excited to bring them to our hometown of San Francisco. Ready to take a ride in a Self-Driving Uber?
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Uber CEO Travis Kalanick: Our Self-Driving Cars Will ‘Make The Roads Safer’ | TODAY
    TODAY



    Published on Dec 14, 2016
    Travis Kalanick, co-founder of ride-sharing service Uber, one of the fastest-growing companies in history, tells TODAY’s Willie Geist about Uber’s next big plan: self-driving cars. Kalanick says, “We’ll make the roads safer.”
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Uber defies California state order to halt its self-driving car program after rolling out fleet of auto-pilot vehicles in San Francisco
    • Uber's self-driving cars were unveiled to the public in San Francisco Wednesday
    • California Department of Motor Vehicles has ordered Uber to obtain a special permit for autonomous cars or 'cease' the program
    • Uber argued that their self-driving cars did not fall under the legal definition of autonomous vehicles because human monitors are still required to sit inside
    • The permit would require the company to publicly report every crash, and every time a monitor takes control of the car during testing
    • Anthony Levandowski, Uber's vice president for advanced technologies, said it would not seek the permit as a matter of principle


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4044182/Uber-defies-order-California-DMV-obtain-special-150-permit-self-driving-cars-require-company-report-crash.html#ixzz4T8lgvoAB
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Automaker Tackle Self-Driving Car Crash Avoidance
    VOA News



    Published on Dec 17, 2016
    Tests of autonomous cars in real-life situations show that navigation and steering technology have matured. But several incidents involving self-driving cars running red lights prove that driverless vehicles still need a human driver ready to take over. Researchers say designing a crash-proof car is difficult, especially with the behavior of human car drivers. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/a/automakers-t...
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Proposed rule would mandate, standardize 'V2V' vehicle-speak

    Jan 4, 2017 Aaron Marsh | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    One day, if vehicles are required to be able to "talk" to each other by sending and receiving safety information messages via standardized V2V communication, NHTSA believes it could prevent "hundreds of thousands" of collisions every year.

    Aaron Marsh/ Fleet Owner
    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    NHTSA plans to mandate V2V technology for vehicles


    Vehicle-to-vehicle, or V2V, technology — one of the promising new possibilities taking shape as part of "smart cities" or "smart infrastructure" — took a step today toward becoming not an if but a when. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a proposed rule this morning looking to require and standardize V2V communications for new light vehicles.

    The agency says it sees great promise in V2V technology, but believes that unless there's a single format and programming environment established and mandated now for vehicles to "talk" to each other, the technology will be developed piecemeal from various, proprietary directions. If that's allowed to happen, V2V tech essentially could end up a tangled mess or fail to catch on, and a beneficial V2V-enabled roadway future may never emerge.

    "Without a mandate to require and standardize V2V communications, the agency believes that manufacturers will not be able to move forward in an efficient way and that a critical mass of equipped vehicles would take many years to develop, if ever," NHTSA states in the proposed rule.

    On the other hand, if an orderly groundwork can be set for V2V communications, NHTSA hopes the technology might someday "prevent hundreds of thousands of crashes and prevent over 1,000 fatalities annually."

    The proposed rule maps out a plan for light vehicles to be able to send and receive "basic safety messages" about things like their speed, location and bearing. The idea is that the shared info potentially could then drive other technology like automatic braking and other autonomous "course-correcting" action to prevent collisions and subsequent injuries and deaths.

    Regarding when this V2V communication would be required, "assuming a final rule is issued in 2019, this would mean that the phase-in period would begin in 2021, and all vehicles subject to that final rule would be required to comply in 2023," NHTSA states.

    The lengthy, 675-page proposed rule is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on Thursday, Jan. 12, and comments will be accepted for 90 days afterward. Comments can be submitted at https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=NHTSA-2016-0126.

    http://fleetowner.com/regulations/p...m=email&elq2=681c0615f33e4149a1bc9a652a51125f
     
  8. GOLDZILLA

    GOLDZILLA Harvurd Koleej Jeenyus Midas Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,720
    Likes Received:
    5,836
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Imagine if your car could flip off other cars without you even having to yell !
     
    searcher likes this.
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    ATA’s Spear named to transportation automation panel

    Jan 12, 2017 Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    ATA President and CEO Chris Spear was selected as a member of the U.S. DOT's transportation automation advisory committee.

    Related Media

    American Trucking Assns. President and CEO Chris Spear said he was “honored” to be selected as a member of the U.S. Dept. of Transportation’s transportation automation advisory committee.

    “I am grateful to have been chosen by Secretary Foxx to serve on this important panel,” Spear said. “Trucking is vital to the U.S. economy and an important part of our transportation system, so it is imperative that trucking and this association have a seat at the table when it comes to issues like autonomous vehicles, and we will be driving that outcome.”

    “While large-scale use of autonomous trucks is years away, the policy framework that will govern this future is being debated and ultimately written today, and I look forward to vigorously participating in those discussions on behalf of the trucking industry,” he added.

    DOT announced Spear was one of 25 individuals representing a myriad of modes and interests that had been named to this committee. The committee will meet for the first time on Jan. 16.

    http://fleetowner.com/fleet-managem...m=email&elq2=10eeb1ed24984cc58b90c72a4815430f
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Automation in vehicles and trucking: Imperfections and solutions

    Jan 17, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Dr. Gill Pratt, CEO of the Toyota Research Institute (TRI), recently offered up some startling – indeed, quite worrying – concerns regarding autonomous vehicle (AV) technology in terms of highway safety during the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

    While introducing Toyota’s new Concept-i – a “thinking car” for lack of a better term – Pratt also highlighted the limitations of the artificial intelligence (AI) powering such vehicles.

    And those limitations present some big ramifications when the talk turns to self-driving trucks.

    However, the trucking industry might also be crucial to solving some of the “limitations” inherent within self-driving systems too. [Make sure you read to the end of this post to find out how.]

    “Historically, humans have shown nearly zero-tolerance for injury or death caused by flaws in a machine,” he explained during a speech at CES.

    “And yet we know that the AI systems on which our autonomous cars will depend are presently and unavoidably imperfect,” Pratt stressed. “So: how safe is safe enough? Society tolerates a lot of human error. We are, after all, ‘only human.’ But we expect machines to be much better. In the very near future, this question will need an answer.”

    Pratt also put it another way: right now, the U.S. experiences some 35,000 traffic fatalities a year. Now, if a machine-driven car proved twice as safe as the human-driven variety, thus meaning only 17,500 lives would be lost in the U.S. every year to vehicle crashes, would society accept that “autonomous” trade-off?

    “Rationally, perhaps the answer should be yes,” he said. “But emotionally, we at TRI don’t think it is likely that being ‘as safe as a human being’ will be acceptable.”

    Still, vehicle manufacturers – heavy truck makers included – are still charging ahead with self-driving technologies, with many expecting AVs to be on the road in practical numbers by the 2020s.

    But what kinds of self-driving systems are we talking about here?

    Pratt contends what we’ll be seeing is a Level 4 autonomous vehicle, NOT the fully self-driving no-human-involved Level 5 type. In the case of Level 4 systems, the vehicle will only drive itself in what he calls “specific Operational Design Domains” such as at only certain speeds, only certain times per day, only when the weather is good, etc.

    “It will take many years of machine learning and many more miles than anyone has logged of both simulated and real-world testing to achieve the perfection required for Level 5 autonomy,” Pratt pointed out.

    Yet even getting to the point where Level 4 autonomous vehicles are “accepted” may be a challenge due to the hurdles presented by Level 2 and Level 3 systems – hurdles Toyota believes are largely generated by the impact on humans from vehicles that can operate themselves in only limited capacities.

    Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations for Toyota, added during his own CES presentation that “considerable research” shows that the longer a driver is disengaged from the task of driving, the longer it takes to re-orient them back to driving.

    “There is evidence that some drivers may deliberately test even level 2 [semi-autonomous] system limits; essentially misusing a device in a way it was not intended to be used,” he emphasized.

    “When someone over-trusts a Level 2 system, they may mentally disconnect their attention from the driving environment and wrongly assume the system is more capable than it is,” Carter warned. “We worry that over-trust may accumulate over many miles of ‘hands off’ driving. Human nature, not surprisingly, remains one our biggest concerns.”

    TRI’s Pratt noted that Level 2 autonomous systems are “perhaps the most controversial right now because it’s already here and functioning in some cars on public roads.”

    He explained that, in a Level 2 scenario, a vehicle hand-off to a human driver may occur at any time with only a second or two of warning.

    “This means the human driver must be able to react, mentally and physically at a moment’s notice,” he said.

    “Even more challenging is the requirement for the Level 2 human driver to always supervise the operation of the autonomy taking over control when the autonomy fails to see danger ahead,” Pratt added. “It’s sort of like tapping on the brake to disengage adaptive cruise control when we see debris in the road that the sensors do not detect. This can and will happen in Level 2 and we must never forget it.”

    Then you get to Level 3, which to Pratt’s mind is a lot like Level 4 technology but with an autonomous mode that at times may need to “hand-off” control to a human driver – a driver who may not be paying attention, since the machine is doing all the driving.
    [​IMG]
    The Toyota Concept-i


    “’Hand-off,’ of course, is the operative term and it’s a difficult challenge,” he explained. “In Level 3, as defined by SAE [the Society of Automotive Engineers], the autonomy [system] must ensure that if it needs to hand-off control of the car, it will give the driver sufficient warning. [The technology] must also ensure that it will always detect any condition requiring a hand-off.”

    That warning is needed, Pratt added, because with Level 3 systems, the driver is not required to oversee the autonomy, and may instead fully engage in other tasks.

    “The challenge lies in how long it takes a human driver to disengage from their texting or reading once this fallback intervention is requested and also whether the system can ensure that it will never miss a situation where a hand-off is required,” he stressed.

    So here are the complications for such a situation:

    • Research shows that the longer a driver is disengaged from the task of driving, the longer it takes to for them to “re-orient” back to driving;
    • At 65 miles per hour, a car travels around 100 feet every second;
    • This means in order to give a disengaged driver 15 seconds of warning, at that speed, the system must spot trouble about 1,500 feet away – some five football fields worth of distance;
    • On top of that, regardless of speed, a lot can happen in 15 seconds; thus ensuring at least 15 seconds of warning is very difficult.
    As a result, Pratt noted that moving to Level 3 AVs may be as difficult to accomplish as moving to Level 4-equipped vehicles.

    But here’s where the trucking industry can play a role in solving this issue, which he said revolves around what psychologists call “Vigilance Decrement.”

    In 1948, a fellow by name of Norman Mackworth wrote a paper that examined the “breakdown of vigilance” during prolonged visual search. To illustrate this issue, he used a clock that only had a second hand – a hand that would occasionally and randomly jump ahead by two seconds.

    Pratt said it turns out that even if you keep your eyes on the “MacWorth clock,” your performance at detecting two-second jumps will decrease in proportion to how long you do it.

    It’s TRI’s belief that something similar occurs to human drivers when they are forced to “remain vigilant” for a possible “hand-off” of control from a Level 2-equipped autonomous car.

    Yet TRI’s research also found that if drivers conduct mild secondary tasks (texting is NOT included, by the by) it might actually help them maintain situational awareness and reduce “Vigilance Decrement.”

    “For example, long-haul truck drivers have extremely good safety records, comparatively,” Pratt noted. How do they do it? He said that perhaps it’s because they employ mild secondary tasks that help keep them vigilant, such as: talking on citizens band (CB) two-way radios; continuously scanning the road ahead; and listening to the radio to stay alert and engaged during long drives.

    “We’ve only begun our research to find out exactly how this all works,” Pratt added.

    It’ll be interesting to see what else TRI discovers at it keeps working on AV technology.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/automati...m=email&elq2=880d95f118424587b041f91b9eed2ddc
     
  11. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,229
    Likes Received:
    3,024
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    Of course it does. It's virtually impossible to stay constantly vigilant and on high alert for long periods time where nothing happens.
    IMHO, what they should do is to just program the car to stop in such conditions. Then hand off control. Not at speed.
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The automation of work: How will trucking cope?

    Jan 19, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Somewhat obscured by the fuss being made over autonomous vehicles (AVs) is that much of modern-day work is being automated at an even more rapid pace.

    Robots are not only taking on more manufacturing duties, they are also doing more work in warehouses, even taking on household chores like cleaning the floors.

    We all know that many observers expect autonomous technology to help alleviate the truck driver shortage, at least to a degree, but how will it affect other trucking jobs like dispatching? Load planning? Could they be automated as well?

    Maybe – but most likely not. What is going to happen is that the nature of such jobs will change, as will the skills required to perform said jobs as well.

    John Larkin, managing director and head of transportation capital markets research for Stifel Capital Markets, touched on this issue within his top ten list of trucking trends to watch in 2017.

    “The U.S. needs to overhaul its education system, in our view, as automated manufacturing and 3D printing won’t create the traditional manufacturing jobs often promised by politicians,” he emphasized.

    “We essentially need to stop suggesting that all citizens receive a college diploma while developing and providing an alternate educational path that equips a sufficient number of young people with the skills necessary to program a computerized machine tool, maintain a robotic welding machine, re-optimize an automated warehouse, operate a platoon of trucks, etc.,” he stressed.

    “When will our political leaders wake up and recognize the need for this new wave blue collar educational path?" he said. "Or will automation lead to increased unemployment, a smaller workforce, and all the attendant social problems?”

    A new report by Accenture Strategy highlights that concern even further, noting that in what the firm describes as “a rapidly changing digital landscape,” CEOs must lead the charge in "re-skilling" their people to be relevant in the future and ready to adapt to change.

    According to Accenture’s report, Harnessing: Revolution: Creating the Future Workforce, CEOs must be mindful to put their people first and at the center of change to create the future workforce.

    The stakes are high for businesses, workers and society as a whole as the report argues that development of human skills such as leadership, critical thinking and creative skills, as well as emotional intelligence, would reduce job losses due to total automation considerably.

    Accenture’s report, based on a survey of 10,527 working people in ten countries, further shows that if the rate at which workers build relevant skills is doubled, the share of jobs at risk of total automation in the U.S. in 2025 would be reduced from 10% to 4%.

    “Paradoxically, the truly human skills, from leadership to creativity, will remain highly relevant and winning organizations will strike the right balance – leveraging the best of technology to elevate, not eliminate their people,” noted Ellyn Shook, chief leadership and human resources officer at Accenture, in this report.

    “Not only are workers optimistic, but they understand they must learn new skills,” Shook said. “Digital can accelerate learning by embedding training seamlessly into daily work – so learning becomes a way of life – helping workers and organizations remain relevant.”

    Accenture also found that, from the U.S. and France to Brazil, India and six other major countries, people responding to its survey were surprisingly positive about the impact of digital technology on the workplace. Fully 84% of workers polled by the firm are optimistic about the impact of digital on their job, while more than two-thirds think that technologies such as robots, data analytics and artificial intelligence will help them be more efficient (74%), learn new skills (73%) and improve the quality of their work (66%).

    On top of that, 87% of those “working people” as Accenture called them (hmmmm …) expect parts of their job to be automated in the next five years, ranging from 93% of millennials to 79 % of baby boomers. However, of those who expect automation to occur, 80% anticipate more opportunities than challenges in how automation will impact their work experiences in the next five years.

    Additional Accenture research, by the by, shows that artificial intelligence alone has the potential to double the annual economic growth rates and boost labor productivity by up to 40% by 2035 in the 12 developed countries examined.

    Thus, to help properly “shape” this future workforce, Accenture offered up a few recommendations:
    • Accelerate “re-skilling”: From top to bottom, invest in technical and more human skills involving creativity and judgment, taking advantage of the fact that 85% of workers are ready to invest their free time in the next six months to learn new skills. Scale re-skilling by using digital technology. This can include wearable technologies, such as smart glasses that provide technical advice and information as workers carry out tasks. It can also include intelligent software to personalize training that offers recommendations to support an individual’s life-long learning needs.
    • Redesign work to unlock human potential: Co-create role-based, gig-like employment opportunities to satisfy workers’ demands for more varied work and flexible arrangements. Develop platforms through which a range of resources and services can be offered to employees and freelancers alike in order to create a compelling community that keeps top talent loyal.
    • Strengthen the talent pipeline from its source: Address industry-wide skills shortages by supporting longer term, collective solutions. These include public private partnerships designed to create a broad adoption of skills training. Work with the education sector to design curricula that develop relevant skills at the beginning of the talent supply chain.
    At lot of this, of course, must be tweaked to fit the needs of the trucking industry. But it’s worth thinking about now as the automation of work seems poised to accelerate in the very near future.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/automati...m=email&elq2=4ac4ccb640974e72b761f54207da3ac1
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    'Big issue yet untouched': With self-driving vehicles, who'll be liable?

    Jan 19, 2017 Aaron Marsh | Fleet Owner


    If someday one of the other vehicles on the road you're driving is driving itself, do you trust it?

    Amid diesel emissions talk swirling around Fiat Chrysler Automobiles last week came a reminder of an issue going forward with autonomous vehicles: who will be liable in case something goes wrong with these things?

    And this is a very significant issue, given the general public's "trust gap" when it comes to self-driving cars and trucks. Analysts such as John Larkin, managing director and head of transportation capital markets research for Stifel Capital Markets, have pointed out the good deal of inherent distrust of fully self-driving vehicles and regulatory frameworks still to be set before autonomous vehicles go mainstream.

    "It seems as though we're getting pretty close to where a lot of the technology elements [of autonomous vehicles] are working," Larkin noted. "The problem, it appears, is on the regulatory front, since the average person is not going to be too comfortable with a driverless vehicle at least initially, until they can be confident the driverless vehicle is safe."

    As in safe enough to deliver a load of Budweiser on a 120 mi.-route through Colorado, as autonomous developer Otto did with its tractor-trailer last October? That was done on a specific route with a driver in the sleeper berth ready to take over if need be, but it amounts to what the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recognizes as Level 4 autonomy, what most people would think of as a fully autonomous vehicle that can pilot itself for an entire trip.

    Addressing the media during two press sessions, FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne drove at the autonomous liability question in addressing the automaker's relationship with Google, and more specifically Waymo, Google's self-driving car project.

    FCA has provided a fleet of 100 specially built Pacificas to Waymo for autonomous testing, and Marchionne noted the relationship is not exclusive but that he hopes it will grow. And for now, the liability of running the fleet is all in Waymo's court, and the FCA chief exec noted "they [Waymo/ Google] are not a tier-one supplier today, they are a customer that has allowed us to come in back and look at what they do."

    From that "look," Marchionne said, FCA has learned much about what goes into autonomous vehicle operation, but added that he sees automakers continuing to lend their vehicle-building expertise while third parties like Google develop and own — i.e., are responsible for — autonomous technology.

    At some point, the autonomous tech companies' and auto manufacturers' relationship could change. Marchionne made a notable statement in that he expects within the next five years, Level 4 autonomous-driving equipment will be "commonplace," meaning in the near future, it'll become the norm for vehicles rolling off the assembly line to have equipment onboard enabling fully self-driving operation, at least for certain trips.

    "And I think you're going to be seeing more and more of the relevant portion of that escalation to Level 4 appear in some version of our cars between now and 2020," Marchionne added. As those parts become added more and more to vehicles, if perhaps waiting to be "switched on" because regulation has yet to catch up, self-driving equipment and software providers may become first-tier suppliers to automakers.

    "That's a big issue going forward, because when you've got tier-one suppliers that will start providing autonomous driving equipment — both software and hardware — into these vehicles, the question about who owns liability associated with the running of those operations is a big issue yet untouched," Marchionne said.

    "So there's a lot of work to be done by the lawyers," he added, "and also commercially in terms of us assuming responsibility for something that may or may not be within our turf."

    From here to there
    The liability question is a big one, coupled with the trust gap that exists. But some believe autonomous vehicles are essentially the next new technology, as antilock brakes once were.

    "Antilock brake systems were smarter than the old systems, and suddenly you were supposed to just slam the brakes down and the system would do a better job of stopping you," noted Stephen Gilligan, vice president of marketing at Navistar. "People are comfortable with that technology now, and the time frame [of drivers being uneasy with it] came and went."

    Also keep in mind that bridge technologies to full autonomy in vehicles are appearing constantly, from the Ford passenger car that will parallel-park itself to the numerous automakers packing automatic emergency braking/ obstacle detection in their cars, SUVs, trucks and vans. Heavy truck makers are not only offering advanced safety systems in their vehicles, they're also working with safety tech companies to integrate those products more deeply into truck systems.

    Technology such as augmented reality — possibly taking the form of head-up displays in vehicles — are also expected to help accustom today's drivers with the thought of more assistance from, and eventually control by, the machines.

    Will the hiccup in self-driving cars and trucks everyone seems to expect, at least subconsciously, ever come? What will happen if, or maybe when, something goes wrong — and if something does, who'll be holding the bag when a litigious society responds?

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/bi...m=email&elq2=4ac4ccb640974e72b761f54207da3ac1
     
  14. mayhem

    mayhem Другая перспектива Silver Miner Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    2,627
    Likes Received:
    2,941
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    South Dixie
    Finally the 900 pound ape behind the curtain appears in this thread. The Insurance Co's. They won't loose the revenue of no fault and collision insurance. While all of this tech is wonderful, and I am OK with it, just what will the costs be? I won't see it in my lifetime but a whole lot of you folks will.

    So you are getting laid because you are on a 3 hour drive and bored to death, when you are just about ready to unload the computer starts hollering "Danger Will Robinson", what will you do? Take those next three strokes, or jump off dripping and pretty much mentally impaired? And anything that runs on software has to have a back door otherwise it is dead meat and will have to be scrapped. That little shit box google is testing will cost 100k, so how many more part time jobs can you work?
     
    searcher likes this.
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Active integration with IoT could supercharge V2V

    IT systems maker says vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology needs to be tied tightly into the Internet of Things (IoT) to truly boost highway safety.

    Jan 30, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff | Fleet Owner


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Proposed rule would mandate, standardize 'V2V' vehicle-speak


    Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology is being aimed for implementation starting in 2020, with the goal of increasing highway safety.

    But Avinash Salelkar, head of manufacturing at information technology firm Syntel, argues unless such “short-range” communication networks are integrated into “active systems” such as automatic emergency braking (AEB), via the more “globalized” Internet of Things (IoT), those full safety “benefits” won’t be realized.

    “Many new vehicles are already equipped with active systems that act in the event of an imminent collision. However, in order for tomorrow’s V2V technology to improve road safety, it is essential that it integrates with active systems that can steer away and brake,” he explained in a recent research note, “Without such active systems, V2V technologies will only be useful in the case of an inattentive driver.”

    Salelkar added that V2V systems are expected to use the 5.9GHz safety spectrum, which was allocated by the Federal government to ensure that V2V and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications run without interference.

    Each vehicle would beam GPS coordinates, speed and direction data. Nearby vehicles would receive the data, analyze it with on-board computers, send safety alerts, and engage collision-avoidance systems, he explained.

    [​IMG]


    However, if IoT-based “connected car” technology was instead deployed to achieve V2V communication, there might be more benefits.

    “The benefits of IoT-enabled cars include real-time monitoring of vehicle health, the ability to provide predictive maintenance reminders, and establishing a feedback loop where vehicle performance data is sent back to manufacturers to make future models more reliable,” said Salelkar. “At this point, it appears likely that the V2V and IoT approaches will work separately.”

    Another “greater challenge” he foresees ahead is how the current vehicle population is addressed in terms of integration with V2V-equipped cars.

    “In a scenario with a mix of transmitting and non-transmitting vehicles, the non-transmitting vehicles would be ‘invisible’ in certain respects to V2V-equipped vehicles,” Salelkar said.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/ac...m=email&elq2=a7fbdc840194471f91c39b9b74628d79
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Digital disruption, friend or foe (part 1): Self-driving trucks, Uber-for-freight

    Despite questions, autonomous vehicles are rolling sooner than expected

    Jan 30, 2017 Kevin Jones | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]

    While there is a good business case for adoption of self-driving trucks, Princeton Consultants recommends fleet executives take a wait-and-see approach, both in terms regulations and the rapidly evolving equipment.

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Disruptors on the march in trucking


    The potential for autonomous trucks to disrupt freight transportation—or at least the recognition, by carriers and shippers, of that possibility—has surged in the past year, according to an updated survey by Princeton Consultants. But the industry still might not fully appreciate the changes that are coming.

    “Our firm believes self-driving trucks are going to get here faster and have more impact than the survey results [showed],” Princeton Consultants CEO Steve Sashihara said, and he cited a load of freight delivered recently by a sensor-driven truck in Colorado. “It’s no longer crazy white cars driving around cities; it’s starting to really happen. … There’s some amazing, smart engineers working on this. On the highways, the technology is already here.”

    As for adoption by the trucking industry, there’s a “solid” business case based around the salary expense and hours limitations of human truck drivers, he explained, speaking in a Stifel Capital Markets conference call Friday.

    Princeton projects implementation of self-driving truck technology in three phases:

    1. Truck autopilot, assisting a traditional driver who’s still in the seat—variations of which are currently being tested on U.S. highways;
    2. Linehaul driverless, for on-highway freight moves (perhaps in pelotons) and with first/last mile conventional drayage—“think of this as the new intermodal,” Sashihara said.
    3. Door-to-door driverless, but not before the public believes the technology is safer than human drivers.
    And while that full, Level 5 autonomy is still some time in the future, the public is rapidly being won over by the rollout of self-driving passenger vehicles, Sashihara added.

    [​IMG]

    “When most people are trying to imagine this, [full autonomy] is where they’re getting hung up. They’re saying ‘have you ever seen a truck back into a dock, or how many docks there are in a crowded city—can a robot really do that?’” he said. “The nice thing about step 2 is you don’t have to worry about that—it’s the long-haul up and down the highways in pelotons; and the peloton itself may save 15% in fuel.”

    In last year’s survey, Princeton found that only 28% of respondents believed self-driving trucks would have a moderate or large impact, compared to 40% in the latest survey. The number who said there would be “no real impact” fell from 24% to 19% this year.

    As business advisors, Princeton is recommending carrier executives take a wait-and-see approach when it comes to self-driving vehicles and drones, both in terms regulations and the rapidly evolving equipment itself.

    But Sashihara also discussed the disruptive potential of “Uber for freight,” or “radical disintermediation” of the freight transportation market. With 57% of the survey respondents anticipating a moderate to large impact, the sentiment was basically unchanged from a year ago.

    “I don’t think we can sit back and just wait for things to happen, but that doesn’t mean we should create our own Uber-like channels. Whether we a buyer of freight, a seller, or an intermediary, we have to improve our user friendliness and automation,” he said. “It’s undeniable that like Amazon really did to retailing, Uber really disrupted taxis—and that’s such a big leap from taxi to commercial freight.”

    [​IMG]

    The takeaway: Easy access to real-time market data and the ability to quickly tender a load and get a price is the direction freight transportation is heading. Still, cross-country freight moves are a lot more complicated than carrying a passenger across town—and that’s why Sashihara suggests change will more likely come from within the industry than from an outsider.

    “There’s a lot moving parts and non-obvious stuff, so it’s hard to think that a couple of people will graduate from Berkeley and disrupt the trucking industry,” he said. “There’s a lot of inefficiencies in our marketplace, but I think it will be someone who is more of an insider who will say, ‘how can we think bigger than most and come up with some disruptive ways of really moving the needle?’”

    Up next: The Internet of Things and Big Data.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/di...m=email&elq2=a7fbdc840194471f91c39b9b74628d79
     
  17. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,229
    Likes Received:
    3,024
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    After market add-on kits?
     
  18. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,229
    Likes Received:
    3,024
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    In all the talk of self driving cars, the one thing I've not seen addressed in any of it is what will this do to the performance car market?

    For example, who will want to buy a self driving Porsche 911 if it "drives" to same exact rules and standards of a Ford Focus? What fun would that be?

    Edited to add: are cars of the future destined to become little more than small grey pods that we will ride around in as we surf the web, chat on our phones, or get extra work done on the way to work?
    Or, they'll have a customizable facade on the outside to make them look different in order to maintain a bit of style, but under the hood they're all the same.
     
  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Could be wrong but I really don't see any of this coming any time soon.
     
  20. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,229
    Likes Received:
    3,024
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    I think that once we start getting some real World data that shows whether or not they truly are safer than human controlled cars, the technology will be adopted at an increasingly faster pace.
    If the data actually shows a dramatic reduction in accidents, injury and deaths, we'd be stupid to not use self driving cars. I mean, who wants to die in an otherwise preventable accident? Or have that happen to a loved one?
    ...and that's not to mention the billions in monetary damage done yearly by human driven cars. Just in the time it took to read this, there have been crashes happening somewhere and maybe even someone dieing in one of 'em. On average, about 100 a day die in or because of, a human driven car.
     
    searcher likes this.
  21. Usury

    Usury Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    3,602
    Likes Received:
    2,590
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I don't believe that the tech will ever be safer than human. Why? Because the tech is programmed by humans. They can't think of everything. What makes the human mind so amazing is its ability to determine a course of action for a situation that it's never encountered before. That's tough to do in programming.

    While the programming may eliminate accidents related to drivers falling asleep and such, they will create more accidents due to the prior paragraph. So what will the net effect be? Not sure, but I don't want to be a part of it. IMO, the way to do this right would be to leverage tech to help assist humans by preventing high-speed accidents that occur due to a lapse in concentration....for whatever reason. Then we get the best of both worlds.
     
  22. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,229
    Likes Received:
    3,024
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    It may be tough, but not impossible. Look at the lengths rail safety has come. Largely due to automation and reducing the reliance on people for 100% of the safety.

    Also, every time one of unforeseen incidents happens, it'll be accounted for by the programmers so the chances of it happening again are greatly reduced. As it is now, multitudes of people make same mistakes others have already made. If those mistakes were accounted for and the lessons learned from it are propagated throughout the system, maybe no one else will have that particular kind of accident.

    The bigger problem I see with self driving cars is snowy conditions and other in climate weather. I think that'll be the tough thing to program for.
    ...but one thing is for sure, we will all soon see how/if it will all work.
     
    searcher likes this.
  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Digital disruption: Analytics, analytics, analytics

    IoT, Big Data are the big drivers of success going forward

    Feb 2, 2017 Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Thinkstock

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Digital disruption, friend or foe (part 1): Self-driving trucks, Uber-for-freight


    While self-driving trucks and Uber-for-freight startups get much of the buzz, Princeton Consultants CEO Steve Sashihara has one word of advice for fleet executives: analytics.

    “You have to drive up you analytics capabilities,” he said, speaking on a recent Stifel Capital Markets conference call. “You going to have start moving your organizational culture to be more data-driven in how you make decisions, and rely less on experience and gut-feelings. Given the low margins in our industry, this is not a competitive advantage—this is, basically, survival.”

    In Princeton’s latest industry survey, Digital Disruption in Freight Transportation, the Internet of Things (IoT)—wirelessly connected real-time sensors for everything from freight to vehicles to personnel and facilities—and Big Data topped the list as the most likely and most impactful trends.

    “These are two sides of the same coin,” Sashihara said. “This is where the action is.”

    In the survey, 84% of respondents agreed that IoT will have moderate or large impact, and 85% said the same for big data, or the collection and analysis of external information.

    And while the labels may be trendy, Sashihara contends analytics is driving “a bona fide revolution” in manufacturing, distribution, and transportation: “everything from how we price, how we move, how we optimize, where we locate.”

    “Better information means the right resources in the right place at the right time,” he said. “That’s what the buyers are buying and the sellers are selling.”

    [​IMG]

    Specifically, the Princeton survey identified nine areas of impact of the coming disruptive technologies, with highest rated being exceptions management, real-time optimization, and visibility into freight movement.

    Direct spend on transportation and logistics in the U.S. is $1.45 trillion, with trucking alone shipping goods valued at $139 trillion, so the investment community sees “a lot of room” for investment in fresh ideas to make the industry more efficient, Sashihara suggests.

    Interestingly, 56% of the transportation executives who took the survey agreed that digital disruption would create new winners and losers in the marketplace—but they’re not clear on how their own organizations will meet the challenges.

    For existing players, the key to survival and success will be to master two types of analytics:

    Analytics at Rest: Using data to model strategic problems and opportunities, to make strategic decisions, and to develop mid- and long-term plans for profitable growth

    Analytics in Motion: Using data to optimize daily operational decisions, such as load planning, truck dispatch, and pricing

    “I know that all of us have been using data for quite a while, but this is another level play,” he said. “We have to be a lot more data driven.”

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/di...m=email&elq2=b9f0404bfd604a43b0273873af513f26
     
  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    A bit of caution for autonomous vehicles
    Jan 30, 2017

    [​IMG]
    by Michael Roeth
    Executive Director, North American Council for Freight Efficiency


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Autonomous trucks: They won’t be driverless


    There has been lots of talk about autonomous vehicles. Driverless cars if you prefer that term. Even the general public is interested in the subject.

    But I wonder if we are willing autonomous trucks into existence because of pressure by regulators to reduce accident rates, drivers less interested in driving cars, let alone trucks, companies wanting to make money off the sale of the systems needed to make autonomous vehicles a reality and the vested interest of researchers and NGOs.

    I think there will be a painful learning curve on our way to fully autonomous vehicles especially if we push too far too fast. A key point to remember is that in an autonomous vehicle a less engaged driver — much like an airline pilot — must always be ready to take control. Recall the airplane accident in San Francisco airport or Tesla’s recent autopilot incident in Florida.

    There are other factors to consider too, like the fact that there is no clear definition of what “minimum object detection” should be. Can the sensors on an autonomous vehicle spot a car in the roadway in any orientation? Can it spot an armadillo? A deer? A moose not moving? A pothole full of water or ice? Differentiate metal plates in the roadway? Confusing paint lines as occurs in construction zones where they paint black over the old dashed lines and add temporary new white lines? Deal with a sudden flat steer tire?

    I wonder if a driver crossing Kansas will get lulled into being distracted after an hour of autonomous driving so he will not be ready for that unexpected emergency which he is there to deal with. For example, a large tumbleweed blows across his path. Does the radar even pick it up? If it does, does it incorrectly slam on the brakes so the car following has to react? Does it swerve to avoid, again not expected by the tailgating car causing that driver to go off the road?

    I am not anti-autonomous trucks and I do know that predictable incidents will be correctly handled by the autonomy and will give back control to the driver in a reasonable amount of time to handle the situation that the autonomy decides it can’t handle. This likely will work for nearly all driving situations. For the remaining, though, the vehicle software will fail — either unable to determine that it is at risk, or handing over control too late to be of value.

    Finally, though, there continues to be huge value in continuing the industry’s efforts on automating trucks. We have integrated and advanced cruise control, refined automated manual transmissions and now there is Two-Truck Platooning, where two drivers steer and maintain control while the truck’s save about 4% in real-world fuel savings. We studied Platooning and reported its status, benefits and challenges here. Driverless, who knows when, but automating with drivers, we are ready now.

    http://fleetowner.com/equipment/bit...m=email&elq2=b9f0404bfd604a43b0273873af513f26
     
    Usury likes this.
  25. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,229
    Likes Received:
    3,024
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    Human drivers already face that problem. Miles of uneventful driving can lower ones vigilance.
    ...and expecting that a "driver" can maintain sufficient attention to, in an instant, be required to assume control of the car and will be able to do so, is a pipe dream IMHO. By the time they figure out the situation, the hazard will have been passed. (or hit)
     
  26. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Messages:
    9,561
    Likes Received:
    6,733
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Florida
    I have read about sensors and cameras failing causing the crash avoidance systems to malfunction. I bet they work 98% of the time, but that other 2% could be fatal..
     
    Usury likes this.
  27. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,229
    Likes Received:
    3,024
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    The big question is, what is the percentage of errors caused by people driving? If it's higher than the percent of errors caused by a computer driven car, we are still better off with a computer driven car.

    Also, human drivers tend to all have to learn by going through their own learning curves. With computers, once an error is detected (perhaps by an accident happening) the program in every other car can be updated and corrected to keep that particular thing from happening to anyone else.
    On the other hand, the way we do it now almost requires each driver to have to experience a particular situation in order to really learn from it.

    Like sliding on ice. You can tell people what to do, but until they actually experience the real thing, it's just an idea of what to do.
     
    searcher likes this.
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Govs' report: Consider this before AVs flood the roads

    Feb 6, 2017 Aaron Marsh | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    It's emerging quicker than many people realize: what do you know, that vehicle next to you is driving itself. Before the new reality of autonomous vehicles, or AVs, is upon us, states have a number of things to consider and rules to set, according to a report from the Governors Highway Safety Assn.

    Governors Highway Safety Assn.
    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    'Big issue yet untouched': With self-driving vehicles, who'll be liable?


    Most autonomous vehicle (AV) testing to date uses human drivers behind the wheel for backup, but AVs with no foot pedals or steering controls at all already are hitting the road. States had better think through and address some key issues before truly driverless trucks and cars start mixing in on America's roadways.

    So recommends a new report prepared for the Governors Highway Safety Assn. (GHSA). Since states themselves are responsible for licensing drivers, registering vehicles, and establishing and enforcing traffic safety laws, the report says the states "should begin planning now to deal with the traffic safety issues presented when autonomous and driver-operated vehicles share the roads."

    The report makes note of advanced AV testing and use on roadways today including AV developer Otto's autonomous truck that last fall delivered a 53-ft. trailer load of beer on a 120-mi. route in Colorado. Perhaps most strikingly, the GHSA report cites five recent studies that indicate knowledge of AVs among the public is limited, and trust is another thing entirely.

    The studies "show considerable skepticism about AVs currently, sometimes with twice as many negative responses as positive," the report authors state. Further, only one out of six drivers say they're willing to ride in an AV today, and only one out of three said they'd ride in an AV in 10 years. That widespread distrust simply could be a reaction to new technology that will ease over time, the report suggests, but it's another good reason for states to address AVs.

    It's because of such realities that the report recommends states get ahead of autonomous vehicle testing and get involved setting new laws and parameters for their operation — before AVs start showing up en masse next to human-driven vehicles. States are advised to consider a number of things now, with that "not if but when" autonomous vehicle emergence unfolding more quickly than many realize.

    How will AVs be tested and allowed for in each state?
    It may be that AVs can be tested legally in most states under current laws, although conditions are in place in some cases such as a backup driver being required to have a hand on the steering wheel or at least be in the vehicle and ready to take control if necessary, as was the case with the Otto tractor-trailer.

    Even so, states could require each AV organization to apply for testing and specify autonomous vehicle, operator, safety plan and other information. The report notes that as of Dec. 2016, California, Florida, Michigan, Nevada, Utah and the District of Columbia have enacted laws authorizing AV testing under certain conditions.

    What will AVs do when they need to make 'common sense' decisions?
    The report points out that there are a number of gray areas drivers encounter out on the road where AVs will need to make a decision, and "states should attempt to understand how AVs will resolve these conflicts."

    For example, a dog runs into the street in the AV's path. Will the AV hit the dog, if it must, or swerve harshly and possibly crash into a tree? Or if there's a parked vehicle ahead blocking the travel lane but the road is otherwise empty, will the AV cross over the double yellow center line — which is normally illegal — to get around the stopped car?

    Consider when else it might make sense to bend the rules a little: take speeding, where you have many (or most) drivers exceeding the posted limit frequently. Echoing the arguments now being debated regarding potential heavy truck speed limiters, if AVs are programmed to do only the speed limit but no more, "they will frustrate many following drivers," the report authors point out.

    Yet if programmed to exceed the speed limit, AVs by definition would thus be designed "to break the law consistently." The speed issue already has come up for Google's AV fleet in California, the report notes, where AVs obeying the speed limit have encountered difficulty merging with speeding motorists on highways.

    How will law enforcement officers recognize and interact with AVs?
    Aside from thinking through the conditions under which AVs will be allowed to operate and where, one thing for states to consider now is law enforcement's readiness to deal with self-driving vehicles.

    That goes for officer safety: does AV operation pose risks to them? Can officers identify what level of autonomous operation a vehicle has — from 1-5 — and what rules and requirements apply to it? How do you pursue and conduct stops of AVs if necessary?

    And here's a noteworthy and worrying consideration: AVs conceivably could be used as "mules" to transport illegal goods and contraband. Criminals and terrorists could wire an AV with explosives and essentially use it as a guided missile.

    But aside from those more extreme scenarios, law enforcement will need to be prepared to deal with more typical problems such as if a human driver has a "road rage" incident with an AV, and states should look to officer training on AVs.

    What about liability and insurance?
    As Fiat Chrysler Automobiles' CEO Sergio Marchionne pointed out last month, the question of liability regarding autonomous vehicles is a significant one and needs to be settled.

    "Who's responsible for a crash in which an AV is at least partially at fault: the 'driver,' the vehicle manufacturer, the software provider or some combination?" the report asks. The first step in this regard is for states to work out how they'll determine an AV's responsibility in a crash, and states will need to divvy up that liability for AVs between the vehicle's manufacturers, software providers, owners, operators and others, according to the report.

    "While various strategies [on liability] have been proposed, there is no consensus and discussions likely will continue for some time," the report states. In addition, as AVs become more prevalent, insurers themselves will need to reconsider their products and how they'll rate them, since traditionally a driver's insurance premiums are set based on his or her prior driving experience.

    The report raises these and a number of other questions for states concerning AVs, including more far-reaching effects such as what autonomous vehicles will mean for traffic lanes and design, interactions with pedestrians and cyclists and parking requirements. In the meantime, the report recommends that states get informed on AVs, get involved, understand their role, don't hurry but thoroughly consider legislation that's enacted, and be flexible since "this is a new game."

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/go...m=email&elq2=39cc41726bc849b69a3f9375c534604f
     
  29. Usury

    Usury Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    3,602
    Likes Received:
    2,590
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Personally I think the liability angle kills AV as soon as a big liability case hits. If the manufacturers are found to be at fault, will any manufacturer continue to offer this?
     
    searcher likes this.
  30. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Messages:
    9,561
    Likes Received:
    6,733
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Florida
    There is still lots of glitching in deluxe models of regular drive automobiles. Their crash avoidance and smart braking systems do not always work right in the rain, especially when changing lanes.
     
    searcher and Usury like this.
  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Is it “vroom, vroom” time for V2X technology?

    Feb 9, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Connected vehicles: It’s where the money will be


    A new report from Navigant Research predicts that annual sales of light duty vehicles equipped with factory-installed vehicle-to-external or “V2X” communication systems – in past often referred to as vehicle-to-infrastructure or “V2I” technology – is expected to hit 70 million units by 2025; a market the consulting firm expects will be worth more than $25 billion.

    “With U.S. regulators on the verge of mandating vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications technology beginning in about 2020, the market for connected vehicles is set to take off,” Sam Abuelsamid, Navigant’s senior research analyst, noted in the report.

    “As wireless communications become increasingly capable and ubiquitous around the world, connecting vehicles to each other, to other road users, and to the surrounding infrastructure will become increasingly important,” he explained.

    “Toyota launched a V2V system based on DSRC in Japan in late 2015, General Motors is launching the first system in the U.S. market in early 2017, and Audi has a 4G LTE-based vehicle to infrastructure system on select model year 2017 vehicles,” Abuelsamid added.

    Now, V2X is a bit of a different mousetrap compared to its V2V brethren, he pointed out, as V2X systems use dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) technologies as well as 4G and 5G cellular data communications networks so vehicles “talk” to things like buildings, street lights, etc., so they can achieve a better overall view of traffic volume and other roadway conditions.

    Navigant also thinks a robust aftermarket market for V2X systems will develop as well, with retrofit kits and smartphones equipped with DSRC capability expected to be made available and ultimately adopted.

    Why? because V2X is expected to be a “key technology” in Navigant’s analysis for reducing vehicle crashes and fatalities in the next decade, as well as creating a platform for the development of “robust” automated driving “ecosystems.”

    That’s a view shared by Steve Sashihara, founder and CEO of Princeton Consultants – especially when it comes to self-driving trucks.

    [​IMG]


    “Our firm believes that self-driving trucks are going to get here faster and have more impact” than many currently think, he said in a recent conference call hosted by Stifel Capital Markets, because “there’s a very solid business case” for automating big rigs.

    “Drivers are about a third the cost of long-haul dry van transportation,” Sashihara explained.

    “When you think about a self-driving car, most of us are driving ourselves, or maybe our families around, so when the thing is self-driving what’s the business case, besides having a new, cool gadget? I guess I could read a magazine while it’s driving me around, and certainly, if you’re handicapped, that’s a good business case,” he pointed out. “But for most people, we’re commuting to work, to school, and so the fact that I don’t have to keep my eyes on the road is not a terrific business case.”

    On the other hand, in commercial trucking, the driver is a huge part of the cost and the hours of service (HOS) rules for the driver really limit the use of tractor utilization. “While there is some slip-seating that goes on in our industry, that’s more the exception of the rule as most of us know. Particularly with a lot of owner-operators, when they’re not driving, they are sitting there,” Sashihara noted.

    “Precisely at the times when the rest of us would like to see the tractors on the road are the worst times to drive in terms of driver distraction or because of fatigue at night,” he emphasized. “Whereas with robots, I think they would be happy to drive at night and have better speeds and utilization.”

    Getting to that fully autonomous vehicle stage in trucking, however, requires several stepping stones – and connected vehicle technologies like V2X and V2V systems are one of the first stones needed.
    [​IMG]


    “We see basically self-driving trucks in the commercial space in three phases, the first which we’re seeing already: truck autopilot, which assists a traditional driver still in the seat,” Sashihara explained.

    The second – which he said will occur faster than many people think – is the operation of partially self-driving “pelotons” of trucks driving up and down the highways. “Think of this as the ‘new intermodal,’” Sashihara noted. “You’ll be doing the first and last mile deliveries using different vehicles, using essentially drayage, then short-haul regional trucking, then back to drayage.”

    Finally, the third phase: a complete door-to-door driverless truck solution.

    Now, Sashihara noted that many in trucking get “hung up” on the self-driving truck concept when thinking about tasks such as backing up to freight docks.

    “They’re saying, ‘look, have you ever seen a truck back into a dock, have you seen how many docks are in a crowded city? Can a robot really do that?’ But the nice thing about option two is you don’t have to worry about that,” he explained. “You can have a human driver pick up and exchange [trailers] like in a standard drayage move,” with only the “long-haul” portion of freight moving up and down highways handled by autonomous trucks, Sashihara added.

    When is this all going to happen? Well the influx of V2X and V2V technologies into all motor vehicles, not just big rigs, will help spur this dramatic shift to driverless trucks in freight transportation. But it won’t be a smooth nor necessarily obvious-to-the-naked-eye shift either, Sashihara argued.

    “Here’s a quote I love: ‘The future is already here, it’s just not very evenly distributed,’” he said. “It’s hard to say this is the moment which Steve Jobs walks out on stage and lifts up the iPhone and suddenly the world shifts. Before he walked on stage you had the Palm Pilot, you had the Blackberry, you had lots of other things that looked like what he did, so there might not be a big inflection point for any of these technologies. But they are coming very quickly.”

    Very quickly indeed.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/it-vroom...m=email&elq2=8bf493c06f7a49fca0b4e63969677d9b
     
  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
  33. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
  34. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Embark unveils self-driving truck

    Feb 24, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Embark unveiled its new self-driving truck technology Feb. 24.

    Embark photo
    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Digital disruption, friend or foe (part 1): Self-driving trucks, Uber-for-freight


    Embark today unveiled its self-driving truck technology to the public. The company, which gained approval by the State of Nevada earlier this year to begin testing its truck on public roads, announced it has created a technology that allows trucks to drive from exit to exit on the freeway without any human input.

    According to the company, Embark’s truck uses a combination of radars, cameras and depth sensors known as LiDARs to perceive the world around it. The millions of data points from these sensors are processed using a form of Artificial Intelligence known as Deep Neural Nets (or DNNs) that allow the truck to learn from its own experience — much like humans learn from practice, Embark noted.

    “Analyzing terabyte upon terabyte of real-world data, Embark’s DNNs have learned how to see through glare, fog and darkness on their own,” said Alex Rodrigues, CEO and co-founder of Embark. “We’ve programmed them with a set of rules to help safely navigate most situations, how to safely learn from the unexpected, and how to apply that experience to new situations going forward.”



    Embark mentioned its truck is built specifically to handle long, simple stretches of freeway driving between cities, rather than all aspects of driving. At the city limit, Embark's computerized truck hands off to a human driver who navigates the city streets to the destination. A human driver will still touch every load, but with Embark they’re able to move more loads per day, handing off hundreds of miles of freeway driving to their robot partners.

    “Spending weeks on the highway is tough on you,” said owner-operator Jeff Scorsur. “If I could still get the job done while driving in my own city and sleeping in my own bed – that would make my family very happy.”

    [​IMG]
    Embark CEO Alex Rodrigues

    According to Rodrigues, the idea for Embark came after blowing a tire on the interstate and waiting four hours for the tow truck to arrive.

    “Every single 18-wheeler that drove past had a sign on the back 'Drivers Wanted'. It was so clear there was a shortage of drivers,” he said. “The numbers back that up. The American Transportation Research Institute estimates there is currently a shortage of 100,000 truck drivers in the industry, which is poised to only get worse as baby boomer drivers - the bulk of the industry’s workforce - retire over the next decade. Embark's goal is to increase productivity per driver and prevent the shortage from becoming a crisis.”

    According to the company, Rodrigues started Embark by recruiting talent from technology leaders including SpaceX, StanfordAI, and Audi's self-driving team. The team is backed by a multi-million dollar investment led by Maven Ventures. Maven’s previous investment in self-driving technology, Cruise Automation, sold to GM for $1B last year.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/embark-unveils-self-driving-truck
     
  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Bad driving and autonomous vehicles
    Feb 23, 2017

    by Michael Roeth
    Executive Director, North American Council for Freight Efficiency


    I do a lot of driving. A very lot. And I’ll admit maybe I am getting old and impatient but I think driver skills and behaviors are much worse than they used to be. Speeding, abrupt lane changes, passing on the right, driving way too slow in the left lane, texting while driving, poor on ramp merging. Need I go on? Those of you who spend hours and hours behind the wheel have seen these behaviors and much more from drivers of both passenger cars and trucks.

    It almost seems like driver education has flown right out the window. Sure lots of people take drivers’ education in order to get their driver’s license the first time. And of course there is the initial driving test where you have to demonstrate certain good driving skills. But after that renewal is often a matter of paying a fee, taking a vision test, perhaps taking a written test and in the case of CDL bringing along your DOT medical certificate. No one checks on a regular basis that your driving skills have stayed sharp.

    The way I see it, autonomous vehicles can help with this issue. They will be configured to follow the rules of the road and to use best driving practices taking away a great many of the problems that are caused by bad drivers. In theory, they will be much safer because they will remove the human element from many driving decisions. And let’s face it, we humans don’t always make the best decisions. Highway vehicle fatalities are up and projected to be more than 40,000 for 2016.

    As someone who spends a lot of time on the road, I am all for anything that helps eliminate bad driving and bad drivers.

    http://fleetowner.com/fleet-managem...m=email&elq2=bed7f801027844d2af3928cb066a9255
     
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Everything You Need to Know About Autonomous Vehicles

    Jeff Desjardins
    on March 5, 2017 at 11:12 am

    Believe it or not, autonomous vehicles have been many decades in the making.

    Even in 1939, General Motors had an exhibit called “Futurama” at the New York World’s Fair that presented a model of the world 20 years in the future. Central to this display was a system of automated highways and vast suburbs, with a focus on how automation could reduce traffic congestion and lead to the free-flowing movement of people and goods.

    Since then, many autonomous vehicle concepts have popped up at various times – but they have always fell short due to technical limitations. Only recently, due to advances in technology, have self-driving cars been able to overcome three primary engineering challenges: sensing the surrounding environment, processing information, and reacting to that environment.

    Today, the future for autonomous vehicles is bright, and it is expected that there will be millions of self-driving cars on the road by 2035, creating a multi-billion dollar market.

    Autonomous Vehicles: What You Need To Know
    The following infographic comes to us from Get Off Road, and it shows the history of autonomous vehicles, how they work, the technical challenges overcome so far, and what the near-future of driverless cars may look like.

    [​IMG]

    Want to learn more about autonomous vehicles?

    Here’s six problems that driverless cars must solve before they go mainstream.

    http://www.visualcapitalist.com/everything-need-know-autonomous-vehicles/
     
  39. pitw

    pitw Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2013
    Messages:
    2,779
    Likes Received:
    2,614
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Custom pesticide applicator.
    Location:
    Eastern Alberta.
    Last time me KW tried driving without me behind the wheel it didn't go good.
    [​IMG]
     
    searcher likes this.
  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    107,567
    Likes Received:
    34,685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Could Nio take on Tesla? Chinese startup reveals plans to sell self driving 'living room on wheels' that has a table and even a BED in the US by 2020
    • Eve unveiled at the South by Southwest tech conference in Austin, Texas
    • Nio has offices in Silicon Valley, Europe and China and over 2,000 employees
    • Windows double as smart glass displays to show entertainment


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4302510/Global-startup-vows-autonomous-car-2020-US.html#ixzz4ayfzq78i
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     

Share This Page