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Health Care In America

Discussion in 'Politics Forum (Local/National/World)' started by searcher, May 4, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    When I left the union and I got the paper work for COBRA I couldn't believe what I was looking at. It was well over 2 grand a month. That's when I started to believe in socialized medicine. We have to pay taxes we may as well get something for it. Why should our tax $$$ be spent 0verseas? Time to end our never ending war in the middle east and take care of our own people here in America.
     
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  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  3. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    And that is why wages are stagnant......... designed when .gov takes over it's a HUGE monster but goes in their income bracket!
     
  4. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    66% can't come up with $1000 so this is designed to break you financially & mentally.
     
  5. latemetal

    latemetal Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    If you can't come up with a $1,000, you have been broken...amazing the people who MUST spend every last dime.
     
  6. solarion

    solarion Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    That's the scam though. Goobermint creates the problem and then offers the solution. Socialized medicine will just lower the standard of care for all over time and of course jack up the national credit card even faster.

    The vast majority of people would do well to reject this scam, pay for most health care services out of pocket, and stack some savings for just in case. The way to kill the federal beast is to strangle it of resources. Feeding it is just a bad idea.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017
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  7. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    It's not an "either/or" proposition. The government has no rightful business in overseas occupations or in health care domestically.
     
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  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Medical Research? Congress Cheers. Medical Care? Congress Brawls.

    [​IMG]
    The New York Times

    By ROBERT PEAR
    16 hrs ago


    WASHINGTON — They cannot agree on subsidies for low-income people under the Affordable Care Act or even how to extend funding for the broadly popular Children’s Health Insurance Program — two issues requiring urgent attention as Congress returns to work.

    But a more exotic corner of the medical world has drawn rapturous agreement among Republicans and Democrats: the development of new treatments and cures through taxpayer-funded biomedical research.

    For the third straight year, lawmakers are planning to increase the budget of the National Institutes of Health by $2 billion. In the process, they have summarily rejected cuts proposed by President Trump.

    The push for additional funding reflects a fascination among legislators with advances in fields like molecular biology, genetics and regenerative medicine, even as they wage bitter battles over just how large a role the government should play in financing health care and providing coverage.

    At a recent hearing, Senators Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Tim Scott of South Carolina, both Republicans, and Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, a Democrat, pressed scientists to explain exactly how gene editing technology could lead to new treatments for sickle cell anemia, H.I.V., cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

    Ms. Hassan wanted to know the relative merits of different techniques for editing DNA and RNA — what she called “this incredible cutting-edge technology.”

    Why is medical research so much less contentious than fundamental issues like health insurance coverage?

    Anthony J. Mazzaschi, a lobbyist at the national organization representing schools of public health, said “the charisma of the cure, the hope and promise of curing disease, seems to excite members of Congress,” including some in their 70s and 80s who are “facing the prospect of disease and disability head-on.”

    And that prospect is bipartisan. “Disease doesn’t impact just Republicans or Democrats,” said Representative Diana DeGette, Democrat of Colorado. “It impacts everybody.”

    While the search for new treatments and cures is advancing at breakneck speed, ideas about how to help patients pay for them lag far behind. And Republicans who sometimes laud the N.I.H. as the National Institutes of Hope also support dismantling the Affordable Care Act, which could limit access to the new treatments.

    “If we are spending billions to incentivize the development of new drugs, I think we also have to ensure that patients can afford those drugs,” said Representative Jan Schakowsky, Democrat of Illinois. “It is almost cruel to find a cure and then have it priced so high that a patient can’t afford it.”

    The challenges facing patients and policymakers were illustrated this past week when a Philadelphia company said it would charge $850,000 for a new gene therapy to treat a rare inherited form of blindness. (The company, Spark Therapeutics, said it would pay rebates to certain insurers if the medicine, given in a one-time injection, did not work as promised.)

    Members of Congress have friends, relatives and constituents who suffer from cancer, Alzheimer’s and other diseases, but lawmakers may have less interaction with people who are uninsured and unable to afford doctor visits or prescription drugs.

    “Sadly,” said R. Alta Charo, a professor of law and bioethics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, “the cynic in me says it’s because of the prevalence of selfishness. We all want to know there’s something out there that will cure us if we need it, but many of us are quite reluctant to pay for somebody else to get cured when they need it.”

    Sherri J. Bale, a geneticist who worked at the N.I.H. for 16 years before founding GeneDx, a genetic testing company in Gaithersburg, Md., said: “Gene therapy has fabulous promise. We will soon be able to treat and even cure people with genetic diseases where we previously had nothing at all to offer them. But where are they supposed to get the money to pay for these treatments — thousands of dollars a month?”

    “What good is the research if all you do is treat people in a clinical trial and publish a few papers?” Ms. Bale asked. “I’m afraid that patients will be left in the lurch.”

    With huge bipartisan majorities, Congress in 2016 passed the 21st Century Cures Act, to speed the discovery of cures and the approval of new drugs and medical devices. Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, called it “the most significant legislation” passed by Congress in 2015-16.

    Nine-year-old Max Schill of Williamstown, N.J., who has a rare genetic condition known as Noonan syndrome, which causes heart defects and growth delays, was the public face of patients who could benefit from that legislation.

    “Max bravely visited nearly every senator’s office with handmade drawings asking for support,” said Senator Robert Menendez, Democrat of New Jersey.

    But while a few children with rare diseases can sometimes elicit an outpouring of concern, millions of Americans continue to lack health insurance.

    A month after President Barack Obama signed the medical cures bill in December 2016, surrounded by members of both parties, Republicans in Congress ramped up their campaign to demolish the Affordable Care Act — a law that Mr. McConnell once described as “the single worst piece of legislation that has been passed in the last half-century.”

    Republicans in Congress and the Trump administration appear uncertain whether they want to repeal what remains of the Affordable Care Act or stabilize insurance marketplaces created by the law. They cannot agree among themselves, much less with Democrats, over the future direction of federal health policy.

    Funds for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which serves nearly nine million children, and for community health centers, which serve more than 24 million patients, are in limbo because of inaction by Congress.

    The partisan divide was evident last week when Mr. Trump proposed to relax certain health insurance rules. Senator Alexander and other Republicans hailed the move as a way to reduce costs for 11 million small-business employees and self-employed people.

    But the House Democratic leader, Nancy Pelosi of California, said the president’s proposal was a recipe for “junk health insurance” that would strip consumers of vital protections provided by the Affordable Care Act.

    Bipartisan Senate efforts to stabilize insurance markets face long odds in the House.

    Mr. Alexander, the chairman of the Senate health committee, and Senator Patty Murray of Washington, the senior Democrat on the panel, drafted a bill to continue paying cost-sharing subsidies to insurance companies on behalf of low-income people.

    But their bill met fierce resistance from conservative House Republicans, who said it would prop up the health law and bail out insurers.

    By contrast, the appeal of biomedical research often appears to transcend politics. In a decision applauded by scientists, Mr. Trump decided to retain the director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Francis S. Collins, who led the government’s 15-year effort to map the human genome and inspires lawmakers with his infectious enthusiasm for medical research.

    When Dr. Collins and Scott Gottlieb, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, appeared at House and Senate hearings to assess progress under the Cures Act, one theme ran through questions from members of both parties: What more can we do to help you?

    The N.I.H. has an annual budget of roughly $32 billion, and over 80 percent of it goes out in grants to more than 300,000 scientists at universities, medical schools and other research institutions that can lobby local members of Congress.

    Dr. Matthew H. Porteus, a pediatrician and stem cell biologist at Stanford University who testified at the Senate hearing on gene editing, said he was impressed with the level of congressional interest and surprised at the lack of partisanship.

    “The senators’ questions were spoken as if they were experts,” he said. “If you didn’t know what party each senator belonged to, you’d have no idea, based on the questions they asked.”

    At the same time, Dr. Porteus said, “it’s really disappointing” that Congress has been unable to find money for a long-term extension of the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

    “If you can’t provide the best possible care for people today, and CHIP is an essential part of that for millions of children,” Dr. Porteus said, “you’ll be in a poor position to provide advanced care to people in the future.”

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ngress-brawls/ar-BBHWlNN?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
     
  10. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    Gubmint needs to get out of both health research and insurance. Argument solved.
     
  11. Ensoniq

    Ensoniq Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    These are all horrible ideas IMO

    1) a national fee schedule is price control (and an opportunity to learn for the millionth time that fixed pricing affects availability of service). The "correct" answer is to require published pricing where everyone knows the cost before hand and you aren't charged differently from anyone else

    2) banning imports is ok but bypassing the FDA by stipulating that regulatory approval by a foreign country is adequate is a bad idea unless the patient indemnifies the supplier and accepts the risk of side effects. Even with the FDA process the drug companies are constantly sued for side effects, this won't get better without GAMP oversite

    3) eliminate FDA involvement with generics is oversimplification and dangerous. A lot can go wrong with drug manufacture. The FDA does a lot more than just approve the generic (such as audit the process of production and participate in defining the acceptance criteria for the drugs value). Even the term generic is an oversimplification. There are tiers, bio similar means "close enough" not the same thing just cheaper

    4) health courts is the exact opposite direction. It's easy to say no lawyers but this will be a boon for the trial lawyers lobby. Yeah, we'll just open another front that adds cost and instability to the supplier that should make the cost come down ;)

    Conceptually we need less government and the patient needs to accept more liability. Pricing need to be published and the regulations that dictate what can and has to be bundled needs to be canceled. The free market would work if you let it (competition)

    Think VIOXX, a great pain killer that's non opioid that was helping millions. But no, the 99% that benefited were told they couldn't have it because 1% were getting leaky heart valves. If the consumer knows and chooses to rake it with the informed risk they should be able to IMO
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    On health care, Democrats are shifting to offense

    [​IMG]
    Associated Press
    By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press
    1 hr ago



    WASHINGTON — Democrats are shifting to offense on health care, emboldened by successes in defending the Affordable Care Act. They say their ultimate goal is a government guarantee of affordable coverage for all.

    With Republicans unable to agree on a vision for health care, Democrats are debating ideas that range from single-payer, government-run care for all, to new insurance options anchored in popular programs like Medicare or Medicaid. There's also widespread support for authorizing Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices, an idea once advocated by candidate Donald Trump, which has languished since he was elected president.

    Democrats are hoping to winnow down the options during the 2018 campaign season, providing clarity for their 2020 presidential candidate. In polls, health care remains a top priority for the public, particularly for Democrats and independents.

    "We're tired of just playing defense," said Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., the party's 2016 vice presidential candidate. "It is now time to talk about the next big idea. It is a good time for everybody to put their big ideas on the table." His offering: "Medicare-X," a public insurance plan to be initially deployed in communities that lack private insurer competition.

    Rising Democratic ambitions come as a cloud of uncertainty lingers over former President Barack Obama's health law. While major provisions have survived the GOP onslaught, some Republicans are vowing to go for repeal again. Congress has ended the health law's requirement that most people get coverage, and that's expected to lead to higher premiums in 2019. But bipartisan legislation to stabilize insurance markets doesn't seem to be getting traction.

    Obama's former health secretary, Kathleen Sebelius, says she sees Democrats reclaiming a core belief that health care should be a right guaranteed under law.

    "Coverage for all is as much of an organizing principle for Democrats as eliminating Obamacare is for Republicans," said Sebelius. "But it turned out that (Republicans) didn't have any idea what that meant. I think Democrats have a much clearer vision."

    Time will tell. Here's a sample of ideas under debate by Democrats and others on the political left:

    —Medicare for All: Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders made single-payer, government-run health care the cornerstone of his campaign for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination. It remains the most talked-about health care idea on the left. Financing would be funneled through the tax system. Individuals wouldn't have to worry about deductibles, copays or narrow provider networks. Although state-level attempts to enact single-payer care have foundered because of the large tax increases needed, about one-third of Sanders' Democratic colleagues in the Senate are co-sponsoring his latest bill.

    —Medicare-X: The legislation from Sens. Kaine, and Michael Bennet, D-Col., would allow individuals in communities lacking insurer competition to buy into a new public plan built on Medicare's provider network and reimbursement rates. Medicare would be empowered to negotiate prescription drug prices. Medicare-X would be available as an option through HealthCare.gov and state health insurance markets. Enrollees could receive financial assistance for premiums and copays through the Obama health law. Eventually, Medicare-X would be offered everywhere for individuals and small businesses.

    —Medicare Part E: Yale University political scientist Jacob Hacker has proposed a new public health insurance plan based on Medicare, for people who don't have access to job-based coverage meeting certain standards. It would be financed partly with taxes on companies that don't provide insurance. Consumers would pay income-based premiums. Hospitals and doctors would be reimbursed based on Medicare rates, generally lower than what private insurance pays. "The crucial part of this is that you have guaranteed health insurance, just like you have guaranteed Medicare or Social Security," said Hacker. He's working with Democrats in Congress to turn the concept into legislation.

    —Medicaid Buy-In: Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, and Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, D-N.M., have introduced legislation that would allow states to open their Medicaid programs up to people willing to pay premiums. Although Medicaid started out as insurance for the poor, it has grown to cover about 75 million people, making it the largest government health program. Most beneficiaries are now enrolled in private insurance plans designed for the Medicaid market.

    Expect more ideas as the year unfolds, said Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress and a former top aide to Obama as well as Hillary Clinton. "Democrats are much more comfortable with an expansionist view," said Tanden. "Almost every Democrat is talking about truly universal health care."

    Some Republicans are taking note. In a recent floor speech, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., said "it's interesting listening to Democrats, because they think they have good ideas and they're just proven wrong by the facts."

    Barrasso aimed his criticism at Sanders' single-payer plan. "Democrats who are pushing for a Washington takeover of America's health care are still not coming clean about the rationing of care that it would cause," he said.

    But in Sanders' home state of Vermont, primary care physician Dr. Deborah Richter says she believes it's only a matter of time before the Unites States adopts single-payer. Activists who failed in an earlier attempt in the state are now focused on passing a plan that would cover just primary care.

    "I think the next election will be a move to the left," said Richter. "Whether Democrats will be willing to go for the whole system is pretty doubtful. I feel it might be possible for us to do it in phases."

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ng-to-offense/ar-BBI4tvN?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Obamacare On Its Last Legs? ... I Hope!
    RonPaulLibertyReport



    Streamed live 54 minutes ago
    Obamacare is a crony-politically-connected program that has punished Americans who need the exact opposite. Government must GET OUT of the healthcare industry. Ron Paul discusses on today's Liberty Report!
     
  14. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    I wonder if anyone in Congress is setting up a contingency budget for "if" the dollar collapses? You know one that will require 95% reduction of federal government and balancing the budget. I know it's a long shot and all that printing the dollar into oblivion would ever backfire.
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Wouldn't surprise me if contingency plans haven't already been drawn up. That could be an opportunity to kinda wipe the slate clean and go cashless. And maybe government by decree.

    Have you ever wondered why we need 18 billion for a wall but nothing for health care?
     
  16. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    I imagine that it has been drawn up but probably not by anyone in congress. Of course someone in Congress will pop up with bill in hand a day after it happens, just like they always do.

    I wonder a lot of things.
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trump White House clears path for Medicaid work requirement

    BY Terence Cullen
    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Updated: Thursday, January 11, 2018, 8:21 AM



    States will now be able to impose work requirements on able-bodied, low-income American adults to receive Medicaid benefits, the Trump administration signaled Thursday.

    The move is expected to impact millions of Americans who rely on the state-federal program to help get health coverage.

    It will allows states to deny Medicaid to able-bodied adults without a job, according to reports.

    Community involvement that’s commensurate with employment will be counted as a job under the new guidelines. That exemption also covers people undergoing treatment for substance abuse problems.

    Medicaid directors speak out against latest GOP health care bill

    “Medicaid needs to be more flexible so that states can best address the needs of this population,” Seema Verma, the Medicaid and Medicare chief, said in a statement. “Our fundamental goal is to make a positive and lasting difference in the health and wellness of our beneficiaries.”

    Ten states, all of which have Republican governors, recently applied for waivers to impose work requirements.

    Kentucky will likely become the first state to receive a waiver, which could happen as soon as Friday, the Washington Post reported.

    States can typically apply for waivers to make tweaks to the biggest government health plan, which covers more than 70 million people.

    NYC pharmacist scammed millions from state Medicaid, AG charges

    Medicaid doesn’t currently require recipients to have a job.

    Elderly and disabled recipients will be exempt from the new rule, as well as pregnant women.

    States have been advised to take into account recipients who look after an elderly relative or children.

    Almost 60% of working-age Medicaid recipients are in fact working full- or part-time jobs, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation study. Many of their employers, however, don’t offer healthcare coverage.

    Cuomo rips Trump’s rule favoring states against Medicaid funding

    Recipients who aren’t working were mostly taking care of a relative, attending school or too sick.

    The majority of those polled by the nonpartisan foundation opposed the Trump administration’s proposed cuts to Medicaid, but 70% said they supported some sort of work requirement.

    Advocates for the poor and Democrats are likely to pan the move.

    “It is a very major change in Medicaid that for the first time would allow people to be cut off for not meeting a work requirement, regardless of the hardship they may suffer,” Judy Solomon with the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities told the Associated Press.

    Upstate GOPers still hoping to hit N.Y. on Medicaid

    Republicans will likely see it as a major reform victory on a stable of the social safety net for more than 50 years.

    Medicaid has expanded over the years beyond the impoverished, to cover people in nursing homes and newborns.

    The Obama administration stretched the guidelines for Medicaid coverage to allow millions of working adults to qualify for the program.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/pol...h-medicaid-work-requirement-article-1.3750874
     
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  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Some Medicaid patients could have to WORK to be eligible for taxpayer-funded health care as Trump allows states to set job requirements
    • Administration said it'd allow states to test requiring some recipients to work
    • Issued guidance making it easier for states to propose test programs that implement such requirements
    • Medicaid is a federal-state collaboration covering more than 70 million people
    • It was expanded to cover those with jobs that don't provide health insurance


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5258147/Major-shift-Trump-opens-way-Medicaid-work-requirement.html#ixzz53stjpxuy
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
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  19. Ensoniq

    Ensoniq Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    Hey, who is cutting the strings on my hammock damnit
     
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    More than three million Americans drop off health insurance rolls as uninsured number sees biggest jump since Obamacare
    • New tax law canceled the 'individual mandate' from Obamacare that forced Americans to buy medical insurance
    • As a result, 2018 will see more Americans uninsured, beginning with a 3.2 million increase during 2017
    • Young Americans who are healthy and don't believe they need insurance, and poor Americans who can't afford it, are the groups that are shedding insurance
    • Gallup's survey found the latest uptick in uninsured numbers was the largest since it started measuring in 2008


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5276219/More-3-million-Americans-drop-health-insurance.html#ixzz54OVjP0cM
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  21. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    Freedom is nice isn't it?
     

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