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House Passes Health Care Bill

Discussion in 'Politics Forum (Local/National/World)' started by searcher, May 4, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    FWIW:

    Why can't we have UBER for Health Care?
    TheHealthRanger



    Published on Jul 18, 2017
    If Uber and other decentralized service systems are more efficient than centralized, government-controlled systems, why can't we have an "uber" version of health care?

    Why is our medical system structured on government monopolies and the criminalization of healing and natural medicine?

    Learn more at http://Liberty.news and http://DrugCartels.com
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trump tells Republican senators THREE TIMES at White House lunch to cancel their vacations until they repeal Obamacare – but Mitch McConnell dodges questions about it
    • Mitch McConnell said Wednesday that he will call a vote next week to repeal Obamacare and start a two-year clock ticking on a replacement deadline
    • At least three GOP senators say they oppose the new version, though – enough to guarantee a defeat
    • Now President Trump says senators shouldn't take their August recess until they get a bill across the finish line
    • He hosted nearly all of them for lunch at the White House, saying Democrats passed the law by lying about what it would and wouldn't do
    • McConnell dodged a question from DailyMail.com after the lunch event, refusing to say whether he will let senators take their annual vacation


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4711702/Trump-tells-Republican-senators-3-TIMES-cancel-vacation.html#ixzz4nJ0K7VyC
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Repeal and regroup
    • By KATHLEEN PARKER
    • 7 hrs ago

    It wasn't quite a wicked-witch-is-dead Munchkin happy dance, but the white noise of foregone conclusions drowned out Republicans' relatively muted regret over their failure to repeal and replace Obamacare.

    It was never gonna happen. Not no how.

    Partly this is because the GOP version of reform would have first done harm to our most vulnerable citizens -- the elderly, the disabled and the poor. Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins cited drastic Medicaid cuts as her reason for withholding support of the so-called "Better Health Reconciliation Act." Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul also said he wouldn't support the bill, because it didn't go far enough in repealing Obamacare.

    When two more GOP senators -- Mike Lee of Utah and Jerry Moran of Kansas -- defected Monday night, the deal was undone. Lee said the bill failed to repeal all of the Obamacare taxes. He also said the bill didn't go far enough in lowering premiums for middle-class families or in loosening costly regulations.

    Thus, the weeks-long tornado of hot tempers and chill winds culminated Tuesday morning when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell realized he didn't have enough votes.

    Health care is such a mind-numbing boondoggle that one must take frequent breaks from thinking about it. Therefore, let us pause for a moment to applaud the relatively unknown L. Frank Baum (1856-1919), author of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." Neither the passage of time nor the contempt usually bred by familiarity seems to dim the popularity or the seemingly eternal applications of his masterwork. In my experience as a columnist, I've found few issues, characters or moments -- whether writing about Bill Clinton's steamy White House encounters or McConnell's bland ruminations on regret -- that don't benefit from Baum's contextual frameworks.

    There. Now to yawn-inspiring health care reform in all its failed foregone-ness.

    During almost a decade of writing sporadically about health care in its various iterations, I've interviewed dozens of people from a mix of related fields -- medical, business, legislative and political. Not once have I found a single person who thought the GOP could pull off a repeal and replace. Why?

    Firstly, because the vast majority of Americans are fundamentally opposed to allowing others to suffer. And secondly, sort of, the ACA affects one-sixth of the U.S. economy. How does one untangle a knot of 20 million strings? Why not just repeal and replace California and call it a day? It would be easier.

    The fact is, Obamacare was never perfect nor should anyone have expected it to be. Today, we have a health care system in pitiful disrepair, as insurance companies opt out of exchanges, premiums continue to climb, and healthy, young people forgo insurance premiums that would have subsidized coverage for unhealthy, older Americans and the less fortunate.

    Therein lies the crux of the least solvable problem inherent in such a gargantuan, multifaceted overhaul: It denies, emphatically, the nature part of being human, which is in constant tension with government-mandated insurance coverage. The central question is: How do you make it both cost-effective as well as fair?

    Many Americans simply don't see the fairness in a system that requires them to pay high premiums for others' poor health, some of which is, let's face it, earned. Not deserved, but sometimes resulting from poor lifestyle choices. Why, indeed, should a single, childless 30-year-old male who runs three miles a day, eats rationally, doesn't drink, smoke or take drugs, be saddled with insurance premiums to cover pregnancy, abortion, alcoholism, addiction, or an abundance of health consequences resulting from obesity and inertia?

    For that matter, why should women have to subsidize men's sexual dysfunction curatives when, by the way, men don't have to pony up for women's corresponding, post-menopausal, medically appropriate intercessions. Here you see one of the finer-print dilemmas. We'd rather force nuns to concede tacit approval of abortion than insist that insurance subsidies be tied to healthy behaviors.

    I'm sorry if this sounds heartless; the brain calls it reality. No wonder Obamacare was so difficult to craft and a replacement equally so. There are simply too many moving parts to make the sucker float -- and too many reasons to not sink it.

    Since McConnell's repeal-only idea seemed doomed Tuesday afternoon after GOP Sens. Collins, Shelley Moore Capito and Lisa Murkowski said they oppose immediate repeal, perhaps, finally, Republicans and Democrats can snap on their wizard hats and cobble something workable together. After all, it's the only thing they haven't tried yet.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 44 cents a day.

    Kathleen Parker writes this column for The Washington Post. Email: kathleenparker@washpost.com.

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_e56b7d3c-c389-54a7-bb40-b5dbc187727c.html
     
  5. Cigarlover

    Cigarlover Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    remember when healthcare was so affordable that Dr's made house calls? You paid for their services with money in your pocket.
    Then insurance was born. You pay them and they will pay your bills for you..(so how does that work? How could it possibly be cheaper to have a middleman pushing papers around and then your Dr waITING 90 DAYS OR MORE TO GET PAID? )
    Then 15% of the American public did not want or could not afford to buy health insurance so the federal Gov stepped in and then insurance really got expensive. And did it fix the problem it was supposed to fix? Nope, still 15% don't have health insurance but the fed gov has spent more than a trillion trying to fix something that wasn't broke in the first place. Now a trillion divided by 40 million is 25,000. So for about 200 million we could have just bought health insurance for those that were uninsured and saved 800 million plus in the process. Now we have spent the money and still there are all those uninsured. LOL.
    But wait the feds are going to fix it!!. I'm not sure we can afford anymore of their fixing.

    If insurance did not exist how expensive would healthcare be? If you had to pay out of pocket would you eat healthier and take better care of yourself?

    In regards to another reply. I'm pretty sure they cant get rid of the clause where they cant come after you for not getting healthcare. I'm pretty sure that was the only thing that let the Supreme court rule in its favor in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2017
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  6. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    Been saying it for years. It's 100% always the case. Any time government gets involved under the premise of controlling costs (making things cheaper), they're guaranteed to skyrocket in price in the long run. Anything they purport to make affordable will be assured of becoming unaffordable.

    Need another recent example? Homes. Are homes cheaper or more expensive since big brother founded Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, FHLA, et al.? Of course they help you get a 30 year government insured loan which is the only way you can afford a home now. Before these boondoggle programs, homes were actually affordable. You had to save 20% but this was something a single wage earner family could achieve within a few short years. 20% in states like CA is $100,000. Good luck! But the idiot sheeple actually think they have been helped.

    Some people are waking up about health care, but the large majority still think that the government involvement is a good thing. Few are asking whether government should have a hand in it at all. Most are just asking, in what way should the government control healthcare.

    The only good news is, the paradigm is ending. Once the petro-dollar implodes, this will all be a moot point. Everything will return to the good old days when services and goods will be payable with direct payments of real money. Government will be forced to shrink 100-fold as they will have to actually balance a budget and won't be able to print money. Entitlements will come to an end. The wake up call will be painful but there's too many idiots now for it to end any other way.
     
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  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    I'm hoping things don't implode. Lotta peeps would be hurting real bad if that were to happen and crime would sky rocket. It wouldn't be safe to go to the grocery store alone. Could possibly lead to a police state. And it would be a golden opportunity for TPTB to get rid of cash and bring in a one world gov, one world monetary system and maye even a one world religion.
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Local paper.............

    Why Obamacare won and Republicans lost
    • By E.J. DIONNE JR.
    • 7 hrs ago

    The collapse of the Republican effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act is a monumental political defeat wrought by a party and a president that never took health care policy or the need to bring coverage to millions of Americans seriously. But their bungling also demonstrates that the intense attention to Obamacare over the last six months has fundamentally altered our nation's health care debate.

    Supporters of the 2010 law cannot rest easy as long as the current Congress remains in office and as long as Donald Trump occupies the White House. Congress can undermine the act through sharp Medicaid cuts in the budget process and other measures. And Trump, placing his own self-esteem and political standing over the health and security of millions of Americans, has threatened to wreck the system.

    "We'll let Obamacare fail, and then the Democrats are going to come to us," Trump said after it became obvious that the Senate could not pass a bill. But if Obamacare does implode, it will not be under its own weight but because Trump and his team take specific administrative and legal steps to prevent it from working.

    "I'm not going to own it," Trump insisted. But he will. And if Trump does go down the path of policy nihilism, it will be the task of journalists to show that it is the president doing everything in his power to choke off this lifeline for the sick and the needy.

    As long as "repeal Obamacare" was simply a slogan, what the law actually did was largely obscured behind attitudes toward the former president. But the Affordable Care Act's core provisions were always broadly popular, particularly its protections for Americans with pre-existing conditions and the big increase in the number of insured it achieved. The prospect of losing these benefits moved many of the previously indifferent to resist its repeal. And the name doesn't matter so much with Obama out of office.

    To the surprise of some on both sides, the debate brought home the popularity of Medicaid, which for the first time received the sort of broad public defense usually reserved for Medicare and Social Security. The big cuts Republicans proposed to the program paradoxically highlighted how it assisted many different parts of the population.

    This creates an opening for a new push to expand Medicaid under the ACA in the 19 states that have resisted it, which would add 4 million to 5 million to the ranks of the insured.

    Republicans also found, as they did during the budget battles of the 1990s, that when they tie their big tax cuts for the wealthy to substantial reductions in benefits for a much broader group of Americans, a large majority will turn on them and their tax proposals. For critics of the GOP's tax-cutting obsession, said Jacob Leibenluft of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, this episode underscores "the importance of making clear the trade-offs of Republican fiscal policy." To win on tax cuts, the GOP has to disguise their effects -- or pump up the deficit.

    One Democratic senator told me early on that Republicans would be hurt by their lack of accumulated expertise on health care, since they largely avoided sweating the details in the original Obamacare debate after deciding early to oppose it. This showed. They had seven years after the law was passed and could not come up with a more palatable blueprint.

    The popular mobilization against repeal mattered, too. With Republican senators discovering opposition to their party's ideas in surprising places, pro-ACA activists drove two wedges into the Republican coalition.

    One was between ideologues and pragmatic conservatives (Republican governors as well as senators) who worried about the impact of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's designs on their states.

    The other divide was within Trump's own constituency, a large share of which truly believed his pledge to make the system better. They were horrified to learn that they could be much worse off under the GOP proposal. A Washington Post-ABC News poll this month found that 50 percent of Americans preferred Obamacare and only 24 percent picked the Republican bill. Trump's approval ratings are dismal, but the GOP plan's were even worse. Defectors in the Trump base may have been the silent killers of this flawed scheme.

    And that is why a scorched-earth approach from the president would be both cruel and self-defeating. Americans now broadly support the basic principles of Obamacare. Republicans, including Trump, would do well to accommodate themselves to this reality.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 44 cents a day.

    E.J. Dionne writes this column for The Washington Post. Email: ejdionne@washpost.com. Twitter: @EJDionne.

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_87b8474a-350a-5825-a8ba-f4df3d23951d.html
     
  9. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    It's a foregone conclusion. It's just a matter of when not if. Once the rest of the world dumps the petro dollar, the jig is up. I think the last number I saw was we'd gone from 75% to 45% of world currency transactions (Mike Maloney source). The major countries we're antagonistically pissing off as well as the reckless overspending on war and entitlements is just accelerating this. Had we been a bit more judicious in our printing, the racket would possibly have continued through our lifetimes. I think the next financial crisis will be enough to cause us to weaken the dollar enough to see that 45% plummet enough to trigger an ultimate rejection of the petro dollar. For the US, we'd then be forced to come up with a hard currency and to balance our budgets. Of course, we'd turn into a 2nd world nation over night.
     
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  10. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Trump should take a lesson from Obama's play book and just sign an EO telling the Executive agencies to not enforce ObamaCare.
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Spending a lot on health care the American way
    • By Tyler Cowen
    • 8 hrs ago


    The U.S. has some of the most expensive medicine in the world, with health-care spending now almost 18 percent of gross domestic product. But why? And might we hope to get this spending down? Unfortunately, expensive health care is embedded in the American way of life -- more specifically, the American desire to live it up with high consumption.

    As outlined by the blog Random Critical Analysis, U.S. health-care expenditures go well beyond what the U.S.'s relatively high per capita GDP might lead us to expect. But viewed through the lens of consumption behavior, American health-care spending is typical of this nation's habits and mores. Relative to GDP, Americans consume a lot more than Europeans, and our health-care spending is another example of that tendency.

    Why is American consumption so disproportionate to American GDP? One reason is the relatively low household savings rate, or possibly American net wealth is high relative to GDP.

    Consumption in the U.S., per capita, measures about 50 percent higher than in the European Union. American individuals command more resources than people in countries such as Norway or Luxembourg, which have higher per capita GDP. The same American consumption advantage is evident if you look at dwelling space per person or the number of appliances in a typical home.

    Once we focus on consumption, America's high health-care expenditures no longer appear so unusual. In fact, if you graph health-care expenditures, per capita, against individual consumption, the fit is very close across developed nations. In other words, the spending bug tracks into health care, too.

    To put it most simply, we Americans spend a lot on health care because we spend a lot period.

    Is health care best thought of as a kind of consumption decision? That's debatable, because spending on better health is also an investment in longevity, comfort and lifetime earnings. It's not like buying a new dress or a fancy ski vacation. Yet Americans nonetheless seem to mentally treat a lot of health care as similar to personal consumption. They may want a particular doctor, or a sufficiently comfortable hospital, the latest technology or the very best prescription drug to make them feel better as quickly as possible. As a nation, we are relatively intolerant of long waits, and we're not sufficiently focused on the long-term solutions of exercise and good diet. We love the quick fix, we want it on our terms, and we hate being told no. We're willing to go to extreme lengths to keep medical patients alive, rather than giving up hope, even when less intervention might be the more rational medical decision.

    I do think these tendencies reflect a kind of American national weakness, and that we would be better off if we had a less consumerist, more philosophical, and indeed more spartan approach to our health and well-being. That would lead to less overtreatment, less strain on health-care resources, and in the longer run a healthier nation with a sounder fiscal position for the federal government.

    But I just don't see this nation on the verge of such a change, and so the message here is somewhat pessimistic. Americans love their personal consumption, and household savings rates have been mostly falling since the early 1980s. Those are long-term cultural trends that no health-care policy will reverse. We should be grateful for whatever cost control we can get, because it is running counter to some fairly fundamental principles of the American economy and what the American people expect out of life.

    Furthermore, we shouldn't take the lower health-care spending in many European nations as a sign of better health-care policy. It's a reflection of a broader cultural difference. If the U.S. someday did move to a single payer system for health care, it probably would be a relatively expensive version of that idea. The U.S., of course, does have a partial single payer system through Medicare, and it is still more expensive per beneficiary than its European equivalents.

    When it comes to understanding America, including its health care, the spending bug is more important than you might think.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 44 cents a day.

    Tyler Cowen is a Bloomberg View columnist. He is a professor of economics at George Mason University and writes for the blog Marginal Revolution.

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_70d1df26-4d94-5f2b-825e-8e46a5dfdb0a.html
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'The repercussions will be far greater than any of them understand!' Trump issues stark warning to the Republican Party over their failure to repeal Obamacare ahead of crucial Senate vote
    • Trump thereatened members of the GOP in a tweet on Sunday night
    • It comes ahead of the Senate vote this week on revised healthcare reform
    • Earlier on Sunday, he expressed his frustration with the GOP, saying they 'do very little to protect their President'
    • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, of Kentucky, is making a last-gasp effort to resuscitate the legislation
    • Trump insisted that senators not leave town for their August recess without passing a health bill


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4723472/Trump-threatens-failure-repeal-Obamacare.html#ixzz4njIVWvvK
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'I wish I could get President Trump to see this': Fairground becomes a makeshift hospital 'like you'd expect to see in Sudan' to deal with the US health care crisis as officials grumble over ObamaCare
    • Hundreds of desperate patients, some in their 90s, travelled miles to be seen to by doctors offering free care
    • Medical staff used animal stalls, articulated lorries and barns to carry out health examinations and treatment
    • Pictures show rows of people lying in beds being treated by doctors walking on dirty tarmac in Wise, Virginia
    • Charity workers said the scenes were like something they would expect to see in South Sudan or Haiti


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4724754/US-fairground-makeshift-hospital.html#ixzz4nlGSow00
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  14. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    So what it's really saying is we don't need all the fancy shit to get care........ didn't see anyone dying in those pics..... glasses, dentist, basic medical.........

    I
     
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  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    ACA: Government gets risk, insurers get profits
    • 10 hrs ago

    I write today with concerns about health care access and affordability for Pennsylvanians. The Senate process of repeal and replace of the ACA was, in my opinion, disorderly and secretive. The legislative proposal that emerged from the Senate had elements of repeal, elements of tax reform and elements of Medicaid restructuring, all in one bill. It was overreaching.

    And for all the elements the Senate proposed legislation did contain, I did not see substantive effort to address a major concern of mine regarding the public-private partnership at the heart of the Affordable Care Act and its vulnerability for taxpayer dollars to be used as corporate profit by the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries.

    Health care costs in premiums, deductibles and copays are too high in the individual market. Health care costs for Medicare and Medicaid/CHIP are too high for the federal and state budgets. At the center of these two problems, I see the health insurance industry. The goal of the ACA was to provide affordable, accessible health care for Americans. This mandate, in large part, is delivered via private-sector companies.

    I believe health care insurers wish to keep our eye on the revenue losses in the individual insurance market, a market that is only 6 percent of all U.S. health insurance. These insurance companies are seeing large and unchecked corporate profits in the larger, group insurance market, a market of 178 million Americans — 61 percent of the health insurance market. Profits in the group market more than offset losses in the individual market.

    The ACA, structured as a public mandate for health care for all Americans implemented by private insurance companies for 67 percent of insured Americans, has left risk for the government to manage and profit for the private health insurance companies to reap.

    The “death spiral” of the ACA alleged by the GOP is overstated. It is reparable, and I urge my members of Congress to do so.

    At the same time, I ask my elected representatives to carry this message to Washington: Do not look to balance the budget and manage the ever-rising cost of health care by uninsuring 20 million Americans through repeal of the ACA. Rather, it is time now to look seriously at containing cost at the heart of the public-private partnership, that is, the profits enjoyed by the health insurance and pharmaceutical companies.

    Andrea Benack, M.D.

    Doylestown Borough

    Dr. Benack is a member of the Bucks County Medical Society and the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 44 cents a day.

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_23c8faa9-f35b-5da5-a964-10daea2c7de1.html
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Be prepared... to lose your job! Trump uses speech in front of Boy Scouts to tell his Health Secretary he will FIRE him if Republicans fall short on repealing Obamacare
    • President Trump spoke before a giant crowd of Boy Scouts of America, celebrating their annual Jamboree in West Virginia Monday night
    • Trump first promised not to make his speech political, though quickly attacked Obamacare, the swamp, the media and even former rival Hillary Clinton
    • Anticipating a close Senate Obamacare repeal vote, Trump used the opportunity to tell Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price he would fire him


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4726598/Trump-uses-Scout-speech-tell-HHS-head-fired.html#ixzz4npmIeyTg
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  18. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    They have the majority in both houses and the white house. They are ineffective at getting anything done even though they ran on it and held 60+ votes to repeal when they knew that would never happen. Now they can't do a dam thing.....
    Seems the whole lot need arkansided. I got no use for them or the drivel they spew at the sight of a camera.
     
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  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Party of Simon Legree doesn't get the realities of life
    • By THEODORE J. COHEN
    • 7 hrs ago

    Anyone who's read Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin" remembers Simon Legree, the cruel slave owner who had Tom brutally flogged to death on his Louisiana plantation. Today, his name has become synonymous with greed, something that describes to a "T" the Grand Old Party, otherwise known as the Republicans.

    One need look no further than the budget President Trump released late last month. What he did then, for all intents and purposes, was poke a giant stick in the eyes of the very people who voted him into office. Think about the people of Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Michigan, among other states. More specifically, think about those in Detroit, or, more locally, in Scranton.

    Food stamps? Cut! Reduced by $193 billion over 10 years. Looked at another way, that could slash by 44 million the number of people who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). And God help you if there are more than six people in your family because any additional family members would be kicked off the program, no questions asked! The reforms in SNAP alone would (according to White House estimates) generate $193 billion in savings over a decade. "Parents in Montana and across Indian country should not have to choose between food for their tables, gas for their cars, and shoes for their kids," said Senator Jon Tester (D-Mont.).

    What's Trump's message to the poor? Budget Director Mick Mulvaney put it this way: "If you are on food stamps and you are able bodied, we need you to go to work." Yet it wasn't clear how the White House would go about putting the 6.8 million unemployed or underemployed Americans back to work.

    Of course, the administration couldn't stop there. When you throw in changes to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (slashed by $616 billion over the next decade) and disability insurance (cut by $70 billion), among other proposed reforms, the total cuts to this nation's safety net amount to more than $1 trillion over 10 years -- savings that apparently would be passed along as tax cuts to the wealthiest 1 percent in the country. But that should not surprise you, given who the president is and the makeup of his $14 billion cabinet.

    What one Trump cabinet member — an apologist for the administration's proposed budget cuts — said about the poor last month reminded me of something Marie-Antoinette, bride of France's King Louis XVI, allegedly uttered in 1789 when told her French subjects had no bread: "Let them eat cake." I am, of course, speaking about the insensitive remarks made by Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Dr. Ben Carson in an interview with Armstrong Williams on SiriusXM Radio. In talking about the poor, he stated: "I think poverty to a large extent is also a state of mind. You take somebody that has the right mindset, you can take everything from them and put them on the street, and I guarantee in a little while they'll be right back up there."

    Talk about not comprehending the realities of life! While fortunate to have had a mother who helped him rise out of poverty, Dr. Carson is totally bereft of experience in both government and politics as well as the management of major social programs . . . hardly the prescription for success in managing an organization overseeing the principal federal agency responsible for the nation's housing needs and the development of its communities.

    Taken together, the Trump budget and the GOP health care bill — which would leave 23 million more uninsured in a decade — show the so-called Party of Reagan for what it truly is: the Party of the One Percent, who will stop at nothing to enrich those at the top of the economic ladder while ensuring the rest of us pay the bills.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 44 cents a day.

    Theodore J. Cohen, Ph.D., of Middletown, spent 40 years in the greater Washington, D.C., area, watching what went on inside the Beltway.

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_b5b37d8a-82ab-593a-aabf-305af6d8013e.html
     
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'ObamaCare is torturing the American People': Trump predicts Republicans will have a 'great victory' in today's Obamacare repeal vote after John McCain's surprise return to the Senate
    • Trump ordered senators yesterday from the bully pulpit of the White House to vote to begin debate on an Obamacare repeal bill today
    • But lawmakers don't even know what repeal route they're voting to take
    • They could pursue legislation that would gut the existing health law now and delay the consequences for two years while they figure out a fix
    • Trump wants them to move ahead with legislation that seeks to meet both aims simultaneously but will take what he can get
    • 'ObamaCare is torturing the American People. The Democrats have fooled the people long enough. Repeal or Repeal & Replace! I have pen in hand,' he said
    • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has a razor-thin margin for error
    • The GOP can lose two votes, if the vice president acts as a tie breaker, and come out ahead, now that John McCain has returned to the Senate


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4728488/Trump-predicts-GOP-great-victory-health-vote.html#ixzz4nqoymyBP
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  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  22. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Great! Now the snowflakes will cry a river.......
     
  23. latemetal

    latemetal Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    I'm going to watch the Republicans destroy themselves not to repeal Obamacare...
     
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  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Senate blocks new GOP plan to repeal and replace Obamacare as NINE Republicans vote against it hours after Trump's victory lap in Ohio
    • Vice President Mike Pence cast a tie-breaking vote to move forward with repealing and replacing Obamacare, a major GOP promise for seven years
    • Hours later, senators voted 57-43 on the amended Better Care Reconciliation Act, falling far short of the necessary 60 votes
    • The BCRA amendment required 60 votes, rather than a simple majority, because it had not been scored by the Congressional Budget Office
    • The GOP will vote Wednesday on a version of the repeal bill that passed both the Senate and the House in 2015 before it was vetoed by Obama
    • If that fails, Republicans will try to vote on separate amendments eliminating elements of Obamacare that are more likely to receive 50 votes


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4730696/Senate-proposal-repeal-replace-Obamacare-voted-down.html#ixzz4nvjqRB7y
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  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  26. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    IMHO, at this point just letting it fail miserably is the best option. If it's reformed or replaced, it'll become TrumpCare and we don't want that either.

    Just let it fail,....as it was originally designed to do.
     
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  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    PA leaders warn of health care bill's negative impact ahead of Senate vote


    Ahead of Tuesday’s U.S. Senate Republican-driven effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, three Pennsylvania leaders joined to once again denounce the health care plan and warn about its negative impact on the state.

    “It’s a bad piece of legislation for virtually everyone we can think of,” U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Lackawanna County, said of the Republican plan, which U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Lehigh County, helped craft as part of a 13-member Senate GOP panel.

    As he has done since it was unveiled, Casey argued that the plan would hurt the middle-class, seniors, children and the disabled mostly through deep cuts to Medicaid funding that would have a widespread impact on health care across the state.

    “We have to do everything we can to defeat this bill,” Casey said, again cautioning that more than 700,000 Pennsylvanians could lose coverage by 2026 and 62,000 health-care related jobs could be lost.

    “This bill is a wrecking ball for our health care system,” he continued.

    Casey and Gov. Tom Wolf, who was also on the conference call with reporters along with state Attorney General Josh Shapiro, have said rural hospitals are specifically threatened by the cuts to Medicaid because they rely on reimbursements to operate.

    “This bill is really bad for Pennsylvania and for so many other states,” Wolf said.

    Whether it is the various versions of the Senate bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, or the U.S. House Republican bill, the American Health Care Act, Wolf said the result will be less coverage, no protection for pre-existing conditions, fewer children and seniors receiving Medicaid assistance and states forced to make grim choices to account for the decrease in federal funding.

    Wolf said 125,000 Pennsylvanians receiving substance use disorder treatment under Medicaid expansion would be at-risk of losing their coverage if the Senate plan is ultimately passed.

    “It’s hard to find anything in these plans that solve the problems that Republicans have been complaining about for years,” said Wolf, listing rising health care costs and increasing premiums among those issues.

    Both Wolf and Casey said President Donald Trump and Republicans have worked to confuse Americans and sabotage the existing system under the Affordable Care Act by claiming it is failing, telling people not to enroll and spreading uncertainty among insurers by threatening subsidies.

    “They’ve made the system worse by promoting uncertainty to uproot the system,” Wolf said.

    Wolf also reiterated his commitment to working on a bipartisan solution to health care issues with other governors, which followed his joining a letter with 10 other Democratic and Republican governors that called on Congress to scrap a repeal of the law commonly known as Obamacare and work to control costs and stabilize the market.

    “Governors are ready to come to the table and give our input,” Wolf said.

    Casey decried the impact the GOP plans would have on efforts to fight the opioid and heroin crisis gripping Pennsylvania. Besides the effect on those seeking treatment that Wolf mentioned, Casey said a purported $45 billion fund to augment opioid treatment over the next decade is not enough.

    “People don’t need a fund. They need coverage,” Casey said. “They don’t need some fund in Washington to buy off votes and that’s what it’s for.”

    That comment was seemingly directed at senators from West Virginia and Alaska and other states with serious opioid problems that were reluctant to back the initial GOP plan.

    Previously, Shapiro, a Democrat and former Montgomery County commissioner and state representative for the 153rd district, has warned that the Senate plan could mean as many as 175,000 Pennsylvanians who gained access to treatment under the ACA would see that opportunity vanish.

    While avoiding Toomey’s name, Shapiro referred to “our other senator” bragging about the fund. Shapiro, though, called it “nothing more than lip service” that won’t cover a quarter of what is needed to address the opioid and heroin epidemic nationwide.

    Toomey was among the 50 senators who voted yes to proceed with a debate on health care Tuesday afternoon. After two Republicans and all 50 Democrats voted no, Vice President Mike Pence voted yes to break the tie.

    After the vote, Casey released a statement again outlining several concerns of consequences if Senate Republicans pass their bill.

    “In the coming days, I will fight like hell to defeat this terrible and indefensible scheme,” he said.

    Staff writer Jenny Wagner contributed to this report.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 44 cents a day.

    J.D. Prose: 724-775-3200, 180; email jprose@calkins.com; Twitter: @jdprose

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_0e27b27e-7176-11e7-b1f6-f718ae6f9edc.html
     
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  29. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Republicans senators including John McCain kill off full repeal of Obamacare - leaving only a 'skinny' abolition on the table – but Trump says 'we’re doing okay'
    • Senate rejected 45-55 a straight repeal of Obamacare with a two-year delay in implementation to allow Congress to work out a replacement
    • Seven Republicans opposed the measure which was being pushed by their party leadership
    • Only option now is 'skinny' repeal
    • Trump hailed Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson for voting to proceed to the bill
    • 'I think we’re doing okay, Ron, I’m hearing good things'


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4732344/Obamacare-repeal-battle-Senate-floor.html#ixzz4nzCDSSgi
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  30. goldielox1

    goldielox1 Silver Miner Seeker

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    Unfortunately the gubmint doesn't work like that. They don't really have separate pockets. They will just pull the money out (printing) to continue paying off the insurance companies and covering the shortfalls. It won't "fail" until the entire gubmint fails (i.e. dollar impodes).
     
  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    '3 Republicans and 48 Democrats let the American people down': Humiliated Trump tweets after cancer-stricken John McCain hands him a defeat by voting AGAINST 'skinny' repeal of Obamacare
    • Three Senate Republicans voted against the skinny' Obamacare repeal bill
    • Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins were previously vocal about their criticisms of the bill; John McCain's deciding 'no' vote came as a shock after vote was stalled
    • Trump responded saying the 51 Senators had 'let the American people down'
    • Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's last ditch effort to pass a pared-down 'skinny' bill to repeal select Obamacare provisions failed spectacularly Friday morning
    • The 'skinny repeal' bill would have repealed individual mandates, raise premiums by 20% by 2018, and leave 16million more Americans uninsured by 2026
    • Previous efforts this week to pass a comprehensive bill and a repeal-only option failed; Trump urged his party to unravel Obamacare on Thursday morning


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4738296/Pence-arrives-Capitol-ahead-skinny-repeal-vote.html#ixzz4o7AORtkx
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
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  32. latemetal

    latemetal Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    51 brave people saved thousands of lives by defeating Trump and his evil minions.....Thank You.
     
  33. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Apparently they don't get enough. Many insurers have pulled out of exchanges. Why didn't the gov just give 'em mo' money to stay in?



    More like 51 idiots that need to be voted out of office.
     
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  34. Buck

    Buck Fabian Society Gold Chaser

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    Millions of brave people voted Trump into office just to drain the swamp
    it's low enough at this point to see exactly who we're dealing with

    At this point in time:
    Can it be anymore clear who the traitors are?

    Obamacare, what a legacy
     
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  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Good Rev wants to say a few words.............

    John McCain Understands Health Insurance
    ATLAHWorldwide



    Published on Jul 28, 2017
     
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Now Trump blames the Senate rules for his Obamacare repeal humiliations saying ditch the need for 60 votes - even though Republicans couldn't even muster 50 after John McCain's shock rebellion
    • Three Senate Republicans voted against the skinny' Obamacare repeal bill
    • Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins were previously vocal about their criticisms of the bill; John McCain's deciding 'no' vote came as a shock after vote was stalled
    • Trump responded saying the 51 Senators had 'let the American people down'
    • Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's last ditch effort to pass a pared-down 'skinny' bill to repeal select Obamacare provisions failed spectacularly Friday morning
    • The 'skinny repeal' bill would have repealed individual mandates, raise premiums by 20% by 2018, and leave 16million more Americans uninsured by 2026
    • Previous efforts this week to pass a comprehensive bill and a repeal-only option failed; Trump urged his party to unravel Obamacare on Thursday morning


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4738296/Pence-arrives-Capitol-ahead-skinny-repeal-vote.html#ixzz4o9NfxO2k
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Opinion | Now that Trumpcare has failed, it’s time to drop all the lies 6 / 18
    [​IMG]

    The Washington Post
    Greg Sargent
    6 hrs ago



    Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.


    It’s fitting that President Trump reacted to the epic collapse of the GOP repeal-and-replace push by vowing to keep up his campaign to sabotage the Affordable Care Act. “Let Obamacare implode, then deal,” Trump tweeted, meaning the administration should continue undermining the law, to force Democrats to the table to … well, it’s not clear what he wants from them, but it is clear is that he will continue sabotaging the ACA out of sheer rage and spite.

    For Trump, this has never been about improving our health-care system. Trump, who visibly had no idea how the ACA works or what was in the various GOP replacements, and who openly said he would sign whatever Republicans put in front of him, just wanted to boast of a “win” while triumphantly using Barack Obama’s signature domestic achievement as his own personal toilet paper roll.

    Trump has not yet secured that opportunity for himself. The “skinny repeal” bill failed, after Sen. John McCain cast the dramatic vote against it that, along with the opposition of Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins, sealed its fate, and for now, the fate of the GOP repeal push. Trump raged that all Democrats and three Republicans had “let the American people down.” But this outcome, ironically, was good news not just for the United States, but also for untold numbers of Trump’s own voters, the low-income and aging whites who also benefited from the ACA’s historic coverage expansion. Trump’s voters were spared the destructive impact of his peculiar combination of ignorance, megalomania and sheer indifference to the fate of millions.

    Trump’s threat to keep sabotaging the ACA, however, could actually still end up hurting a lot of people. There are plenty of tools that the administration can employ to keep sabotaging the individual markets and the ACA. Politico has a good rundown: The administration can do too little to promote enrollment or scale back enforcement of the mandate or give states more leeway to experiment with Medicaid in destructive ways. The administration can refuse to guarantee continued cost-sharing reductions, which has already caused insurers to exit the markets and hike premiums, something that could continue or get worse, leaving many more people without coverage options. Insurers are already warning of such an outcome.

    I don’t know if Trump will make good on these threats. But the important point is that the openly stated goal here is to hurt our health-care system — which would hurt real people — in service of an end that Trump has not articulated. Because he has no interest in understanding what challenges the ACA and our health system face, he has no idea what any “deal” with Democrats would look like. His only discernible goal is to force Democrats to capitulate to him in some vague way.

    But there is another way. If there is one thing I hope happens now, it’s that Trump and Republicans can shape their current response to the ACA around an acceptance of an idea that many of them have refused to acknowledge: that the ACA has effected positive change in the lives of millions, making American life more humane and just. The Medicaid expansion has expanded coverage to millions of poor people, many of whom no doubt never had coverage in their lives, and many deep in the heart of Trump country. The exchanges, for all their problems, have helped extend coverage to millions more, particularly people with preexisting conditions, who can now get robust insurance packages, and lower-income people who can now get coverage with the help of subsidies.

    Trump’s ongoing threats to sabotage the ACA have important overlap with the position of many congressional Republicans. Unlike Trump, Republicans had genuine principled reasons for wanting the ACA repealed — many of them sincerely believe that the ACA’s expansion of government spending and regulation is not worth the benefits the law has brought. But beyond this, many Republicans have also refused for years to tell the truth about the real-world impact of the law, or about what their own replacements for it would actually do. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan kept lying right up until the end, claiming the ACA is merely “collapsing and hurting American families.” Throughout, Republicans claimed endlessly that their solutions would not cut Medicaid and would leave nobody worse off, and that if millions were left uninsured, it would be by choice under the new reign of freedom they would usher in. Trump, too, hopes to sabotage the ACA under the guise of the lie that it is collapsing of its own accord.

    But the American people flatly rejected all of these arguments. By finally introducing concrete plans of their own that would bring about an enormous rollback of the ACA’s historic coverage gains, Trump and Republicans managed to get Americans to take another look at Obamacare. The result is that it finally edged into positive approval territory, with large majorities supporting the basic priorities embedded in its expansion of health spending on poor and working people, paid for by high-end taxes, and large majorities rejecting the GOP’s massively regressive alternative.

    My point is not that Republicans should stop making arguments against the ACA or stop trying to move our health-care system in a conservative direction. Indeed, a genuinely bipartisan approach to reforming our health-care system could end up giving Republicans some deregulatory measures in exchange for GOP help in shoring up the exchanges and a GOP acceptance of the ACA’s coverage expansion. Some Republican health wonks are now calling on their party to adopt a similar approach. But for this to happen, we would all have to proceed from shared agreement that this coverage expansion — one fostered by government — has actually helped enormous numbers of people, even if it isn’t in the manner that Republicans had hoped.

    * REPUBLICANS WHO VOTED FOR BILL KNEW IT COULD BE DISASTROUS: An important point in the New York Times overview:

    "Even some senators who voted for the bill Friday conceded that its enactment could have been disastrous. It would have repealed the mandate that most Americans have insurance, without another mechanism to push Americans to maintain insurance coverage. Under those circumstances, healthy people could wait to buy insurance until they are sick. The insurance markets would become dominated by the chronically ill, and premiums would soar, insurers warned."

    Let’s not forget that most Senate Republicans, in an act of staggering bad faith, voted for something they knew (if the House passed it, which Ryan suggested could happen) could end up becoming law, despite knowing it would be massively damaging to the country.

    * MIKE PENCE’S LAST-MINUTE PLEAS FAIL: The Post has a great anecdote showing how the vice president’s last-minute plea to John McCain, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski failed:

    "Pence walked over at 12:44 a.m. McCain smiled, pointed at Collins and Murkowski, said something about “marching orders,” and stood up. “Mr. Vice President,” he said, greeting Pence. For the next 21 minutes, the vice president cajoled McCain, Collins and Murkowski. Twice during the conversation, a Pence aide came to whisper in the vice president’s ear — other reporters learned it was the White House calling."

    The ignominious performance of Vice President Pence, who lied about the GOP bill in truly reprehensible fashion, should also not be forgotten.

    * WHERE MUELLER’S PROBE MAY BE HEADED:USA Today scoops:

    "Since Election Day, President Trump’s businesses have sold at least 30 luxury condos and oceanfront lots for about $33 million. That includes millions of dollars in properties to secretive shell companies … Now, details of some of those deals and other transactions by Trump’s family business could be unmasked as special counsel Robert Mueller expands his inquiry … Federal investigators are expected to delve into records revealing some of the President’s most closely guarded secrets, including how much money he makes, who he does business with and how reliant he is on wealthy, politically-connected foreigners."

    Keep in mind, some of this appears to include financial activity that took place after Trump was sworn in as president.

    * CONGRESS’S CHECK ON TRUMP FOREIGN POLICY IS UNUSUAL: Yesterday the House voted to dramatically restrict Trump’s ability to ease sanctions on Russia, and the Washington Examiner notes the larger context:

    "Foreign policy analysts … say that it is highly unusual for Congress to hamstring a president’s ability to conduct foreign policy. The trend over the past 25 years or so has been to show deference on these matters to the executive. “It’s unusual. The last time Congress overrode a presidential veto in a major foreign policy issue was Ronald Reagan in 1986 on South African sanctions,” said Aaron David Miller, a scholar at the Wilson Center."

    Between this and the failed health-care vote, it was a very bad day for the tweeter-in-chief.

    * RUSSIA RETALIATES OVER SANCTIONS VOTE:Meanwhile:

    "Russia announced Friday it would seize U.S. diplomatic properties and demand that the State Department reduce its staff in Russia, a tit-for-tat punishment that the Russian Foreign Ministry said was spurred by a financial sanctions bill now awaiting a signature from President Trump."

    This creates a very interesting situation for Trump, who still has not said clearly whether he’ll sign the sanctions bill or veto it.

    * ON HEALTH CARE, DON’T FORGET THE BIG PICTURE:Paul Krugman reminds us of it:

    "This story didn’t start in the last few weeks, or the past few months. Republicans have been denouncing Obamacare and pledging to repeal and replace it for seven years, only to be caught flat-footed when given the chance to come up with an alternative. Shouldn’t someone in the G.O.P. have asked, “Hey, guys, what is our plan, anyway? If we don’t have one, shouldn’t we consider helping make this law work?” But nobody did."

    Even more cynically, Republicans spent years voting to repeal the law, secure in the knowledge that Obama would veto those attempts and spare them from owning the consequences.

    * AND TRUMP LOVES ‘THE MOOCH’: New White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci is getting lots of attention for saying really nasty stuff about other top White House people. Axios reports:

    "The President likes people with backbone. And at the moment, Scaramucci is empowered: We’re told the President loved the Mooch quotes. But President Trump doesn’t like being upstaged. “Mini-me” can’t forget the “Mini” part. Being more Trump than Trump, in Trump’s house, is a dangerous game."

    The funny thing about this is that it’s entirely plausible, both in Trump’s affection for “the Mooch” and in how Trump might be conflicted over all the attention he’s getting.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/opini...-all-the-lies/ar-AAoYp3n?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
     
  39. latemetal

    latemetal Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    [​IMG]Somebody got paid off.
     
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  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'They look like fools!' Trump slams the Republicans for healthcare disaster in early morning Twitter rant and says Russia was 'against' him in the election
    • President Donald Trump took to Twitter Saturday and criticized Republican lawmakers as ‘fools’ for failing to pass a bill that would repeal Obamacare
    • ‘Republican Senate must get rid of 60 vote NOW!’ the president tweeted on Saturday
    • Trump was referring to the 60-vote threshold that is needed in the Senate to override a filibuster whenever discussion came up for a bill
    • GOP reeling from dramatic late-night vote on Friday in which three senators - John McCain, Lisa Murkowski, and Susan Collins - sunk healthcare bill
    • Trump also retweeted link to story claiming that firm which wrote dossier of salacious allegations against him once worked for Russian government


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4742146/Trump-slams-GOP-healthcare-disaster-Twitter-rant.html#ixzz4oEBGZmJf
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  41. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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