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French Election

Discussion in 'Politics Forum (Local/National/World)' started by Scorpio, Apr 20, 2017.



  1. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    French election 2017: All you need to know
    • 18 April 2017
    • From the section Europe

    France is choosing a new president in a battle to decide the country's future course, after the Brexit vote in the UK and election of US President Donald Trump.

    The race is wide open, with 11 candidates contesting the first round of voting on 23 April. Assuming no candidate wins more than 50% of the vote, the top two contenders will then go through to a run-off on 7 May.

    President Francois Hollande, a Socialist, is not seeking a second term - the first French president to opt out in modern history.

    What is unusual about this election?
    For a start, President Hollande's decision not to run for another term is unprecedented and the candidate chosen to fight for the Socialists, Benoît Hamon, is seen as out of the running.

    Not only that, their conservative rivals, the Republicans, have had to battle to stay in the race because their candidate, François Fillon, is at the centre of a judicial inquiry over "fake jobs".

    That means for the first time in decades France may be led by a president who does not come from the two big parties of the left or centre-right.

    Who could win?
    If you believe the opinion polls there are two front-runners, far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen and centrist Emmanuel Macron.

    Marine Le Pen took over the leadership of the FN from her father in 2011 and has worked hard to "detoxify" the party from its extreme past.

    Image copyright Getty Images
    Image caption There are five main candidates but only four have a chance of going through: (L-R) Francois Fillon, Benoît Hamon, Marine Le Pen, Emmanuel Macron and Jean-Luc Mélenchon
    Mr Macron, a 39-year-old ex-investment banker, was economy minister under President Hollande but resigned in 2016 to fight for the presidency as head of his En Marche! (On the move) party. Not only has he never been an MP - he has never stood for election.

    The early favourite was Republican François Fillon, but his hopes were dented by allegations that he paid his wife public money for work she did not do. He is now under formal investigation, blaming a political conspiracy, but he is not out of the race and his team is still confident of making the second round.

    Image copyright AFP
    Image caption Ms Le Pen and the other candidates have made an obligatory appearance at the Paris Agricultural Fair
    A surprise package in the election is far-left stalwart Jean-Luc Mélenchon, whose witty charisma has attracted new supporters.

    A 65-year-old former Socialist minister who left the party in 2008, he now leads La France Insoumise (Unbowed France) and has used hologram technology to address separate rallies simultaneously.

    Image copyright AFP/Getty Images
    Image caption Eleven candidates are running but only two can go through to the second round
    French election 2017: Who are the candidates?

    What are the issues?
    One of the overriding issues facing French voters is unemployment, which stands at almost 10% and is the eighth highest among the 28 EU member states. One in four under-25s is unemployed.

    The French economy has made a slow recovery from the 2008 financial crisis and all the leading candidates say deep changes are needed.

    Image copyright AFP
    Image caption Dozens of people were killed in the Nice lorry attack on Bastille Day in 2016
    Security and immigration are also high on the agenda.

    More than 230 people have died in terror attacks since January 2015 and France remains under a state of emergency. Officials fear more of the hundreds of young French Muslims who have travelled to Syria and Iraq may return to commit new atrocities.

    Marine Le Pen has vowed to suspend all legal immigration and give jobs, welfare, housing and school provision to French nationals before foreigners.

    What's all this about a hologram?
    Far-left candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon kicked off his campaign by appearing at rallies in Lyon and Paris and creating a social media buzz.

    Image copyright AFP/Getty
    Image caption Mr Mélenchon's hologram appearance was a masterstroke
    He and Ms Le Pen are the masters of social media - she has 1.38 million followers on Twitter, he has 300,000 YouTube subscribers.

    The phenomenon of fake news has also made an appearance, with an Algerian news organisation picking up a spoof story that Ms Le Pen planned to build a wall around France and make Algeria pay for it.

    Is the Fillon payment affair fake news?
    That's what an investigating judge is hoping to find out.

    Satirical weekly Le Canard Enchainé says his wife Penelope was paid €831,400 (£710,000; $900,000) for work as a parliamentary assistant that she did not carry out. One report suggested she did not even have a parliamentary pass or a work email.

    Image caption Le Canard Enchaine has made a series of allegations about the Fillon family's earnings
    She is also said to have pocketed €100,000 for writing just a handful of articles for a literary review owned by a billionaire friend of the family.

    Mr Fillon insists everything was above board and says the investigation against him is a "political assassination" designed to deny French voters the choice of a centre-right candidate.

    What makes the Front National far-right?
    Ms Le Pen is fighting to appeal to the centre and left of French politics after working to move the party away from the image of her father, who has been repeatedly convicted for hate speech and describing the Holocaust as a "detail of history".



    Media captionWhy people are voting for Marine Le Pen
    But she still has a far-right platform. She wants to allocate public services to French citizens ahead of foreigners and has vowed to suspend all legal immigration.

    The FN also has close ties with other European parties such as Austria's far-right Freedom Party that mainstream right-wing parties want nothing to do with.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europ...ction-2017&link_location=live-reporting-story
     
  2. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    Macron hangs on to lead in French election, Le Pen's camp rows with Brussels



    By Richard Balmforth and Sarah White | PARIS
    Centrist Emmanuel Macron clung on to his status as favorite to win France's presidential election in a four-way race that is too close to call, as the camp of far-right challenger Marine Le Pen ramped up its eurosceptic rhetoric in a row with Brussels.

    A closely-watched Cevipof opinion poll published on Wednesday showed frontrunners Macron and Le Pen both losing some momentum ahead of Sunday's first round, and conservative Francois Fillon and far-left candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon still in contention for the second round run-off.

    With millions of French voters still undecided or planning to abstain, the vote is the most unpredictable in France in decades and investors are nervous about potential last-minute surprises that could trigger market turmoil.

    Le Pen and Melenchon, who both pitch themselves as defenders of French workers, say they could take France out of the European Union and the euro currency. Banks have requisitioned their staff to be at their desks through the night on Sunday to enable them to respond fast to the outcome.

    Le Pen has pressed hard her anti-immigration, anti-globalisation message as she seeks to mobilize voters.

    As she prepared for the last big rally of her campaign in the Mediterranean city of Marseille, her camp became embroiled in an angry Twitter exchange with the European Commission.

    Reacting to Le Pen's refusal to appear on France's TF1 television channel on Tuesday unless the EU's yellow-starred blue flag was removed, the Commission tweeted: "Proud of our flag, a symbol of unity, solidarity and harmony between the people of Europe. Let's not hide it."

    Le Pen's deputy Florian Philippot fired back: "You'll see, we'll soon be sticking your oligarchic rag in the cupboard."


    Emmanuel Macron, head of the political movement En Marche!, or Onwards!, and candidate for the 2017 presidential election attends a campaign political rally in Saint-Herblain near Nantes, France, April 19, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe

    The election race for a successor to the deeply unpopular Francois Hollande has become increasingly tense as the gap between the leading candidates shrinks.

    SECURITY IN FOCUS

    The Cevipof poll of 11,601 people showed first round support for Le Pen falling 2.5 percentage points since early April to 22.5 percent and backing for Macron down 2 points to 23 percent.

    Melenchon, a firebrand left-winger who has surged in recent weeks, was on 19 percent, while Fillon, whose campaign has been hurt by a financial scandal, received 19.5 percent of support.

    Macron would win a head-to-head contest against National Front chief Le Pen, the poll showed.

    Another poll, a daily survey by Opinionway, gave similar projections to Cevipof for the top candidates and projected Macron beating Le Pen in the May 7 second round by 65 percent to 35.

    Abstention, a key factor adding to uncertainty over the outcome of the first round, was seen at 28 percent, Cevipof's survey found - near a record level that helped Marine's father, Jean-Marie Le Pen, make it to the runoff in 2002.

    Another poll, conducted by BVA, showed Macron taking 24 percent of the vote in the first round, one point more than Le Pen, with Fillon and Melenchon tied on 19 percent.

    The BVA poll showed abstentions at between 20 and 24 percent.

    Related Coverage
    Fillon, 63, an ex-prime minister whose campaign was derailed by an embezzlement inquiry targeting him, his wife and two of his children, got last-minute public endorsements from ex-president Nicolas Sarkozy and ex-prime minister Alain Juppe - two men he beat to win the presidential ticket of his party, The Republicans.

    Fillon, who says he is victim of a "dirty tricks" campaign, said in comments reported by Le Parisien newspaper that he would work to ensure France's institutions better protected the confidentiality of sensitive information.

    For large parts of the campaign, sleaze allegations have overshadowed hot button themes like unemployment and how to revive France's sluggish economy.

    However, security and tackling the threat posed by Islamist militants has returned to the fore after the arrest of two men in Marseille on Tuesday suspected of plotting an imminent attack.

    The Paris prosecutor said on Tuesday that a video linked to the two Frenchmen and intercepted in early April had featured a machine gun placed on a table as well as a newspaper which had one of the presidential candidates on the front page.

    A source close to the investigation said on Wednesday that the candidate featured on the newspaper cutting was Fillon.

    France's internal intelligence agency had warned the main candidates of a threat, campaign officials said.

    (Additional reporting by Matthias Blamont, Sudip Kar-Gupta, Ingrid Melander, Emmanuel Jarry, Sophie Louet and Maya Nikolaeva; Editing by Richard Lough and Adrian Croft)

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-election-idUSKBN17L0MY
     
  3. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    Opinion: No matter which front-runner wins the French election, it’s a revolution

    By Zaki Laïdi
    Published: Apr 19, 2017 9:15 a.m. ET




    Expect Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron to face off in France’s second round on May 7


    [​IMG] VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images
    PARIS (Project Syndicate) — In a few weeks, France will elect its next president. Given the French executive’s considerable powers, including the authority to dissolve the National Assembly, the presidential election, held every five years, is France’s most important. But the stakes are higher than ever this time.

    The two front-runners are the far-right National Front’s Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron, who served as economy minister under Socialist President François Hollande, but is running as an independent. If, as expected, Le Pen and Macron face off in the election’s second round on May 7, it will be a political watershed for France: the first time in 60 years that the main parties of the left and the right aren’t represented in the second round.

    France hasn’t endured such political turmoil since 1958, when, in the midst of the Algerian War, General Charles de Gaulle came to power and crafted the Constitution of the Fifth Republic. That shift, like any great political rupture, was driven by a combination of deep underlying dynamics and the particular circumstances of the moment.

    Today is no different. First, the underlying dynamic: the rise, as in most developed countries nowadays, of popular mistrust of elites, feelings of disempowerment, fear of economic globalization and immigration, and anxiety over downward social mobility and growing inequality.

    These sentiments — together with the French state’s historical role in fostering national identity and economic growth — have contributed to a surge in support for the National Front. Le Pen’s nationalist, xenophobic message and populist economic policies resemble those of the far-left candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon.

    Although support for the National Front has been growing for more than a decade, the party has so far been kept out of power by France’s two-round electoral system, which enables voters to unite against it in the second round. And, given the National Front’s inability to make alliances, power has remained in the hands of the main parties of the left and the right, even as France has moved toward a tripartite political system.

    Marine Le Pen, leader of the National Front, is one of the most divisive politicians in Europe—and a front-runner in France's presidential election this spring. What does she stand for, and can she win? WSJ's Niki Blasina reports. Photo: Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

    Now, Macron is taking advantage of current circumstances to blow up the tripartite system. Macron’s great insight, which few initially recognized, was that the right-left divide was blocking progress, and that the presidential election amounted to a golden opportunity to move beyond it, without the help of an organized political movement. At a time when the French people are increasingly rejecting the traditional party system, Macron’s initial weakness quickly became his strength.

    It helped that, as Macron himself recognized, both the right and the left have fragmented in recent years. This is particularly true on the left, where a clear division has emerged between a reformist current, led by former Prime Minister Manuel Valls, and traditionalists, represented by the Socialist Party candidate, Benoît Hamon. The Socialists’ problems are compounded by the existence of a radical left working actively to eliminate them, much as Spain’s left-wing Podemos party has sought to replace the Socialist Workers’ Party there.

    The source of the mainstream right’s travails is less clear. Its forces remain generally united on economic and social issues. In fact, until a few months ago, its presidential candidate, the Republicans’ François Fillon, was expected to lead the pack in the first round by a wide margin. But a scandal over his personal conduct (he allegedly paid his wife and children for nonexistent jobs while he was a member of parliament) damaged his candidacy — probably fatally.

    Whatever the reason for the right’s decline, Macron has benefited substantially from it, as well as from the rifts afflicting the left. Now, there is a real chance the young independent could be elected president on May 7, upending the Fifth Republic’s political system.

    But an electoral victory is just a first step. To govern in France’s hybrid presidential-parliamentary system, Macron would need to secure a majority in the National Assembly. This opens the possibility of two scenarios.

    In the first scenario, Macron quickly gains a parliamentary majority, as French voters seek to reinforce his mandate in June’s National Assembly election. This is conceivable, but not certain: it is here where the lack of an organized political movement on the ground remains a weakness for Macron.

    That is why the June election could give rise to the second scenario: cohabitation with a parliamentary coalition comprising a small right-wing faction, a large centrist faction, and a hopelessly divided left-wing faction. Such a development would be familiar in many European countries. But in France, where republicanism gave rise to the left-right ideological spectrum that shapes politics throughout the West today, it would be a genuine revolution — one that could spell the end of the Socialist Party.

    Proofpoint CEO Gary Steele talks to MarketWatch about the cyberattacks that caused over $3 billion in losses in 2016 and how companies and individuals can protect themselves.

    Given the symbolic power of the left-right divide, France’s voters and political leaders alike have long tended to frame virtually all of the country’s problems in ideological terms. The public and its politicians have little experience with government based on broad coalition agreements. This partly explains why the political system becomes gridlocked, sometimes making reforms difficult to implement, and why Macron’s message, which includes clear reform plans, is so unusual for France.

    If Le Pen somehow comes out on top, French politics — not to mention the European Union — will be turned upside. But even the ostensibly moderate Macron represents, in his own way, a truly radical stance. With both candidates likely to make it to the second round, France is on the verge of a political revolution, regardless of who wins.

    Zaki Laïdi, Professor of International Relations at L’Institut d’études politiques de Paris (Sciences Po), was a political adviser to French Prime Minister Manuel Valls. This article has been published with permission of Project SyndicateThe Coming French Revolution

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/no...e-french-election-its-a-revolution-2017-04-18
     
  4. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

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    This is more true now, than ever !

     
    GOLDBRIX likes this.
  5. southfork

    southfork Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

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    Im stunned anyone supporting immigration has a chance to win, how can people not see how vile and criminal these mid east scum are, I would vote for anyone opposing immigration, really wtf can people be thinking that are ok with these muslims and syrains coming in with whats going on everywhere they infest?
     
  6. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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  7. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    The people voting for immigration are all of the migrants and their families. No normal Frenchman is putting up with it anymore.
     
  8. dacrunch

    dacrunch Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    most earlier predictions for a 2nd round run-off were Macron 65%, Marine 35%...

    I expect it to be closer... but it'll be hard for Marine to get over 50%, with Macron being promoted by ALL the "Big Media" - front pages on ALL magazines, not a word about his money-laundering... or the fact that he was 16 when he started dating his 37 year-old married teacher with kids (now his wife)... The word "pedophilia" has never been mentioned... (or the whispers of his being a "closet gay")...

    ... and he attended the 2014 Bilderberg Meeting, where he got "annointed" (2 weeks later he was Economy Minister). Before that, he was a "private secretary" for Socialist President Hollande, and before that a Rothschild Banker. Earlier, he "flunked" entry exams to many of the "elite schools" before finally finding one that would take him - and supposedly he was far from "top of the class".

    Never been elected in his life, nor even run for any office... Only "promoted" like a detergent... Surely takes orders very well... (except from the Citizenry).
     
    Pyramid, TAEZZAR and gringott like this.
  9. Fanakapan

    Fanakapan Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    Some of you fellas seem to have a pretty erroneous view of what the Front National represent, its probably your distance from the actual people, combined with distorted media reporting ?

    If the FN are anything like UKIP, and they probably are, then substituting the variables into terms that would be readily understood in the USA would reveal the FN to be supported in large part by the Trailer Dwelling Class, with the balance being folks who are unaware of the old adage that Patriotism is the Last Refuge of the Scoundrel. Its like a shop that has attractive stuff in the window, but once inside you find its filled with junk that wont work, and no refunds are given.

    Now the question has to be, would you guys in the USA be supportive of, and vote for a party who drew the majority of its support from the indolent and those who would be shocked to ever be expected to look beyond the titty bottle of the state ?
     
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  10. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

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    We are a nation, more divided than ever, due mostly from the thinking of the socialist.
    Unfortunately, you are describing those socialist leftist , worthless(indolent) snowflakes, or just "flakes" that did vote & it was for the bitch.
    Anyone with 1/2 an ounce of self worth, did not vote for her, and of course that is the majority of this group (GIM2).
     
  11. Fanakapan

    Fanakapan Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    See, thats my point. The likes of LePen, Wilders, and Farage, paint themselves as freedom loving guardians of liberty, but the party manifesto's show the parties to be Statist in the extreme.

    They sell the idea of Protection to those who feel threatened, whether it be by foreigners or the need to adapt to a world that is changing at a greater rate than it has ever done before.

    The big difference between Donald Trump, and these others that many in the US think are out of the same mould, is that whilst the Euro Clowns peddle visions of national greatness that evaporated a hundred years ago or more in the case of France, the Trump idea is of a nation the size of a continent that has in the relatively recent past demonstrated what it can achieve.

    Whereas most of President Trump's support comes from the established Republican vote, and the non aligned, you'll find that the bulk of the success enjoyed by the Euro Populist/Nationalist groups, has been on the backs of those who would have been expected to vote left of centre in the past, and have been hardest hit by the ongoing depression that is supposed to have ended. In essence its going to be the difference between folks who still have some idea of getting on, and the group that'll always be stuck in the Slough of Despond even if it magically became the 1950's again.

    As I've said before, the supposed Similarities between President Trump and his platform, and the EuroClowns, is superficial at best.
     
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  12. dacrunch

    dacrunch Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    Fanakapan - might be wearing a Guy Fawkes "V" mask - but is standing for the Bankster Establishment 100%...
     
  13. historyrepete

    historyrepete Silver Member Silver Miner

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    I'd say they get what they deserve but i think we all get what we're served
     
  14. Fanakapan

    Fanakapan Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    You'd be one of the guys who never reads the small writing on the back of the box, right ?
     
  15. Pyramid

    Pyramid Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    French Presidential Favourite Macron: Terrorism ‘Part of Our Daily Lives for Years to Come’ After Paris Shooting
    by Jack Montgomery,21 Apr 2017

    Emmanuel Macron, the current favourite to win the French presidential elections, has described terrorism as an “imponderable problem” which will be “part of our daily lives for the years to come”.

    Speaking in a French radio interview reported by The Guardian newspaper, the centre left En Marche! candidate appeared to echo former Prime Minister Manuel Valls’s controversial statements following the Nice lorry attack on Bastille Day 2016, in which a Tunisian migrant mowed down 434 men, women, and children, killing 87.

    “Times have changed and we should learn to live with terrorism,” Valls said at the time. The comments led to the socialist being cursed and jeered in public, and played a prominent role in terminating his own hopes of a presidential run.

    In contrast to Macron, Front National leader Marine Le Pen had been highlighting the fact that crime and security had, in her view, been “completely absent” from the presidential campaign in a live debate just minutes before news of the Kalashnikov attack broke.

    “It’s a major subject that nobody has mentioned,” she complained. “We must take control of our national borders to know who is coming in. We must reorganise the intelligence services, reinforce the means at the disposal of police and gendarmes, and attack the evil at its roots – that’s to say the communitarianism and the development of Islamic fundamentalism.”

    Ms. Le Pen also said she would immediately deport all foreign nationals on the terror watch list if elected, asking rivals: “Explain to me why we should take the risk of keeping them in our territory?”

    In a major speech on 18 April, the 48-year-old declared that “mass immigration” had not been “an opportunity for France, [but] a tragedy for France”.

    She vowed to terminate France’s membership of the borderless Schengen Zone, criticised as an “international passport-free zone for terrorists” by former Interpol chief Robert Noble, and promised citizens: “I will protect you.”

    Emmanuel Macron, a former Rothschild banker, was economy minister under the outgoing Socialist president, François Hollande, who claimed, “I will leave the country to my successor in much better condition than I found it” shortly before yesterday’s shooting.

    The attack was the latest in a series of high-profile Islamist attacks under his premiership, beginning with the Charlie Hebdo massacre in January 2015.

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/04/21/macron-terrorism-part-daily-lives-years-paris-shooting/

    Pyramid's comments: So, terriorism is now an "imponderable problem" and "part of our daily lives for the years to come" according to Macron, the hand-picked "centrist" that is really a globalist, socialist lackey protege of former PM Vall. Vall said "Times have changed and we should learn to live with terrorism."

    Let me get this straight. Foreigners coming from the ME and select N. African nations that are not actually "refugees" that commit suicide bombings, run over people with trucks, mass murder, rape and perform genital mutilation of females and other heinous crimes are to be accepted with open arms and tolerance in the name of a "belief system?" It's believed that less than 3% of the illegal immigrants are actually "refugees." The other 97+% are a planned invasion. Like dandelions in a yard...they slowly infiltrate, then propagate, then dominate. I hope the French people do the right thing an elect Le Pen, but I'm not getting my hopes up considering the generally pacifist nature of the French. Good luck out there folks.
     
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