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Mad Max time in Venezuela...

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by gringott, Feb 9, 2018.



  1. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    Amazing. How much faster can this collapse go? I guess we will soon find out.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...s-venezuelas-lawless-roads-idUSKBN1FT1G9?il=0

    For the link impaired:

    Mad Max violence stalks Venezuela's lawless roads
    Andrew Cawthorne8 Min Read
    8-9 minutes
    LA GRITA, Venezuela (Reuters) - It’s midnight on one of the most dangerous roads in Latin America and Venezuelan trucker Humberto Aguilar hurtles through the darkness with 20 tons of vegetables freshly harvested from the Andes for sale in the capital Caracas.

    When he set off at sunset from the town of La Grita in western Venezuela on his 900-km (560-mile) journey, Aguilar knew he was taking his life in his hands.

    With hunger widespread amid a fifth year of painful economic implosion under President Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela has seen a frightening surge in attacks on increasingly lawless roads.

    Just a few days earlier, Aguilar said he sat terrified when hundreds of looters swarmed a stationary convoy, overwhelming drivers by sheer numbers. They carted off milk, rice and sugar from other trucks but left his less-prized vegetables alone.

    “Every time I say goodbye to my family, I entrust myself to God and the Virgin,” said the 36-year-old trucker.

    While truck heists have long been common in Latin America’s major economies from Mexico to Brazil, looting of cargoes on roads has soared in Venezuela in recent times and appears to be not just a result of common crime but directly linked to growing hunger and desperation among the population of 30 million.

    Across Venezuela, there were some 162 lootings in January, including 42 robberies of trucks, according to the consultancy Oswaldo Ramirez Consultores (ORC), which tracks road safety for companies. That compared to eight lootings, including one truck robbery, in the same month of last year.

    “The hunger and despair are far worse than people realize, what we are seeing on the roads is just another manifestation of that. We’ve also been seeing people stealing and butchering animals in fields, attacking shops and blocking roads to protest their lack of food. It’s become extremely serious,” said ORC director Oswaldo Ramirez.

    Eight people have died in the lootings in January of this year, according to a Reuters tally.

    The dystopian attacks in a country with one of the world’s highest murder rates are pushing up transport and food costs in an already hyperinflationary environment, as well as stifling movement of goods in the crisis-hit OPEC nation.

    They have complicated the perilous life of truckers who already face harassment from bribe-seeking soldiers, spiraling prices for parts and hours-long lines for fuel.

    Government officials and representatives of the security forces did not respond to requests for comment for this story.

    Barred by law from carrying guns, the Andean truckers form convoys to protect themselves, text each other about trouble spots - and keep moving as fast as possible.

    Aguilar said that on one trip a man appeared on his truck’s sideboard and put a pistol to his head - but his co-driver swerved hard to shake the assailant off.

    On this journey, however, he was lucky. Just before reaching Caracas, assailants hurled a stone at his windscreen but it bounced off.

    Even once Andean truckers reach cities, there is no respite.

    Armed gangs often charge them for safe passage and permission to set up markets.

    “The government gives us no security. It’s madness. People have got used to the easy life of robbing,” said Javier Escalante, who owns two trucks that take vegetables from La Grita to the town of Guatire outside Caracas every week.

    “But if we stop, how do we earn a living for our families? How do Venezuelans eat? And how do the peasant farmers sell their produce? We have no choice but to keep going.”

    GUNMEN ON BIKES
    The looters use a variety of techniques, depending on the terrain and the target, according to truckers, inhabitants of towns on highways, and videos of incidents.

    Sometimes gunmen on motorbikes surround a truck, slowing it down before pouncing like lions stalking prey. In other instances, attackers wait for a vehicle to slow down – at a pothole for example – before jumping on, cutting through the tarpaulin and hurling goods onto the ground for waiting companions.

    [​IMG]
    A child looks at a basket filled with mandarins while workers load merchandise into Humberto Aguilar's truck at the wholesale market in Barquisimeto, Venezuela January 30, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
    In one video apparently showing a looting and uploaded to social media, people are seen gleefully dragging live chickens from a stranded truck.

    The looters use tree trunks and rocks to stop vehicles, and are particularly fond of “miguelitos” - pieces of metal with long spikes - to burst tires and halt vehicles.

    A ring-road round the central town of Barquisimeto, with shanty-towns next to it, is notorious among truckers, who nickname it “The Guillotine” due to the regular attacks.

    In some cases, crowds simply swarm at trucks when they stop for a break or repairs. Soldiers or policemen seldom help, according to interviews with two dozen drivers.

    Yone Escalante, 43, who also takes vegetables from the Andes on a 2,800-km (1,700-mile) round-trip to eastern Venezuela, shudders when he recalls how a vehicle of his was ransacked in the remote plains of Guarico state last year.

    The trouble began when one of his two trucks broke down and about 60 people appeared from the shadows and surrounded it.

    Escalante, about half an hour behind in his truck, rushed to help. By the time he arrived, the crowd had swelled to 300 and Escalante – a well-spoken businessman who owns trucks and sells produce – said he jumped on the vehicle to reason with them.

    [​IMG]
    Slideshow (22 Images)
    “Suddenly two military men arrived on the scene, and I thought ‘Thank God, help has arrived’,” Escalante recounted during a break between trips in La Grita.

    But as the crowd chanted menacingly “Food for the people!”, the soldiers muttered something about the goods being insured – which they were not – and drove off, he said.

    “That was the trigger. They came at us like ants and stripped us of everything: potatoes, onions, tomatoes, cucumber, carrots. It took me all day to load that truck, and 30 minutes for them to empty it. I could cry with rage.”

    MAD MAX OR ROBIN HOOD?
    Though events on Venezuela’s roads may seem like something out of the Mad Max movie, truckers say they are often more akin to Robin Hood as assailants are careful not to harm the drivers or their vehicles provided they do not resist.

    “The best protection is to be submissive, hand things over,” said Roberto Maldonado, who handles paperwork for truckers in La Grita. “When people are hungry, they are dangerous.”

    However, all the truckers interviewed by Reuters said they knew of someone murdered on the roads - mainly during targeted robberies rather than spontaneous lootings.

    With new tires now going for about 70 million bolivars - about $300 on the black market or more than two decades of work at the official minimum wage - looters often swipe them along with food.

    The journey from the Andes to Caracas passes about 25 checkpoints, where the truckers have to alight and seek a stamp from National Guard soldiers.

    At some, a bribe is required, with a bag of potatoes now more effective than increasingly worthless cash.

    Yone Escalante said that on one occasion when he was looted after a tire burst, policemen joined in the fray, taking bananas and cheese with the crowd.

    In the latest attack, just days ago, he was traveling slowly over potholes in a convoy with four other trucks after dark, when assailants jumped on and started grabbing produce.

    “Even though there were holes in the road, we sped up and swerved to shake them off,” he said. “It’s either us or them.”

    (See reut.rs/2GVaX0s for a related photo essay and tmsnrt.rs/2sgqfJP for a map of one trucking route)

    Additional reporting by Leon Wietfeld in Caracas and Anggy Polanco in La Grita; Editing by Girish Gupta, Daniel Flynn and Frances Kerry
     
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  2. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    By the way, note the bribery needed at army checkpoints.
    At least in Mexico and Central America, this is the norm. In my travels there, I always had cheap cigarettes and hard candy to give to the soldiers. It made everything much easier.
     
  3. Professur

    Professur Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    Next episode ... and then the trucks just stopped coming. No point if it's just going to be stolen.
     
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  4. Silver

    Silver Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    The American Consular in Oaxaca recommended that I carry a Playboy mag and some Marlboro cigs for Army checkpoints - let them flip through the mag and look at the centerfold and give them a couple of cigs. It would violate the macho code for them to not respond properly.
     
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  5. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    Somewhat related - when passing through checkpoint Bravo and Charlie [Berlin to West Germany and back] you could leave a pack of smokes on the dashboard, or a playboy or penthouse, and the outside [Soviet] guard would normally offer a hat badge or belt buckle for it after you came back out from presenting your flag orders. Once I was asked "Do you have the beautiful American cigarette Marlboro?" I just said, "Nope, just Camels" and took off. I didn't need no stinkin' badges.
     
  6. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    I would give a carton of Marlboros for a night with Miss Venezuela.

    miss-venezuela-2017.jpg ae2666519e786cc37dc005d43c308925--miss-universe--miss-venezuela.jpg
     
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  7. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    True story =
    When I was stationed in Panama there was an SF group in the same barracks, down at the end.
    Miss Venezuela came a callin', wasn't interested in Grunt Infantry.
    SF guys were passing her around.

    Guess what? She passed them the HIV she didn't know she had.
    Lot of families, lives, and careers destroyed.
     
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  8. DodgebyDave

    DodgebyDave Metal Messiah Midas Member

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    they don't have cool enough cars to have mad max there, the best they can muster is another limp communist meltdown

     
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  9. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    let's not forget, they begged for this,
    they have earned every empty dinner table
    hugo was livin' the dream with high oil prices masking the true effects of his policies, and they have since come home to roost




    Key events in Hugo Chavez's rise to power and presidency in Venezuela


    The Associated Press 03.05.2013

    ShareAdjustCommentPrint
    Key events in Hugo Chavez's life:

    Feb. 4, 1992 — Army paratroop commander Lt. Col. Chavez leads botched coup against President Carlos Andres Perez. Faces possible 30-year prison term, but case never goes to trial.

    Nov. 27, 1992 — Military officers with close ties to Chavez make second coup attempt, which is quashed.

    March 26, 1994 — After two years in jail awaiting trial, Chavez and fellow plotters set free when President Rafael Caldera dismisses charges on condition they retire from the military.

    Dec. 13, 1994 — Chavez visits Cuba, where he has long talks with President Fidel Castro and is honoured with ceremony at University of Havana.

    Dec. 6, 1998 — Wins come-from-behind presidential election victory, promising to seek "third way" between socialism and capitalism.

    Jan. 16, 1999 — Travels to Cuba for private talks with Fidel Castro and Colombian President Andres Pastrana on attempts to bring peace to Colombia.

    Feb. 2, 1999 — Hours after being sworn in, decrees referendum on whether to rewrite constitution.

    April 25, 1999 — Venezuelans overwhelmingly approve Chavez's proposal to draft a new constitution.

    July 25, 1999 — Allies of Chavez win 122 of 128 seats in constitutional assembly, allowing them to draft document tailored to his wishes.

    Dec. 15, 1999 — Venezuelans vote to accept Chavez-backed constitution. It eliminates Senate, changes country's name to Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, and lengthens presidential term from five years to six, clearing the way for Chavez to stay in office as long as 13 years.

    July 30, 2000 — In presidential election, Chavez elected to six-year term.

    April 11, 2002 — Gunfire erupts as protesters demanding president's resignation march toward presidential palace; 19 people killed. That spurs revolt by dissident generals who arrest Chavez and usher in interim government.

    April 12, 2002 — Business leader Pedro Carmona takes presidential oath, throws out constitution and dissolves National Assembly.

    April 13, 2002 — Tens of thousands of Chavez supporters take to streets demanding his return.

    April 14, 2002 — Loyal army officers rescue Chavez, restore him to power.

    Dec. 3, 2002 — Business organizations, labour unions, political parties and executives from state-run oil company call strike demanding that Chavez agree to nonbinding referendum on his rule. Strike fizzles after two months, government regains control of oil industry.

    April 7, 2003 — Chavez fires seven top executives at state oil company for joining strike. Within weeks, 18,000 employees are fired for participating in the strike.

    Aug. 15, 2004 — Venezuelans overwhelmingly vote "no" in referendum asking if Chavez should leave office immediately.

    Dec. 14, 2004 — Chavez and Castro sign agreement deepening co-operation between Venezuela and Cuba. Pact evolves into leftist ALBA bloc as other Latin American and Caribbean nations join.

    Sept. 7, 2005 — Chavez creates Petrocaribe agreement that sells oil on preferential credit terms to more than dozen countries.

    Oct. 31, 2005 — Telesur, Caracas-based television network launched by Chavez, begins broadcasting as alternative to corporate media outlets. Telesur financed mainly by Venezuela with help from Argentina, Cuba and Uruguay.

    Dec. 4, 2005 — Chavez's allies win all 167 seats in National Assembly as major opposition parties boycott election.

    Sept. 20, 2006 — Chavez calls U.S. President George W. Bush "the devil" in speech at United Nations General Assembly, raising tensions with Washington.

    Dec. 3, 2006 — Wins re-election to six-year term, capturing 63 per cent of vote.

    Dec. 5, 2006 — Emboldened by victory, tells countrymen his political movement aims to transform Venezuela into socialist state.

    Jan. 8, 2007 — Announces plans to nationalize Venezuela's electrical and telecommunications companies.

    Jan. 31, 2007 — Pro-government lawmakers grant Chavez sweeping powers to legislate by decree for 18 months.

    Feb. 8, 2007 — Government nationalizes Venezuela's largest private electric company, signing agreement to buy controlling stake in Electricidad de Caracas from U.S.-based AES Corp.

    Feb. 12, 2007 — Officials sign agreement to purchase Verizon Communications Inc.'s stake in Venezuela's largest telecommunications company.

    Feb. 27, 2007 — Chavez orders takeover of oil projects run by foreign companies in Orinoco River region, giving government majority stake in the joint ventures.

    May 28, 2007 — Radio Caracas Television, country's oldest private network, goes off air after Chavez refuses to renew its broadcasting license.

    Oct. 14, 2007 — Ailing Fidel Castro calls Chavez's radio show, making his first live appearance on Cuban airwaves since falling ill 14 months earlier, in example of how close the two men have become.

    Dec. 2, 2007 — Voters reject amendments proposed by Chavez to make more sweeping changes to constitution, a setback for his drive to transform Venezuela into socialist state.

    April 3, 2008 — Chavez orders nationalization of Venezuela's cement industry.

    April 9, 2008 — Government announces it will nationalize country's largest steel maker.

    July 31, 2008 — Chavez announces plans to nationalize Bank of Venezuela, owned by Santander Central Hispano banking group of Spain.

    Sept. 12, 2008 — Orders U.S. ambassador to leave Venezuela, accusing him of conspiring against government. Patrick Duddy later returns to finish his assignment, but Venezuelan and U.S. officials fail to agree on replacement.

    Nov. 23, 2008 — Chavez's party wins 17 of 24 gubernatorial races, while opposition candidates triumph in Venezuela's most populous states and cities.

    Feb. 15, 2009 — Chavez wins voter approval to eliminate term limits, allowing him to run for re-election indefinitely; he vows to remain in power for at least another decade.

    Sept. 26, 2009 — Chavez, along with allies including Argentina, Brazil and Bolivia, sets up regional development lender called Bank of the South. It's billed as Latin American alternative to institutions such as International Monetary Fund.

    Sept. 27, 2010 — In congressional elections, Chavez's allies lose two-thirds majority that has allowed them to ignore opponents in rewriting fundamental laws and appointing key officials such as Supreme Court justices. Chavez's allies still retain a majority.

    Dec. 17, 2010 — Outgoing congress grants Chavez power to enact laws by decree for 18 months.

    June 10, 2011 — Chavez undergoes surgery in Cuba for pelvic abscess.

    June 12, 2011 — Telephones state television in Venezuela from Cuba, saying he is recovering from surgery, but his silence and seclusion following call prompts speculation he could be suffering severe illness.

    June 28, 2011 — New videos and photos of Chavez appear on Venezuelan state television, showing him on his feet and talking with Fidel Castro.

    June 30, 2011 — Chavez appears on television to confirm he had a cancerous tumour removed. He later says tumour extracted was the size of baseball.

    July 4, 2011 — Returns to Venezuela, but later travels to Cuba periodically for chemotherapy and medical tests.

    Sept. 23, 2011 — Says he has completed chemotherapy and calls the treatment successful. Says subsequently that tests show no reappearance of cancerous cells.

    Feb. 21, 2012 — Says his doctors found new lesion in same place where tumour was previously removed, and announces plans to return to Cuba for surgery.

    Feb. 26, 2012 — Undergoes operation that removes tumour from same location in pelvic region. Says later that follow-up tests showed tumour was "recurrence of the initially diagnosed cancer."

    March 24, 2012 — Travels to Cuba to begin first round of radiation therapy.

    July 9, 2012 — Says at a news conference that tests have shown he is "totally free" of cancer.

    Oct. 7, 2012 — Wins another six-year term, beating challenger Henrique Capriles by an 11-point margin.

    Dec. 9, 2012 — Announces that his cancer has returned and that he needs surgery again. Also says for the first time that if he is unable to stay on as president, Vice-President Nicolas Maduro should take his place and should be elected president.

    Dec. 11, 2012 — Undergoes his fourth cancer-related operation in Cuba. Officials describe it as a complicated six-hour surgery.

    Dec. 16, 2012 — Chavez's allies sweep gubernatorial elections, winning in 20 of 23 states.

    Dec. 18, 2012 — Venezuelan government reports that Chavez has a respiratory infection but says it has been controlled. He is said to be in stable condition.

    March 5, 2013 — Government announces the death of Hugo Chavez.


    http://www.vancouversun.com/busines...power+presidency+Venezuela/8053353/story.html
     
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  10. Area51

    Area51 Silver Miner Seeker

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    Inexcusable for anyone in a country with the climate of Venezuela to be "starving".

    FFS, how useless are people that they can't grow the simplest vegetables and raise the most basic livestock?
     
  11. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    How bout Frustrated Max and we can use Kia's and H.
    It's one of the most urbanized parts of Latin America, very Mountainous and many areas have been crime riddin and it's government is as corrupt as possible. It's easy to criticize from our computers.
     
  12. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    yes, newmisty, always 2 sides to this,

    note in this article how hugo is donating and the kenyan is cutting aid

    I remember this going on at the time, and thinking how that was a pretty bold move by hugo in the propaganda war.

    ------------

    Venezuela donates free heating oil to 100,000 needy US households

    By Brett Wilkins Feb 6, 2013 in Business
    Baltimore - For the eighth straight year, Venezuela's state oil company is donating free heating oil to hundreds of thousands of needy Americans.


    The CITGO-Venezuela Heating Oil Program has helped more than 1.7 million Americans in 25 states and the District of Columbia keep warm since it was launched back in 2005. The program is a partnership between the Venezuelan state oil company Petróleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), its subsidiary CITGO and Citizens Energy Corporation, a nonprofit organization founded by former US Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II that provides discounted and free home heating services and supplies to needy households in the United States and abroad. It has been supported from the beginning by Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez.

    In 2005, a pair of devastating hurricanes, Katrina and Rita, led to dwindling oil supplies and skyrocketing fuel costs. Some of the poorest and most vulnerable Americans, including many elderly people on fixed incomes, found themselves having to choose between heating their homes or providing food, clothing or medicine for themselves and their families.

    Since that first winter, CITGO has provided 227 million gallons of free heating oil worth an estimated $465 million to an average of 153,000 US households each year. Some 252 Native American communities and 245 homeless shelters have also benefited from the program. This winter, more than 100,000 American families will receive Venezuelan aid.

    With the US government estimating that households heating primarily with oil will pay $407 (19 percent) more this year than last, the program remains an invaluable helping hand to many needy Americans. "The CITGO-Venezuela Heating Oil Program has been one of the most important energy assistance efforts in the United States," CITGO CEO Alejandro Granado said at the Night of Peace Family Shelter in Baltimore, Maryland, where he and Citizens Energy Corporation Chairman Kennedy launched the 2013 program.

    "This year, as families across the Eastern Seaboard struggle to recover from the losses caused by Hurricane Sandy, this donation becomes even more significant." Last year, President Barack Obama and Congress reduced Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) funding by 25 percent, cutting off an estimated one million US households from desperately needed assistance just as winter's worst chill, accompanied by record heating oil prices, set in.

    Fortunately, the CITGO-Venezuela Heating Oil Program was able to assist an estimated 400,000 Americans last year. "The federal fuel assistance program reaches only one-fifth of all the eligible households in the US," Kennedy said in Baltimore. "Millions of families just go cold at night in their own homes." US Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), who was on hand at the Baltimore launch, expressed his gratitude to CITGO. "The demand is greater and the resources are shorter," Cummings said to widespread "amens" from the packed house. "We must not turn our heads away from the working poor-- remember, we could be in the same position. The help you provide to families is bigger than just the oil. It's about helping children lead stable lives."

    The people gathered at the shelter prayed for the recovery of Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, whose condition is reportedly improving following cancer surgery in Havana, Cuba. Chávez is often demonized as a dictator by many US politicians and by the US corporate mainstream media. But he remains wildly popular in Venezuela, where he has won four straight presidential elections. He was reelected last October with 54.4 percent of the vote.

    Although his leadership style is increasingly authoritarian, his Bolivarian Revolution-- characterized by popular democracy, economic independence, equitable distribution of national wealth and reduced corruption-- has improved the lives of millions of Venezuela's poorest citizens and inspired tens of millions of Latin Americans seeking more just societies to vote in leftist governments throughout the region. US critics claim that Chávez is anti-American.

    This oversimplifies matters-- while he is an ardent anti-imperialist who raised eyebrows and ire in Washington and on Wall Street by nationalizing the assets of foreign petroleum companies which many Venezuelans asserted were exploiting the country's natural resources, the US remains Venezuela's most important trading partner. And while Chávez is highly critical of US policies and actions around the globe, he is far from alone in his opposition.

    His distaste for Washington has also no doubt been influenced by the fact that senior officials in the George W. Bush administration were deeply involved in an attempted 2002 coup d'état against his popular regime.

    All of this matters little to most of the 1.7 million Americans who have received free fuel from the CITGO-Venezuela Heating Oil Program. "All I know is he was kind to the people of the United States," program recipient Alice Maniotis, a New York grandmother on a fixed income, said of Chávez. "He rules differently, like Obama rules differently," Maniotis told RT last year. "Who are we to tell these people how to live? Are they invading our country? They're not. They're being generous to give us what comes out of their earth at no charge. So could you really have ill feelings against them?"

    Kennedy thanked CITGO, Venezuela and Chávez for "help[ing] more than 400,000 people stay warm and safe this winter," adding that he has approached numerous major oil-producing nations as well as some of the largest US oil companies and asked them if they were interested in helping the poor heat their homes. "I don't see Exxon responding," he told the crowd in Baltimore. "I don't see other major oil companies heating the homes of the poor." "They all said no," Kennedy added, "except for CITGO, President Chávez and the people of Venezuela."

    http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/342972
     
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  13. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    You really know how to kill a man's fantasy. For punishment look upon this pic of DWS and deliberate to which side she parts her pubes.
    170725-debbie-wasserman-schultz-getty-1160-600x600.jpg
     
  14. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    Well, to lighten it up a bit brother, she was the FORMER Miss Venezuela at the time.

    I will suffer in silence. Starting now.
     
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  15. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    At least he got that right!
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
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  16. Cigarlover

    Cigarlover Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Here, the ice started to melt yesterday as we got into the mid 40's. I haven't had heat in a couple days though. My hands get a little cold but it's about 60 or so in the house. The passive solar design really helps. In fact this simple designed house, if implemented nationwide in the north would cut heating oil drastically.
    I do heat with wood though and don't even own a furnace unless you want to call my wood stove a furnace. Bought it used off cl 8 years ago for 175 bucks. Its a little small for the house and you do notice it when its 20 below but we don't see that very often.
    Sadly only 1% of households in the US are built with this design.
     
  17. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    ^^^^^^^^
    It seems to me passive solar combined with geothermal heat pump would be great.

    Or passive solar home design + active solar for powering geothermal heat pump.
     
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  18. Area51

    Area51 Silver Miner Seeker

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    Geothermal pumps are not cheap to install. If there's access to wood I'd go with two or three wood stoves instead. Never have to worry about mechanical failures or electricity issues with the wood stoves or fireplaces either. Although cooling in the summer from the geothermal is a nice feature.
     
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  19. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    agreed, that is the way I see it also,

    great concept but the payback is far too long compared to alternatives at current energy prices

    and as you state, totally dependent on other systems to be useable.
     
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  20. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    Are you able to share the design?
     
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  21. Cigarlover

    Cigarlover Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Sure I have some photos on my other cpu if I can get them..
    Basically the north side of the house is built into a hillside. My east side is as well. Sought and west side are the sides with windows. Cathedral ceiling in the LR and well insulated roof.

    In the winter when the sun is low on the horizon the sun comes right through the windows. In the summer the sun is high and hits the roof instead. Because it's also an embankment house the house stays cool in the summer. Most summers I only need Ac for 2-3 weeks but a dehumidifier works almost as well. Last summer was different though and used AC all summer long. The most I have ever used it in 8 years.
    30 degrees or above I really don't need a fire unless its cloudy and rainy like today. Even today I haven't had a fire but its colder in here than most would tolerate it, especially women folk. I may burn for an hr or 2 tonight. Probably the same for most of next week as well. Not bad for feb.
    I'll probably burn a little under 2 cord this year but I had some nice oak that was down on the property so I used that.. Most years I buy wood just to keep my trees growing but you end up with some garbage from peeps and end up using 3-4 cords instead of the 2 cord of good oak.
     
  22. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    Concrete slab for heat sink? Heavy curtains?
     
  23. Cigarlover

    Cigarlover Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Yes concrete on the main floor and I installed tile over that. There's some carpet as well. I never had curtains until last year. Some girl just couldn't get over not having curtains over the windows even though I have no neighbors in sight.. I haven't noticed a difference with or without them..
     
  24. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    Double pane windows, reflective barrier under the roof, cellulose and fiberglass in the walls. My new house stays cooler in the summer. When it gets into the 90s I run the a/c on 73*-74* and the FPL bill peaked at $120 while we used blankets to watch tv. This past winter it got into the upper 20s and low 30s a few times. The coldest inside the house was *66 and I never turned on the heat.
     
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  25. GOLDBRIX

    GOLDBRIX God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh Site Supporter Platinum Bling

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    As the case in all socialist controlled .govs It is the high population urban centers that PASS this FREE SH!T style .gov. They have little to no ability raise what is needed to survive, but they can vote for the "Guns" to get what they want. Once that failed to get .gov to do their bidding the gangs stepped in NATURE ABHORS A VACUUM.

    The rural area obviously can raise the produce and livestock for their survival but must raise fiat money the pay the Socialist TAX demands to keep the "Guns" off of them, and the "Guns" won't stop the gangs.

    Road Warrior movies had .gov guns in the vary first movie. You ( fans) have not seen .gov guns since, just gang guns.
     
  26. GOLDBRIX

    GOLDBRIX God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh Site Supporter Platinum Bling

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    His major fan base that got him elected in the first place, along with the White Guilt Society. The frog ( the Free Sh!t people) and the scorpion ( PROGS and Obama).
     
  27. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    I see what you did there and am terribly disappointed in your attitude!

    'BAILIFF, WHACK HIS PEEPEE!!'
     
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  28. GOLDBRIX

    GOLDBRIX God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh Site Supporter Platinum Bling

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    " NOT THE PEEPEE, NOT THE PEEPEE"
    :rage 1 :tied up: :rage 1 :tied up: :rage 1 :tied up: :rage 1
     
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  29. DodgebyDave

    DodgebyDave Metal Messiah Midas Member

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    how did this thread get that far?
     
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  30. GOLDBRIX

    GOLDBRIX God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh Site Supporter Platinum Bling

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    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Scorp. is being mean -snif , snif, tear cry
    cry:
     
  31. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    Infernal combustion machines, sexy gals, thefts and pee pee whackin....this threads got it all!
     
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  32. solarion

    solarion Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    It all sounds so sorted to hear you tell the tale sir. lol
     
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  33. DodgebyDave

    DodgebyDave Metal Messiah Midas Member

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  34. Stop Making Cents

    Stop Making Cents Seeker Seeker

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  35. Stop Making Cents

    Stop Making Cents Seeker Seeker

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    Very sad situation. If I had a family to feed, i'd ransack a truck or do whatever I needed to do, so not judging them for that. But the corruption seems to be endemic amongst the Latin American people and countries. No excuse for it. It's pure savagery and completely dishonorable. And yet, we import these people by the millions and think that this supposed diversity will make us better. These people just don't operate the same way white people do. Whites have their own problems, why add to them by mixing in foreign peoples who hate us and steal from us and have a collective propensity to communism, corruption, theft, etc. ? Makes no sense unless you want to overthrow everything that made America great.
     
  36. Area51

    Area51 Silver Miner Seeker

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    South Americans are very upfront and open about corruption - - Americans keep their corruption shrouded under the cover of darkness.

    Don't kid yourself, my friend - - both are equally corrupt. One is just more discrete about it.
     
  37. Stop Making Cents

    Stop Making Cents Seeker Seeker

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    Wrong. I've never had to bribe a public official to get a license or bribe a cop to pass a checkpoint etc. in America but it's expected in the shithole countries. Yes, there is corruption at the upper levels but it would be a public outrage and a criminal act if exposed.
     
  38. Area51

    Area51 Silver Miner Seeker

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    Obviously peasants are unable to bribe law officers or government officials in America. Corruption like that is reserved for the wealthy elites and corporations. When exposed, it typically results in nothing more than a slap on the wrist. If that.
     

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