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Driverless Cars / Trucks

Discussion in 'Auto, Tractor, Motorcycles, Racing, and Mechanics' started by searcher, Aug 30, 2016.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Now robots are taking jobs from BIN MEN: Volvo launches automated garbage trucks in Sweden
    • The trucks will make picking up rubbish safer, swifter and more efficient
    • Sensors guide the truck around obstacles as it follows a pre-determined path
    • The truck reverses itself between bins allowing the 'driver' to walk alongside
    • But the vehicles will cut the manpower needed for the job


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4545718/Volvo-unveil-automated-garbage-trucks.html#ixzz4iIzFhdKN
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  2. Rollie Free

    Rollie Free Midas Member Midas Member

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    Fwiw,
    My brother has a B stock in Warren Buffet's Berkshire Hathaway. So since the annual stakeholders meeting is up the road he takes the opportunity. Buffet said to get out a of any car insurance stock.

    One wonders then where the liability will be. Single payer car insurance next?
     
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  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Texas poised to be next to allow autonomous testing
    No driver will be required for trials on public roads.

    May 30, 2017 Neil Abt | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    A bill approved by the Texas legislature paves the way for testing of fully autonomous vehicles on public roads. (Photo by Daimler)

    Related Media
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    Report: Autonomous technology can cut commercial fleet costs


    Texas is poised to become the next state to allow testing of fully autonomous vehicles on public roads after the state’s legislature approved a bill creating the basic framework manufacturers will need to follow.

    The legislation was passed by the House on May 20. That approval came several weeks after the Senate unanimously backed the measure. Once signed by Gov. Greg Abbott (R), it will become law as of Sept. 1.

    "The Texas economy fosters innovation," said Sen. Kelly Hancock, author of the bill and chairman of the state Senate Business and Commerce Committee. "Automotive technology is advancing at a rapid pace, and we need to be prepared for it."

    Popular Now
    How freight is priced and paid for is changing fast

    Daimler recalls nearly 700 Freightliner, Western Star trucks

    Report: Driverless trucks will eliminate millions of jobs



    Texas did not previously prohibit autonomous vehicles; there has already been limited autonomous testing near the cities of Dallas and Austin. However, the legislation was meant to clarify the expectations and liabilities concerning the emerging technology, Hancock said.

    The bill allows testing fully autonomous vehicles on public roads, provided the vehicle is in compliance with all federal laws, is registered in the state, has proper insurance and includes a data recorders.

    It also will not “require a licensed human operator to operate a motor vehicle” but the “owner of the automated driving system is considered the operator,” and could be held responsible if there is an incident. The legislation also prohibits local entities from imposing their own rules or fees for autonomous testing.

    According to research from the National Conference of State Legislatures, 15 states already have approved legislation allow some form of testing of autonomous vehicles. Governors in several other states have signed executive orders related to autonomous vehicles.

    Peterbilt Motors, based in Denton, TX, has been testing autonomous trucks on closed test tracks in the state for a number of years. Fleet Owner’s most recent visit to Texas to view Peterbilt’s development was in December 2015.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/te...m=email&elq2=3b2420fa3af147f582fbeb95bbf6e74e
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Report: Driverless trucks will eliminate millions of jobs
    Joint study predicts a 50% to 70% cut in truck driving jobs in the U.S. and Europe due to self-driving technology by 2030.

    May 31, 2017 Sean Kilcarr | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    “Automation in trucking demands a managed and just transition.” —Steve Cotton, General Secretary of the International Transport Workers’ Federation. (Photo: Daimler AG)

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Road to driverless trucks clogged with unanswered questions


    A new joint report issued by four European transport groups estimates that between two million to 4.4 million truck driving jobs in the U.S. and Europe could become “redundant” and thus be eliminated in just 13 years if efforts aimed at widely deploying self-driving commercial vehicles are successful.

    This new study – entitled Managing the Transition to Driverless Road Freight Transport and prepared jointly by the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITWF), the International Road Transport Union (IRU), and the International Transport Forum (ITF) – noted that driverless trucks could be a regular presence on many roads within the next decade, as they are already operating in “controlled environments” such as ports or mines, awhile undergoing testing on public roads in both the U.S. and European Union.

    “Manufacturers are investing heavily into truck-automation technology, while many governments are actively reviewing their regulations to understand what changes would be required to allow self-driving vehicles on public roads,” noted José Viegas, the ITF’s Secretary-General, in a statement.

    He pointed out that automated trucks would enable cost savings, lower emissions and safer roads, while also addressing what Viegas called the “emerging shortage” of professional drivers faced by the trucking industry, particularly in Europe.
    [​IMG]


    The cost savings derived from a switch to driverless trucks are of keen interest, too, as labor currently accounts for an estimated 35% to 45% of operating costs of road freight in Europe, he noted.

    And that’s before the impact of the driver shortage is calculated. Without driverless trucks, around 6.4 million truck drivers are projected to be needed across the U.S. and Europe by 2030, according to the report – while fewer than 5.6 million are expected to be willing to work under what the study described as “current trucking conditions.”

    The report went on to note that majority of those currently working as truck drivers “are in the later stages of their careers,” with few women and younger men choosing trucking as a profession.

    “The adoption of driverless trucks is likely to reduce demand for drivers at a faster rate than a supply shortage would emerge,” the study concluded.

    Along similar lines, James Arbib, co-founder of independent research group RethinkX, is working on a similar trucking study that examines the impact of not just self-driving technology but a changeover to electric propulsion as well – mirroring the group’s recent report for light vehicles entitled Rethinking Transportation 2020-2030: The Disruption of Transportation and the Collapse of the ICE Vehicle and Oil Industries.

    Arbib told Fleet Owner that the “move to autonomy” in trucking will address one of the three “big costs” of commercial vehicle operation: driver wages, fuel, and maintenance.

    While he stressed human drivers will still be required to operate large trucks, especially in dense urban areas for “last mile” deliveries, automation will allow for far higher truck utilization rates and for use at times when highway traffic is minimal, which will improve safety.

    Yet he echoed the conclusions of the ITF-led driverless freight transport report, stressing that automated trucks “will hit like a train” and result in millions of job losses if the trucking industry does not prepare itself.

    [​IMG]
    Photo: Daimler AG


    Indeed, the ITF-led driverless truck report emphasized that solving the shortage via the broad adoption of autonomous technology will lead to deep cuts in available truck driving positions in the U.S. and Europe alike.

    All told, out of the 6.4 million truck driver jobs expected to be available by 2030, the report found that between 3.4 million and 4.4 million would “become redundant” if driverless trucks are deployed quickly.

    Even accounting for prospective truck drivers being “progressively dissuaded” by the advent of self-driving commercial vehicles, over two million drivers across the U.S. and Europe could be “directly displaced” by 2030 in some of the scenarios examined for this joint study.

    “While truck drivers are typically flexible, self-reliant and able to concentrate for long periods, their relatively low education level and potential automation in other sectors puts them at a high risk of extended periods of unemployment,” the report noted.

    On top of that, financial support for those displaced workers in developed economies may prove to be inadequate given the potential speed and scale of job losses, the study emphasized.

    “We must avoid excessive hardship for truck drivers and ensure the gains from the technology are fairly shared across society [as] self-driving trucks threaten to disrupt the careers and lives of millions of professional truck drivers,” added Steve Cotton, the ITFW’s General Secretary, in a statement. “Automation in trucking demands a managed and just transition.”

    To that end, the four groups involved in compiling this report offered four major recommendations to “smooth” the transition to driverless trucks in order to avoid “potential social disruption” from job losses:
    • Governments, industry and researchers should continue to advance self-driving truck tests on public roads in designated corridors and areas so no commitment is made to an individual company, standard or technology too early in the development process. “This will help ensure societal benefits from automated road freight transport will be maximized,” according to the study.
    • The “harmonization of rules” across countries to create common vehicle standards and operational rules would allow for smoother cross-border movements of autonomous trucks and should be put in place at least at a continental level, but preferably at the global level.
    • Governments should establish a temporary transition advisory board that includes representatives from labor unions, road freight businesses, vehicle manufacturers and government to help determine the “right policy mix” to ensure that the costs, benefits, and risks from automated road haulage are “fairly distributed.”
    • Governments should consider establishing a “temporary permit system” to manage the speed of driverless technology adoption while supporting a “just transition” for displaced drivers. Such a permit system would offer revenue to support displaced drivers, with funds for “transition assistance” generated by the main beneficiaries of the operation of driverless trucks. “Careful design of the permit system would ensure that permits are used to manage the labor transition fairly and not as a proxy to limit the free movement of goods,” the report noted.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/re...m=email&elq2=513ca721b14948038fb627d41cc4f3e6
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Will autonomy actually make traffic congestion worse?
    May 31, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Report: Driverless trucks will eliminate millions of jobs


    There’s been a lot of discussion lately about the positive and negative impact widespread adoption of autonomous vehicles (AVs) might have on our society – positive in the sense that they’ll reduce crashes and thus improve safety, but negative in terms of the potential for massive job losses among truck drivers.

    In a recent blog post, Howard Jennings – managing director of the Mobility Lab – added another concern to the worry list surrounding AVs: could they worsen traffic congestion in our nation?

    [That would not be good, especially since traffic congestion is proving to be a giant drain on the trucking industry’s wallet as this story explains.]

    “The advent of AVs is fraught with uncertainty, especially when it comes to their impacts on traffic, travel choices, and the broader transportation system,” noted Jennings in his post.

    “They offer many potential benefits, but many potential negative impacts, depending in part on how they are deployed,” he added. “While widespread adoption may still be decades away, significant numbers will begin to be on the roads in less than 10 years, according to manufacturers and other observers. Ultimately, many expect them to have major transformational effects on our transportation systems and built environment.”

    Jennings said the key is to consider the impact of AVs on our roads as a potential transportation demand management (TDM) problem – and preparing TDM-type policies to address them.

    “When it comes to the most pressing issues to be addressed in the deployment of AVs, safety and infrastructure do not necessarily top the list of urgent needs,” he explained.

    “Federal and state policies are already looking to address these. Since safety is one of the major motivations for adopting autonomous technologies, and a top concern for skeptical consumers, agencies and automakers are prioritizing it,” Jennings stressed. “Either they will be made safe, or they won’t be on the roads.”

    Yet the exact impacts to communities and traffic systems from broad deployment of AVs are “poorly understood” form where he sits – and could potentially create new problems.

    [​IMG]


    “Ironically, the efficiency of AVs has long been touted as a solution to traffic, but new research is beginning to suggest that AVs will, in fact, generate more of it,” Jennings emphasized.

    “Simply put, there is no guarantee the traffic effects of AVs will be handled. It is entirely possible that they will spread widely and, without adequate policies, many places may never manage their impacts,” he noted. “We never fully anticipated the impacts of conventional cars as they were being developed, and we have been living with many unintended consequences in … our communities for the last 100 years.”

    What we do know, Jennings pointed out, is that AVs will create an “unprecedented convenience” in driving.

    “By eliminating most of the hassles of driving, such as parking and lost productivity time, AVs will induce not only more trips, but longer ones,” he noted. “Additionally, AVs waiting to pick up new riders will add ‘deadheading’ miles.”

    Yet in terms of traffic flow, the only thing worse than a single-occupant vehicle is a zero-occupant vehicle, Jennings explained.

    “Placed all together, this suggests they will almost certainly increase vehicle-miles traveled (VMT), energy use, and emissions,” he emphasized. “Those impacts might be locked in by further sprawl and other shifts toward less efficient land-use patterns.”

    AVs, according to a 2015 Urban Mobility study by the International Transit Forum and Corporate Partnership Board, are expected to generate up to 35% more VMT when compared to manually-driven conventional cars.

    [​IMG]


    And while AVs in a shared “fleet” would generate less VMT, AVs in “taxi mode” carrying single passengers all the way to their destinations would create 90% more VMT than typical taxies.

    “To avoid the worst of these traffic scenarios, policy needs to be deployed with an eye towards minimizing the added miles and the demand for situations involving zero-occupant vehicles,” Jennings stressed.

    When it comes down to it, the demand guiding AV impacts is a hybrid of a person’s choice, as in their decision to initiate the trip, and the self-driving technology itself, he explained.

    “In short, policymakers should adapt TDM principles to autonomous vehicles, using a mix of incentives and disincentives to guide choices,” Jennings noted.

    To that end, he made a few suggestions:
    • Policies should always seek to encourage AVs that move more people in fewer vehicles.
    • Incentives should be in place to guide people and employers towards more efficient choices. The deployment and pricing models offered by automotive and tech companies should be structured to make shared AVs, not personal AVs, the model of choice.
    • AVs that feed into transit systems create the lowest amount of VMT and, in many cases, might expand the reach and usefulness of those transit systems. For example, autonomous taxis used as a “connector” to public transit networks only produce 6% more VMT compared to “typical” taxis.
    • Policymakers should seek to create pricing policies to head-off the traffic-inducing effects of personal AVs. For example, a VMT fee would discourage longer trips in general, while a higher single-occupant fee would encourage AV riders to share rides. A zero-occupant vehicle [ZOV] charge, addressing the miles added by AVs circling between pick-ups or headed home to park, would warrant the highest VMT fee.
    “The ‘ZOV’ miles represent an entirely new [traffic] congestion danger, as they may be generated from the mere convenience of AV owners asking their cars to circle while they pick up groceries, but can add up to significant traffic consequences,” Jennings stressed.

    Just some of things we need to keep in mind as AVs begin to deploy on our roadways.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/will-aut...m=email&elq2=513ca721b14948038fb627d41cc4f3e6
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Move over Uber: Russia's largest search engine firm Yandex reveals its self-driving taxi
    • A video shows a driverless Toyota Prius picking up and dropping off a passenger
    • Unexpected pedestrians and cars seem to present little challenge to the car
    • Yandex is hoping to test out its vehicle on public roads within the next year


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4558122/Russian-firm-unveils-plans-self-driving-taxi.html#ixzz4ig6bGIXE
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  8. Garyw

    Garyw Silver Member Silver Miner

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    I don't know about the rest of you but I am tired of buying tires. I vote for hovercrafts with rubber bumpers.
     
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  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Waymo confirms it is testing a self-driving truck
    Google spin-off using a Peterbilt truck at its California track.

    Jun 1, 2017 Neil Abt | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Waymo is already conducting on-road tests of several self-driving passenger vehicles, including this Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivan. (Photo: Waymo)

    Related Media
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    Report: Driverless trucks will eliminate millions of jobs


    Waymo, the company spun-off by Google that has been developing autonomous-driving technology, confirmed it is testing a self-driving truck.

    The story was first reported by BuzzFeed on June 1.

    “Self-driving technology can transport people and things much more safely than we do today and reduce the thousands of trucking-related deaths each year. We’re taking our eight years of experience in building self-driving hardware and software and conducting a technical exploration into how our technology can integrate into a truck," a Waymo spokesperson said in a statement.

    The company told Forbes it is testing a single Peterbilt truck at its private track in California. Waymo hopes to conduct road tests in Arizona later this year.

    The company said it has conducted more than three million miles of on-road testing of autonomous cars.

    This news comes days after Uber announced it fired Anthony Levandowski, the founder of Otto and former Google employee accused of stealing confidential files and trade secrets.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/wa...m=email&elq2=5107f9e1ff0d42539c1d5b88cc689bb2
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    States' patchwork of autonomous laws creates a downside
    Report urges uniformity and recommends creating user fees for AVs.

    Jun 4, 2017 Neil Abt | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Otto’s autonomous truck during its 120-mile beer delivery in Colorado in October. (Photo: Uber)

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Report: Driverless trucks will eliminate millions of jobs


    The rush by states to pass regulations meant to attract development and testing of autonomous vehicles (AVs) runs the risk of creating unintended obstacles.

    That was a takeaway from the latest report from the Eno Center for Transportation, which also studied how states can better align future infrastructure and workforce investments with the rapidly evolving technology.

    “When writing laws or executive orders, states need to be careful not to overdesign reporting requirements for manufacturers and tech firms as they continue to test and deploy AVs,” the report said.

    During a conference call, Paul Lewis, Eno’s vice president of policy and finance, cautioned against the growing patchwork of AV regulations across states. Eno is concerned, he said, with differences in definitions of autonomous vehicles between many of the various laws and executive orders. That can be a particularly tricky issue near states lines, where only a few miles separate different regulations and definitions of autonomous vehicles.

    Lewis recommended states stick to the accepted definitions from SAE International and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

    “Make sure testing AVs is not only allowed, but also that it fosters the development of an entire ecosystem of automakers and/or tech firms, research institutes and localities engaged in the field,” the report stated.

    [​IMG]
    Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder signs autonomous vehicle legislation in December 2016. (Photo: Office of the Michigan governor)

    During the call, Eno officials were critical of a recently approved New York law that created a one-year pilot program for autonomous testing. Besides the short time frame, cities have complained it does not accommodate testing of automated shuttles to move people over short distances.

    On the same day the report was issued, Colorado became the latest state to pass legislation regulating autonomous vehicles. Advocacy groups including Securing America’s Future Energy (SAFE) praised the bill signed by Gov. John Hickenlooper for avoiding over regulation. The law states if an autonomous vehicle complies with every other state and federal law, then it can be tested, provided proper notice is given to transportation officials.

    Meanwhile, Eno recommended greater harmonization in other areas as well.

    “States need to work with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to harmonize tort and liability laws and enable consistent, national safety standards for commercial AV certification,” the report said.

    Looking at infrastructure needs, Stanford Turner, a co-author of the report, said states interested in attracting autonomous vehicles should ensure roads are well maintained and properly marked. Turner suggested states should study vehicle-to-infrastructure technology and other emerging communications technologies.

    To help fund these needs, states should look into adopting a fee for autonomous vehicles, which would help offset lost revenue fuel taxes or moving violations. This idea was backed by Mary Peters, former secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation, in an opinion piece published over the weekend.

    Turner credited Tennessee for creating a system that, if fully implemented, will collect 1 cent per mile for two-axle autonomous vehicles, and 2 cents per mile for vehicles with more than two axles .

    The report also recommended states better prep for future impacts of AVs on the overall workforce by investing in programs that will help retrain workers.

    For example, partnering with schools and the private sector for career development can enhance efforts to mitigate job losses.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/st...m=email&elq2=654e39ad44944b3393f5ace7b3d8cc6b
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Could autonomy foster a roadway safety paradigm shift?
    Jun 6, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Report: Driverless trucks will eliminate millions of jobs


    There’s no doubt that the debate over autonomous vehicles (AVs) is only going to get fierier in the weeks and months ahead. Just discussing the potential job losses associated with the deployment of driverless trucks, for example, is one surefire way to increase trucker blood pressure.

    Yet the reason behind the push to bring more self-driving vehicles – cars and commercial trucks alike – to our roadways is really fairly basic: by removing the fallible and unpredictable “human element” from vehicle operation will lead to far fewer crashes, property damage, injuries, and deaths.

    That’s the theory, anyways; one that’s been touched in stories like this one, that one, and oh yeah, this other one over here.

    Consulting firm Infiniti Research is the latest “think tank” (for lack of a better term) to take a stab at illustrating the proposed benefits from wider adoption of AVs.

    “Their imminent debut in the mainstream scheme of things will reinvent the concept of driving and personal transportation of people and goods,” the firm noted in a recent report.

    Here are the three key advantages Infiniti believes AVs will bring to the transportation table:
    • Real-time route optimization: AVs on a common stretch of the road are connected together with vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) mechanisms that enable driverless vehicles to gain real-time information on the condition of the roads as well as exchange protection and mobility information with the surrounding infrastructure and redirect the routes accordingly. Additionally, employing of V2V and V2I to find out optimal routes can aid in reducing the number of miles driven, save time and rein in the fuel consumption.
    • Increased lane capacity: AVs can operate at top speeds while trimming down the space between vehicles, leading to greater lane capacity. The latter can also increase with the embracing of adaptive cruise control. This technology adjusts the vehicle’s speed mechanically to ensure a safe distance between the vehicles on that stretch of the road. Such technologies will “shoot up” the lane capacity, Infiniti said, yet reduce accidents – all while ensuring greater passenger comfort and safety, thereby building the customers’ confidence in driverless technology.
    • Reduced energy consumption: AVs are less prone to accidents and are actually lighter than the conventional automobiles. Thanks to the lightweight composites used for building the modern vehicle, and the efficient manufacturing procedures, vehicles could become lighter while maintaining their overall size, yet remain impervious to accidents. Lightweight automobiles save on fuel consumption, further aided by such eco-friendly driving technologies and practices as cruise control, deceleration and smooth acceleration.
    Yet the biggest benefit AVs offer is improved roadway safety, noted Peter Hart, senior counsel with the LeClairRyan law firm.

    He argued in a blog post last month that since driver error is the leading cause of accidents on U.S. roadways – something I’ve noted in this space before – by deploying AVs and taking humans out from behind the steering wheel, many are betting that businesses such as trucking firms, delivery services and shuttle operators will face dramatically fewer legal settlements and court battles triggered by vehicular accidents.

    Hart added that AVs promise to make reconstructing accidents vastly easier and more accurate, as they are packed with advanced sensors such as beacon-based locational systems, stereo "vision," Lidar [which stands for “light detection and ranging” radar], GPS and inertia-measurement devices.

    “This stands to eliminate some of the most contentious issues in today's accident suits – and possibly put accident-reconstruction experts and proverbial ambulance-chaser lawyers out of work,” he argued. “The absence of a driver or drivers takes issues such as perception-reaction time and driver fatigue out of the mix. Those issues will be litigated with much less frequency."

    But that doesn’t mean vehicle-related lawsuits will disappear once AVs hit the road – oh no. For one of the biggest legal questions ahead for AVs is who or what is held liable if there is a crash?

    “Most of the accidents thus far have been the result of humans crashing into driverless cars or otherwise causing accidents with them, not the other way around,” Hart noted. “This is not to suggest, however, that all liability risk will vanish.”

    Today, he explained that many lawsuits – including the big class action efforts – target manufacturers of conventional cars and trucks for mechanical failures such as faulty steering wheels, braking systems or accelerators.

    [​IMG]


    “It is possible that AVs, once introduced onto American roads in sufficient numbers, could cause accidents as manufacturers strive to discover and eliminate the remaining bugs in these systems,” Hart stressed.

    "It is easy to imagine the kinds of lawsuits that could occur: 'The manufacturer claimed the car would be safe in the snow,' the plaintiff tells the jury, 'but the car was totally confused in that blizzard and caused a horrific crash,'” he warned. “Most [such] cases would be litigated over which system failed and who is responsible for the failure."

    Thus, where AVs are concerned, insurance and liability burdens could tilt away from companies that once employed human drivers and toward manufacturers of driverless vehicles – including those that make autonomous trucks.

    I’m going to bet once that particular legal angle starts getting bandied about more frequently, the push to bring AVs to our roadways will slow down a little. We’ll see if that is indeed the case.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/could-au...m=email&elq2=3856512ef83943a39f30c8815d156699
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Autonomous cars with no human backup could hit public roads for the first time next year in historic trial
    • Delphi and Transdev to use autonomous taxis and shuttle van on French roads
    • Two Renault Zoe autonomous taxis will be deployed in Rouen, Normandy
    • Shuttle van will run from rail station to campus in university district Paris-Saclay
    • Both will start with humans on board, with intent to go fully autonomous 2018


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4580522/Delphi-Transdev-partner-self-driving-buses.html#ixzz4jLakq6cr
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Talk about staying in your comfort zone! InMotion concept vehicle reveals how cars of the future will have 'self-driving rooms' that adapt to each passenger's needs
    • The InMotion was revealed at the CES technology show in Shanghai this week
    • It ditches the steering wheel and driving column for a spacious area
    • Users would share the vehicle and customise it for their needs through an app
    • It is still a concept and it is unclear if its designers will create a working version


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4588440/InMotion-world-s-driverless-LIVING-ROOM.html#ixzz4jiNduFkQ
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  15. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    If this whole driverless car thing actually works as it is currently being described, that will probably end up being the only kind of "car" that most people will want.

    Imagine driving cross country and instead of getting a motel for the night, you just go to sleep in the bed inside your car as it makes its way to your destination.
    ...and the motion of a car often makes for good sleeping. Bonus would be the fact that an autonomous car could even have a pre-programed "sleeping mode" that operates the car a bit slower and more smoothly in order to aid sleep. Heck, we'll probably end up with cars slowly driving around all night carrying sleeping people who might otherwise be insomniacs.

    Yes, if this stuff takes off, I see a whole 'nother World of transportation coming.
     
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  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trucking: A ‘poster child’ or ‘problem child’ for automation?

    Movin’On panel discusses potential opportunities and challenges expected with platooning and autonomous trucking.

    Jun 16, 2017 Cristina Commendatore | Fleet Owner

    [​IMG]
    Peter Sweatman, a co-founding principal at CAVita, discusses platooning and autonomous trucking at Michelin’s Movin’On Conference. (Photo: Cristina Commendatore/Fleet Owner)

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    Report: Driverless trucks will eliminate millions of jobs


    MONTREAL, QUE. Is the heavy trucking industry the poster child for automation or the problem child? It’s a question that moderator Peter Sweatman, a co-founding principal at CAVita, posed to a panel of transportation experts discussing platooning and autonomous trucking here at Michelin’s Movin’On Conference on sustainable mobility.

    Panelist John Woodroffe, head of transportation safety analysis at University of Michigan, explained that it is important for truck manufacturers and tech developers to make autonomous trucks even more reliable and safer than the trucks already on the road.

    “We should be designing trucks that refuse to crash,” he noted. “If the truck refuses to crash, then society’s perception will improve, and it will reflect the industry well.”

    Fellow panelist Steven Shladover, a professor and program manager of the PATH Program at University of California at Berkeley, agreed.

    “I think the trucking industry should be the poster child for automation, not the problem child,” he stressed. “I think a lot depends on whether it will be possible to get some separation between truck traffic and regular traffic.

    Shladover added that we’ve all experienced Level 4 automation and driverless vehicles at some point – when we take shuttles at airports between terminals, for instance. However, he noted, that level of automation is in a very restricted environment.

    “How do we get to a point where we have restricted truck lanes so the trucks are segregated from the unsafe drivers of other vehicles,” he asked.

    [​IMG]
    Panelists (seated from left) Panelists Peter Sweatman, cofounding principal at CAVita; John Woodroffe, head of transportation safety analysis at University of Michigan; Steve Shladover, professor at University of California at Berkeley; Bernard Jacob, expert at IFSTTAR; and Jose Viegas, secretary-general at ITF.


    Jose Viegas, secretary-general of the International Transport Forum, highlighted some of the major challenges that have to be addressed before fully autonomous trucks become the norm. Though the current truck driver hours of service regulations could end up being lifted with autonomous trucks, Viegas explained that there has to be a harmonization of regulatory frameworks.


    “We may be entering a nightmare of regulatory harmonization,” he emphasized. “Do we draft totally new regulations or do we extend current regulations? After a certain point, extending a regulation that was made for human drivers may have a blockage effect that we did not anticipate.”

    Viegas also noted that in addition to addressing the general public’s fears of passing a truck on the road with no driver behind the wheel, the industry as a whole must consider new mistakes humans can make with the new equipment. For instance, he said, there could be fuzzy communication between drivers and the movement of vehicles and a driver could end up misinterpreting computer problems.

    “With automation, a lot of problems may be solved, but we could be creating a totally new range of problems that we don’t know about yet,” he explained. “And we have to be prepared for that. This is a process that should be socially managed and harmonious, and we believe it could be done.”

    Truck platooning

    Throughout the industry various transportation experts and analysts have projected that platooning can lead to significant fuel savings for truck fleets. A leading truck in a platoon could save around 5% of fuel consumption, while the savings for the second, third, or fourth trucks in a platoon could generate fuel savings of around 10% to 15%.

    [​IMG]
    Potential fuel savings shown with truck platooning. (Photo: Omnitracs)

    Regardless of the fuel savings benefits, there are still many challenges and kinks the industry still has to work out. According to Shladover, some of those challenges include protecting the spectrum for vehicle-to-vehicle communications, software safety assurance for higher automation, and the harmonization of following-distance regulations. Another big problem, he said, is addressing unrealistic expectations for platooning and higher automation.

    “Public and political leaders have been led to believe that all truck driver jobs will go away,” he said. “This has to be evolved on a gradual time scale and if people are misled, we’re going to have very serious problems. For a number of years the system will require driver engagement. The driver is not going to go away.”

    Bernard Jacob, the deputy scientific director for transport, infrastructures and safety at IFSTTAR, noted some additional opportunities and challenges regarding platooning.

    Opportunities:
    • Driver/truck productivity and range extension
    • Lane capacity increase
    • Eco-driving and speed harmonization, aerodynamic gain
    • Logistics organization
    Challenges:
    • Impact on infrastructure migration (i.e., long span bridges)
    • Road safety and other users’ perception
    • Driving time regulation and social issues
    • Business model, platoons “on the fly,” multi-brand platoons
    And because of the unequal range of savings for the vehicles in a platoon, Woodroffe explained there needs to be some sort of mechanism to reward the first truck in a platoon. Another big question broached was insurance liability and who would be liable if first truck in a platoon gets in an accident.

    Panelists agreed this would be something the manufacturers and industry as a whole would have to address with insurance companies and the courts going forward.

    http://fleetowner.com/technology/tr...m=email&elq2=6c7b6f6177604fc4b71cb68e14ad320b
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Move over Tesla: Nissan teases self-driving features for the next-generation Leaf available next year
    • Nissan has announced a new technology called ProPILOT Assist
    • The feature takes control of acceleration, braking and steering
    • Nissan has not said when the next-generation Leaf will be available
    • Rumours suggest it could be September, with shipping by the end of 2018


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4632740/Nissan-teases-self-driving-feature-generation-car.html#ixzz4kuwbmFoc
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     

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