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Driverless Cars / Trucks

Discussion in 'Auto, Tractor, Motorcycles, Racing, and Mechanics' started by searcher, Aug 30, 2016.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Though Details Need to be Worked Out, Self-Driving Cars Nearly Here
    VOA News



    Published on Dec 12, 2016
    For many drivers, the era of self-driving cars can't come too soon. The future holds the promise of stress-free, accident-free driving that could save thousands of lives. But don't hold your breath, because the technology still has to catch up with the dream. Still, every day brings us a bit closer to an era when being "behind the wheel" is a thing of the past.
    Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/a/self-driving...
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Riding in Uber’s self-driving cars
    The Verge



    Published on Dec 14, 2016
    Uber is expanding its self-driving pilot to San Francisco, giving Bay Area residents the first taste of a driverless future. Anyone who hails an UberX could find themselves in the backseat of one of Uber’s self-driving Volvo XC90 SUVs.
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    San Francisco, Your Self-Driving Uber is Arriving Now
    Uber



    Published on Dec 14, 2016
    Self-driving cars have been picking up and dropping off riders on the streets of Pittsburgh for the last 3 months, and now we’re excited to bring them to our hometown of San Francisco. Ready to take a ride in a Self-Driving Uber?
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Uber CEO Travis Kalanick: Our Self-Driving Cars Will ‘Make The Roads Safer’ | TODAY
    TODAY



    Published on Dec 14, 2016
    Travis Kalanick, co-founder of ride-sharing service Uber, one of the fastest-growing companies in history, tells TODAY’s Willie Geist about Uber’s next big plan: self-driving cars. Kalanick says, “We’ll make the roads safer.”
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Uber defies California state order to halt its self-driving car program after rolling out fleet of auto-pilot vehicles in San Francisco
    • Uber's self-driving cars were unveiled to the public in San Francisco Wednesday
    • California Department of Motor Vehicles has ordered Uber to obtain a special permit for autonomous cars or 'cease' the program
    • Uber argued that their self-driving cars did not fall under the legal definition of autonomous vehicles because human monitors are still required to sit inside
    • The permit would require the company to publicly report every crash, and every time a monitor takes control of the car during testing
    • Anthony Levandowski, Uber's vice president for advanced technologies, said it would not seek the permit as a matter of principle


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4044182/Uber-defies-order-California-DMV-obtain-special-150-permit-self-driving-cars-require-company-report-crash.html#ixzz4T8lgvoAB
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Automaker Tackle Self-Driving Car Crash Avoidance
    VOA News



    Published on Dec 17, 2016
    Tests of autonomous cars in real-life situations show that navigation and steering technology have matured. But several incidents involving self-driving cars running red lights prove that driverless vehicles still need a human driver ready to take over. Researchers say designing a crash-proof car is difficult, especially with the behavior of human car drivers. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/a/automakers-t...
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Proposed rule would mandate, standardize 'V2V' vehicle-speak

    Jan 4, 2017 Aaron Marsh | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    One day, if vehicles are required to be able to "talk" to each other by sending and receiving safety information messages via standardized V2V communication, NHTSA believes it could prevent "hundreds of thousands" of collisions every year.

    Aaron Marsh/ Fleet Owner
    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    NHTSA plans to mandate V2V technology for vehicles


    Vehicle-to-vehicle, or V2V, technology — one of the promising new possibilities taking shape as part of "smart cities" or "smart infrastructure" — took a step today toward becoming not an if but a when. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a proposed rule this morning looking to require and standardize V2V communications for new light vehicles.

    The agency says it sees great promise in V2V technology, but believes that unless there's a single format and programming environment established and mandated now for vehicles to "talk" to each other, the technology will be developed piecemeal from various, proprietary directions. If that's allowed to happen, V2V tech essentially could end up a tangled mess or fail to catch on, and a beneficial V2V-enabled roadway future may never emerge.

    "Without a mandate to require and standardize V2V communications, the agency believes that manufacturers will not be able to move forward in an efficient way and that a critical mass of equipped vehicles would take many years to develop, if ever," NHTSA states in the proposed rule.

    On the other hand, if an orderly groundwork can be set for V2V communications, NHTSA hopes the technology might someday "prevent hundreds of thousands of crashes and prevent over 1,000 fatalities annually."

    The proposed rule maps out a plan for light vehicles to be able to send and receive "basic safety messages" about things like their speed, location and bearing. The idea is that the shared info potentially could then drive other technology like automatic braking and other autonomous "course-correcting" action to prevent collisions and subsequent injuries and deaths.

    Regarding when this V2V communication would be required, "assuming a final rule is issued in 2019, this would mean that the phase-in period would begin in 2021, and all vehicles subject to that final rule would be required to comply in 2023," NHTSA states.

    The lengthy, 675-page proposed rule is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on Thursday, Jan. 12, and comments will be accepted for 90 days afterward. Comments can be submitted at https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=NHTSA-2016-0126.

    http://fleetowner.com/regulations/p...m=email&elq2=681c0615f33e4149a1bc9a652a51125f
     
  8. GOLDZILLA

    GOLDZILLA Harvurd Koleej Jeenyus Midas Member

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    Imagine if your car could flip off other cars without you even having to yell !
     
    searcher likes this.
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    ATA’s Spear named to transportation automation panel

    Jan 12, 2017 Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    ATA President and CEO Chris Spear was selected as a member of the U.S. DOT's transportation automation advisory committee.

    Related Media

    American Trucking Assns. President and CEO Chris Spear said he was “honored” to be selected as a member of the U.S. Dept. of Transportation’s transportation automation advisory committee.

    “I am grateful to have been chosen by Secretary Foxx to serve on this important panel,” Spear said. “Trucking is vital to the U.S. economy and an important part of our transportation system, so it is imperative that trucking and this association have a seat at the table when it comes to issues like autonomous vehicles, and we will be driving that outcome.”

    “While large-scale use of autonomous trucks is years away, the policy framework that will govern this future is being debated and ultimately written today, and I look forward to vigorously participating in those discussions on behalf of the trucking industry,” he added.

    DOT announced Spear was one of 25 individuals representing a myriad of modes and interests that had been named to this committee. The committee will meet for the first time on Jan. 16.

    http://fleetowner.com/fleet-managem...m=email&elq2=10eeb1ed24984cc58b90c72a4815430f
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Automation in vehicles and trucking: Imperfections and solutions

    Jan 17, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Dr. Gill Pratt, CEO of the Toyota Research Institute (TRI), recently offered up some startling – indeed, quite worrying – concerns regarding autonomous vehicle (AV) technology in terms of highway safety during the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

    While introducing Toyota’s new Concept-i – a “thinking car” for lack of a better term – Pratt also highlighted the limitations of the artificial intelligence (AI) powering such vehicles.

    And those limitations present some big ramifications when the talk turns to self-driving trucks.

    However, the trucking industry might also be crucial to solving some of the “limitations” inherent within self-driving systems too. [Make sure you read to the end of this post to find out how.]

    “Historically, humans have shown nearly zero-tolerance for injury or death caused by flaws in a machine,” he explained during a speech at CES.

    “And yet we know that the AI systems on which our autonomous cars will depend are presently and unavoidably imperfect,” Pratt stressed. “So: how safe is safe enough? Society tolerates a lot of human error. We are, after all, ‘only human.’ But we expect machines to be much better. In the very near future, this question will need an answer.”

    Pratt also put it another way: right now, the U.S. experiences some 35,000 traffic fatalities a year. Now, if a machine-driven car proved twice as safe as the human-driven variety, thus meaning only 17,500 lives would be lost in the U.S. every year to vehicle crashes, would society accept that “autonomous” trade-off?

    “Rationally, perhaps the answer should be yes,” he said. “But emotionally, we at TRI don’t think it is likely that being ‘as safe as a human being’ will be acceptable.”

    Still, vehicle manufacturers – heavy truck makers included – are still charging ahead with self-driving technologies, with many expecting AVs to be on the road in practical numbers by the 2020s.

    But what kinds of self-driving systems are we talking about here?

    Pratt contends what we’ll be seeing is a Level 4 autonomous vehicle, NOT the fully self-driving no-human-involved Level 5 type. In the case of Level 4 systems, the vehicle will only drive itself in what he calls “specific Operational Design Domains” such as at only certain speeds, only certain times per day, only when the weather is good, etc.

    “It will take many years of machine learning and many more miles than anyone has logged of both simulated and real-world testing to achieve the perfection required for Level 5 autonomy,” Pratt pointed out.

    Yet even getting to the point where Level 4 autonomous vehicles are “accepted” may be a challenge due to the hurdles presented by Level 2 and Level 3 systems – hurdles Toyota believes are largely generated by the impact on humans from vehicles that can operate themselves in only limited capacities.

    Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations for Toyota, added during his own CES presentation that “considerable research” shows that the longer a driver is disengaged from the task of driving, the longer it takes to re-orient them back to driving.

    “There is evidence that some drivers may deliberately test even level 2 [semi-autonomous] system limits; essentially misusing a device in a way it was not intended to be used,” he emphasized.

    “When someone over-trusts a Level 2 system, they may mentally disconnect their attention from the driving environment and wrongly assume the system is more capable than it is,” Carter warned. “We worry that over-trust may accumulate over many miles of ‘hands off’ driving. Human nature, not surprisingly, remains one our biggest concerns.”

    TRI’s Pratt noted that Level 2 autonomous systems are “perhaps the most controversial right now because it’s already here and functioning in some cars on public roads.”

    He explained that, in a Level 2 scenario, a vehicle hand-off to a human driver may occur at any time with only a second or two of warning.

    “This means the human driver must be able to react, mentally and physically at a moment’s notice,” he said.

    “Even more challenging is the requirement for the Level 2 human driver to always supervise the operation of the autonomy taking over control when the autonomy fails to see danger ahead,” Pratt added. “It’s sort of like tapping on the brake to disengage adaptive cruise control when we see debris in the road that the sensors do not detect. This can and will happen in Level 2 and we must never forget it.”

    Then you get to Level 3, which to Pratt’s mind is a lot like Level 4 technology but with an autonomous mode that at times may need to “hand-off” control to a human driver – a driver who may not be paying attention, since the machine is doing all the driving.
    [​IMG]
    The Toyota Concept-i


    “’Hand-off,’ of course, is the operative term and it’s a difficult challenge,” he explained. “In Level 3, as defined by SAE [the Society of Automotive Engineers], the autonomy [system] must ensure that if it needs to hand-off control of the car, it will give the driver sufficient warning. [The technology] must also ensure that it will always detect any condition requiring a hand-off.”

    That warning is needed, Pratt added, because with Level 3 systems, the driver is not required to oversee the autonomy, and may instead fully engage in other tasks.

    “The challenge lies in how long it takes a human driver to disengage from their texting or reading once this fallback intervention is requested and also whether the system can ensure that it will never miss a situation where a hand-off is required,” he stressed.

    So here are the complications for such a situation:

    • Research shows that the longer a driver is disengaged from the task of driving, the longer it takes to for them to “re-orient” back to driving;
    • At 65 miles per hour, a car travels around 100 feet every second;
    • This means in order to give a disengaged driver 15 seconds of warning, at that speed, the system must spot trouble about 1,500 feet away – some five football fields worth of distance;
    • On top of that, regardless of speed, a lot can happen in 15 seconds; thus ensuring at least 15 seconds of warning is very difficult.
    As a result, Pratt noted that moving to Level 3 AVs may be as difficult to accomplish as moving to Level 4-equipped vehicles.

    But here’s where the trucking industry can play a role in solving this issue, which he said revolves around what psychologists call “Vigilance Decrement.”

    In 1948, a fellow by name of Norman Mackworth wrote a paper that examined the “breakdown of vigilance” during prolonged visual search. To illustrate this issue, he used a clock that only had a second hand – a hand that would occasionally and randomly jump ahead by two seconds.

    Pratt said it turns out that even if you keep your eyes on the “MacWorth clock,” your performance at detecting two-second jumps will decrease in proportion to how long you do it.

    It’s TRI’s belief that something similar occurs to human drivers when they are forced to “remain vigilant” for a possible “hand-off” of control from a Level 2-equipped autonomous car.

    Yet TRI’s research also found that if drivers conduct mild secondary tasks (texting is NOT included, by the by) it might actually help them maintain situational awareness and reduce “Vigilance Decrement.”

    “For example, long-haul truck drivers have extremely good safety records, comparatively,” Pratt noted. How do they do it? He said that perhaps it’s because they employ mild secondary tasks that help keep them vigilant, such as: talking on citizens band (CB) two-way radios; continuously scanning the road ahead; and listening to the radio to stay alert and engaged during long drives.

    “We’ve only begun our research to find out exactly how this all works,” Pratt added.

    It’ll be interesting to see what else TRI discovers at it keeps working on AV technology.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/automati...m=email&elq2=880d95f118424587b041f91b9eed2ddc
     
  11. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Of course it does. It's virtually impossible to stay constantly vigilant and on high alert for long periods time where nothing happens.
    IMHO, what they should do is to just program the car to stop in such conditions. Then hand off control. Not at speed.
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The automation of work: How will trucking cope?

    Jan 19, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Somewhat obscured by the fuss being made over autonomous vehicles (AVs) is that much of modern-day work is being automated at an even more rapid pace.

    Robots are not only taking on more manufacturing duties, they are also doing more work in warehouses, even taking on household chores like cleaning the floors.

    We all know that many observers expect autonomous technology to help alleviate the truck driver shortage, at least to a degree, but how will it affect other trucking jobs like dispatching? Load planning? Could they be automated as well?

    Maybe – but most likely not. What is going to happen is that the nature of such jobs will change, as will the skills required to perform said jobs as well.

    John Larkin, managing director and head of transportation capital markets research for Stifel Capital Markets, touched on this issue within his top ten list of trucking trends to watch in 2017.

    “The U.S. needs to overhaul its education system, in our view, as automated manufacturing and 3D printing won’t create the traditional manufacturing jobs often promised by politicians,” he emphasized.

    “We essentially need to stop suggesting that all citizens receive a college diploma while developing and providing an alternate educational path that equips a sufficient number of young people with the skills necessary to program a computerized machine tool, maintain a robotic welding machine, re-optimize an automated warehouse, operate a platoon of trucks, etc.,” he stressed.

    “When will our political leaders wake up and recognize the need for this new wave blue collar educational path?" he said. "Or will automation lead to increased unemployment, a smaller workforce, and all the attendant social problems?”

    A new report by Accenture Strategy highlights that concern even further, noting that in what the firm describes as “a rapidly changing digital landscape,” CEOs must lead the charge in "re-skilling" their people to be relevant in the future and ready to adapt to change.

    According to Accenture’s report, Harnessing: Revolution: Creating the Future Workforce, CEOs must be mindful to put their people first and at the center of change to create the future workforce.

    The stakes are high for businesses, workers and society as a whole as the report argues that development of human skills such as leadership, critical thinking and creative skills, as well as emotional intelligence, would reduce job losses due to total automation considerably.

    Accenture’s report, based on a survey of 10,527 working people in ten countries, further shows that if the rate at which workers build relevant skills is doubled, the share of jobs at risk of total automation in the U.S. in 2025 would be reduced from 10% to 4%.

    “Paradoxically, the truly human skills, from leadership to creativity, will remain highly relevant and winning organizations will strike the right balance – leveraging the best of technology to elevate, not eliminate their people,” noted Ellyn Shook, chief leadership and human resources officer at Accenture, in this report.

    “Not only are workers optimistic, but they understand they must learn new skills,” Shook said. “Digital can accelerate learning by embedding training seamlessly into daily work – so learning becomes a way of life – helping workers and organizations remain relevant.”

    Accenture also found that, from the U.S. and France to Brazil, India and six other major countries, people responding to its survey were surprisingly positive about the impact of digital technology on the workplace. Fully 84% of workers polled by the firm are optimistic about the impact of digital on their job, while more than two-thirds think that technologies such as robots, data analytics and artificial intelligence will help them be more efficient (74%), learn new skills (73%) and improve the quality of their work (66%).

    On top of that, 87% of those “working people” as Accenture called them (hmmmm …) expect parts of their job to be automated in the next five years, ranging from 93% of millennials to 79 % of baby boomers. However, of those who expect automation to occur, 80% anticipate more opportunities than challenges in how automation will impact their work experiences in the next five years.

    Additional Accenture research, by the by, shows that artificial intelligence alone has the potential to double the annual economic growth rates and boost labor productivity by up to 40% by 2035 in the 12 developed countries examined.

    Thus, to help properly “shape” this future workforce, Accenture offered up a few recommendations:
    • Accelerate “re-skilling”: From top to bottom, invest in technical and more human skills involving creativity and judgment, taking advantage of the fact that 85% of workers are ready to invest their free time in the next six months to learn new skills. Scale re-skilling by using digital technology. This can include wearable technologies, such as smart glasses that provide technical advice and information as workers carry out tasks. It can also include intelligent software to personalize training that offers recommendations to support an individual’s life-long learning needs.
    • Redesign work to unlock human potential: Co-create role-based, gig-like employment opportunities to satisfy workers’ demands for more varied work and flexible arrangements. Develop platforms through which a range of resources and services can be offered to employees and freelancers alike in order to create a compelling community that keeps top talent loyal.
    • Strengthen the talent pipeline from its source: Address industry-wide skills shortages by supporting longer term, collective solutions. These include public private partnerships designed to create a broad adoption of skills training. Work with the education sector to design curricula that develop relevant skills at the beginning of the talent supply chain.
    At lot of this, of course, must be tweaked to fit the needs of the trucking industry. But it’s worth thinking about now as the automation of work seems poised to accelerate in the very near future.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/automati...m=email&elq2=4ac4ccb640974e72b761f54207da3ac1
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'Big issue yet untouched': With self-driving vehicles, who'll be liable?

    Jan 19, 2017 Aaron Marsh | Fleet Owner


    If someday one of the other vehicles on the road you're driving is driving itself, do you trust it?

    Amid diesel emissions talk swirling around Fiat Chrysler Automobiles last week came a reminder of an issue going forward with autonomous vehicles: who will be liable in case something goes wrong with these things?

    And this is a very significant issue, given the general public's "trust gap" when it comes to self-driving cars and trucks. Analysts such as John Larkin, managing director and head of transportation capital markets research for Stifel Capital Markets, have pointed out the good deal of inherent distrust of fully self-driving vehicles and regulatory frameworks still to be set before autonomous vehicles go mainstream.

    "It seems as though we're getting pretty close to where a lot of the technology elements [of autonomous vehicles] are working," Larkin noted. "The problem, it appears, is on the regulatory front, since the average person is not going to be too comfortable with a driverless vehicle at least initially, until they can be confident the driverless vehicle is safe."

    As in safe enough to deliver a load of Budweiser on a 120 mi.-route through Colorado, as autonomous developer Otto did with its tractor-trailer last October? That was done on a specific route with a driver in the sleeper berth ready to take over if need be, but it amounts to what the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recognizes as Level 4 autonomy, what most people would think of as a fully autonomous vehicle that can pilot itself for an entire trip.

    Addressing the media during two press sessions, FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne drove at the autonomous liability question in addressing the automaker's relationship with Google, and more specifically Waymo, Google's self-driving car project.

    FCA has provided a fleet of 100 specially built Pacificas to Waymo for autonomous testing, and Marchionne noted the relationship is not exclusive but that he hopes it will grow. And for now, the liability of running the fleet is all in Waymo's court, and the FCA chief exec noted "they [Waymo/ Google] are not a tier-one supplier today, they are a customer that has allowed us to come in back and look at what they do."

    From that "look," Marchionne said, FCA has learned much about what goes into autonomous vehicle operation, but added that he sees automakers continuing to lend their vehicle-building expertise while third parties like Google develop and own — i.e., are responsible for — autonomous technology.

    At some point, the autonomous tech companies' and auto manufacturers' relationship could change. Marchionne made a notable statement in that he expects within the next five years, Level 4 autonomous-driving equipment will be "commonplace," meaning in the near future, it'll become the norm for vehicles rolling off the assembly line to have equipment onboard enabling fully self-driving operation, at least for certain trips.

    "And I think you're going to be seeing more and more of the relevant portion of that escalation to Level 4 appear in some version of our cars between now and 2020," Marchionne added. As those parts become added more and more to vehicles, if perhaps waiting to be "switched on" because regulation has yet to catch up, self-driving equipment and software providers may become first-tier suppliers to automakers.

    "That's a big issue going forward, because when you've got tier-one suppliers that will start providing autonomous driving equipment — both software and hardware — into these vehicles, the question about who owns liability associated with the running of those operations is a big issue yet untouched," Marchionne said.

    "So there's a lot of work to be done by the lawyers," he added, "and also commercially in terms of us assuming responsibility for something that may or may not be within our turf."

    From here to there
    The liability question is a big one, coupled with the trust gap that exists. But some believe autonomous vehicles are essentially the next new technology, as antilock brakes once were.

    "Antilock brake systems were smarter than the old systems, and suddenly you were supposed to just slam the brakes down and the system would do a better job of stopping you," noted Stephen Gilligan, vice president of marketing at Navistar. "People are comfortable with that technology now, and the time frame [of drivers being uneasy with it] came and went."

    Also keep in mind that bridge technologies to full autonomy in vehicles are appearing constantly, from the Ford passenger car that will parallel-park itself to the numerous automakers packing automatic emergency braking/ obstacle detection in their cars, SUVs, trucks and vans. Heavy truck makers are not only offering advanced safety systems in their vehicles, they're also working with safety tech companies to integrate those products more deeply into truck systems.

    Technology such as augmented reality — possibly taking the form of head-up displays in vehicles — are also expected to help accustom today's drivers with the thought of more assistance from, and eventually control by, the machines.

    Will the hiccup in self-driving cars and trucks everyone seems to expect, at least subconsciously, ever come? What will happen if, or maybe when, something goes wrong — and if something does, who'll be holding the bag when a litigious society responds?

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/bi...m=email&elq2=4ac4ccb640974e72b761f54207da3ac1
     
  14. mayhem

    mayhem Silver Miner Seeker

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    Finally the 900 pound ape behind the curtain appears in this thread. The Insurance Co's. They won't loose the revenue of no fault and collision insurance. While all of this tech is wonderful, and I am OK with it, just what will the costs be? I won't see it in my lifetime but a whole lot of you folks will.

    So you are getting laid because you are on a 3 hour drive and bored to death, when you are just about ready to unload the computer starts hollering "Danger Will Robinson", what will you do? Take those next three strokes, or jump off dripping and pretty much mentally impaired? And anything that runs on software has to have a back door otherwise it is dead meat and will have to be scrapped. That little shit box google is testing will cost 100k, so how many more part time jobs can you work?
     

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