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Fleet & Trucking

Discussion in 'Auto, Tractor, Motorcycles, Racing, and Mechanics' started by searcher, Aug 10, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The ELD Mandate: What to expect

    Oct 16, 2017

    [​IMG]
    by Joseph Evangelist
    Executive Vice President, Transervice

    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    FMCSA proceeds with December ELD enforcement plan


    You’d have to be living under a rock not to be aware of the impending deadline for the use of electronic logging devices (ELDs) to track drivers’ Hours of Service (HOS).

    HOS regulations were initially developed in 1937, with paper logging rules established in the early 1960s. There were not a lot of changes to the rule until the 2000s as legislation began to intersect with the demands of the modern supply chain.

    Like it or not, the era of paper driver logs is over. Technology is available that will automatically record drivers Hours of Service and better ensure compliance with legislation.

    As of December 18, 2017 commercial drivers with model year 2000 or newer trucks who currently are required to prepare Hours of Service records of duty status (RODS) must start using an ELD.

    However, fleets that currently are using automatic on-board recording devices (AOBRDS) can continue to use those devices until December 16, 2019 to comply with the ELD mandate.

    You also need to be aware that the 10-hour-out-of service order associated with non-compliance with the mandate will begin April 1, 2018, according to the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance. However, this does not mean that you can avoid getting an ELD. Drivers who don’t have an ELD or grandfathered AOBRD will be cited and possibly fined, but won’t be taken out of service. However, after April 1, 2018, all of the above will apply.

    Many large and medium-sized fleets have already installed ELDs on their trucks, but smaller fleets and owner-operators have lagged in implementation because of concerns about cost, how ELDs will impact productivity and a hope that the mandate deadline will be extended.

    At this point, it is very unlikely that the deadline will be extended, so it’s time to start reviewing ELD suppliers and selecting one that makes sense for your operation. Begin installing them so you can work through the inevitable learning curve your drivers will have. If nothing else, doing so will allow you to simplify your DOT logs, reduce the amount of driver paperwork, allowing them to concentrate on what they do best — driving.

    You’ll also benefit from a reduction is logging violations and faster and easier roadside inspections.

    http://fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/e...m=email&elq2=02e43225868243098cbd416e5b08a7ed
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    ALI's state-of-the-art LiftLab opens in Cortland

    New center will draw lift inspectors and engineers from around the world
    Oct 16, 2017 Josh Fisher

    [​IMG]
    A 1946 Brockway 260XW heavy-duty truck is up on a lift that is being inspected by men during an inspector certification class at the new Automotive Lift Institute's LiftLab in Cortland, NY. (Photo: Josh Fisher/Fleet Owner)


    A 1946 Brockway 260XW heavy-duty truck is up on a lift that is being inspected by men during an inspector certification class at the new Automotive Lift Institute's LiftLab in Cortland, NY. (Photo: Josh Fisher/Fleet Owner)
    Related Media

    CORTLAND, NY. The Automotive Lift Institute (ALI) officially opened its new headquarters and LiftLab with a grand opening celebration at the 8,500-sq.-ft. facility on Thursday, Oct. 12. Lift inspectors and engineers from around the world will come to Central New York to be trained here, getting hands-on experience with 12 different lifts – from a motorcycle lift to 74,000-lb. mobile column lifts.

    [​IMG]
    ALI's four logos greet visitors to its new headquarters in Cortland, NY. (Photo: Josh Fisher/Fleet Owner)

    Before the celebration began that evening, the ALI Lift Inspector Certification Program wrapped up another of its two-day classes with inspectors from Texas and Arkansas in the state-of-the-art facility. Lift inspectors and manufacturers from around the world are expected to visit the new ALI headquarters, which has been quietly open since March. ALI member manufacturers have provided and installed 12 vehicle lifts in the LiftLab. They range from the smallest motorcycle lifts to the most common two-post style, all the way up to heavy-duty in-ground and mobile column lifts. This is the only facility in North America that brings together such a range of operational lifts from various manufacturers and makes them available for hands-on industry training, according to the institute.

    "Through the generous support of the ALI member companies that produce North America’s certified vehicle lifts, we are able to facilitate opportunities for candidate lift inspectors, product safety engineers, and others to come to a single location to examine two-post, multi-post, scissors, in-ground, mobile column and low-rise lifts," said R.W. “Bob” O’Gorman, ALI president. "This will enable lift inspector candidates to more expediently meet the requirements of the Lift Inspector Certification Program, which will help address increasing customer demand. At the same time, we can improve the technical skills and knowledge of the experts charged with testing and certifying future vehicle lifts."


    [​IMG]
    R.W. "Bob" O'Gorman moves one of a set of four wireless, heavy-duty mobile column lifts in the ALI LiftLab. (Photo: Josh Fisher/Fleet Owner)


    O'Gorman said that every five years, lift manufacturers will have the opportunity to enter a lottery to have their lifts installed at ALI, which plans to stay up to date with the latest technology.

    There are currently 21 ALI-member lift manufacturers, with six-nonmember firms producing ALI-certified gold label lifts; and another six, O'Gorman said, who have started the process of getting the ALI gold label of approval, which adorns all lifts that meet this third-party certification.

    The lifts installed in the center — more than $500,000 in equipment – are stripped of their branding. "We ask everyone to leave their competitiveness at the door and focus on safety," O'Gorman said. "These manufacturers understand the benefits to the industry and safety."

    Established by nine lift manufacturers in 1945, ALI was headquartered in New York City until relocating to Indialantic, FL, in 1993. ALI moved its headquarters to Cortland in 2005 and has since grown from two employees to eight as the organization has expanded its safety-focused activities (and it is looking to hire a second engineer).

    With the trucking industry facing a technician shortage, some heavy-duty lift manufacturers contend that getting mechanics out of the pits could be appealing to the next generation.

    [​IMG]
    A 1969 Plymouth Road Runner sits on a lift in the ALI LiftLab. (Photo: Josh Fisher/Fleet Owner)


    "From the folks that I talk to, my understanding is that there are more and more young guys who are coming through the tech schools that are actually being exposed to some of the newer equipment, and it’s my belief, from some of the folks that I’ve talked to, that newer equipment is making the job easier from an ergonomic standpoint and from a safety standpoint," O'Gorman said, noting that ALI is not in the sales business. "All of this equipment that has any electrical features within 18 inches of floor is tested and certified to meet the hazardous locations requirements for workplace safety. Basically in a shop that’s where the gas fumes and the exhausts are – and that’s always been an issue with pits.”


    The following lifts are installed in the ALI LiftLab:
    [​IMG]
    ALI uses color-coded inspection labels that change each year so inspectors can quickly see the last time a lift was inspected. (Photo: Josh Fisher/Fleet Owner)

    Light-duty two-post surface-mounted lift, 10,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Light-duty low-rise frame-engaging lift, 10,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Heavy-duty two-post surface-mounted lift, 16,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Set of four wireless heavy-duty wheel-engaging mobile units (mobile column lifts), 54,000 lbs. total rated capacity.
    • Heavy-duty inground lift, 60,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Heavy-duty scissors lift, 30,000 lbs. rated capacity, equipped with wheels-free device.
    • Heavy-duty two-post surface-mounted lift, 15,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Light-duty scissors lift, 9,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Heavy-duty four-post surface-mounted lift, 14,000 lbs. rated capacity, equipped with wheels-free device.
    • Light-duty motorcycle lift, 1,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Light-duty inground lift, 10,000 lbs. rated capacity.
    • Set of four wireless heavy-duty wheel-engaging mobile units (mobile column lifts), 74,000 lbs. total rated capacity, along with set of four high-reach supplementary stands.

    [​IMG]
    The new ALI facility is on Luker Road in Cortland, NY. (Photo: Josh Fisher/Fleet Owner)

    To add a little excitement to the lift lab O'Gorman brought in some classic vehicles to lift up. A 1946 Brockway 260XW, one of the first postwar, heavy-duty trucks to be built in volume — right here in Cortland — sits on one of the heavy-duty lifts. A 1969 Plymouth Road Runner, which O'Gorman is restoring on his own time, sits on another lift. And a 1958 Allstate motorcycle, which was a Sears brand, sits on the lone motorcycle lift at in the LiftLab.

    Thursday's grand opening celebration drew more than 50 people from around North America — including ALI members, lift inspectors, suppliers, and others in the vehicle lift and workplace safety industries.

    Along with the LiftLab, the new facility at 3699 Luker Road is four times larger than ALI's former Cortland office. It includes 3,575 square feet of renovated office and conference space, a modern classroom for 20, video boards, sharply designed instructional posters, and more.

    ALI is dedicated to the safe design, construction, installation, service, inspection and operation of vehicle lifts used in automotive and heavy-duty vehicle repair shops throughout North America. It sponsors several national lift safety standards. ALI also offers third-party certification programs for vehicle lifts and lift inspectors.

    Through its Lift Inspector Certification Program, ALI qualifies, tests, and certifies vehicle lift inspectors. There are 465 ALI Certified Lift Inspectors and 842 individuals from around the world participating in some stage of the certification process. In 2014, ALI expanded its membership beyond North American-based lift manufacturers to include an associate class. ALI Associate Class membership is open to companies with at least one ALI Certified Lift Inspector on staff. There are currently 268 associate class members.

    ALI offers a wide range of vehicle lift safety training materials including printed copies of all the safety standards, the new Lifting It Right online training course, new Automotive Lift Safety Tips Card and Safety Tips Poster, the annual Vehicle Lifting Points guide, and uniform warning labels and placards.

    http://fleetowner.com/maintenance/alis-state-art-liftlab-opens-cortland
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    New CV report from Wards
    The report examines statistics on trucks in service today and breaks out the data across various operating categories.
    Oct 20, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff
    [​IMG]
    The report details fleet size and location, gross vehicle weight class, age and brand. (Photo: Sean Kilcarr/Fleet Owner)


    Related Media
    [​IMG]
    Optimism grows for significant freight rate increases


    Sources for truck and trailer sales are plentiful, but an accurate accounting of utilization by fleet size and location, by gross vehicle weight class, by age and by brand had never existed, until a just-released report erased this information gap.

    The new Wards CV Utilization Report goes in-depth into commercial vehicles to identify 28.5 million commercial vehicles (CVs) in U.S. by size, use, industry, age and brand. It dives many levels deeper than existing production data, examining statistics on trucks in service today and breaking out the data across various operating categories.

    The report is a collaboration between the transportation analysis teams of WardsAuto and FleetSeek, brother brands to Fleet Owner.


    It considers commercial vehicle utilization across Gross Vehicle Weight Ratings, Fleet Type, Industry, Geography, Age, and Brand. In addition, this report illustrates a detailed profile of the current U.S. trucking population that highlights different uses, requirements and expectations among the broad spectrum of commercial vehicle operations.

    The data is summarized from the FleetSeek database of trucking operations in North America as well as research performed by the team.

    The report is currently available for purchase at http://intelligence.wardsauto.com/commercial-vehicle-utilization-report. For more information please contact Richard White at richard.white@penton.com.

    http://fleetowner.com/trucks/new-cv...m=email&elq2=53b381df92ad4ac9b0627491f794ae26
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trucking: New drivers you have to protect your license and your life.
    J Canell



    Published on Oct 20, 2017
    It is your license and your livelihood. That CDL is your gate way to taking care of your family.
    Do not let an outside source even though he /she has been designated to train you screw that up for you.
     
  5. Buck

    Buck Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    and this is all by design, mostly at the behest of the government

    and it's for Our Safety.


    not really, it's designed to slow down production and delivery and to prevent start up companies from even getting their toes wet

    What we are witnessing today, in our collective societies, is a destruction of what we were doing and a forced push to where they want us to go

    No more internal combustion engines by 2040
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trucking: Is it legal to refuse a driver a scale ticket because you don't like his tone?
    J Canell



    Published on Oct 23, 2017
    Night shift employee at the Trexel Plaza Truck stop in Allentown, PA denies a driver his scale ticket.
    Apparently he didn't like the tone when asked a question about the functioning status of the scale.
    The cat scale app was not functioning at the time however the scale was.
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    CVSA releases 2017 Brake Safety Day results

    Safety group said 22% of all vehicles inspected during the one-day event were placed out of service for “violations of any kind.”
    Fleet Owner Staff | Nov 07, 2017

    Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) said that 78% of the 7,698 commercial motor vehicles inspected back in September during its annual Brake Safety Day enforcement blitz did not have any violations that would’ve placed them out of service (OOS).

    The group noted that 14% or 1,064 of all the inspections conducted resulted in an OOS violation for brake-related violations, with 22% or 1,680 of all vehicles inspected turning up OOS violations of any kind.

    Related: Bendix: CVSA’s Brake Safety Week highlights importance of maintenance

    A total of 6,361 commercial motor vehicle inspections were conducted in the U.S. during Brake Safety Day, CVSA added, with 1,337 conducted in Canada.

    "Brake-related violations are the largest percentage of all out-of-service violations cited during roadside inspections,” noted Capt. Christopher Turner of the Kansas Highway Patrol in a statement. He also serves as CVSA’s current president.

    "Our goal is to reduce the number of crashes caused by faulty braking systems, by conducting roadside inspections, educating drivers, mechanics, owner-operators and others on the importance of proper brake inspection and maintenance,” Turner added.


    Brake Safety Day also captures data on how well antilock braking systems (ABS) are maintained in accordance with federal regulations.

    CVSA said ABS violations were counted when the malfunction lamp did not work or the malfunction lamp stayed on, indicating a fault of some kind. The ABS-related findings include:
    • 5,456 air-braked power units required ABS; 11% or 610 had ABS violations.
    • 3,749 trailers required ABS; 14% or 540 had ABS violations.
    • 821 hydraulic-braked trucks required ABS; 5% or 45 had ABS violations.
    • 49 buses required ABS; 10% or five had ABS violations.
    Turner noted that properly functioning brake systems are crucial to safe commercial motor vehicle operation, as improperly installed or poorly maintained brake systems can reduce braking efficiency and increase the stopping distance of large trucks and buses, posing serious risks to driver and public safety.

    Brake Safety Day is part of CVSA’s Operation Airbrake Program in partnership with the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). More than 3.4 million brakes have been inspected since the program’s inception in 1998, CVSA noted.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/safety/cv...m=email&elq2=6ea22cccdf774056a1cc19c0db37af8a
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trucking: Meet Some of the people of Uber Freight. Driver Love?
    J Canell



    Published on Nov 9, 2017
    The cast of characters introduce themselves and have a chat about what they do and who they are.

    Todd Burch: Senior Marketing Manager
    Jeff Ogren Manager, Business Development
    Greg Murphy Manager, Driver Community
    Charlie Bergevin Assoc Enterprise Account Executive, Freight Sales
    Sara Blair Manager, Product Team
    Bob Chappuis Manager, Business Development
    Eric Berdinis Senior Product Manager"

    This is a sponsored video.
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Delving into the uptime opportunities for truck makers

    Parts and service support will become ever-more critical for OEMs to maintain market share.

    Sean Kilcarr | Nov 08, 2017

    Save something of a tear right now, with said volumes viewed as a predictor for hefty truck production rates next year and beyond.

    And even though medium-duty truck orders are sluggish by comparison to their big rig brethren – orders for medium-duty units were down 2% last month in year-over-year comparisons, whereas October Class 8 orders were up 167% year-over-year – they, too, are expected to do well in 2018.

    Related: Maintenance and repair costs rise: Find someone to help you manage them

    Indeed, Stifel Capital Markets continues to believe medium duty production will be up “modestly” next year, predicting total Class 5-7 North American volumes will hit 257,000 units for 2018, which is 4% higher than expected 2017 volumes.

    Yet Gary Brooks, chief marketing officer for Syncron– a cloud-based aftermarket “service optimization” firm – believes that the key for OEMs going forward will be the “after-sales service” provided to all of those new vehicles rolling off
    the assembly lines.

    In his view, truck customers will now only continue to expect more product uptime. New trucks aren’t cheap, after all – by 2022, according to Frost & Sullivan, the sticker price for a new Class 8 rig will range between $118,000 and $147,000 – and the cost to keep them up and running isn’t declining either.

    Thus keeping commercial vehicles on the road, hauling freight and making money, will probably become one of the single most important requirements in the minds of truck owners going forward, Brooks explained.

    “With a greater emphasis now on maximum product uptime, heavy truck manufacturers must guarantee that their service supply chains remain efficient and optimized,” he said. “Manufacturers must keep tabs on service parts, cut out excess and obsolete stock, and better forecast when they might need to bring in additional stock. Those practices are crucial for meeting the expectations of customers, while also maintaining a competitive edge.”

    Doing those things is a bigger deal than many might think in the trucking space. For example, Renaldo Adler, principal for asset maintenance and fleet and service centers at TMW Systems, recently noted that the maintenance costs for heavy-haul vehicles in North America have increased an estimated 50% over the past five years, with up to 20% of these costs are associated with vehicle breakdowns and other unplanned service events.

    In fact, the cost of each unplanned event can reach thousands of dollars based on towing charges, lost labor, the purchase of replacement parts, shipper penalties and reduced margin, he stressed.

    “Preventing just 35% of unplanned repairs can save fleets thousands of dollars in hard costs alone,” Adler noted.

    Yet keeping parts on hand to handle such repairs isn’t cheap, noted Syncron’s Brooks. He said parts inventory carrying costs are only getting more expensive as they amount to what he dubs a “mind-boggling” 25% of the value of the total inventory on the shelf.

    Thus more “real-time” inventory management is vital to help minimize such expenses, as well ensure customers quickly get the parts they need to get their trucks back on the road.

    “With massive companies such as Amazon and Alibaba entering the service parts category, finding competitive differentiators is becoming more and more challenging,” Brooks stressed. “For heavy truck manufacturers, service parts pricing provides the chance to stick out – and have a positive impact on business.”

    That also means pricing parts based not only on demand, but by geography, weather and other market conditions, will be important.

    “As service-led initiatives become more of the norm, decisions must be made on a moment-to-moment basis,” Brooks stressed. “This can be a challenge given all the moving parts associated with pricing, inventory logistics, and how supplementary stock is distributed, among other things.”

    And that’s putting it mildly, if you ask me.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/industry-...m=email&elq2=511f480dd098464fbeacc063a9e42bf9
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trucking: You Asked, Uber Freight Answers Part. 1
    J Canell



    Published on Nov 10, 2017
    This is the first Q and A session with Eric Berdinis And Bob Chappuis of Uber Freight.
    These are the questions that you asked so lets get answers.

    I recommend if there is something you want more clarity on, that you ask in the comment section.
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Worlds Most Beautiful Truck Driver
    The Asian Mai Show



    Published on Nov 17, 2017
    The worlds most beautiful truck driver.
    Song: Joakim Karud Celebrate
    Title: Celebrate
    Artist: Joakim Karud
    Genre: Hip Hop Electronic, instrumental hip hop
    Mood: Chill

    Created by VideoShow:http://videoshowapp.com/free
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Shared: Trucking TV Classic - overnight recovery shift, part 3
    Shipping TV



    Published on Nov 19, 2017
    Shared across our network! Trucking TV series Driver's Days now sharing with Shipping TV online . .
    We're back for part 3 of our overnight shift with Michael Scott of Lantern Recovery, and its all going good as Michael's 2nd try at getting the trapped truck out of the clagg pays off!
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Shared: Trucking TV Classic - overnight recovery shift, part 4
    Shipping TV



    Published on Nov 23, 2017
    Shared across our network! Trucking TV series Driver's Days now sharing with Shipping TV online . .
    Part 4 of our Driver's Day 6 video series, filmed on an overnight shift with Lantern Recovery driver Michael Scott - this time he's collecting his second job of the night - a big tipper with problems . .
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Tesla Truck Driver
    Truck Driver 101



    Published on Nov 25, 2017
    In this video I discussed Tesla semi truck and the $480,000 an hour Tesla's losing.
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Tesla's Electric Semi Trucks Will Cost
    The Asian Mai Show



    Published on Nov 25, 2017
    Tesla electric semi truck will cost 150k for base price. 180k for long range model and 200k for founder series. Thanks and please subscribe!

    Created by VideoShow:http://videoshowapp.com/free
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Truck Mechanic's thoughts on Tesla's Semi
    The HD Perspective



    Published on Dec 2, 2017
    In this video I talk about my thoughts on the new Tesla Semi truck. It'll be interesting to see how this truck turns out. I'm a little skeptical of the claims that Elon Musk makes. We'll have to see when it actually comes out.

    The view is from my dash cam on Anthony Henday drive in Edmonton during a snowstorm. I recorded the audio later.
     
  19. searcher

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    Trucking: Trucking Exec & JCanell discuss some real situations about getting in a hurry!
    J Canell



    Published on Dec 3, 2017
     
  20. searcher

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    They laughed at me and leasing on old equipment
    Brotherman Trucking



    Published on Sep 12, 2017
     
  21. searcher

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    How to apply Warren Buffet methodology to your trucking business
    Brotherman Trucking



    Published on Dec 8, 2017
     
  22. searcher

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  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Senators introduce legislation aimed at preventing truck underride crashes
    Neil Abt | Dec 12, 2017

    Sen. Kirstin Gillibrand (D-NY) has introduced the bipartisan “Stop Underrides Act of 2017,” which would require rear guards to be strengthened and mandate the use of guards on the sides and front of trucks.

    The legislation is co-sponsored by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL). Companion legislation is backed in the House by Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN). Gillibrand was joined at a Dec. 12 press conference on Capitol Hill with lawmakers from both parties, as well as people who have lost family members in underride crashes.

    Related: Trailer underride guards vs. aero skirts: Potential to save lives

    American Trucking Associations said in a statement after the press conference that it “has supported efforts to strengthen rear underride guards in the past, based on data from years of study by [the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration] and the experiences of our members. NHTSA is already examining the potential benefits and problems with side underride guards and we believe they should be able to continue
    with their work and we look forward to the results of their research."

    In October, Gillibrand asked Paul Trombino, President Trump’s nominee to lead the Federal Highway Administration, about truck underride crashes. She noted these crashes render many vehicle safety features “worthless” because of how the car slides underneath the truck.

    In response, Trombino said that if confirmed he would review underride studies and consider updated rule makings that could improve safety.

    Speaking at the press conference, Jackie Gillian, head of the Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, said the first underride standard was set in the 1950s and the last update was in 1998.

    She added the National Transportation Safety Board has recommended underride improvements numerous times in recent years, but there has yet to be any action.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/safety/se...m=email&elq2=e7606d19724a48a79c458062d1d912a6
     
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    The transition to ELD enforcement
    overdrivemag



    Published on Dec 14, 2017
    As the electronic logging device mandate takes effect Dec. 18, Overdrive Senior Editor Todd Dills hits the highlights of what to expect in the early days of enforcement.
     
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    How quickly will ELDs be felt in the freight market?
    Last-minute push to install ELDs to comply with the December 18 mandate could lead to "confusion" due to lack of preparation and training time.

    Neil Abt | Dec 14, 2017

    Once the electronic logging mandate becomes official on Dec. 18, attention will turn to just how quickly it cuts into freight capacity.

    Andrew Lockwood Sr., senior manager of analytics and solution design for the Kenco Group, said it will be several months before there is reliable data.

    Related: FMCSA will grant 90-day ELD waiver for short-term rental trucks

    However, Lockwood said initial signals could be found in DAT’s report on spot market rates for the week of Dec. 18, which will be issued after Christmas. It particular, Lockwood said he will monitor changes in load-to-truck ratios.

    Lockwood and Kevin Hill, founder of CarrierLists, have been polling fleets for several months on ELD preparations ahead of the mandate. As of early December, about 75% fleets said they were ELD ready, up from around 50% in October.

    Hill said it is no surprise to see the sharp increase ahead of the deadline, but the last-minute push will likely lead to initial confusion due to a lack of training and practice time.

    Overall, ELD rates among regional haulers lagged other fleets, with tank and bulk carriers ranking the least compliant. Reefer carriers were most compliant at about 90%, while dry van carriers were second with 75%.

    In a joint interview with Fleet Owner, Hill and Lockwood said a true indication how much capacity ELDs have taken from the market may not been seen until the end of March. January and February often are weaker months for freight, and some smaller carriers may remain on the fence whether they want to move forward with ELDs.

    “This story is really about those with five trucks in the fleet,” Lockwood said.

    He added while he understands the feeling of some owner-operators that the government is forcing this upon them, he believes there remain several misconceptions.

    First, he stressed ELDs are not nearly as expensive as many believe. Additionally, Lockwood said they can provide truckers a way to gain better treatment from customers “that are just awful when it comes to loading carriers on time.”

    ELDs will help “fix areas that have been in blind spots for a long time,” especially shippers not respecting truckers’ hours. He also expressed some skepticism drivers will be so quick to turn in their vehicles and turn to the construction sector with a strong freight market and rising rates.

    At the same time, moving to electronic logs will also will weed out some of the bad apples and “dark sides of the industry,” Lockwood added.

    Separately, Hill said there remain many questions about ELD enforcement.

    “There is no one plan – it varies wildly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction,” Hill said. One example is Oklahoma, where the highway patrol was planning an 8-hour training session starting in the second week of December.

    Hill said there are plans to utilize 10-hour, out-of-service penalties, instead of fines, during the soft enforcement period.

    Still, they said confusion is inevitable, such as the 90-day agricultural extension. That covers trucks only when transporting approved items, so ELDs will still be needed with backhauls of commodities not covered.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/technolog...1_48&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1&elqTrack=true
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Truth About the Tesla Semi Electric Truck | Auto Expert John Cadogan | Australia
    AutoExpertTV



    Published on Dec 18, 2017
    The Tesla truck - the much-hyped Semi - is heavy-hauling electrified pie in the sky.

    Is Tesla a cult? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6GeH...

    The Tesla Semi - it’s claimed - will accelerate from zero to 100 kilometres per hour in 20 seconds - configured with an all-up weight of 36 metric tonnes. It will drive up a five per cent gradient at 65 miles per hour (104 kays an hour). It’ll consume less than two kilowatt-hours per mile, they say.

    Two versions are planned: 300 or 500 miles in range. And, if you want to join the Elon Musk boy band, you can reserve yours today for US$20,000.

    But the cult offers no information about the tare weight of the truck - from which we might infer some critical facts about the weight of the batteries required to power it. And, to a trucking operator, this is critical. See, the weight of any truck is a zero-sum game.

    That means: you’re getting paid to deliver the payload. The heavier the truck, the less the payload. Because the all-up weight is absolute. (Here in Australia, the maximum weight of a five-axle semi-trailer is 40 tonnes.)

    From Tesla: Deafening silence on the payload. (It’s probably not good.)

    The critical engineering deficiency of any battery-powered truck is the energy density of the batteries. Let’s reverse-engineer that. Actually - that’s already been done.

    Back in June, two researchers from Carnegie Mellon University concluded that a battery-powered semi would cost a fortune, and have limited cargo capacity. The paper was peer-reviewed and published in the journal: ACS Energy Letters (published by the American Chemical Society.).

    In other words, that independent paper was everything The Cult’s Semi announcement was not: It was academically robust, detailed and independent. Produced by experts and reviewed by experts. Of course it’s hard to compete with Elon Musk’s charisma - he did describe the Semi as a (quote) “BAMF” (for bad-ass motherlover) to enthusiastic sycophants at the launch.

    Tough to compete there, when all you have is brains and facts, I guess… Still, the non-BAMF expert researchers found that an electric semi-trailer with a 600-mile range would require a battery pack that weighed 14 tonnes - not including the four significant electric traction motors and control and power management systems.

    Simplistically, that’s compared with, say, 500 litres of diesel to do the same job. Plus an engine and transaxle. That’s nowhere near 14 tonnes. And you have to remember that the trucking industry is ruled by efficiency. Every kilo of a truck’s intrinsic weight is a kilo you don’t get paid to carry.

    Then there’s the time to recharge - which Mr Musk told cult members would be 30 minutes for 400 miles of range. That’s a lot of electrical energy.

    At the Cult’s claimed two kilowatt hours per mile, that’s a charging station capable of pumping in 800 kilowatt hours of electricity in 30 minutes. That’s 1.6 megawatts of input power, for a half-hour duty cycle. Or about 700 conventional domestic power outlets (in ‘Straya) on maximum delivery capacity.

    I’d suggest it will be some time until the power grid infrastructure is available for that, in the boonies between capital cities. Of course, you could buy a 1.6 megawatt diesel generator from China (per truck). That’ll cost you about $250,000 for a generator capable of fast-charging one truck.

    It’ll weigh about 15 tonnes, and pack a 71-litre V16 diesel engine. Expect to pay quite a bit for delivery. And you’ll burn about 200 litres of diesel to charge one truck … which seems to me somewhat less than totally green, and in fact completely contrary to the fundamental objective here.

    Alternatively, you could have an 8000 square-metre solar array to do the same job, in real time. For one truck. That’s about six and a half Olympic swimming pools in area. Per truck. But of course if you want to charge the truck overnight, or on a cloudy day, you’d need about 20 tonnes of batteries per truck. Ballpark.

    Alternatively, you could install a two megawatt wind turbine (plus - I don’t know - 50 tonnes of batteries - because it’s not windy every day). And the turbine will cost you about $2-3 million.

    Mr Musk is a charismatic, weapons-grade non-achiever of his stated goals. That’s a fact. He keeps not delivering. He has many enthusiastic cult members sucking on that Kool-Aid, but the facts are simply not on his side.
     
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    Mack to add 400 workers to assembly plant in PA
    Neil Abt | Dec 18, 2017

    Mack Trucks said it is adding 400 workers to its assembly plant in Lower Macungie Township, PA.

    The factory already employs about 2,000 people. The new employees will begin on Jan. 2, pushing its total workforce at the plant to an all-time high, the company said.

    Related: Mack’s Macungie plant marks 40 year anniversary

    Mack Trucks spokesman Chris Heffner said the expansion is in response to higher market demand, including for the new Anthem model that will be assembled at the plant.

    The plant is running two shifts. Mack is Lower Macungie’s largest employer, and one of the Lehigh Valley’s largest employers.

    In a separate announcement, Bendix said its Wingman Fusion advanced driver assistance system will come standard on all models of the new Anthem from Mack. The new truck was launched in September.

    Mack has offered Bendix Wingman Advanced on its Pinnacle line since 2012.

    “When a Mack Anthem leaves our Macungie, PA, facility with Wingman Fusion aboard, we know it’s going to help make our drivers
    and everyone else on the road safer,” said Roy Horton, director of product strategy for Mack.

    Mack recently said Martin Weissburg will become president of Mack on June 1. He will succeed Dennis Slagle.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/equipment...m=email&elq2=2b9ea4d084484dd6825ae50aa6ac05ec
     
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    The ELD mandate goes live
    Soft enforcement period begins today, with roadside inspectors given broad latitude on whether to write citations or not.
    Fleet Owner Staff | Dec 18, 2017

    Starting today, the soft enforcement” period for the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate begins as roadside enforcement personnel throughout the U.S. start documenting violations of the rule, according to the Commercial Vehicle Safety Administration (CVSA)

    “At a jurisdiction’s discretion, they may issue citations to commercial motor vehicle drivers operating vehicles without a compliant ELD,” noted CVSA Executive Director Collin Mooney in a statement.

    Related: Battle over ELDs continuing to the end

    "Enforcement personnel have been trained in anticipation of the ELD rule and now that it is in effect, inspectors will be verifying hours-of-service compliance by reviewing records of duty status requirements electronically,” he added. “And on April 1, 2018, inspectors will start placing commercial motor vehicle drivers out of service if their vehicle is not equipped with the required ELD.”

    [More information regarding enforcement of the new rule is available at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety
    Administration’s
    ELD implementation website]

    CVSA also pointed out that fleets and drivers may continue using “grandfathered” automatic onboard recording devices (AOBRD) that meet the requirements of 49 CFR 395.15 until Dec. 16, 2019, which is when they, too, must switch over the ELDs.

    CarrierLists has been polling fleets for several months on ELD preparations ahead of the mandate. As of early December, about 75% fleets said they were ELD ready, up from around 50% in October.

    Kevin Hill, founder of CarrierLists, said it is no surprise to see the sharp increase ahead of the deadline, but the last-minute push will likely lead to initial confusion due to a lack of training and practice time.

    Overall, ELD rates among regional haulers lagged other fleets, with tank and bulk carriers ranking the least compliant, according to the company’s data Reefer carriers were most compliant at about 90%, while dry van carriers were second with 75%.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/driver-lo...m=email&elq2=2b9ea4d084484dd6825ae50aa6ac05ec
     
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    ELD mandate: More changes, more challenges ahead
    FMCSA seeks to update “personal conveyance” guidance as focus turns to enforcement of ELD mandate.
    Sean Kilcarr | Dec 19, 2017

    Even as the focus shift to enforcement of the still highly-controversial electronic logging device (ELD) mandate, changes are being proposed to the guidance surrounding some of its particulars, especially where “personal conveyance” is concerned – when drivers use the commercial motor vehicle (CMV) assigned to them for “personal needs, such as when going to a restaurant or heading home.

    On top of that, experts warn that staying compliant with the ELD mandate will require drivers and motor carriers alike to pay closer attention to items such as supporting documents, instructional materials, and especially “form and manner” details when logging on- and off-duty status with the devices.

    Related: How quickly will ELDs be felt in the freight market?

    “The shipment ID number and trailer number, where applicable, are both required elements and you need to manually enter them unless your ELD is integrated into a transportation management,” John Seidl, a transportation consultant and account executive
    with Integrated Risk Solutions, explained during a conference call this week hosted by Stifel Capital Markets.


    “If you don’t, you will get cited for a form and manner violation,” he explained. “You also need to keep instruction cards and a blank set of logbooks on the truck. This has been a requirement since 1988. But if you are using an AOBRD [automatic onboard recording device] the instruction cards are different compared to an ELD – and if you fail to change the instruction card you will be cited for that.”

    When it comes to “personal conveyance” and “yard moves,” Seidl said the basic guidance offered by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is changing.

    Under previous guidance, he explained that if a driver is relieved from all responsibility for performing work, only needs to travel a “short distance,” and is not “laden” with freight, time spent traveling from a driver’s home to his/her terminal and vice versa, or from “en route” lodgings to restaurants in the vicinity of such lodgings, using a CMV may be considered off-duty time.

    However, under new guidance being proposed in the federal register, the “short distance” and “laden” requirements would go away; whether or not a CMV is loaded with freight would no longer be relevant. Instead, FMCSA would focus on what the “purpose” of the vehicle movement is – and if it's solely for the driver's benefit and not for the movement of goods, then it would considered “personal conveyance.”

    “Yard moves” is another tricky area, noted Seidl, because the government “has not specifically defined what a yard is.” He said that motor carriers have submitted comments to the FMCSA requesting that the agency define the nature of a “yard” in the regulations, and not in its guidance, so there is a more “uniform understanding” as to when drivers can record it in their electronic logs.

    When it comes to enforcement of the ELD mandate, Siedl – who served a goodly number of years with the Wisconsin State Patrol as a motor carrier inspector – reiterated that the industry is now in a period of “soft enforcement” and inspectors won’t place drivers or vehicles out-of-service for violating the ELD rule until April 1, 2018.

    He added that having a false ELD or no record of duty status via an ELD after April 1 will result in a driver and their vehicle being placed out of service for 10 consecutive hours.

    However that doesn’t mean failure to comply with the ELD rule won’t have consequences over the next three and half months, he warned.

    “Here is the effect: drivers will get citations for not having an ELD and some states will write tickets and some won’t,” Siedl emphasized.

    The states set their own fines for violations, too, he stressed, meaning tickets could cost anywhere from “a couple hundred bucks” to “over a thousand” for not having an ELD, instructional materials, supporting documents, and blank logbooks.

    “Some states rely on the revenues” from such fines to fund various highway safety programs as well, Sield added: “I’m not so sure they suspend them until April 1.”

    He also pointed out that trucking company insurance underwriters will see such tickets and will care a lot about them, as well. “And litigators will care, too. If you are cited 52 times for not having an ELD and you are in a crash, you are potentially liable,” Siedl warned. “So a lot of things can hurt carriers and drivers if you do not put them [ELDs] in.”

    When it comes to enforcement of the ELD rule, here’s is what he thinks will become the most problematic enforcement issues both motor carriers and drivers will face:
    • Visibility of ELD data at the roadside
    • ELD malfunctions and data diagnostic events
    • Personal conveyance and yard moves
    • Form and Manner
    • Lack of instruction card and/ or supply of blank paper logbooks
    Those issues aside, some industry advocates believe ELDs will ultimately benefit trucking companies and drivers.

    “The benefits of this rule exceed the costs by more than $1 billion, making it a rule we can firmly support and easily adopt,” noted Chris Spear, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations (ATA) trade group, in a statement.

    “We firmly believe that America’s truck drivers – if they were operating legally within the hours-of-service (HOS) rules before today – will see tremendous benefits in using an ELD. Whether in reduced crashes, less time spent on paperwork or in fewer errors in their logbooks,” he added. “The data, as well as our members’ experiences, with this technology tells us that ELDs reduce crashes, increase compliance with the [HOS] rules and ultimately benefit our industry and the motoring public.”

    “Having good data from the use of ELDs will make it easier for ATA to make the case for technical corrections to the hours-of-service rules in areas like detention time, split sleeper berth and more,” added Bill Sullivan, ATA executive vice president for advocacy.

    Others, however, don’t see it that way at all.

    “The mandate provides no safety, economic, or productivity benefits for most ensnared by the mandate,” stressed Todd Spencer, executive vice president of the Owner Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA).

    One “chief concern” expressed by OOIDA is the self-certification rules regarding ELDs, meaning the makers of the devices themselves and not FMCSA or a third-party testing firm validates their functionality.

    “Most small-businesses can ill afford to make these purchases only to learn later that the ELD is non-compliant. Yet they are required to do so or risk violation,” Spencer said.

    If an ELD malfunctions, a lot of work will need to be completed in short order, Integrated’s Siedl emphasized:
    • If the ELD fails to work, a driver must immediately complete a paper log.
    • The driver must also provide logs for each of the past seven days by either re-constructing the logs on paper immediately, possessing data from the logs, or getting access to ELD data via the device or via his or her company.
    • ELDs must be repaired within eight days or be granted an FMCSA extension for repairs.
    • Important note: so-called “data diagnostic events” need correction but do not rise to the level of an ELD malfunction.
    He added that there are several instances where improper or inoperable ELDs could lead to out-of-service violations for drivers and fleets after April 1 this year:
    • If a driver or carrier using ELD not authorized by FMCSA, the driver and carrier are considered to have no record of duty status;
    • If a driver is unable to produce or transfer data from ELD, the driver has no record of duty status;
    • If a driver using a special driving category but is not involved in that activity, the ELD is considered false;
    • A driver failing to reconstruct logs for a malfunctioning ELD for the current day and previous seven days is considered to have no record of duty status;
    • A motor carrier failing to repair an ELD within eight days or obtain extension from FMCSA then has no record of duty status and is in violation of the mandate;
    • If a driver fails to log into an ELD, then they have no record of duty status;
    • If a driver is required to have an ELD but the vehicle is not equipped with an ELD, then they have no record of duty status.
    And, as a reminder, post-April 1, Siedl said having a false ELD or no record of duty status place both vehicle and driver out of service for 10 consecutive hours.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/driver-lo...m=email&elq2=424ecaf85ba74c19954553a6ad83fa40
     
  30. searcher

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    ELD-Day: Rainy-day report from a Kentucky scale
    overdrivemag



    Published on Dec 19, 2017
    Interviews with Sergeant Jason Morris of the Kentucky State Police and driver David Bell illustrate enforcement practices on Day One of the ELD mandate, Dec. 18. Kentucky, as with many though not all other states, is pursuing a policy of no-ticket-writing for violations incurred for not having an ELD, through April 1, when out-of-service orders and penalties will begin to be levied. Driver Bell, previously with Maverick Transportation but currently running short-haul with Aetna Freight Lines, talks a little about his prior experience with e-logs and personal conveyance to get home when close but out of hours, his primary gripe with the devices. For more, visit https://www.overdriveonline.com/eld-d...
     
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  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    What you said about the Tesla Semi truck launch (warning: contains Nuts)
    AutoExpertTV



    Published on Dec 21, 2017
    Tesla Truck Feedback

    Some YouTubers decline to give a voice to their audience. But au contraire, I say. You deserve to be heard, as I sit here in my cell, awaiting sentencing. Here is a small sample of what you said, live, from Trollsville.

    Haters are gonna hate and Tesla keeps changing the world.” - Miigaa E

    This is a classic first world, 21st Century argument. A disgraceful refuge for the intellectually weak, I’d suggest. Instead of debating facts, let’s frame the debate by labelling anyone who disagrees as a hater. Newsflash, you imbecile - a critical, contrary view is not hate. Especially when it is backed by facts, and supported by rational argument. Objective truth reality does matter. Or at least, it should.

    On this ‘changing the world’ business. Tesla has not in fact changed the world in any materially significant way that I can see. Gallileo changed the world, Marie Curie changed the world, Voltaire changed the world, Einstein changed the world. In any case, changing the world is a poor test of greatness. Osama bin Laden changed the world.

    "Many have doubted him before he has already changing the whole automotive industry. If you cannot see that you should find a new job, and quickly." - Obie 1

    How, exactly, has Elon Musk changed the (quote) “whole automotive industry”? You know, as a journalist and an engineer I’ve been looking at the ‘whole automotive industry’ for twenty-something years - and I struggle to see a Musk-based step change in the way business is done overall. Tesla is a sideshow.

    The company is a tech start-up wrapped in an investment bubble, currently. And, for every one of these tech startups that survives, like Apple, dozens - followed equally enthusiastically at their height of cult bubbledom - collapse, and sink without a trace.

    Tesla could easily join Atari, Compaq, Palm, Netscape, Gateway, Intuit and RealNetworks. The Gigafactory might just as easily end up another warehouse for rubber dogshit from China, located deep in Dog’s Balls, Nevada.

    "Do like I did as you went through your points and consider what alternatives your might have yourself implemented, I say this, because, as you progressed I thought I might have metaphorically, fired a Blunderbuss through the middle of some of your points without hitting anything. - Chris T

    Small problem: I’m in the reporting business, not the alternative-implementing business. And if you don’t see the value in that, go to a place like North Korea, where they do not allow freedom of the press.
    Big problem: I get this bullshit a lot - sweeping generalisations about me being wrong, with the critical comment failing to address a single specific error I am alleged to have made.

    Musk has not released data on the weight of the batteries. Independent, peer reviewed scientists have crunched the numbers - 14 tonnes - I reported that.

    "Imagine the trouble when one of them truck batteries catches fire in a tunnel or on a ferry......” Paddy C

    Paddy, on this point we disagree. Batteries are no more dangerous than liquid hydrocarbon fuels, or Hydrogen, LPG, mains power - whatever. The danger is not the specific fuel, or the manner of its storage. It is the amount of energy and your proximity to it, should it be released in some unscripted way. This danger is all around, in the modern world.

    Get used to it. In fact, pucker up and givef thanks for the systematic protection that keeps you safe every day, at home and at work, from the closely-coupled energy dense systems all around, which provide the convenience we all take for granted.
     
  33. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trucking faces a rapidly-changing job market
    If you think hiring and retention posed difficult challenges for trucking last year, what’s ahead in 2018 may make things even tougher.
    Sean Kilcarr | Jan 02, 2018


    So let’s start with the shortage of truck drivers, which was expected to reach an all-time high by the end of last year. Finding folks willing to pilot big rigs for a living – and keeping them behind the wheel for a significant stretch of time – is already hard to do.

    Now, however, the U.S. economy revving up and creating better-paying jobs that don’t require workers to be away from home for long stretches of time – or require them to cover a variety of job-related expenses out of their own pockets.

    Related: Study: Veteran drivers more likely to be dissatisfied with pay

    Then you add in the job-elimination threat posed by driverless trucks; for why hire-on in an industry that may use technology to replace you?

    All of that above, mind you, is focused on dealing with the recruiting and retention issues surrounding just one of the many jobs within trucking. [Let’s not even get started on how hard it is becoming to find and keep truck technicians long term. Or even short term for that matter.]

    Yet similar challenges are being faced by an ever-wider pool of industries these days and that’s only going to become more acute in 2018, predicts Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist for Glassdoor.

    In his recent forecast What's Ahead for Jobs? Five Disruptions to Watch in 2018, Chamberlain focuses on a wide range of issues – from how artificial intelligence (AI) will redefine work to how mobile technology is changing the way people find and apply for jobs.

    "The U.S. economy experienced a landmark year, despite two major hurricanes and political challenges in Washington, D.C.,” he stressed. “Some 1.9 million new jobs were added in 11 months and stock markets reached an all-time record high. The nation's unemployment rate plummeted to a 17-year low, fueling a talent war in tech, healthcare, e-commerce and professional services.

    Yet though the nation's labor market is strong heading, average wages for many jobs remain in Chamberlin’s words “stubbornly flat” and a stark divide remains in who benefits from continued job growth, with technology skills “earning a premium” with other jobs face “significant changes” with the rise of AI and automation.

    Here are the trends he believes executives need to keep an eye on in 2018:

    • AI is Changing the Future of Work: AI and automation are poisedto impact nearly every facet of the workforce in some way, but two industries that are ripe for big changes in 2018: human resources and finance. Revolutionary new AI tools are complementing people's skills in both HR and finance, upending many established and easy-to-automate roles.
    • Modernization of Mobile Job Applications: Most of the existing applicant tracking systems were built in a bygone era, making applying for a job from a mobile device cumbersome. Job application via mobile phones is ripe for overhaul in 2018, yet has a long way to go.
    • Job Growth in Health Care, Technology, and Labor-Intensive Roles: Job creation in 2018 is being driven not only by innovations in tech, which will continue to expand within traditionally non-tech industries, but by significant demographic shifts such as an aging population. Many traditional jobs like restaurant waiters and truck drivers that cannot be automated easily in the near term will continue to grow and be a core source for jobs.
    • Increased Transparency in the Application and Interview Process: While workplaces have increased their transparency in recent years, the online application process remains notoriously opaque. In 2018, job seekers can expect more visibility into both the application process and the status of job applications in real time.
    • Encouraging Employee Passions Through Role Experimentation: More companies are creating ways to support employee aspirations outside the common vertical trajectory within a company through role experimentation. By establishing clearer pathways for internal lateral job moves, companies can tap into the changing skills and passions of their workforce, help reduce turnover, and do a better job of matching proven talent with their most productive role inside an organization.

    The technology aspects of recruiting and retention need to be acknowledged as well, according to Ira Wolfe in his book Recruiting in the Age of Googlization. Wolfe in particular places some of the blame for under-performing talent acquisition activity squarely on the shoulders of management, citing a lack of evidence-based recruitment and employee selection, an “unfair bashing” of Millennials, and job application processes that is completely out of touch with today’s labor and jobs marketplace.

    Like Glassdoor’s Chamblerin, Wolfe also believes strongly that technologies such as AI, robotics and 3D printing will “revolutionize” not just work roles but how people live and play day-to-day.

    He also believes three trends will “blindside” many businesses and workers within the next five years:

    • Jobs will be automated faster than anticipated.
    • Automation will not be limited to low-skill jobs.
    • The impact from automation will disrupt work, careers, and jobs greater than expected.

    “The world of work is changing exponentially faster than most people realize and that in turn will intensify and accelerate the competition for skilled workers,” Wolfe stressed.

    That sure isn’t making things any easier where trucking’s job recruiting and retention effort are concerned.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/trucks-wo...m=email&elq2=6d11ab3f31b04d0eb1f8171661fca4d0
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Covenant Transport offers $40,000 bonus to driving teams
    Truckers would earn $1,000 each for every 60,000 paid miles a team drives.
    Fleet Owner Staff | Jan 03, 2018



    Covenant Transport is launching a $40,000 "teaming bonus" program aimed at teams and single truck drivers willing to convert to teaming.

    The new program, which goes into effect Feb. 1, pays a $2,000 bonus to driving teams every time a team eclipses 60,000 paid miles together. The team drivers will receive $1,000 each — and could earn up to $20,000 each in bonuses.

    The bonus program comes as Chatanooga, TN-based Covenant aims to grow its team truck count from its 2017 average of 980 in the face of expected demand for team capacity in 2018. The company said it hopes to send a message to existing and potential driving teams that Covenant wants them.

    “We have team freight,” said David Parker, founder and CEO of Covenant Transport Services. “That’s important to note because a lot of carriers bring on team drivers and put them on solo lanes.”

    Parker, who founded Covenant Transport 32 years ago as a team carrier with wife Jacqueline, said: “One of the most frustrating things for a team is being underutilized.
    Teams want long lengths of haul, and that’s what we are focused on giving them,” he said.

    Joey Hogan, president of Covenant Transport Services, said in an increasingly competitive labor market, the new bonus program also solidifies Covenant’s place among top driver employers.

    “Rewarding people for doing the work you ask them to do is what attracts and retains the type of drivers you are looking for,” Hogan said. “We feel our new teaming bonus will be a great reward for our team drivers who go out and run.”

    Hogan said throughout 2017, Covenant felt growing competition for team drivers, “so we knew we had to start off the year by putting our stamp on what we specialize in, and that’s teaming. “We’re excited to offer these bonuses to our current team drivers,” he said, “and look forward to welcoming many new team drivers in 2018.”

    To be eligible for the $40,000 Teaming Bonus, new drivers are not required to bring a team partner to Covenant. The company’s team matching program will match single drivers in search of driving partners, and following orientation, newly-formed teams are immediately eligible to begin earning under the $40,000 Teaming Bonus program.

    http://www.fleetowner.com/driver-ma...m=email&elq2=d9082a55a0d64e7a9b84799966385344
     
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    Trucking: Good brokers bad brokers and is Ike the worst one???
    J Canell



    Published on Jan 13, 2018
    Meet Patricia one of the back bones of the transportation department. She talks about the drivers and brokers and the struggles of dealing with myself and scott because we are divas.
     
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    Trucking: This is how we all end up in trouble!
    J Canell



    Published on Jan 13, 2018
    Tasers and the #OneChipChallenge and OMG.
     
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