1. Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
    Dismiss Notice
  2. There are no markets
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Week of 6/24/2017 Closing prices & Chg Over Last Wk---- Gold $1256.40 Silver $16.64 Oil $43.01 USD $96.94
  4. "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"
    Dismiss Notice

Five sailors injured, 10 missing after ANOTHER U.S. Navy destroyer collides with a merchant ship

Discussion in 'Politics Forum (Local/National/World)' started by Goldhedge, Aug 20, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    U.S. Navy Provides Details of Surface Fleet Review In Wake of ‘Disturbing Trend’ of Accidents

    August 25, 2017 by gCaptain

    [​IMG]
    Tugboats from Singapore assist the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) as it steers towards Changi Naval Base, Republic of Singapore following a collision with the merchant vessel, August 21, 2017. U.S. Navy Photo

    The U.S. Navy has provided details of a comprehensive review of the Navy’s global surface fleet operations after the destroyers USS Fitzgerald and John S. McCain were both involved in major collisions with commercial vessels just two months apart.

    In a memorandum to Adm. Philip Davidson, Commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. William Moran, provided details of Davidson’s responsibilities as the head of the chief of naval operations-directed review.

    In the memorandum, which is dated August 24, 2017 and posted in full below, Admiral Moran describes the collisions involving the Fitzgerald and John S. McCain, as well as other recent incidents, as part of a “disturbing trend” of mishaps involving U.S. Navy ships.

    “During the last 69 days, the USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and the USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) were involved in two separate major collisions with commercial vessels while operating in the Seventh Fleet AOR [area of responsibility],” stated Moran in the memorandum. “Recent events indicate these tragic incidents are not limited occurrences but part of a disturbing trend of mishaps involving U.S. warships in the AOR – include the grounding of the USS Antietam (CG 54) in January and a collision between the USS Lake Chaplain (CG 57) and a South Korean fishing vessel in May.”

    The memorandum directs Davidson to “lead a Comprehensive Review” of surface fleet operations and incidents at sea that have occurred over the past decade, with a particular focus on those occurring in the Seventh Fleet area of responsibility, in order “to inform improvements Navy-wide.”

    “In the conduct of the review, you will seek input and insights from other services, industry, and highly qualified experts outside the services in order to ensure the widest possible perspective as we drive to the heart of the underlying issues and attack the root causes for these mishaps,” Moran writes.

    The guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) was involved in a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on August 21.

    On Friday, the Navy identified the second deceased USS John S. McCain sailor, 26-year-old Electronics Technician 3rd Class Dustin Louis Doyon, after divers recovered his body from inside a flooded compartment of the ship. Eight others are still missing and are presumed dead.

    In June, seven sailors were killed when the USS Fitzgerald collided with a containership off the east coast of Japan.

    Monday’s collision involving the John S. McCain prompted the removal of the Seventh Fleet Commander, Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command.

    The collision also prompted Navy Admiral John M. Richardson, Chief of Naval Operations, to order a temporary “operational pause” of all U.S. Navy fleets around the world in order to allow fleet commanders to assess and review with their commands “the fundamental practice to safe and effective operations.”

    Richardson also said he would order Admiral Davidson to take charge of the comprehensive review that will include representation from throughout the Navy, as well as from other services and the private sector.

    U.S. 7th Fleet is the largest of the U.S. Navy’s forward deployed fleets. At any given time there are roughly 50-70 ships and submarines, 140 aircraft, and approximately 20,000 Sailors in the region.

    The memorandum is available in full below or at the following link: http://go.usa.gov/xRGNw

    AUGUST 24, 2017

    MEMORANDUM FOR COMMANDER, U.S. FLEET FORCES COMMAND

    Subj: COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF RECENT SURFACE FLEET INCIDENTS

    1. During the last 69 days, the USS FITZGERALD (DDG 62) and the USS JOHN S. MCCAIN (DDG 56) were involved in two separate major collisions with commercial vessels while operating in the SEVENTH Fleet AOR. Recent events indicate these tragic incidents are not limited occurrences but part of a disturbing trend of mishaps involving U.S. warships in the AOR — including the grounding of the USS ANTIETAM (CG 54) in January and a collision between the USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN (CG 57) and a South Korean fishing vessel in May.

    2. You are directed to lead a Comprehensive Review of surface fleet operations and incidents at sea that have occurred over the past decade with emphasis on SEVENTH Fleet operational employment to inform improvements Navy-wide. This review should address the follow areas:

    a. Individual training and professional development, to include seamanship, navigation, voyage planning, leadership development, officer and enlisted tactical training in formal schools and on the job;

    b. Unit level training and operational performance, to including manning, personnel management, watchbill management, bridge (and CIC) team resource management, contact management, contact avoidance, leadership oversight and risk assessment/mitigation at all levels of the chain of command;

    c. Development and certification of deployed operational and mission standards (Force Generation) with particular emphasis on Forward Deployed Naval Force (FDNF), to include validation of required certification standards, gaps between required standards and actual employment practices, effectiveness of leadership and oversight at all levels of administrative and operational chains of command, maintaining and enforcing standards throughout FDNF assignment including self-assessment practices, external inspection reinforcement, remedial action mitigation plans;

    d. Deployed Operational Employment and Risk Management (Force Employment), to include Combatant Commander mission requirements, theater security cooperation requirements, maintenance impacts, other competing priorities (fleet experimentation, concept development), and their corresponding impact to operational tempo (OPTEMPO) and fundamental mariner and seamanship proficiency;

    e. Material Readiness of electronic systems to include navigation equipment (e.g. AIS, radars, ECDIS, VMS, WSNs), propulsion machinery to include steering systems, combat system modernization, and material availability;

    f. Practical Utility of current navigation equipment and combat systems including sensors, tracking systems, displays, and internal communications networks to evaluate their effectiveness at integrating tactical data and providing situational awareness to our people.

    3. As part of this review, request you make detailed recommendations with respect to corrective actions necessary to ensure the safety of our people, safe operations at sea, and the readiness of our forces. In the conduct of the review, you will seek input and insights from other services, industry, and highly qualified experts outside the services in order to ensure the widest possibly perspective as we drive to the heart of the underlying issues and attack the root causes for these mishaps.

    4. The final results of the review will be provided to me within 60 days, unless an extension is requested and granted.

    W.F. Moran

    Filed Under: News Tagged With: U.S. Navy, USS Fitzgerald, USS John McCain

    http://gcaptain.com/u-s-navy-provides-details-surface-fleet-review-wake-disturbing-trend-accidents/
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Navy Recovers Remains Of USS McCain Sailors

    August 27, 2017 by Reuters

    [​IMG]
    A combination photo showing (from L to R, top) Electronics Technician 3rd Class Kenneth Aaron Smith, Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Logan Stephen Palmer, Electronics Technician 3rd Class John Henry Hoagland III, Electronics Technician 3rd Class Dustin Louis Doyon, Electronics Technician 3rd Class Jacob Daniel Drake, (from L to R, bottom) Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Timothy Thomas Eckles Jr., Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kevin Sayer Bushell, Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Abraham Lopez and Electronics Technician 1st Class Charles Nathan Findley, who was stationed aboard the USS John S. McCain when it collided with a merchant vessel in waters near Singapore and Malayasia, August 21, 2017, are shown in these undated photos provided August 24, 2017. U.S. Navy/Handout via REUTERS

    by Fathin Ungku (Reuters) – The U.S. Navy on Monday confirmed recovery of the remains of all 10 sailors killed after the warship USS John S. McCain collided with a merchant vessel in waters near Singapore and Malaysia.

    The guided-missile destroyer collided with the Alnic MC east of Singapore last week while approaching the city state on a routine port visit.

    “The U.S. navy and marine corps divers have now recovered the remains of all 10 USS John S.McCain sailors,” the Seventh Fleet said in a statement on its website.

    The news follows the navy’s Thursday announcement that it had suspended wider search and rescue operations after finding and identifying the remains of one sailor.

    The navy found the remains of missing sailors inside sealed sections of the damaged hull of the warship, which is moored at Singapore’s Changi Naval Base.
    “The incident is under investigation to determine the facts and circumstances of the collision,” the statement added.

    Aircraft, divers and vessels from Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and the United States joined a search-and-rescue operation for the missing sailors over an area of about 5,500 sq. km. (2,124 square miles) around the crash site.

    The pre-dawn collision, the fourth major accident for the U.S. Pacific Fleet this year, has prompted a review of its operations.

    The Navy has removed Seventh Fleet Commander Vice Admiral Joseph Aucoin from his post, citing “a loss of confidence in his ability to command” after the run of accidents.

    Rear Admiral Phil Sawyer takes command of the fleet from Aucoin, who had been due to step down next month.

    The U.S. navy has also flagged plans for temporary and staggered halts in operations across its global fleet to allow staff to focus on safety.

    In a one-day operational pause last Wednesday, officers and crew of Seventh Fleet ships deployed at a facility in Yokosuka, Japan, received fresh training in risk management and communications.

    The Seventh Fleet, headquartered in Japan, operates as many as 70 ships, including the U.S. navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, and has about 140 aircraft and 20,000 sailors.

    Reporting by Fathin Ungku; Editing by Clarence Fernandez

    © 2017 Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.

    Filed Under: Collision, Navy Tagged With: USS John McCain

    http://gcaptain.com/navy-recovers-remains-uss-mccain-sailors/
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  6. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3,998
    Likes Received:
    4,865
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Negligence at that level is simply murder and should be dealt with as such.
    To busy texting, tweeting, sexting, playing with fidget spinners & just plain F'ing off not paying attention.
    Kinda like a drunk airline pilot. There are REAL consequences for those actions.
     
  7. mayhem

    mayhem Silver Member Silver Miner Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    3,419
    Likes Received:
    4,523
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Depending way to much on electronics. Sailor on watch: Hey bridge a BF ship is headed right at us! Bridge reply's, 'not on our scope'. Crunch.

    From the looks of the damage the McSwain was dead in the water when struck.
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  11. 917601

    917601 Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    11,190
    Likes Received:
    9,176
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Sinclair thinks the Chinese and Russians have defeated the US Navy nav systems. He has mentioned it on and off, another mention.

    "Watch this chart of the USDollar index. If we fall below the 92 level expect some strong movements in other asset classes! The Chinese are mingling with the operating systems of the US navy"

    "North Korea flies Nuclear Capable missile over USA ally: Japan.
    Already MSM is hinting about some unnamed treaty that makes that ok for North Korea to do what they did. If Trump does not react with the “Fire and Fury” as promised then I suspect the guidance systems on the USA military may have been compromised technologically. Lets see in a few more ships run into each other. Will this message be taken down by the new gods internet censors? That would serve to prove we are correct in our supposition.
    Jim"

    www.jsmineset.com
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2017
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    U.S. Navy to Haul Damaged Destroyer John S. McCain to Japan for Damage Assessment

    September 6, 2017 by Mike Schuler

    [​IMG]
    Guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) can be seen moored pier side at Changi Naval Base, Republic of Singapore following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC on August 21. U.S. Navy

    The U.S. Navy is planning to haul the damaged guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain to its ship repair facility in Yokosuka, Japan where damage assessments will continue to take place.

    The Navy said Tuesday it intends to issue a task order on an existing contract, for the salvage patching and transport via heavy lift of USS John S McCain (DDG 56) from Changi Naval Base in Singapore to the U.S. Navy’s Ship Repair Facility-Japan Regional Maintenance Center in Yokosuka, Japan. The Navy did not specify which existing contract it was referring to.

    The lift is notionally planned for late September.

    The Navy said it is moving John S. McCain to Yokosuka to allow the crew to be close to their families and to allow for a complete assessment of the damage. Completion of the damage assessment is needed before the Navy can fully determine repair plans for the destroyer, including cost, schedule, and location for the repairs.

    The guided-missile destroyer USS John S McCain was involved in a collision with the merchant tanker Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on August 21. The ship suffered significant damage to her port side aft, which resulted in flooding to nearby compartments, including berthing, machinery, and communications rooms. Ten sailors were killed in the accident.

    Following the collision, the John S. McCain was able to reach the Changi Naval Base in Singapore under its own power.

    The USS John S. McCain is attached to Destroyer Squadron 15 and is forward-deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. Her homeport is at the Yokosuka Naval Base in Yokosuka, Japan. McCain was commissioned in 1994 following construction at Bath Iron Works in Maine.

    In August, the U.S. Navy awarded a $3.1 million contract for heavy lift of the damaged USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) from its current location in Yokosuka to Pascagoula, Mississippi, where the ship will be repaired by Huntington Ingalls Industries. The USS Fitzgerald was also constructed at Bath Iron Works.

    Fitzgerald was involved in a collision with the containership ACX Crystal off the coast of Japan on June 17, 2017. Seven sailors were killed in that accident.

    http://gcaptain.com/u-s-navy-to-haul-damaged-destroyer-john-s-mccain-to-japan-for-damage-assessment/
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  19. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3,998
    Likes Received:
    4,865
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The US ships run into non maneuverable container ships they have lookouts & need more money? FU!
    Funny how only US Navy ships are crashing into each other & few private ships are crashing.
     
    mayhem likes this.
  20. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

    Joined:
    May 31, 2015
    Messages:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    15,406
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Oxygen Breather
    Location:
    Somewhere out there!
    Yeah, this isn't normal and I don't care. There is much going on that is kept from us with no way for us to know what will come next. I simply stay vigilant and prepared.
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Ball Diamond Ball – The U.S. Navy’s Failure To Reorient To Danger

    September 14, 2017 by John Konrad

    [​IMG]
    USN Guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57) lights up its mast to indicate restricted in ability to maneuver (RAM) during night delayed landing qualifications. Photo via US Navy

    By Captain John Konrad (gCaptain) Collision avoidance requires all members of a bridge team to have certain traits. Observation skills, quick thinking, intuition, pattern recognition and the ability to make and act upon decisions quickly in a complex environment. A prudent watch officer must also be able to recognize when the only good option is to turn the ship around to cut forward momentum.

    Are these skills the US Navy deploys (or even recognize)?

    Related Book: Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders. By L. David Marquet

    The Naval Academy leadership book defines Leadership as “The art, science or gift by which a person is enabled and privileged to direct the thoughts, plans and actions of others in such a manner as to obtain and command their obedience their confidence, their respect, and their loyal cooperation”. Leadership is about controlling people and the primary reason the US Navy fosters a control mindset is to avoid making mistakes.

    But is it possible for a Captain to control and command the obedience of bridge team while the ship is immersed in a highly complicated vessel traffic situation? Is it possible – with the publication of checklist, policies, and procedures – for shore based Admirals to command the mind and actions of a helmsman seconds before a collision?

    The United States Navy, like most large organization, spends a vast amount of time, money and focus on avoiding mistakes. Mistakes are easy to investigate, easy to quantify, easy to manage but focusing on avoiding mistakes takes our focus away from becoming exceptional.

    Once a ship has achieved success merely in the form of preventing major errors there is no need to strive beyond the level of minimum competence. There is no need to innovate or excel. When it comes to avoiding mistakes, ideas and thoughts take a back seat to checklists and processes, adherence to the process frequently becomes the only objective, as opposed to achieving the objective that the process was put in place to achieve.

    “When we put too much energy into eliminating mistakes, we’re less likely to gain insights.” Says Gary Klein, author of Seeing What Others Don’t. “Having insights is a different matter from preventing mistakes.”

    Dr. Klein’s advice is important because he is the top pioneer in the field of naturalistic decision-making, the branch of psychology studying how people make decisions and perform cognitively complex functions in demanding real-world situations. Klein’s insights, published in his award-winning book Sources Of Power are based on observations of humans acting under such real-life constraints as time pressure, high stakes, personal responsibility, and shifting conditions. Humans like watchstanders on the bridge of a warship in the Singapore Strait.

    Dr. Klein warns against top down, control based organizations that command the obedience of crew, focus on mistake avoidance and punish followers not in strict compliance with the rules. Klein recommends that, instead of controlling the actions of followers, leaders empower their men to become leaders themselves. Junior crew members might not have the technical expertise of the Captain or the proven track record of an Admiral but, according to Klein, “good enough” solutions for complex problems under time pressure are much more effective than wasting time to find a perfect solution.

    Rather than explore all possible options and evaluate their trade-offs Klein says that effective officers work by quickly run a mental simulation in their mind. If they find the option won’t work, they quickly move on to the next simulation until they find one that matches their observation of the current traffic situation.

    As a licensed ship captain I immediately recognized the value of Dr. Klein’s advice the moment I first read it but translating his teachings to the ocean environment proved difficult. How does a ship’s master translate academic ideas into command tactics? And is it possible for a U.S. Navy captain, who operates under a far stricter set of legal and operational codes, to relinquish control and empower his crew to make decisions and take independent action?

    Merchant ship captains are often critical of the US Navy’s watchstanding practices and strict hierarchical structure. Few are able to share positive comments about the US Navy beyond broad concepts like “patriotism”, “honor” and “commitment”. In narrowing their focus to what they can see through binoculars and hear on the VHF, civilian officers aboard ship are missing some significant advantages to the US Navy’s system.

    Navy ships are well manned by a highly trained and motivated crew of enlisted sailors. Naval officers are highly educated and highly screened for a myriad of traits including intelligence, ability, core knowledge and a winning attitude. And the US Navy has an enormous pool of candidates from which to pick its commanding officers. It also has a very large budget.

    Some of these positive traits work against the Navy. A Naval officer is unlikely to pass through the screen of a promotion board if he adopted the advice of today’s most successful silicon valley entrepreneurs to Fail Fast, Fail Often. But these traits, accompanied by a mental focus on the uncertainties of combat, do produce creative thinking at times. And sometimes the negative traits, like strict top-down leadership, allow individual Admirals to protect and incubate the ideas of radical thinkers.

    Such is the case with Captain L. David Marquet, US Navy retired who, as Commanding Officer of a submarine, developed a radical new method of leadership that may be the missing link between the psychological research of Gary Klein, innovative communication structures (e.g. Donald Vandergriff’s Mission Command philosophy) and the proven teachings of John Boyd.

    After being assigned to command the nuclear-powered submarine USS Santa Fe, then ranked last in retention and operational standing, Marquet realized the traditional leadership approach of “take control, give orders,” wouldn’t work. He turned his ship around by creating a leader-leader command structure… treating the crew as leaders, not followers, and giving control, not taking control. This approach took the Santa Fe from “worst to first,” achieving the highest retention and operational standings in the navy.

    “The leader-leader model not only achieves great improvements in effectiveness and morale but also makes the organization stronger,” says Marquet in his bestselling book Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders. “Most critically, these improvements are enduring, decoupled from the leader’s personality and presence. Leader-leader structures are significantly more resilient, and they do not rely on the designated leader always being right. Further, leader-leader structures spawn additional leaders throughout the organization naturally. It can’t be stopped.”

    Don’t get the wrong impression that the entire U.S. Navy works this way – most American Naval vessels have not adopted the ideas Marquet implemented over a decade ago – but it is important for the civilian shipping world to understand that many new ideas and smart innovative systems of thought and leadership are still developed within the hulls of warships.

    Several gCaptain editorials have stated that Pentagon admirals could learn important lessons from the way civilian ships operate (and we are very happy to report that some important people are starting to listen!) but there is also much we civilians can learn from the US Navy. The key to reducing incidents on both sides of the channel is to improve communication and the quantity and depth of interactions between US Navy, US Coast Guard and US Merchant Marine officers.

    What is particularly useful about Marquet’s advice is that it provides a framework that can be adopted by large global shipping organizations AND also provides functional advice to ship captains, officers, and crews working aboard vessels of all sizes and shapes.

    gCaptain highly recommends Captain Marquet’s book to all readers because every one of you will take away positive and specific advice that can be implemented aboard your ship(s).

    The overall takeaway of the book, however, from my perspective as a master mariner, is that the civilian world of shipping has much to learn from the US Navy and vice-versa. The Navy should not only implement Marquet’s ideas aboard their own ships but in improving communication between the Navy and merchant marine.

    My overall takeaway as an editor of gCaptain is that the modern Navy of 2017 still has the intelligence, drive, and passion within its ranks to create and test innovative, world changing, ideas. Unfortunately, the Navy shows little ability to recognize and promote the ideas of its own thought leaders.

    The current leadership of the US Navy is like a large slow and heavy drillship, technologically advanced but dangerously connected to ancient sources of power… black oil deep below the surface. Today the Pentagon flys the ball-diamond-ball day shape of a drillship restricted in her ability to maneuver, moving forward at zero point zero knots and unwilling to alter her course or position for any vessel or idea that threatens her connection to the past.

    Pockets of innovation are alive and well aboard navy ships, in her labs, and within certain classrooms at the US Naval War College and US Naval Academy but few are adopted internally or shared with civilians. The question is: can the Navy’s top heavy leadership ever support the work of those like Captain Marquet, men who have decided to be rather to do.

    When will senior Admirals realize that their oath to support and defend the first amendment includes supporting and defending those within their ranks who speak the truth or offer an honest opinion about both problems and innovative new ideas that will make the nation stronger? Will the Pentagon ever Turn the Ship Around to face the new world of complexity and information in which we now live?

    I believe the answer is yes. We all have a long voyage ahead of us if we want to prevent future incidents like the USS McCain and USS Fitzgerald collisions, we will all have to sail together in one convoy in order to better understand and communicate together. And I feel hopeful because the Navy has already cast off the first line.

    Related Video by Captain L. David Marquet,



    http://gcaptain.com/ball-diamond-ball-u-s-navys-failure-reorient-approaching-danger/
     
    mayhem likes this.
  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    John McCain Blames Navy For Lack Of Training

    September 17, 2017 by Bloomberg

    [​IMG]
    Senator John S. McCain III is piped aboard during a visit to the forward-deployed Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) early this summer.

    By Ben Brody (Bloomberg) Following a series of deadly accidents, Senator John McCain on Sunday renewed his calls to address what he described as a U.S. failure during the past eight years to ensure that the military is prepared, equipped and trained.

    “Whenever you cut defense capabilities, the first thing that goes is the training and the readiness, because that’s easy enough to cancel,” the Arizona Republican and chairman of the Senate Armed Service Committee said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

    Related Book: Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders. By L. David Marquet

    McCain, a Vietnam War veteran from a military family, has been a longtime critic of the automatic cuts in U.S. spending — including reductions in U.S. defense — known as sequestration that began in 2013 under an earlier deal to raise the country’s debt limit.

    The Senate plans to take up a defense-authorization bill this week.

    The U.S. Navy, in particular, has had high-profile accidents that McCain blamed on spending cuts, including an August collision near Singapore between an oil tanker and the USS John McCain, which killed 10. The ship is named for the senator’s father and grandfather. A collision off the coast of Japan in June between a U.S. destroyer and a cargo ship killed seven U.S. sailors.

    “When you really look at how much time they have at actual training and readiness, it’s continued to shrink,” McCain said. “We have accident after accident after accident. We are killing more Americans in uniform in training than we are in engagement with the enemy. That’s not acceptable.”

    http://gcaptain.com/john-mccain-blames-navy-lack-training/
     
  24. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

    Joined:
    May 31, 2015
    Messages:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    15,406
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Oxygen Breather
    Location:
    Somewhere out there!
    McCain is a piece of shit. I hope he dies in excruciating pain and suffering
     
  25. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3,998
    Likes Received:
    4,865
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I pray for that for all of them...... and SOON!
     
  26. Professur

    Professur Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,844
    Likes Received:
    4,619
    Trophy Points:
    113
    What trailing failure results in an experienced bridge crew crossing the T with another boat .... ever?
     
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    U.S. Navy Fires Two More Commanders After Warship Accidents

    September 18, 2017 by Reuters

    [​IMG]
    The guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) arrives pier side at Changi Naval Base, Republic of Singapore after its collision with the MV Alnic MC off of Singapore, August 21, 2017.

    WASHINGTON, Sept 18 (Reuters) – The U.S. Navy dismissed two senior officers on Monday after a series of collisions involving Seventh Fleet warships in Asia, citing a loss of confidence in their ability to command.

    Rear Admiral Charles Williams, commander of Task Force 70, and Captain Jeffrey Bennett, commander of Destroyer Squadron 15, were fired by Seventh Fleet commander Vice Admiral Phil Sawyer, the Navy said. In August, Sawyer replaced fleet commander Vice Admiral Joseph Aucoin, who was fired after the accidents.

    “Both reliefs were due to a loss of confidence in their ability to command,” the Navy statement said.

    The shakeup in the Seventh Fleet command followed a pre-dawn collision between guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain and a merchant vessel east of Singapore and Malaysia on Aug. 21, which killed 10 sailors and was the fourth major incident in the U.S. Pacific Fleet this year.

    In June, another destroyer, the USS Fitzgerald, collided with a Philippine cargo ship, killing seven U.S. sailors.

    Several other officers have also been relieved, with administrative action taken against other members of the ship’s watch teams. (Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Bernadette Baum)

    (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2017.

    http://gcaptain.com/u-s-navy-fires-two-commanders-warship-accidents/
     
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  29. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    28,446
    Likes Received:
    32,323
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Planet Earth
    Why did we drop two atomic bombs 1. on Hiroshima and 2. on Nagasaki??


    Because we didn't want them to think the first one was a fluke...


    I'm thinking the 2nd warship was the same as Nagasaki.

    Our technology has been compromised and whomever it is just made sure we knew the 1st wasn't a accident....
     
    ^updated^ and the_shootist like this.
  30. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Mattis To Review Navy Accidents

    September 19, 2017 by Reuters

    [​IMG]
    U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis listens during a National Security session at the 2017 Somalia Conference in London, May 11, 2017.

    by Idrees Ali (Reuters) – U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Monday that he was working to see if there was a link between a spate of recent military accidents and budget caps, but said he could not draw a direct line at this time.

    Since June, more than 70 U.S. service members have either been killed or injured in training or non-combat accidents, ranging from two naval collisions in Asia to a Marine Corps transport plane crash in rural Mississippi.

    Related Book: Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders. By L. David Marquet

    “I am not willing to say right now that there is a direct line between sequestration and what has happened. I am willing to say … we are going to take a very close look at that,” Mattis told reporters.

    Mattis said that he was looking at a number of broader issues to try and explain the large number of accidents, including whether there were cultural issues in the military.

    “We are almost hardwired to say ”can do,“ that is just the way we are brought up,” Mattis said. “But there comes a point in peacetime where you have to make certain you are not always saying we’re going to do more with less,” he added.

    Mattis said he was not concerned that military leaders felt pressured to say their troops were trained and ready, even if they were not.

    The issue of U.S. military accidents was highlighted by a series of recent naval collisions.

    A pre-dawn collision between guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain and a merchant vessel east of Singapore and Malaysia on Aug. 21 killed 10 sailors and was the fourth major incident in the U.S. Pacific Fleet this year.

    In June, another destroyer, the Fitzgerald, collided with a Philippine cargo ship, killing seven U.S. sailors.

    The secretary of the Navy and the chief of naval operations will appear before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday, where they are expected to face tough questions from lawmakers on the collisions and whether enough was done to avoid them.

    In a Sunday interview on CBS’ “Face the Nation” Senator John McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said recent military accidents were because of budget caps.

    “It’s because of a thing called sequestration, and our failure over the last eight years to make sure our military is prepared, equipped, trained,” McCain said.

    Reporting by Idrees Ali and Phil Stewart; Editing by Jonathan Oatis

    © 2017 Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.

    http://gcaptain.com/mattis-review-navy-accidents/
     
  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Senator McCain Urges End to 100-Hour Work Weeks in Navy After Collisions

    September 19, 2017 by Reuters

    [​IMG]
    Tugboats from Singapore assist the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) as it steers towards Changi Naval Base, Republic of Singapore following a collision with the merchant vessel off Singapore, Aug. 21. U.S. Navy Photo

    WASHINGTON, Sept 19 (Reuters) – U.S. Senator John McCain called on Tuesday for an immediate stop to U.S. sailors working over 100 hours a week as top Navy leaders struggled to explain a series of fatal naval collisions in the past few months.

    Earlier this month, the Government Accountability Office government watchdog said that a reduction in crew sizes was contributing to safety risks, with some sailors working over 100 hours a week.

    “I think I know what 100 hours a week does to people over time and that has been standard procedure for a long time,” McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said.

    “I’m glad you’ve got RAND and whoever the hell else it is that is studying (the issue)… (but) you could make the change tomorrow,” McCain added. RAND is a U.S.-backed think tank.

    The guided missile destroyer John S. McCain, named after the Senator McCain’s father and grandfather, suffered significant damage and 10 sailors were killed when it collided with a tanker east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on Aug. 21.

    The John S. McCain’s sister ship, the Fitzgerald, almost sank off the coast of Japan after colliding with a Philippine container ship on June 17. The bodies of seven U.S. sailors were found in a flooded berthing area after that collision.

    Family members of some of the sailors who were killed were attending the hearing.

    Navy Secretary Richard Spencer told the hearing that a review was underway to look issues within the Navy.

    “We have a problem in the Navy and we are going to fix it,” Spencer said.

    Spencer added that the Navy would consult with outside companies, including BP North America, which has experience in dealing with tragedies. In 2010, a BP rig in the Gulf of Mexico exploded which lead to the worst off shore oil disaster in U.S. history.

    Admiral John Richardson, the chief of naval operations, said that a high pace of operations and budget caps had an impact on the Navy, but ultimately Navy leaders were responsible for safety and readiness.

    The Navy has fired a number of officers, including the commander of the Seventh Fleet, as a result of the collisions involving its warship in Asia. (Reporting by Idrees Ali and Phil Stewart; Editing by Alistair Bell)

    (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2017.

    http://gcaptain.com/mccain-urges-end-to-100-hour-work-weeks-in-navy-after-collisions/
     
  33. mayhem

    mayhem Silver Member Silver Miner Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    3,419
    Likes Received:
    4,523
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I looked at the damage done to the Mc Swine, and it appears the boat was dead in the water when hit, otherwise the damage would have raked down the side of the ship. So, why was it dead in the water? That's the question no one is asking.
     
    searcher and D-FENZ like this.
  34. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  37. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

    Joined:
    May 31, 2015
    Messages:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    15,406
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Oxygen Breather
    Location:
    Somewhere out there!
    3 guesses and the one about the false flag gets the most points! We're not stupid but there's still little we can do about it mates.
     
  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
    U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet Commander to Retire in Latest Fallout from Deadly Warship Collision

    September 26, 2017 by Reuters

    [​IMG]
    Admiral Scott Swift speaks during the joint U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) and U.S. Pacific Fleet (PACFLT) change of command ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in July 2015. U.S. Navy Photo


    By Tim Kelly and Idrees Ali TOKYO/WASHINGTON, Sept 26 (Reuters) – U.S. Pacific Fleet commander Admiral Scott Swift said he plans to retire after being passed over for promotion to the chief of all military forces in the region in the wake of two deadly collisions involving U.S. warships.

    Swift was in the running to replace Admiral Harry Harris as the Commander, U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM). Whoever the Pentagon chooses to replace Harris will be taking over at a time when North Korea poses a rising threat and China is flexing its military muscle.

    Any replacement will have to be approved by the U.S. Senate, giving U.S. President Trump limited time to find a replacement and, alternatively, the Pentagon could ask Harris to continue beyond the expected end of his three-year term in May.

    “I have been informed by the Chief of Naval Operations that I will not be his nominee to replace Admiral Harry Harris as the Commander, U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM),” Swift said in an e-mailed statement.

    “In keeping with tradition and in loyalty to the Navy, I have submitted my request to retire,” Swift said. He did not request a retirement date.


    Like Harris, Swift is a proponent of freedom of navigation in the South China Sea and a strong critic of Beijing’s island building there.

    Under Swift’s command the U.S. Navy’s Third Fleet, which normally operates east of the international date line in the Pacific has taken a command role in Asia alongside the Seventh Fleet, which is headquartered in Japan.

    The move aimed to bolster U.S. forces in the region as a counterweight to China’s growing military might.

    Swift did not refer to the spate naval collisions in the Pacific in recent months when announcing his retirement on Monday in the United States.

    But, he is the most senior naval officer to step down after collisions in June and August in which a total of 17 U.S. sailors were killed.

    In August, Swift removed Seventh Fleet chief Vice Admiral Joseph Aucoin, citing a lack of confidence in his ability to command.

    Ten sailors aboard the guided missile destroyer John S. McCain died when it collided with a tanker east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on Aug. 21. Its sister ship, the Fitzgerald, almost sank off the Japanese coast on June 17 after colliding with a container ship. Seven crew died. (Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore)

    (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2017.

    http://gcaptain.com/u-s-navy-pacific-fleet-commander-retire-latest-fallout-deadly-warship-collision/
     
  39. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113
  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    132,117
    Likes Received:
    38,245
    Trophy Points:
    113

Share This Page