1. Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
    Dismiss Notice
  2. There are no markets
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Week of 6/24/2017 Closing prices & Chg Over Last Wk---- Gold $1256.40 Silver $16.64 Oil $43.01 USD $96.94
  4. "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"
    Dismiss Notice

Driverless Cars / Trucks

Discussion in 'Auto, Tractor, Motorcycles, Racing, and Mechanics' started by searcher, Aug 30, 2016.



  1. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,861
    Likes Received:
    4,569
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    Sold!


    I want one.
     
    searcher likes this.
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Truly driverless cars that don't even need a human inside could be on California roads by the end of 2017
    • Truly driverless cars lack steering wheels, pedals and don't need humans inside
    • Regulations still require remote monitoring and ability to pull itself over in case of emergency
    • They could be testing in California by the end of 2017. Have been tested in Texas
    • Could be on the market in 2018 depending on federal government regulations
    • These differ from driverless cars that have steering wheels, human backup driver


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4302768/California-green-light-truly-driverless-cars.html#ixzz4b3BYliKb
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Dubai's Driverless Vehicles Could Herald the Future of Transport
    Journeyman Pictures



    Published on Mar 14, 2017
    A special announcement in Dubai looks set to transform the future of transport. Subscribe to Journeyman here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

    At the recent World Government Summit in Dubai, the Roads and Transport Authority unveiled two new autonomous vehicles which look set to transform the future of transport.

    For similar stories, see:
    One Man's Mission To Convert The World To Electric Cars (2011)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-7H_...
    The 24-Hour Bus Sheltering Silicon Valley's Homeless
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aztbK...
    The Dark Underbelly of Dubai (2012)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DelMt...
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Google vs Uber in the Silicon Valley legal battle of the decade as the search giant claims Uber is using the $500 MILLION stolen secrets of self-driving cars
    • Google is suing Uber claiming it is using the web giant's secrets of self-driving cars after a 'calculated theft'
    • Former Google engineer Anthony Levandowski is accused of downloading 14,000 highly confidential files before he left to set up his own firm
    • That firm was sold to Uber just after he received his final payment from Google - and Google say it is using the trade secrets he took
    • Google wants Uber banned from using what it says is its version of LiDAR, the 360-degree scanning technology which lets driverless cars 'see'
    • Levandowski was behind the technology patented by Google, and allowed it to create first ever car with no steering wheel, pedals, or driver
    • Uber boss Travis Kalanick calls him his brother from another mother but case could now damage car-service firm
    • Google says its self-driving car subsidiary Waymo has been ripped off to the tune of $500 million from its technology secrets being 'stolen'


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4316394/Google-goes-war-Uber-self-driving-cars.html#ixzz4bQYAG3Q3
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Will truckers become like drone operators?

    Mar 21, 2017 Larry Kahaner | Fleet Owner


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Self-driving Otto truck hauls beer by itself


    Stefan Seltz-Axmacher knows that many drivers don't like him and his autonomous trucks so he tries to change the conversation. "Yes, we're these nerdy guys from San Francisco, and we've built a robot that looks like it does their work," says the CEO and co-founder of Starsky Robotics. "Drivers say, 'Oh, my gosh. Are they going to take our jobs?' but when the conversation becomes about remote driving, and more home time, we go from being an enemy to a friend. I really hope that's the dynamic we're largely able to have."

    The company's goal is to retrofit trucks with radar, cameras and all the other gadgets that have proven their worth in point-to-point superslab trials like Otto hauling beer. But it's the 'last mile' that makes the difference. Currently, autonomous trucks need a driver in the seat to negotiate the more complex trips to-and-from the interstates, and that's where Starsky Robotics is changing the rules.

    Instead of requiring a person in the seat, the truck will be piloted by remote control by a CDL driver who could be many miles away. Like a military drone operator or video gamer with a driving console, the remote driver will see everything a driver in the cab would see and operate the same controls including steering wheel, brakes and accelerator. Most of the equipment is 'off-the-shelf' and therefore not expensive.

    Seltz-Axmacher suggests that one driver could control 20 to 30 different trucks to and from the highway. "Let's say that Phil gets Truck #1 at 9 a.m. at the terminal at the start of his shift and that takes about 20 minutes. At 9:20, he gets Truck #2 from the terminal to the highway; that's 20 minutes. Then truck #3. Once they get to the highway, they're all driving themselves," he says.

    You could get local drivers, pay them what they might earn now, but they stay near their home, he says. How close are they to making this work? "The goal in the next couple of months is to have regular service, where on a consistent basis robot-driven trucks are hauling freight on the highway. Safety drivers will still be in the truck, but by the end of this year the safety driver will be out of the vehicle."

    As for the cost, Seltz-Axmacher's noted: "We will be charging the same as if a carrier hired a driver. Rather than do a whole of recruiting work to get a driver and then pay them 45 cents a mile, you would pay us 45 cents a mile and then your truck can drive 23-1/2 hours a day, and we don't quit."

    The company is focusing its efforts on highways in Michigan, Florida and Nevada because their laws and regulations are more sympathetic to autonomous truck testing.

    President Trump's newly-appointed Department of Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao wants to speed up implementation of autonomous trucks. Speaking at the National Governor's Winter Conference in November she said that the president is interested in advancing autonomous vehicles and removing regulations put in place by the Obama administration.

    The Obama guidelines called on autonomous technology companies to adhere to a voluntary 15-point safety assessment. However, when the regulations were implemented, autonomous vehicle companies complained that they were too restrictive and would delay testing and slow down implementation.

    Chao told the governors: “This administration is evaluating this guidance (the Obama guidelines) and will consult with you and other stakeholders as we update it and amend it, to ensure that it strikes the right balance.” About the loss of trucking driving jobs she said: "As a former secretary of Labor, I am very, very concerned about that and very cognizant of those challenges. So we do have to transition people, and we need to keep that in mind.”



    http://fleetowner.com/driver-manage...m=email&elq2=35def983c7224b31bd7997bd8b682d92
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Safety technology? Great. Self-driving technology? Not so much.

    Mar 20, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    'Big issue yet untouched': With self-driving vehicles, who'll be liable?


    Re-insurance giant Munich Re recently conducted a survey among 1,001 U.S. drivers aged 65 and older regarding their view of new vehicle safety systems, such as backup cameras and automatic emergency braking (AEB) technology (though that’ll be standard in a few years) as well as self-driving cars.

    The results: Such “older drivers” recognize the benefits of new vehicle safety technologies and are “comfortable” having them aboard. But they remain very reluctant to relinquishing total control to autonomous vehicle (AV) systems.

    Yet does this view point matter, especially where trucking is concerned? I’d say it does for now as truck drivers as a population group continue to trend older by the day. But down the road, when millennials comprise the lion’s share of the workforce? I don’t think this “AV reluctance” will be much of a force by then – not in the least as it seems many millennials don’t like driving to begin with.

    Still, the acceptance of so-called “active safety technology” by older drivers is a good thing as this is population with slower reaction times.

    Indeed, drivers over age 65 are currently one of the fastest-growing demographic groups in the U.S. – they’ll number 40 million by 2020 – and are more susceptible to accidents given the challenges they face such as declining vision, decreased flexibility and slower reflexes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHSTA).

    “Active vehicle safety technology has the potential to reduce crashes in any age group, but may offer specific benefits for older drivers,” noted Mike Scrudato, head of the mobility domain at Munich Re’s U.S. division, within the firm’s report.

    “For example, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) found that rear cameras had the biggest benefit for drivers age 70 and older, reducing the backup crash rate by 40%, compared with 15% for drivers younger than 70 years old.”

    When Munich Re asked older drivers asked what they believe to be the greatest benefit of active safety features, nearly half (41%) of those polled cited improved safety of elderly drivers, maintaining their independence (19%) and reducing the “societal costs” resulting from vehicle crashes (13%).

    As a result, Munich Re’s survey found that some two out of three (63%) drivers over age 65 intend to spec active safety technology with their next new vehicle purchase, with blind spot detectors (51%), a backup camera (43%) and AEB systems (31%) the most “sought after” safety features. And of those polled, about 44% said they would be willing to pay more for a vehicle with active safety features if the added cost is less than $5,000, Munich Re discerned.

    Yet older drivers, like a goodly portion of other motorist demographics, remain reluctant to relinquish total control to a car’s internal systems. Nearly half (49%) of those Munich Re polled noted that they would be somewhat or very uncomfortable riding in a fully autonomous vehicle.

    The survey found that the majority of older drivers (53%) would still prefer to drive themselves, even if ridesharing services were available at a reasonable cost.

    Still, Munich Re’s Scrudato stressed that AV technology remains poised to “transform the U.S. transportation ecosystem” with a mix of what he called “opportunities” and “risk exposures” alike facing motorists, vehicle manufacturers, and government regulators alike – especially as to who or what is at fault when an AV crashes.

    Getting all of that worked out is but the start.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/safety-t...m=email&elq2=4d478bdaaf114d2cba898f46b3354062
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
  9. edsl48

    edsl48 Silver Member Silver Miner

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,211
    Likes Received:
    1,446
    Trophy Points:
    113
    What will the municipalities do without the DUI revenue?
     
  10. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Messages:
    11,453
    Likes Received:
    9,099
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Florida
    As I stated a few pages ago, too much already goes wrong with electronic assists on conventional automobiles. To think you can send a driverless car down the road using only computers to navigate is very careless. Even airplanes need a pilot and there is much less to crash into 26,000 feet in the air.
     
  11. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,861
    Likes Received:
    4,569
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    The issue in this case was not the Uber car, but the car that hit the Uber car. If the idiot in the regular car had followed the rules of the road and yielded when said idiot was supposed to yield, this "accident" would never have happened.

    So what we actually have here is evidence to support getting all the human driven cars off the roads. Their organic computers are obviously not up to the task of continuously operating the vehicle safely.
    ...and that is the difference. No human can, or will pay 100% attention at all times when driving. The roads would be exponentially safer without people behind the wheels.

    I can see a day coming when it'll be much harder to get a DL than it is today where virtually anyone with a pulse and the ability to pay the fees can get a license.
    ...and then proceed to go terrorize people with their awful driving skilz.


    Edited to add: Quote and link

    According to Tempe police, another vehicle failed to yield at a traffic signal while making a left turn onto Don Carlos Avenue from McClintock Drive. The vehicle collided with the Uber SUV and then a third vehicle was hit.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
    searcher likes this.
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Autonomous

    Mar 30, 2017
    by Paul Menig
    CEO, Tech-I-M LLC



    I was changing planes in Dallas Ft. Worth airport a couple of weeks ago. I rode their Skylink transit vehicle. For all intents and purposes, it was an autonomous vehicle. No driver in site. No steering wheel. No brake pedals. Of course, I expect there was quite a bit of monitoring in a control room somewhere on the premises, in case something went wrong.

    When I went to my hotel, I rode the elevator to the 15th floor. Again, not a driver in site. Just push a button and it operates autonomously, getting me where I want to go, complete with freight (my luggage).

    Now, several organizations want to apply some of the same technology to commercial vehicles hauling people and freight. The countdown has begun to autonomous commercial vehicles—the race, if you want to call it that, is on.

    1. Otto is in a legal dispute with Alphabet (Google). Their sister company, Uber, suspended autonomous driving of its vehicles for a few days this month after an accident, reportedly caused by the other vehicle.

    2. Tesla is known to be hiring people for a truck. It will certainly be electric, but given what they do with autonomous operation on the cars, it will likely have some level of self-operation—might it be much more fashionable looking than a current truck?

    3. Embark (formerly Varden Labs) came out of stealth mode in late February. Of course, they weren’t in stealth mode for long. They were Canadian college students just last year when they showed off Marvin, their small golf cart.

    4. Starsky Robotics is looking to make a retrofit kit to make an existing truck run autonomously.

    5. Daimler showed an autonomous truck last year, but seems pretty quiet about taking it any further at this time.

    6. PACCAR just announced a deal with Nvidia on self-driving truck technology.

    7. Volvo and others in the mining industry have had autonomous vehicles in actual operation for more than 4 years now.

    [​IMG]

    While the above are working on autonomy, Nikola says they will have a hydrogen powered electric truck out by mid-2020 with on-road testing starting next year. Some 4,000 reservations have been taken for the vehicle, an approach that Tesla used to get money up front and similar to what others do with crowdfunding sources such as KickStarter. But, even since December, they’ve made some significant changes as they learn more about this industry. No longer will they provide a 6x6 drive configuration. I wonder what else they will learn about what it takes to put out a new vehicle from scratch.

    In my experience in the trucking industry, it takes on the order of 30 years to go from prototypes to high volume. I use the Automated Mechanical Transmission as an example. I was working on them in 1985 at Eaton. Today, more than 50% of Class 8 trucks are going out the manufacturing assembly door with them. Other examples are anti-lock brakes and collision mitigation systems. At TMC I presented this chart. It’s based on the Gartner Hype Cycle and the standard charts used for take up of technology in an industry. We are just at the beginning now and developing guidelines for the future. We will see prototypes out in small quantities in the next few years, but not large volumes.

    So, my belief is we will see autonomous vehicles, trucks, shuttles, mining vehicles, taxis, and trucks. We will not see Auto NoMo for Us, but we will see autonomous vehicles. Just look for the blue light special as it approaches you.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/au...m=email&elq2=a6b0f6e3d3f54a25929d152ac0af5788
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Are flying taxis coming to New York? Uber and Google test vertical take-off flying cars
    • Flying air taxis, ride-shares are e-VTOLs or 'electric vertical take off and landing'
    • One model, the EHang 184 Autonomous Aerial Vehicle, comes to Dubai this July
    • American technology companies are prototyping the technology
    • Could become part of American cityscapes along with 'vertiports' within decade


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4372034/Uber-Google-test-flying-taxis-debut-Dubai.html#ixzz4d2lyLPFq
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Driverless driving in three years: Now that’s ambitious.
    Apr 4, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Autonomous trucks: The reality is setting in


    So component supplier Bosch and global vehicle maker Daimler AG recently announced they are joining forces to “advance the development of fully automated and driverless driving,” which really isn’t all that shocking, since almost every vehicle manufacturer – including heavy trucks OEMs – is engaged in similar research.

    [Go here, here and here for just a few examples.]

    Here’s the thing though: Bosch and Daimler said they plan to bring fully automated (SAE Level 4) and driverless (SAE Level 5) vehicles to urban roads by “the beginning of the next decade,” which is just a scant three years off.

    As a reminder, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) developed six distinct definitions of vehicle automation to help establish a firmer understanding of the technology.

    Those six levels are:

    • Level Zero – No Automation: The full-time performance by the human driver of all aspects of the dynamic driving task, even when enhanced by warning or intervention systems.
    • Level 1 – Driver Assistance: The driving mode-specific execution by a driver assistance system of either steering or acceleration/deceleration using information about the driving environment and with the expectation that the human driver performs all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task.
    • Level 2 – Partial Automation: The driving mode-specific execution by one or more driver assistance systems of both steering and acceleration/deceleration by using information about the driving environment and with the expectation that the human driver performs all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task.
    • Level 3 – Conditional Automation: The driving mode-specific performance by an Automated Driving System of all aspects of the dynamic driving task with the expectation that the human driver will respond appropriately to a request to intervene.
    • Level 4 – High Automation: The driving mode-specific performance by an Automated Driving System of all aspects of the dynamic driving task, even if a human driver does not respond appropriately to a request to intervene.
    • Level 5 – Full Automation: The full-time performance by an automated driving system of all aspects of the dynamic driving task under all roadway and environmental conditions that can be managed by a human driver.
    Bosch and Daimler, then, are aiming for the “end game” where self-driving is concerned – vehicles that can operate themselves without a human at the wheel.

    “The objective is to develop software and algorithms for an autonomous driving system,” the companies noted in a joint statement; mirroring the phrase mentioned in SAE’s Level 5 description.

    [​IMG]
    In the future, Daimler said that within a specified area of town, users will be able to use their smartphone to order a car sharing car or robot taxi. The vehicle will then make its way autonomously to the user and the onward journey can commence.

    By introducing fully automated and driverless driving to the urban environment, Bosch and Daimler said they aim to improve the flow of traffic in cities, enhance safety on the road, and provide an important building block for the way traffic will work in the future.

    “The technology will, among other things, boost the attraction of car sharing [and] will allow people to make the best possible use of their time in the vehicle and open up new mobility opportunities for people without a driver's license, for example,” they explained.

    “The prime objective of the project is to achieve the production-ready development of a driving system which will allow cars to drive fully autonomously in the city,” Bosch and Daimler noted.

    “The idea behind it is that the vehicle should come to the driver rather than the other way round,” they explained. “Within a specified area of town, customers will be able to order an automated shared car via their smartphone. The vehicle will then make its way autonomously to the user and the onward journey can commence.”

    This is ambitious stuff, largely because many still feel the general public remains unready for fully autonomous vehicles to go whizzing along our streets.

    But since we’re on this topic, let me add another wrinkle: what if such autonomy could be added to vehicles capable of operating on both land and sea?

    That thought comes devolves from a new concept vehicle Daimler’s smart division is working on: the amphibious forsea, which seats two and is “inspired” by what the OEM calls the “classic lobster boat.”

    [​IMG]
    The forsea concept vehicle

    [FYI: in an interesting development earlier this year, Daimler is no longer selling gasoline-powered “smart cars” in the U.S. and Canada, focusing instead on only electrified versions instead.]

    It’s set to launch in Italy this summer, traversing the Strait of Sicily on its maiden test voyage.

    Daimler noted that the wheels on the forsea are angled at 35 degrees, thus lining up with the hull and the underbody of the car. It can cruise the water at a speed of 10 knots, with peaks at 15 knots, along with – get this now -- three hours of “navigating autonomy.”

    The forsea’s 90 hp rear engine is paired with a custom-made water-jet propeller and connected to a joint shaft on the rear differential, while transferring traction from the rear wheels to the water jet is managed by an ECU that handles the differential lock and transfers torque from the axles to the universal joint shaft.

    So imagine this: an autonomous car that can pilot itself on asphalt and on water, perhaps even deciding on its own whether to go by land or by sea (in a coastal community of course) depending on traffic volumes.

    That will be the day.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/driverle...m=email&elq2=a1804a21bab94deabdcba0ca72fa3246
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Is there less desire for driverless vehicles than thought?
    Apr 11, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Autonomous trucks: The reality is setting in


    Ponder this for a moment: what if autonomous vehicle (AV) technology is getting too far ahead of itself in terms of acceptance by the general public?

    That is, what if a majority of motorists – even among the Millennial and Gen Z populations – actually prefer to “manually” drive their vehicles, as opposed to letting a computer do all the work?

    Well, if recent research conducted by global consulting firm Ketchum is any guide, the incoming generation of car buyers is more worried than excited about the concept of self-driving cars, with concerns about safety, viruses, hacks or other malfunctions topping the list.

    Ketchum surveyed nearly 1,000 16- to 24-year-olds about the future of transportation, including self-driving cars and ride sharing. Far from suggesting car ownership may become obsolete, Ketchum’s study found that 92% of next-generation car buyers either already own a car or plan to buy one.

    Popular Now
    Building a global automated transmission strategy

    Knight: Merger an opportunity that couldn’t be passed by

    FMCSA to adjust penalty schedule for inflation



    They also share a passion for physically being in control behind the wheel, associating driving with “independence, freedom and fun,” noted Lisa Sullivan, executive vice president and director of Ketchum's North American technology practice, in the firm’s report, which is entitled The Next-Gen Guide to the Connected Ride.

    She added that while the 39 million members of the Gen Z generation in the U.S. – aged 16 to 24 at the time they were polled – have “grown up steeped in technology, so you might expect them to be ahead of the curve in terms of their readiness to embrace the future of transportation,” that doesn’t seem to be the case where AVs are concerned.

    [​IMG]
    Uber's "robot taxi" fleet lined up for service in Pittsburgh, PA.


    Here are some more findings from Ketchum’s study where Gen Z drivers are concerned:
    • Of those who have a driver's license, 78% of 21- to 24-year-olds and 58% of 16- to 20-year-olds have their own vehicle.
    • Among those who have a license but don't have their own vehicle, 61% plan on getting one as soon as they can afford it; another 19% plan on getting their own vehicle as soon as they begin their career.
    • Nearly half of those who can drive (45%) say they love driving and never want to give it up.
    • The majority (61%), especially females (65%), say driving makes them feel more independent, and 53% (48% male and 58% female) see driving as a necessary skill as an adult.
    • Some 39% overall are worried about self-driving technology, while 29% say they are excited about it. In fact, more respondents (35%) are excited about flying cars compared to driverless vehicles.
    • Only 23% of those who have or are planning to get a driver's license say they can see themselves buying a self-driving vehicle (30% of males vs. 18% of females).
    • Only 25% think driverless cars will make the roads safer, while 43% are concerned that self-driving cars could get hacked.
    • Just 18% think their next vehicle is more likely to be made by a technology company than a traditional car maker (that must be a relief to GM, Ford, FCA and others OEMs, methinks).
    Now, the emerging technologies drawing the most interest from Gen Z drivers are alternative forms of fuel/energy (43%), followed by augmented reality and heads-up display on the windshield (28%), gesture controls (26%), artificial intelligence personalizing the driving experience (25%), and mobile payment options in the dashboard (24%).

    [​IMG]


    Thus, not surprisingly, Ketchum’s poll found Gen Z drivers are three times more likely to choose an environmentally friendly car over a fast one (74% vs. 26%).

    And guess what: price still matters – a lot. Ketchum’s poll found that when shopping for a vehicle, price (75%) and safety (74%) are at the top of the Gen Z driver’s list.

    However, Paul Wood, partner and head of Ketchum's transportation and automotive practice, made an interesting comment within the firm’s study: in essence, Gen Z drivers could be convinced to embrace driverless cars if details regarding this technology is not only via “visual” communicated but backed up with data.

    "Trust is vital to this audience, and their cautious approach to the future of transportation gives us clues as to how to open the dialogue with them,” he said.

    “Language choices are critical and message testing is a must; technical information and data are better shown than explained; and absolutely everything must be proven over time,” Wood added. “Only once they feel secure that new technology can play a positive role in their lives can they begin to embrace adoption."

    Something to keep in mind as AV development continues to charge forward.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/there-le...m=email&elq2=c4176cc23d5d41999273e5d28263a975
     
  19. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,861
    Likes Received:
    4,569
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    So a car subscription service would allow them to afford their own transportation sooner. They'll also be able to start that career sooner if they have cheaper transportation that enlarges the size of the area available to them to look for a career-type job in the first place. Owning a car full time for occasional use is expensive. Anything that reduces the cost of entry would be good for them, IMO.
    ...and if the touted safety factor of self driving cars actually come to fruition, they'll go for it.


    Why waste time actually operating the car when that time could be used for other things? Talk on the phone, text, eat, get online, make out, or anything else people oftentimes are already tryin' to do while driving. I've seen everything from people reading newspapers to women trying to put make up on behind the wheel.
    People say they like to drive, but it seems many want to do anything but drive while behind the wheel.
    ...and manually driving a car could still be a thing in the future, but it'll be something one does strictly for pleasure rather than as a day to day necessity. Going to the track may become a very popular pass time.
     
    searcher likes this.
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    It's a go! Apple gets the green light to test self-driving cars on California roads
    • Apple is in the self-driving car business and could start develop its own cars
    • Apple has invested heavily in the study of machine learning and automation
    • Executives have been coy about their interest in cars, but rumors have spread


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4412656/Apple-receives-permit-California-test-self-driving-cars-DMV.html#ixzz4eGYT1Ff0
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    GM set to hire over 1,000 specialists to work in its self-driving car unit over the next 5 years
    • GM hiring 1,100 people to work at its Cruise Automation unit it acquired last year
    • Is already testing over 50 Chevrolet Bolt vehicles with self-driving technology
    • Vehicles are tested in San Francisco, Scottsdale, Arizona and metro Detroit


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4412966/GM-expanding-self-driving-car-unit-1100-new-hires.html#ixzz4eGZ4gNhX
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  22. Irons

    Irons Deep Sixed Site Supporter Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    23,418
    Likes Received:
    31,037
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The police, lawyer and prison industry will not allow self driving cars.
    Their entire existence requires drunk drivers for revenue.

    .
     
    TAEZZAR and searcher like this.
  23. Irons

    Irons Deep Sixed Site Supporter Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    23,418
    Likes Received:
    31,037
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Follow up: Other happy horseshit, the insurance companies and police industry!
    No more speeding ticket increases, reckless driving increases, DWI increases. No more ticket revenue for police, no more mandatory safe driving classes, highway alcohol safety classes, mandatory counseling shit the list is damn near endless.

    Besides if TPTB really cared about death and highway carnage they would end drunk driving and texting/cell use while driving 100% with the stroke of a pen and they do not do it.
    Put alcohol sensors and cell signal jammers in cars. Problems solved. But it isn't about saving lives and it never was.

    .
     
    TAEZZAR and searcher like this.
  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The data demands of self-driving systems
    Apr 17, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Is there less desire for driverless vehicles than thought?


    In all of this talk about autonomous vehicles (AVs) and self-driving trucks, some serious discussion us needed regarding the sheer amount of data required to allow motor vehicles to pilot themselves.

    A recent blog post by Kathy Winter, vice president and general manager of the automated driving solutions division at Intel Corp., puts a number on that data demand and frankly to my eyes it’s unfathomable huge: four terabytes per vehicle per DAY.

    [How much data is in a “terabyte” you ask? Enough to hold one thousand copies of the Encyclopedia Britannica. And a self-driving car needs FOUR of them.]

    But that’s just for the hour and half of daily driving averaged by the everyday motorist, according to Winter: we’re not talking about the autonomous trucks that some in the industry are expecting to operate for far longer stretches per day than that.

    “By 2020, that’s the amount of data [four terabytes] that 3,000 individual internet users are expected to put out each and every day,” she noted in her post. “It might not sound like much until you think of it in a different way: How many of us have 3,000 friends on Facebook? Now imagine trying to follow and absorb everything they all post each and every single day.”

    [​IMG]
    Intel's Kathy Winter

    [By the by, Winter’s been delving into several different aspects of the self-driving vehicle phenomenon. Go here and here for two other interesting posts on this subject.]

    Winter stressed that there’s another interesting twist to the data created by a self-driving car.

    “What makes data the new oil for autonomous driving – and what makes it a real challenge – is our need to make sense of that data, to turn it into actionable insight that lets cars think, learn and act without human intervention,” she emphasized. “[That’s] data that lets cars do the driving so that the 90% of the accidents caused by human error may one day be a thing of the past.”

    Yet the “exponentially growing size” of the data required for AVs to operate will require in Winter’s words “an enormous amount of computing capacity to organize, process, analyze, understand, share and store” this amount of information.

    “Think data center server computing power, not PC [personal computer] power,” she added.

    The need to train AVs as quickly as possible presents another challenge, Winter noted.

    “When new driving responses or situations are identified, machine learning, simulation and algorithm improvements must happen almost instantly – not weeks or months later – and updated driving models must be pushed to the cars immediately once available,” she said. “When, where and how that happens has implications not just for today, but for the day when self-driving cars are the norm.”

    [Frankly, however, a recent survey pours some cold water on that outlook.]

    [​IMG]


    There’s also the matter of data protection and what that means for consumers so they will eventually trust what she calls “the autonomous experience.”

    [Click here for a good story by our own Aaron Marsh that dives deeper into that critical subject.]

    “How we will achieve truly secure storage and sharing of data is a question I am asked about frequently and one we take very seriously,” Winter continued. “Which data gets stored? Which gets tossed? Which data sets get shared? And how will we protect it all? These are valid questions that will require industry collaboration and our best experts to address in a meaningful way.”

    Of course, perhaps the biggest overall challenges when contemplating the “four terabyte” needs of AVs is as their population grows into potentially hundreds of millions of them operating worldwide.

    “The ability to make this happen comes only through the ability to process increasingly larger data sets,” Winter stressed. She added that “true system scalability” will be critical both inside self-driving cars – “back to that four terabyte number” – and outside of them in “massive data centers,” as the self-driving supercomputer and the cloud that supports it continue to evolve.

    Things to think about as we continue to travel down the road to self-piloting vehicles.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/data-dem...m=email&elq2=61dba872c11647d39fd1a1cc92b22307
     
  25. Rollie Free

    Rollie Free Midas Member Midas Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,487
    Likes Received:
    3,752
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Nebraska
    I've had this idea for a novel (just and idea, I don't write) where some Charlton Heston type characters(s) come back to earth to discover industry vigorously in process all over the world. Transporation, manufacturing, processing, farming, livestock, everything that goes on daily.... except all the human's have died. This robotic world continues on because it doesn't know any better and no one is there to stop it.
     
    GOLDZILLA and TAEZZAR like this.
  26. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    10,526
    Likes Received:
    16,191
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    ORYGUN
    Did Rod Serling do a Twilight Zone Episode on something similar ?
     
  27. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    10,526
    Likes Received:
    16,191
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    ORYGUN
    For me a resounding YES !!!
    I enjoy driving, PERIOD.
    To take the "driving" out of cars, would be like taking the alcohol out of liquor, beer & wine. WTF !! over.

    If ya don't want to drive, then take the bus !!!
     
    searcher likes this.
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Report: Autonomous technology can cut commercial fleet costs

    Navigant Research says driver assistance systems can help in the short turn, with bigger cost savings from fully automated commercial vehicles starting in the next decade.

    Apr 27, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Navigant says driver assistance systems will deployed in the short term, which will pave the way for adoption of fully automated vehicles over the longer term. (Photo: Freightliner Trucks)

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Road to driverless trucks clogged with unanswered questions


    A new report from Navigant Research predicts that both semi- and fully-autonomous driving systems can lead to significant reductions in fuel consumption and operating costs for commercial fleets.

    According to the firm’s analysis, automated systems can reduce the number of accidents, use a more fuel efficient style of driving, and because they do not get distracted or need extended rest periods, operators can achieve higher levels of vehicle utilization, particularly in long haul applications.

    “The pursuit of a fully automated driving car has spurred investment in advanced sensors and computing hardware and software,” noted David Alexander, Navigant’s senior analyst, in a statement.

    “Lower cost and higher power are the keys to commercial success, and the technology is quickly approaching the threshold where it will be practical to bring advanced features to the mass market,” he added. “These systems are being rapidly adapted to the commercial vehicle market.”

    According to Navigant’s study, those benefits could be the incentive for commercial fleets to implement driver assistance systems in the short term, which will pave the way for adoption of fully automated vehicles over the longer term – beginning in the next decade.

    Freight-hauling trucks and buses can benefit in the short term from collision avoidance and lower fuel consumption, the firm noted, while automated driving systems could “potentially change significantly the nature of truck driving jobs.”

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/re...m=email&elq2=200008e2da7146b9b5faaa2591134702
     
    TAEZZAR likes this.
  29. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    10,526
    Likes Received:
    16,191
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    ORYGUN
  30. Irons

    Irons Deep Sixed Site Supporter Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    23,418
    Likes Received:
    31,037
    Trophy Points:
    113
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.jpeg
    More images



    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.png
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.png
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.png
    upload_2017-4-27_20-7-1.png






    Maximum Overdrive
    R
    1986 ‧ Disaster Film/Action ‧ 1h 38m
    Play trailer on YouTube
    Like
    Dislike
    5.4/10IMDb17%Rotten Tomatoes
    After a comet causes a radiation storm on Earth, machines come to life and turn against their makers. Holed up in a North Carolina truck stop, a group of survivors must fend for themselves against a mass of homicidal trucks. A diner cook, Bill Robinson (Emilio Estevez), emerges as the unlikely leade… More

    Release date: July 25, 1986 (USA)
    Director: Stephen King
    Story by: Stephen King
    Screenplay: Stephen King
    Budget: 10 million USD

    Plot[edit]

    As the Earth passes through the tail of a comet, previously inanimate objects suddenly spring to life and turn homicidal. In a pre-title scene, a man (King in a cameo) tries to withdraw money from an ATM, but it instead calls him an "asshole", and he whines to his wife (King's real life wife Tabitha). Chaos soon begins as machines of all kinds come to life and begin assaulting humans: a drawbridge inexplicably raises during heavy traffic, resulting in multiple accidents, most notably a black AC/DC van and a watermelon truck; while at a Little League game, a vending machine kills the coach by firing canned soda point-blank into his groin and then to his skull; a driverless steamroller flattens one of the fleeing children, but one named Deke Keller manages to escape on his bike.

    The carnage spreads as humans and even pets are brutally killed by lawnmowers, chainsaws, electric hair dryers, pocket radios, and RC cars. At a roadside truck stop just outside Wilmington, North Carolina, a waitress is injured by an electric knife and arcade machines in the back room electrocute another victim. Employee and ex-convict Bill Robinson begins to suspect something is wrong when suddenly marauding big rig trucks, led by a black Western Star 4800 sporting a giant Green Goblin mask on its grille, run down two individuals (including Deke's father) and surround the truck stop, trapping the rest of the civilians inside the truck stop's diner.

    Robinson rallies the survivors; they use a cache of firearms and M72 LAW rockets stored in a bunker hidden under the diner and destroy many of the trucks. The trucks fight back in the form of both a Caterpillar D7G bulldozer which drives through the diner and a M274 Mule which fires its post-mounted M60 machine gun into the building, killing several including the waitress when she rants at them. The Mule then demands, via sending morse code signals through its horn, that the humans pump the truck's diesel for them in exchange for keeping them safe; the survivors soon realize they have become enslaved by their own machines. Robinson suggests they escape to a local island just off the coast, on which no vehicles or machines are permitted.

    During a fueling operation, Robinson sneaks a grenade onto the Mule vehicle, destroying it, then leads the party out of the diner via a sewer hatch to the main road just as the trucks demolish the entire truck stop. The survivors are pursued to the docks by the Green Goblin truck - which manages to kill one more trucker after he steals a ring from a female corpse in a car - before Robinson destroys the truck once and for all with a direct hit from an M72 LAW rocket shot. The survivors then sail off to safety; a title card epilogue explains that two days after the machines' rampage, a UFO was destroyed by a Soviet "weather satellite" conveniently equipped with class IV nuclear missiles and a laser cannon.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2017
  31. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    10,526
    Likes Received:
    16,191
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    ORYGUN
    I can hear Nancy Pelosi saying "we have to disable it, to see how it works" !!


    self drive.png
     
    searcher likes this.
  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    OTTO founder steps aside as head of Uber’s self-driving group

    Ex-employer Google has accused Levandowski of stealing confidential information.

    Apr 28, 2017 Neil Abt | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Anthony Levandowski (at right, with Sean Waters, director of compliance and regulatory affairs for Daimler Trucks North America) during a panel presentation at the American Trucking Associations (ATA) annual convention last year. (Photo by Sean Kilcarr/Fleet Owner)

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Self-driving Otto truck hauls beer by itself


    The founder of OTTO, the company behind the autonomous beer delivery in Colorado last year, has stepped aside as head of Uber’s self-driving group while a lawsuit moves forward.

    Uber confirmed to media outlets that Anthony Levandowski is taking another position within the company.

    Levandowski worked at Google, prior to launching OTTO. Uber then purchased OTTO for $680 million in August and gave Levandowski a leadership role.

    Several months after OTTO’s beer run, Waymo, the self-driving car unit spun-off from Google, initiated court action against Uber and Levandowski.

    He is accused of stealing confidential documents related to LiDAR, short for 'light detection and ranging,' which are specialized radar sensors that map their surroundings. Eric Meyhofer has been named as Levandowski’s replacement.

    At an industry conference last fall, Levandowski presented an ambitious vision for the future, where autonomous trucks allowing for around-the-clock trucking.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/ot...m=email&elq2=7da3af1a33b34149aed90c7e99f1bdb0
     
  33. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
  34. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Sorting out self-driving terminology
    May 1, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Road to driverless trucks clogged with unanswered questions


    There are a lot of descriptives and terms in the mix when the talk turns to autonomous vehicles (AVs) – which are also known as self-driving vehicles, driverless vehicles, robot cars, etc.

    To bring some “standardization” to how we discuss the systems involved with self-driving vehicle operation, the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) recently rolled out what it calls a “common lexicon” to explain the concepts and definitions involved..

    CTA’s recently-formed “Self-Driving Vehicles Working Group,” which is comprised of 34 different companies and chaired by Daimler North America Corp. and Google’s self-driving vehicle division, Waymo, spearheaded this “terminology” effort.

    “A common lexicon will increase understanding amongst policymakers, consumers and other stakeholders and encourage sound policies to bring automated driving technology to market,” noted Jessica Nigro, Daimler’s manager of outreach and innovation policy and chair of this “working group.”

    So what are some of these now “standardizes” concepts and terms? Here’s an initial list:

    • Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) or “Driver-Assist” Features: Onboard systems developed to improve safety and performance – examples include lane departure warnings, collision avoidance, adaptive cruise control and automatic emergency braking (AEB).
    • Aftermarket Technology: Technology services or upgrades provided by companies – unaffiliated with the vehicle manufacturer – added after a vehicle is sold or leased.
    • Driving Environment Sensing: The capturing, processing and analysis of sensor data (e.g., cameras and light detection and ranging radar or LIDAR) to enhance or replace what a human driver senses.
    • MaaS (Mobility as a Service): The shift from personal ownership of transportation modes to shared transportation systems and services.
    • Platooning: Synchronous operation of multiple vehicles, often in a convoy, to increase road capacity and efficiency.
    • Self-Driving Vehicle: A vehicle capable of fully modeling its environment through an array of sensors, maps and other data in order to navigate and drive without human interaction.
    • Urban Mobility: The ability for people in urban and suburban areas to access all modes and forms of transportation.
    According to CTA research conducted last year, the vast majority of U.S. consumers (three out of four) are “excited about the many benefits self-driving vehicles can offer” while almost two-thirds want to swap their current cars for completely self-driving vehicles.

    Additionally, 70% of consumers have a strong interest in testing a driverless car, CTA found, while almost all drivers (93%) who use existing driver-assist features appreciate the usefulness of these driving technology innovations.

    [​IMG]

    Yet, as I’ve noted in this space before, the “desire” to turn the driving over to autonomous vehicles may not be as widespread as many think: just go here, here and here for but a few examples.

    There also remain a lot of unanswered questions regarding the use of autonomous technology in trucking, particularly in terms of crash liability and operational efficiency.

    And hat’s before we start dissecting the data demands of self-driving vehicles, which will be pretty steep.

    There’s also the concern about job losses – particularly among truck drivers – due to AVs.

    That’s why CTA is holding an inaugural New American Jobs Summit this week in Washington, D.C., to explore how government and the private sector can collaborate to develop a competitive workforce, create new high-wage jobs and foster economic growth in the face of rapid technological innovation, an aging population and increased global competition.

    “Our future will have fewer traffic collisions and fewer deaths – and self-driving cars will create undreamed of independence for seniors and the visually impaired,” noted Gary Shapiro, CTA’s president and CEO, in a statement. “We are thrilled to gather many of the different interests in the self-driving ecosystem who are committed to saving lives as soon as possible. This will improve our world.”

    Let’s hope that rosy outlook is the one that comes true.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/sorting-...m=email&elq2=50be720a45b240a1a9748c69ed723b0a
     
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Autonomous vehicles may follow the PC development pathway
    May 4, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Road to driverless trucks clogged with unanswered questions


    One trend that’s been going on in trucking in fits and starts for a long while now is the move towards “vertical integration,” whereby truck OEMs directly manufacture most of the major components that comprise today’s commercial vehicles, such as engines, transmissions, cabs, axles, etc.

    Of course many independent suppliers still remain – especially where truck tires are concerned – but even with such “outside” suppliers, exclusive “standard position” contracts often rule the day.

    Yet as we begin to enter the era of autonomous vehicles (AVs) and especially self-driving trucks, this “proprietary approach,” whereby each OEM comes up with its own unique solution, may undergo some serious change – mirroring what occurred in the personal computer (PC) market several decades ago, according to Doug Davis, senior vice president and general manager of the automated driving group (ADG) at Intel Corp.

    “Autonomous driving will accelerate when the industry comes together to align on common platforms and technologies. That enables developers to go quickly and in volume while still differentiating their solutions in software,” he explained in a recent opinion column.

    “How do I know this? Let’s look at the PC and server industries as examples. Before 1980, the computer industry was highly proprietary, serving primarily researchers, big companies and hobbyists,” Davis noted. “This changed a few years later when IBM built the first personal computer using mostly off-the-shelf parts and an outsourced operating system.”

    Those early PCs were the base for a “standardized approach” to computer design that led to faster evolution of technology and 150-times growth for the PC industry in a just two decades, he stressed.

    [​IMG]
    Intel's Doug Davis


    “The data center is similar. After mainframes came microcomputers, [and they] enabled some flexibility and cost-effectiveness,” Davis pointed out.

    “But it was the adaptation of PC technology that allowed data centers to evolve quickly to handle the data that came with the Internet,” he said. “[Research firm] IDC reported there were 1.8 zettabytes of data generated in 2011, and now it estimates we will generate over 40 zettabytes by 2020. Only through standardized solutions have we been able to grow the industry fast enough to keep up.”

    And managing that huge volume of data will be critical to making AVs work properly – something both Davis and his Intel colleague Kathy Winter cannot emphasize enough.

    “The single most important factor in autonomous driving is data – how best to process it, manage it, move it, store it, share it and learn from it,” Davis stressed. “As we move down the road toward autonomous cars, the data challenge will become much more complex and require new ways to work with data inside the vehicle, throughout the network and across the cloud.”

    To ensure that the transportation industry and the system developers supporting it put “the absolute right strategy” in place to handle that massive data challenge, Davis said Intel has installed the first of several planned data centers dedicated to autonomous driving.

    “These unique labs will be used for algorithm development and training, as well as for understanding the special infrastructure needs for autonomous driving data movement and storage,” he explained.

    [​IMG]
    Ford testing its AV prototypes within a simulated city environment.


    “Researchers will continually feed information from Intel’s test cars into these data centers to train neural networks and improve machine learning algorithms,” he noted.

    Which brings him to artificial intelligence (AI); the linchpin on which self-driving cars will either succeed or fail.

    “Mastering AI both inside the car and in the data center will be essential to the autonomous driving data challenge,” Davis said. “Here it’s important to remember that autonomous driving isn’t a game. When cars are thinking and acting without human intervention, they must be able to do so in a safe and trustworthy way.”

    He added that the “artificial intelligence” needed to make all of that happen isn’t just “computer vision,” either.

    “Think voice, decision-making, personalization and preferences,” Davis emphasized. “Each of those AI workloads needs a different set of algorithms and likely different kind of processing for optimum performance. If all we needed was a supercomputer to handle the autonomous driving data challenge, our work would be done.

    This brings him back to AVs and to whether they will become a reality or end up as just another science-fiction pipe dream.

    [​IMG]
    Ford testing AV operation in the snow.


    “There are plenty of naysayers,” Davis said. “There are plenty in the automotive industry who don’t understand how open collaboration can enable differentiation and innovation. I understand the skepticism, but from years of experience, I know that technology solves problems best when it’s organized around common platforms and predictable interfaces. Without a doubt, that’s the fastest way forward on our autonomous journey.”

    Davis also doesn’t think that society as a whole can afford to continue down a proprietary path where AVs are concerned.

    “The cost in time, money and human lives is too great,” he explained. “The faster we can deliver autonomous driving technology and take humans out of the driver’s seat, the faster we can save lives. It’s that simple – and that important.”

    That’s one view, at least, of what’s driving the development of AVs and driverless trucks forward. We’ll see how much headway this particular philosophy gets in the trucking industry

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/autonomo...m=email&elq2=42e851b79d394013aab12c2f2047d545
     
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Where driverless vehicles and golf clubs meet
    May 11, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Autonomous vehicles may follow the PC development pathway


    It’s not every day that you encounter and analogy that links self-driving vehicle technology and golf clubs. Not by a long shot.

    [OK; you knew that was coming – admit it.]

    Yet in some ways, this most unusual analogy – offered up by Kathy Winter, vice president and general manager of the automated driving solutions division at Intel Corp. – makes a lot of sense.

    ADVERTISING

    “Golf is one of my favorite pastimes and … it takes a certain amount of strategy and creativity to decide which clubs to use along the way,” she explained in a recent blog post – part of a series of posts addressing the technical issues surrounding autonomous vehicles (AVs).

    In terms of golf club selection, Winter noted that some are “fairly obvious,” such as using a driver off the tee, a wedge for the sand trap or a putter for the green.

    Other shots, however, require a bit more ingenuity when it comes to club selection – such as using a 3-iron to “punch out” from under a tree.

    “I like to think of my bag of clubs as my golfing toolkit – each club chosen to provide optimal performance and power for the circumstances,” Winter noted.

    And just as one needs different clubs to successfully play 18 holes of golf, she emphasized, different kinds of processors tare needed to successfully “drive” an autonomous vehicle.
    [​IMG]
    Intel's Kathy Winter


    Take sensors as an example. Each type of sensor generates a very different kind of data: cameras generate pixels; LIDAR, short for “light detection and ranging,” uses light in the form of a pulsed laser to measure “ranges” variable distances; and radar generates analog waveforms.

    “All of these data types need to be processed differently,” Winter pointed out. “And if you were developing an autonomous car brain, you would choose very specialized tools perfectly suited to each data type rather than a single gaming processor for all of it.”

    The same “golf club” philosophy, if you will, holds true for the “artificial intelligence” or AI inside a self-driving vehicle as well, she stressed.

    “We often hear that the role of AI in autonomous cars is for ‘computer vision,’ and that a specific kind of computing element can be used for all AI in autonomous driving,” Winter said. “But that’s an incomplete picture of the challenge.”

    She explained that AI is much more than computer vision; in fact, it’s used throughout a driverless vehicle to do everything from natural language processing and “personalization” to decision-making.

    [​IMG]
    A test run for Daimler AG's European self-driving truck

    “Those are all very different kinds of AI, each with very different and unique computing needs,” Winter emphasized. “So instead of choosing one processor for all of the artificial intelligence tasks in the car, you need a processing toolkit with computing elements designed for each of those very different tasks.”

    Thus, in similar fashion as to how golfers need a full bag of clubs to successfully play golf, AV designers need a suite of computing technologies to successfully engineer an AV’s “brain” and all the different functions it needs to control and perform.

    “Although golf gives us an interesting way to describe the complexity of autonomous car design, I have to end my analogy there,” Winter stressed.

    “Golf is a fun game … but a game nonetheless. Autonomous driving is not; we also know exactly how challenging it is,” she pointed out. “If you ask the leaders in autonomous driving what kind of computer they would design for deployment in [self-driving] cars five years from now, none of them can tell you. The rate of change and innovation in this industry is staggering.”

    Something to keep in mind as efforts to deploy autonomous cars and trucks on our roads continue to gain speed.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/where-dr...m=email&elq2=b4d228a8665d42d8bda3eea085307fd0
     
  38. mubert42

    mubert42 New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2017
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Driverless driving is really cool, but expect an increase in the number of unemployed in the future.
     
  39. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    134,482
    Likes Received:
    38,547
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Volvo, Renova test autonomous refuse truck
    May 18, 2017 Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Volvo Trucks and Swedish waste management company Renova are testing autonomous vehicles for refuse handling. (Volvo Trucks)

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Autonomous trucks: The reality is setting in


    Together with Swedish waste management company Renova, Volvo Trucks is testing and researching automated vehicles for refuse handling. According to Volvo, the automated systems being tested are in principle the same as those fitted to the autonomous Volvo truck operating in the Kristineberg Mine in northern Sweden since autumn 2016.

    "Driving a heavy commercial vehicle in an urban residential area with narrow streets and vulnerable road users naturally imposes major demands on safety, even when the vehicle's speed doesn't exceed a normal walking pace. The refuse truck we are now testing continuously monitors its surroundings and immediately stops if an obstacle suddenly appears on the road. At the same time, the automated system creates better prerequisites for the driver to keep a watchful eye on everything that happens near the truck," says Carl Johan Almqvist, traffic & product safety director, Volvo Trucks.

    The first time the automated refuse truck is used in a new area, it is driven manually while the on-board system constantly monitors and maps the route with the help of sensors and GPS technology. The next time the truck enters the same area, it knows exactly which route to follow and at which bins it has to stop, Volvo noted.

    At the first stop with the automated system activated, the driver climbs out of the cab, goes to the rear of the truck, brings out the wheelie-bin and empties it exactly the way the job is done today by operating the relevant controls. When the operation is completed, the truck automatically reverses to the next bin upon receiving the driver's command. The driver walks the very same route that the truck takes and thus always has full view of what's happening in the direction of travel. But why reverse instead of driving forward?

    "By reversing the truck, the driver can constantly remain close to the compactor unit instead of having to repeatedly walk between the rear and the cab every time the truck is on the move. And since the driver doesn't have to climb in and out of the cab at every start and stop, there's less risk of work related injuries such as strain on the knees and other joints," says Hans Zachrisson, strategic development manager at Renova.

    According to Volvo, reversing can be a fairly risky maneuver since the driver may find it difficult to see who or what is moving behind the vehicle, even if it is fitted with a camera. In certain areas it is not allowed to reverse with a heavy commercial vehicle for safety reasons, in others it is a requirement that a co-driver must stand behind the truck to ensure that the road is clear before the vehicle is allowed to reverse. The solution being tested is designed to eliminate these issues. Since sensors monitor the area all around the refuse truck, driving is equally safe no matter the direction in which the vehicle is moving. And if for instance the street is blocked by a parked car, the refuse truck can automatically drive around the obstruction provided there is sufficient space alongside.

    “Although the technical scope already exists, a lot of research, testing and development remains before self-driving refuse trucks can become a reality,” Volvo said. “The current joint project will continue until the end of 2017 and will be followed by an extremely thorough evaluation of functionality, safety and, not least, how well this type of vehicle is accepted by drivers, other road users and local residents. Vehicles with varying degrees of automation will probably be introduced earlier in other applications, where transport assignments take place within strictly confined areas such as mines and cargo terminals.”

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/vo...m=email&elq2=3c1c07d657314da08bde09d3e4d15027
     
  40. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,861
    Likes Received:
    4,569
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Instant Gratification Land
    This makes no sense at all. It'd be better to automate the actual trash pick up part instead.


    So they are going to slow trash pick-up down to walking speed? That's crazy.
    If they are going to the trouble of making a self driving garbage truck, they need to get the whole thing automated. Where I live the guy never gets out of the truck. There's an arm with a mechanical claw that picks up the trash can and dumps it into the truck in about 2 seconds. Then it's off to the next house. All you'd need at that point is a self driving truck and sensors on all the trash cans so it can "see" where they are. Then there's no need for the guy riding on it. Which is the expensive part of the deal in the long-term.
     

Share This Page