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How Angry Will You Be If The Republicans In Congress Do Not Repeal Obamacare?

Discussion in 'Politics Forum (Local/National/World)' started by Scorpio, Feb 28, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  2. gnome

    gnome Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    I agree, it is not a simple issue, there are many variables, including diet, exercise, occupational hazards, murder rate, environmental pollution, culture...

    The Japanese, while slimmer, have smoke tobacco at 2X the rate of the US.

    Per capita alcohol consumption is roughly equal, which I have a tough time believing considering the amount of vomit I regularly observe on the streets of Tokyo, especially saturday and sunday mornings.

    Why do the Japanese die of flu or pneumonia? Because they are old.

    While life expectancy vs total healthcare costs is an imperfect measure, it clearly shows that we are an outlier in that regard.
    Is there a better measure of healthcare efficiency?

    Even if we look at costs alone, and put aside outcomes, we pay by far the highest percentage of GDP for healthcare of any nation on earth. What do we have to show for our money?

    Pharma and insurance own our congress and are robbing us.

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    That's mostly due to the fact that the healthcare providers have been incentivized to massively over charge their customers.
     
  4. gnome

    gnome Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    Say more as to what you see as the incentives?

    I see when GWB put in the prescription drug benefit there was no incentive to control drug costs.
    When Obamacare was passed, private insurance companies were handed a captive audience.
    Both of those, to me, represent the worst aspects of merger of corporation and state.

    I'm not sure I'd call it an incentive, but one factor is insured patients end up paying higher costs for the uninsured who show up in the ER.
     
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  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    In today's paper..............


    Political interests outweigh public interest
    • By Dr. Mark Lopatin
    • 8 hrs ago


    So the American Health Care Act was rejected. And I want to scream! Not because it failed, but because of the way the whole thing was handled.

    While both parties will argue that they were trying to do what is best for the American public, I disagree. As a physician, what I see are two forces more intent on winning a political battle than in helping the public.

    Both the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the AHCA would help some people and hurt others. Young and old, healthy and sick, rich and poor all have competing needs and desires. It is absolutely incumbent upon our legislators to work together to find common ground.

    I am offended when House Speaker Paul Ryan talks about “our” plan where the word “our” refers to Republicans rather than all of Congress. The Democrats are no better, pointing out only the flaws in the AHCA without considering potential benefits. This "Us vs. Them" mentality must stop.

    The current system is untenable. The core of medicine is the patient-physician relationship. This is being destroyed by government mandates, electronic health records, coding requirements, insurance “guidelines,” etc. Third parties are determining health care rather than patients and physicians. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of physicians increased by about 100 percent from 1970 to 2009. During the same time frame, the number of administrators increased by about 3,200 percent!

    That is an incredible and telling statistic.

    These administrators stand between patients and doctors. Typically, a third party who is not even in the room is dictating what medicine or tests a patient can have. Physicians now spend more time documenting care to satisfy third party bureaucrats than actually providing care. Something is clearly wrong.

    Insurance needs to be in a relationship between patient and insurer, not between physician and insurer. I believe that patients should pay directly for routine care such as office visits, lab work, vaccinations, etc. and then reimbursed by insurers. This would not apply to catastrophic care. Auto insurance does not cover gas or oil changes. Why is health care expected to cover everything? These basic costs could, in part, be funded by tax credits and health savings accounts. Furthermore, direct patient care, a health care model that removes the middleman, is a viable option to provide care at reduced costs.

    Incumbent upon this is that costs must come down so that lower income people can have access to care. More importantly, costs must be transparent.

    Health care is the only entity where services are purchased without knowledge of cost. You would not go into a restaurant and order an item labeled “market price” without asking the price. Why is it different in health care?

    We also need to reduce sticker shock in high deductible plans. One idea is to have a limited deductible per event, much like how car insurance works. For example, if a patient has a $10,000 deductible, perhaps the deductible could be $500 per event. If an MRI costs $2,000, the patient would be responsible for the first $500. They would continue to pay up to $500 per “event” until they have met their total deductible.

    Pharmaceutical costs must be reduced. Competitive negotiating by Medicare, removal of pharmacy benefit managers, and elimination of direct to consumer advertising would be a start. However, the pharmaceutical lobby is a big one and would certainly object.

    These are just some of the things we can do. The only way there is change is if there is a public outcry. Physician organizations such as Practicing Physicians of America www.practicingphysician.org are leading the charge, but without patient input, change is not likely. I urge each of you to contact your legislator, write a letter, post on social media, etc., that it is simply unacceptable for someone other than the patient and physician working together to be dictating patient care.

    And we must demand bipartisan politics. Why not take the best of the AHCA and the best of the ACA to create a new plan with legitimate physician and patient input? We must insist that Democrats and Republicans work together. If not, it is not clear who will win, but it is predetermined who will lose and that is the American public.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 33 cents a day.

    Dr. Mark Lopatin, Jamison, is a rheumatologist in Willow Grove and Doylestown and chairman of the Montgomery County Medical Society and serves on the board of the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_cd43c88c-5c98-511b-aa2b-5ca2919e7475.html
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Also in today's paper............

    The GOP's lost health care conscience
    • By E.J. DIONNE JR.
    • 8 hrs ago

    I really miss liberal Republicans. People like Mitt Romney.

    No doubt the former Massachusetts governor would be aghast at being called such a thing. Of course Romney is not a liberal in any conventional sense. But 11 years ago -- it now seems like a lifetime -- Romney acted in the great tradition of liberal Republicans. He saw a problem and tried to solve it in the most business-friendly way possible. The result was the Massachusetts health care plan.

    At a celebration for the new law, as recounted in a 2011 New Yorker piece by Ryan Lizza, Romney tried to explain why his approach was in line with his party's history. "It's a Republican way of reforming the market," he declared. "Because, let me tell you, having 30 million people in this country without health insurance and having those people show up when they get sick, and expect someone else to pay, that's a Democratic approach."

    A bit demagogic? Sure, especially when one of the politicians who helped Romney pass his bill was the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, for whom universal health coverage was the cause of his political life.

    But Romney's definition of a plausible path for his party on health care was compelling. "The Republican approach is to say, 'You know what? Everybody should have insurance. They should pay what they can afford to pay. If they need help, we will be there to help them, but no more free ride.'"

    Yes, requiring everyone to buy health insurance on the private market and providing adequate subsidies so lower-income citizens could afford it really was a conservative idea. It was an alternative to liberal calls for a single-payer approach that would have the federal government take over the health care system.

    The mandate was seen not as oppressive, but as an endorsement of personal responsibility. If you can be required to buy car insurance (because everybody is at risk of getting into an accident), why not require people to buy health insurance (because everybody is at risk of getting sick)? But since health coverage is financially out of reach for so many, the fair thing is to ask them to pay what they can and have government fill in the rest.

    The debacle that is Trumpcare, aka Ryancare -- both President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan own this thing -- is a reminder that conservatism has gone haywire. Romney looks like a liberal because conservative Republicans (with a few honorable dissenters) have largely abandoned trying to solve social problems, except for offering free-market bromides as if they are solutions.

    Even Romney usually played down the greatest achievement of his governorship when he ran for president in 2012 because President Obama had the nerve to learn from the Massachusetts experience: The Affordable Care Act is rooted in the principles and policies of Romneycare. This was awkward for a Republican presidential candidate because repealing Obamacare had become GOP dogma. So, like a repentant heretic, Romney dutifully bowed to the new orthodoxy.

    We already know that any promise Trump makes is meaningless (my colleague Eugene Robinson memorably observed, "He even lies about his own lies"), but it's worth remembering that Trump has consistently tried to cast himself as more 2006 Romney than 2017 Ryan. "We're going to have insurance for everybody," Trump told The Washington Post in January. "There was a philosophy in some circles that if you can't pay for it, you don't get it. That's not going to happen with us."


    Actually, that is exactly what happened when Trump found himself issuing ultimatums on behalf of a bill that deprives an estimated 24 million Americans of health coverage (while cutting taxes on the affluent). Thus has Trump betrayed the working-class supporters he hides behind while pursuing the interests of his rich friends -- as well as his own.

    The United States is the only wealthy democracy in the world that doesn't provide health coverage to all its people. Republicans used to recognize this as a problem. Now, their ideology forces them to pretend it doesn't exist.

    In his definitive piece on Romneycare, Lizza noted that in the hardcover edition of Romney's book "No Apology," he had said of his health plan: "We can accomplish the same thing for everyone in the country." Lizza observed that "in the paperback, that line had been deleted."

    Many in the GOP seem ready to edit out part of its conscience. The Trump/Ryan health care bill crashed on Friday because at least some Republicans refused to acquiesce in desecrating their party's tradition.

    Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 33 cents a day.

    E.J. Dionne can be reached by email at ejdionne@washpost.com. Twitter: @EJDionne.

    http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_f1a2ce38-6a36-5cbb-9f9d-0edcdcbc0e7f.html
     
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  7. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    This from ALL THE ASS TURDS that have exempted themselves......
     
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  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    I can't wait to hear what kind of scheme "they" come up with next.
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Ryan tries to revive Obamacare repeal bill, saying Republicans will 'sit down and talk things out until we get there' – but Spicer says White House is not 'planning an immediate strategy'
    • House Speaker Paul Ryan addressed reporters days after Republicans had to pull a bill to repeal and replace Obamacare because it didn't have the votes to pass
    • He said he didn't want Republicans to 'become a factionalized majority'
    • President Trump has blasted the conservative Freedom Caucus on Twitter after the bloc failed to provide enough support for the bill
    • White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon has been meeting with conservative and more moderate members to discuss a possible path forward
    • The White House had threatened last week that the health bill was the 'only train leaving the station' and there was no 'Plan B'


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4357920/Ryan-says-Republicans-sit-talk-things-out.html#ixzz4ceXPYoQw
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  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Who needs complicated Trumpcare? Republican congressman files bill to repeal Obamacare with a single sentence
    • One Freedom Caucus member, Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., has introduced a bill that would repeal Obamacare in just one line
    • Brooks is calling on his GOP peers to sign the discharge petition so the bill could go through committee
    • While Speaker Paul Ryan said today he still has an appetite to deal with healthcare reform, the White House has moved away from the issue


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4357018/Lawmaker-files-bill-repeal-Obamacare-one-sentence.html#ixzz4chjefbrX
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  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  13. latemetal

    latemetal Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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  14. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    The providers are incentivized to start out with as large of a bill as possible because they know in advance that the insurance companies and Medicare/aid will only pay a portion of the billed amount. The providers want that portion to be as big as possible, hence the incentive to overcharge.
    ...and the insurance companies use those padded bills as the excuse to charge super high premiums with large deductibles.
    Edited to add: both practices feed off each other and destroy any incentive to find ways to actually lower the cost of healthcare, because both parties have a monetary interest in the customer thinking that the services cost way more than they actually do cost the providers to deliver.


    Also, with the customer who actually receives service being removed for the most part from the billing/paying process, most end up not caring what it costs because someone else gets the bulk of the charges.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2017
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  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trump takes Sen. Rand Paul to his Virginia golf club to play a game and talk health care
    • President Donald Trump visited his Trump National Golf Club in Potomac Falls, Virginia on Sunday
    • Trump brought along Sen. Rand Paul and Office of Management and Budget director Mick Mulvaney
    • Paul opposed Trump's health care bill for the same reasons that it wasn't a hit with the House Freedom Caucus
    • Today Trump tweeted that the health care conversation was ongoing and that he believed they could get to a deal


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4373282/Trump-hits-golf-course-Sen-Rand-Paul.html#ixzz4d7pOC2QP
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  16. edsl48

    edsl48 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    >>>>one factor is insured patients end up paying higher costs for the uninsured who show up in the ER.<<<<
    BINGO!!!
     
  17. Ensoniq

    Ensoniq Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    ^^

    A lot more encouraging than "I'll work with the Demonrats"
     
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  18. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    ...and all the unpaid healthcare costs totaled a whopping $41B/year when O'care was started. Sounds like a lot, but it's only about $125/person per year.
    So why do premiums and overall cost of healthcare need to go up by thousands per person in order to cover costs of a hundred per person?
     
  19. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Hope he "explained" to ryan why he won't be needing healthcare if he keeps fu<king up. I own your ass.
     
  20. hammerhead

    hammerhead Not just a screen name Gold Chaser

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    Looks like the people in the government that are against our government being involved with health care are few or nonexistent.
     
  21. hammerhead

    hammerhead Not just a screen name Gold Chaser

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    I would love to see all the actual numbers on what health coverage actually costs. This seems to me to be impossible to compute.
     
  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trump reboots health care: Paul Ryan says a new health care bill is in the 'concept stage' - as Rand Paul says president got him to stake vote for reform on outcome of golf game
    • The White House is giving health care reform another go with Vice President Mike Pence deployed to Capitol Hill to talk with conservatives last night
    • Today House Speaker Paul Ryan confirmed that a new plan is in the 'concept stage right now,' though wasn't sure if it would get a vote by recess
    • Sen. Rand Paul also revealed that Trump tried to sway him on health care when the two golfed together on Sunday, by making a bet on the outcome of the game


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4379302/Ryan-says-new-health-care-bill-concept-stage.html#ixzz4dJ0OUZ00
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  23. southfork

    southfork Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

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    Still think they should let it implode, dems all own it 100%
     
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  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  25. Ensoniq

    Ensoniq Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    I want to agree with this so much because you are so right

    A lot of people affected though

    Kill it dead for sure but let's unwind in an orderly fashion
     
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  26. latemetal

    latemetal Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    Since no matter what the Rethuglicans do, they WILL BE BLAMED, for the failure of Romney/Obama care, I say have fun...and see you in November 2018.
     
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  29. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Retired Miners Lament Trump’s Silence on Imperiled Health Plan
    [​IMG]
    The New York Times

    By NOAM SCHEIBER
    3 hrs ago

    UNIONTOWN, Pa. — Donald J. Trump made coal miners a central metaphor of his presidential campaign, promising to “put our miners back to work” and look after their interests in a way that the Obama administration did not.

    Now, three months into his presidency, comes a test of that promise.

    Unless Congress intervenes by late April, government-funded health benefits will abruptly lapse for more than 20,000 retired miners, concentrated in Trump states that include Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. Many of the miners have serious health problems arising from their years in the mines.

    In mining areas like Uniontown, Pa., and surrounding Fayette and Greene Counties, which Mr. Trump carried 2 to 1, it is an upsetting and potentially costly prospect. “It’s just a terrible, terrible feeling,” said one of the retirees, David VanSickle, who spent four decades at work in the mines. “I think about that 25 times a day.”

    The president has offered no public comment on the issue, even as he has rolled back regulations on mine operators, an omission that has not escaped the notice of Mr. VanSickle and other retired miners.

    “To me, that was kind of a promise he did make to us,” Mr. VanSickle said about Mr. Trump, whom he supported last fall. “He promised to help miners, not just mining companies.”

    Responsibility for the retirees’ health plans has increasingly shifted to the federal government in recent years, as struggling coal companies have shed their liabilities in bankruptcy court. Congress voted last fall to finance benefits for a large group of retirees for several months, but House and Senate Republican leaders have yet to agree on a longer-term solution.

    The benefits can easily mean the difference between a middle-class retirement and economic hardship, since many retired miners are too young to qualify for Medicare. Others have chronic or debilitating health problems that would require expensive supplemental coverage — currently provided by the retiree plan — even with the Medicare benefit.

    Norm Skinner worked for more than 20 years as a miner in eastern Ohio and had triple bypass surgery in 2010. Without the retiree health plan, he said, the surgery “would have broke me,” even with Medicare picking up much of the bill.

    Uniontown, which lies about 30 miles east of two large mines that once employed well over 1,000 miners but are down to roughly 600 after one ceased production in 2015, hints at both middle-class affluence and postindustrial angst.

    Around the corner from Ptak’s, a formidable-looking formal wear store on Main Street, are a handful of dilapidated storefronts and a vast, empty commercial space that advertises “mental health counseling” and “motivational speaking” for veterans. The space has the appearance of a renovation that was never completed and, to the naked eye, could pass for a sign of either revival or decline, like much of Uniontown itself.

    Mr. VanSickle, who lost parts of two fingers on the job, said his doctor advised him to retire two years ago, at 59, because he suffers from black lung, a condition associated with long-term exposure to coal dust.

    He manages the illness by attaching himself to a breathing machine that essentially props open the airway to his lungs while he sleeps. “My oxygen content would drop so low without it,” he said, fitting tubes into his nose from the bedroom of his comfortable home in Uniontown.

    Last fall, Mr. VanSickle priced out a private insurance plan that would provide roughly comparable benefits for him and his wife, who takes about a dozen separate medications to treat lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. The estimates came in at $1,500 to $1,800 per month.

    “I always wanted to be a person who would leave a little legacy for my children,” he said. “If I lose these benefits and my pension, there will not be enough for me, let alone for my children.”

    (Mr. VanSickle and his wife could be eligible for thousands of dollars in subsidies if they purchased insurance under the Affordable Care Act, said Larry Levitt of the Kaiser Family Foundation. But such a plan would most likely be more limited, and Mr. Trump still maintains that he wants to undo the program.)

    The miners typically regard their health care with a sense of moral entitlement, having frequently passed up higher pay during contract talks in order to top off their benefits.

    John Leach, 67, worked in four different mines over 23 years as a miner in western Kentucky. As a result, he said, “I got four of those speeches: ‘If you work here, you work your 20 years, you are guaranteed insurance for yourself and your family for the rest of your life.’”

    Since he retired in 2001, that insurance, along with Medicaid and Medicare, has kept him and his wife, Rhonda, 60, afloat. The couple care for two adult children with severe physical and mental disabilities. In 2015, the health plan paid out over $50,000 for Rhonda’s hip-replacement surgery.

    “I don’t know if you’ve ever gone through a serious test at the doctor’s office,” Ms. Leach said by phone. “You wait and wait and don’t hear anything and the pressure starts building up: Am I going to live or am I going to die? That’s exactly what this is like: living and dying.”

    Many retired miners who supported Mr. Trump understood that his promise to revive employment in their industry was a long shot in the face of cheap natural gas — “a couple of jobs” might come of it, Mr. VanSickle said.

    But they believed their wish was a modest one. The price tag for their benefits averages a little under $200 million per year over the next 10 years, which can be partly offset through interest that accrues in a federal fund for reclaiming abandoned mines. Because no new miners would become eligible for the health benefits awarded to this group, the cost would eventually dwindle to zero.

    Last year, the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, appeared reluctant to expedite a vote on a permanent fix despite bipartisan support, and despite representing a state where several thousand retirees are affected.

    One reason for his lack of enthusiasm may have been the hundreds of thousands of dollars the union spent opposing him in his most recent re-election campaign.

    Earlier this year, Mr. McConnell appeared to develop a sense of urgency, however, introducing legislation to pay for a once-and-for-all extension of the health benefits. (A McConnell spokesman noted that he had supported a one-year extension late last year.)

    Some time after that, the House speaker, Paul D. Ryan, let it be known that he could abide no more than 20 months, after which the benefits would either lapse or have to be extended again.

    “It perfectly lined up with the 2018 election,” said Senator Joe Manchin III, Democrat of West Virginia, the Senate’s leading proponent of a permanent resolution. Mr. Manchin speculated that Republicans favored another short-term reprieve so that his Republican opponent next year, who could be one of the House Republicans from his state, could claim credit for yet another extension.

    A spokeswoman for the House Appropriations Committee said all 2017 funding bills were still being negotiated.

    According to Mr. Manchin, Mr. Trump has told him privately that he supports his efforts, and Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, even reshared on Twitter one of Mr. Manchin’s social media pronouncements to that effect.

    A White House spokeswoman declined to comment.

    In the last few days, the House Republican leadership has suggested that it, too, might support a permanent fix, according to Phil Smith, the chief lobbyist for the miners union, but only if it can settle on a revenue source to offset the full cost. “It leaves the door wide open to ‘Well, we couldn’t find one,’” Mr. Smith said.

    Many miners in their early 60s are postponing retirement, unsure if their savings will suffice absent the health insurance they have long expected.

    Tony Brnusak, 62, who has worked for nearly 40 years in the Cumberland mine, said he would probably be retiring, if not for the uncertainty around his benefits.

    “My wife works and she’ll be retiring next year, but she won’t have the medical when she retires, she won’t have a pension,” he said. “We’re counting on mine.”

    He serves as president of the local mine workers union and estimates that at least 50 to 60 more workers at Cumberland, out of just under 600, are in a similar position.

    Although he agrees with Mr. Trump on some key issues, not least climate change, he can’t conceal his disappointment that the health care issue has lingered for so long.

    “I thought he was really going to help people,” Mr. Brnusak said, referring to Mr. Trump. “He’s helped the rich man, the coal operators. But nothing for us so far.”

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...d-health-plan/ar-BBA2DUF?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
     
  30. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Some Republicans Think They May Have A Health Care Deal
    [​IMG]
    The Huffington Post

    Matt Fuller
    5 hrs ago


    WASHINGTON ― GOP moderates and conservatives are nearing a deal on health care that in theory could get the Republican alternative to the Affordable Care Act out of the House and over to the Senate. The changes also might move Republicans even further away from passage ― no one really knows.

    The deal, brokered between House Freedom Caucus chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Tuesday Group co-chairman Tom MacArthur (R-N.J.), would allow states to get waivers eliminating the so-called community rating provision ― the rule that prohibits insurers from charging higher premiums to people with pre-existing conditions. In order to obtain the waiver, states would have to participate in a federal high-risk pool or establish their own, and satisfy some other conditions.

    In exchange for that conservative concession, the amendment would reinstate the Essential Health Benefits that were already taken out of the bill ― though, again, states could waive those provisions as well if they were able to show that doing so would lower premiums, increase the number of people insured, or “advance another benefit to the public interest in the state.”

    That’s according to a white paper describing the amendment, which is the result of weeks of negotiation between Meadows and MacArthur. While they have both agreed to the amendment, supposedly representing a number of conservatives and moderates respectively, the amendment is still being reviewed by the Senate and House GOP leadership.

    Additionally, with Republicans effectively going back on their repeated promises to guarantee coverage for people with pre-existing conditions, the amendment could lose a number of Republicans who already supported the legislation. In short, even though the Tuesday Group and the Freedom Caucus think they have a deal, Republicans writ large might have nothing.

    Leadership is expected to discuss the amendment on a conference call this Saturday with GOP members, but public opinion might also affect the landscape. Republicans are trying to say their amendment will cover people with pre-existing conditions ― because, first, the legislation still claims those people can’t be denied coverage, and second, because there will be high-risk pools for those people if insurance costs dramatically go up for them.

    The reality, however, is that insurers would be able to effectively deny coverage by pricing sick people out of the market.

    “This effectively allows states to eliminate the ACA’s guarantee of access to insurance at a reasonable price for people with pre-existing conditions, in the interest of lowering premiums for people who are healthy,” Larry Levitt, senior vice president at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, said upon seeing a description of the proposal. “It seems to tilt heavily towards what the Freedom Caucus has been looking for.”

    Republicans argue that the high-risk pools would then cover those people, taking them out of the regular insurance pool and lowering prices for everyone else, but high-risk pools have traditionally been underfunded by states and the federal government, resulting in poor coverage and high costs for those who need insurance the most.

    Those concerns may be significant enough that, even with MacArthur’s blessing, the deal does not win over moderates. The concessions also might not be enough for some conservatives, who have expressed issue with Republicans establishing an advance refundable tax credit to help pay for insurance.

    Republicans need 216 votes to pass their health care bill, and based on statements from GOP members, even with the support of the entire Freedom Caucus for the amendment, there may be enough moderate hold-outs to prevent passage anyway. (MacArthur doesn’t count as a convert; he supported the last bill, albeit reluctantly.)

    The amendment wouldn’t seem to address the big concerns moderates have expressed ― like raising the cap on how much insurers can charge seniors or cutting $880 billion from Medicaid. These changes are among the reasons that the Congressional Budget Office predicted the House health care legislation would increase the number of people without insurance by 24 million within a decade.

    Many Republicans ― particularly in the Senate ― have said such deep cuts are not acceptable. Just this week, Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) said he couldn’t support a proposal that jeopardized coverage for the approximately 300,000 people in his state dependent on the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion.

    Public opinion has also shifted since the repeal effort began in earnest ― and it has shifted decisively against Republicans and their cause. The Affordable Care Act is more popular than ever, and in a recent Pew Research Center poll, 54 percent of Americans said they trusted Democrats more than Republicans on health care, while just 35 percent said they trusted Republicans more. That’s the biggest advantage for Democrats on health care since 2009.

    In short, some leaders in the GOP conference might think they have a deal, but they also might have just found a way to make the bill even more unpalatable for Republicans, thus bringing Congress no closer at all.

    Still, Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) suggested that Republicans were getting close to a deal. “We’re in the midst of negotiating sort of finishing touches,” Ryan said Wednesday during a trip to London.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...lth-care-deal/ar-BBA3QjW?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
     
  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  32. tom baxter

    tom baxter back from 2004

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    That could be due to radiation poisoning the suburbs of Tokyo are pretty contaminated now.
     
  33. gnome

    gnome Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    The puke? Nah, the vomit tsunami preceded 3/11 fukushima catastrophe.
     
  34. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trump's Second Obamacare Repeal Attempt On The Edge Of Collapse

    [​IMG]
    by Tyler Durden
    Apr 27, 2017 7:02 PM

    Exactly one month after Trump was humiliated by his own party, when in the last moment the House failed to get the number of votes to pass a Republican healthcare bill due to holdouts from the conservative Freedom Caucus, the president's second attempt to repeal Obamacare before his first 100 days in office run out, appears on the edge of failure. However, whereas the latest effort succeeded in appealing to the conservatives who caused the first vote to be pulled in the last moment, this time is the moderates who are about to pull the plug on Trump's - and Paul Ryan's - second attempt to overhaul Obamacare.

    [​IMG]

    As a reminder, in order to appeal to conservatives, the revised bill was negotiated by centrist Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-N.J.) and conservative Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and was meant to allow states to opt out of some of ObamaCare’s requirements, which however could result in people losing their current health coverage or facing much higher premiums. While the changes aimed at winning over conservatives, proved successful, in the process the new bill might have lost just as many centrists. According to the latest roll call by The Hill, at least 21 Republicans have said they would vote no on the revised GOP healthcare bill. Only 23 votes are required to kill the bill.

    "The mood is still guardedly optimistic," said Representative Chris Collins, a moderate and Trump ally who supports the bill. "There are, I’m going to say, still some 'lean no's' that we’ve just got to get over the hurdle ..."

    The "no" votes include Reps. Patrick Meehan (Pa.), Ryan Costello (Pa.), Barbara Comstock (R-Va.), Jaime Herrera Beutler (Wash.) and John Katko (N.Y.), all centrists who had reservations about the previous ObamaCare repeal bill that was pulled from a floor vote last month because of a lack of GOP support. The Hill adds that on top of that, a trio of usually reliable Republicans — Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce (Calif.), Adam Kinzinger (Ill.) and Mario Diaz-Balart (Fla.) — said that they were undecided on the new bill after saying they were yes votes on the earlier legislation.

    “I’m absolutely undecided,” Diaz-Balart, a member of the GOP whip team, told The Hill. “I was a yes before, but there are a lot of red flags” with the revised bill.

    It also remains unclear how dozens of other Republicans would vote this time, but the number of Republicans publicly opposed or leaning against the bill is enough to raise doubts about whether the House would pass it in its current form. In fact, just two more no votes would be sufficient to end the latest push.

    Centrists opposed to the new bill are largely echoing Rep. Charlie Dent (R-Pa.), who said the negotiations between Meadows and MacArthur only exacerbated his earlier problems with the bill. Dent, in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” on Thursday, said he worried that people with pre-existing health conditions might be left without insurance because of the changes, something supporters of the bill have fiercely denied.

    Many members of the centrist Tuesday Group members complained that the MacArthur-Meadows amendment pushed the bill too far to the right, and they privately griped that MacArthur had shifted blame for the stalled healthcare effort from conservatives to centrists.

    The White House has kept the pressure on GOP leaders to hold a vote by President Trump’s 100th day in office, Saturday. But they say they won’t bring their revised bill to the floor until they secure the 216 needed GOP votes. And right now, they acknowledge, they don’t have them.

    Speaking earlier on Thursday, Paul Ryan said that “I think we’re making very good progress. … We’re going to go when we have the votes, but that’s the decision we’ll make when we have it." For now, however, there is no indication of progress, in fact quite the opposite.

    There are other considerations among voting republicans, many of whom are up for reelection next year and are "running scared." According to the Hill, one moderate Republican was overheard in a House cafeteria this week telling an aide: “If I vote for this healthcare bill, it will be the end of my career.”

    Finally, there are significant doubts about whether the legislation would go anywhere in the Senate.

    Several Senate Republicans have raised questions about the bill, making it unclear whether it could win 50 votes in the upper chamber.

    And Senate Democrats have said that parts of the bill, including the new language, would run afoul of special budget rules the GOP is using to avoid a filibuster. That means those sections might have to be ripped out of the bill to prevent it from being dead on arrival in the Senate.

    Should Friday come and go with no healthcare vote, there won't be dramatic consequences, but it will mean even more embarrassment for Trump, who will have been defied by his own party twice in the span of 100 days.

    There is a silver lining, if only for markets: with Democrats warning they "will not support a stop gap bill" to fund the government after Saturday if there is a healthcare bill this week - thus potentially resulting in a government shutdown - at least the government will stay open for one more week. How a long-term deal can be achieved in one week, however, with animosity between the left and right growing by the day, remains very much unclear

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-04-27/
     
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'Obamacare is dead' says Trump as he blasts leaderless and obstructionist Democrats for being 'only interested in themselves'
    • President lashes out at Democrats for standing in the way of Obamacare repeal
    • 'The Democrats, without a leader, have become the party of obstruction,' he tweeted
    • Trump said Saturday night that he will be 'angry' with GOP congressmen 'if we don't get that damn thing passed quickly'


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4460278/Obamacare-dead-says-Trump-blasts-Democrats.html#ixzz4fk938f17
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    House to vote on repealing sections of Obamacare tomorrow... six weeks after humiliating climbdown due to lack of votes
    • Republican leaders announcedthe House will vote to repeal and replace portions of Obamacare on Thursday
    • House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy confidently predicted success after a day of wrangling votes and personal arm-twisting by Trump
    • It comes after an earlier failure on March 24 when Republican leaders were forced to pull the bill for lack of votes
    • The decision to move forward indicated confidence on the part of GOP leaders


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4468792/Government-wide-spending-bill-headed-House-vote.html#ixzz4g6deMAGk
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  39. Irons

    Irons Deep Sixed Site Supporter Mother Lode

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    BREAKING: House Republicans Pass Obamacare Repeal – 217-213

    Cristina Laila May 4th, 2017 1:31 pm 155 Comments

    Washington D.C. – House Republicans pass health care bill to repeal and replace failing Obamacare.

    The legislation passed 217 to 213 with NO Democrats joining Republicans to repeal the failed Obamacare law.

    20 Republicans voted no on the legislation(?)

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Via CNN

    BREAKING: In a major victory for President Donald Trump, the House has voted to dismantle the pillars of the Affordable Care Act and make sweeping changes to the nation’s health care system.

    The bill now heads to the Senate where it faces daunting challenges because of the same ideological splits between conservative and moderate Republicans that nearly killed it in the House.
    Trump will hold a celebratory news conference at the White House, and GOP lawmakers are expected to take buses from Capitol Hill after the vote.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/05/breaking-house-republicans-pass-obamacare-repeal/
     
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  40. bemac

    bemac Midas Member Midas Member

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    Must have been a real close one, no Massie and no Jones, but they squeezed a yes out of Amash. Everyone should be thanking the freedom caucus for saying 'no' to the last pile of crap.
     
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