1. Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
    Dismiss Notice
  2. There are no markets
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Week of 6/24/2017 Closing prices & Chg Over Last Wk---- Gold $1256.40 Silver $16.64 Oil $43.01 USD $96.94
  4. "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"
    Dismiss Notice

Mulberry as Survival Food & Multi-Use Tree

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by gnome, Aug 6, 2013.



  1. gnome

    gnome Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,172
    Likes Received:
    2,506
    Trophy Points:
    113
    1) Fruit - good fresh or dried

    There are 3 main varieties - Morus Alba (White Mulberry), Morus Nigra (Black Mulberry), Morus Rubra (Red Mulberry). Morus Nigra is generally considered the tastiest, but i like the whites as well, especially dried. The Reds are wild american types which tend to be more cold tolerant, as far north as Canada.

    There are a wide range of cultivars from around the world with different qualities, including huge berries, improved flavor, everbearing, drought-tolerance or cold-tolerance.


    2) Leaves are High-Protein Human & Animal Forage

    Mulberry leaves are 25% protein and digestible even for humans. Yes, eat the canopy.

    It's not quite iceberg lettuce, but less bitter than many garden greens. Slightly fibrous, but not such that you end up with fibers in your teeth. Eat raw or cooked. Traditionally, mulberry leaves are stuffed like grape leaves. Some people put them in green smoothies. I just graze on the tip leaves right off the tree. If I start to spin silk and pupate, you'll know why.

    As an animal forage, mulberry is preferred over other forage by rabbits, goats and many ruminants. Tilapia will eat it, and likely other fish for aquaculture. Feed your worm bin or Black-Sodier Fly pod to feed the chickens. Etc.

    Having a pest-free & maintenance free endless supply of high-protein veggies 6 - 9 months of the year without having to till, sow or water & save seed is a big plus.

    3) Zombie-proof stealth crop

    If the zombies want a side-dish to accompany brains, they will ramble right past your mulberry and head for your larder or veggie plot. At worst they might steal your berry crop.

    4) Fast growing biomass for composting, growing mushrooms, etc.

    The annual leaf drop from my mulberry tree is enough organic matter to add a garden bed every year. Last winter I got my mulberry leaf compost up to 130f, should have coiled a hose in the pile for hot showers.

    5) Easy to propagate by cutting or seeds

    Just cut off a branch, trim the leaves and stick it in the earth, water occasionally & voila, new tree! Seedlings will pop up here and there on their own.

    6) Produces long, straight & branchless poles which can be used like bamboo for many purposes

    I use them mostly for garden stakes & trellises, but I could think of a hundred uses, especially post SHTF

    7) Can be coppiced to the ground and will grow back quickly

    Let's say you or someone else takes a chainsaw to the trunk - no problem, it'll be back in one season. 8) Fast growing firewood

    Despite being a very fast growing tree, the wood is decent firewood. Especially good if you want uniform, small diameter wood for feeding cooking fires or rocket stoves. Larger hunks of firewood can be had by pollarding main limbs or coppicing to the ground.

    9) Deciduous Shade Tree for passive solar cooling

    Ours sits on the west side of the house and fills out to block the hot western sun at just the right time of year. Drops leaves to allow in winter sun.

    10) Attracts small game for trapping

    Roast squirrel anyone?
     
    ABC123, Gomez, Lt Dan and 1 other person like this.
  2. ttazzman

    ttazzman Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    4,663
    Likes Received:
    3,844
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    commercial/ industrial-construction/engineering/ma
    Location:
    mid-usa
    dont park your car under one.....
     
    Argentium, GOLD DUCK and gnome like this.
  3. birddog

    birddog Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    2,626
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Nice to know - great information.
     
    gnome likes this.
  4. <SLV>

    <SLV> Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    3,191
    Trophy Points:
    113
    My wife's mulberry pie is the best pie I've ever tasted. Just mildly sweet, nice and firm texture -- great with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. I didn't think I'd like it because of the woody stems in the berries, but they cook down completely soft and you don't even notice them.

    We've got several mulberry trees (black) on our property, and we put up about 100 pounds per year in the freezer. Mulberry pie all winter long!
     
    gnome likes this.
  5. gnome

    gnome Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,172
    Likes Received:
    2,506
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Good advice.

    We had one over the driveway when I was a kid, and despite a small army of neighborhood kids constantly up in the tree picking ripe berries, the autos were heavily strafed by the birds with purple munitions.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2013
  6. ttazzman

    ttazzman Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    4,663
    Likes Received:
    3,844
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    commercial/ industrial-construction/engineering/ma
    Location:
    mid-usa
    around here.......the berries and the birds on the berries are a lethal combination for car paint
     
  7. Lt Dan

    Lt Dan Gold Pirate Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    3,087
    Likes Received:
    3,647
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    disabled veteran
    Location:
    VA Psych Ward
    Now you've almost got me convinced to plant a few in the chicken lot - give them some shade and free food while the berries last. Worst that could happen would be a roost for the hawks to lite in to attack my hens.

    Wild mulberries grow as more or less a weed tree on our property, but I have picked the berries and thrown them to the chickens. DIL (Thia) picks them to eat, but doesn't get many from the hordes of wild birds that feast on them.

    Something I've observed about them is that some of the trees will have berries and others in the same hedgerow will not.
     
  8. birddog

    birddog Gold Member Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    2,626
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Not easy to find at the garden places....

    Here is one of my favorite tree, berry on line order sites...

    Stark Bro's
     
  9. gnome

    gnome Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,172
    Likes Received:
    2,506
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Chickens will love the fruit drop. Unlike other animals, I don't think they go crazy for the raw leaves, though their egg quality and production will be improved by adding around dried mulberry leaf powder to their feed.

    Pretty sure those are male trees. Fruitless male trees are very common around here as landscape plants because of fast growth, drought tolerance and epic shade without the mess of females.

    Our big old mulberry was a male, no fruit. So, I grafted on female scion of "Early White", "Lavender" and "Pakistan White". The Pakistan never took, the others did and the Early White fruited almost immediately. Notice the grafting tape at right:

    early white grafted.jpg

    If I had a bunch of wild trees in my area, I would root cuttings where I wanted them and then graft on several named cultivars to get larger and tastier fruit and a long, continuous harvest season.
     
    Lt Dan likes this.
  10. GOLD DUCK

    GOLD DUCK Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    13,777
    Likes Received:
    6,817
    Trophy Points:
    113
    QWAK,When I was a kid some friends had a big mulberry tree in there yard and when the berries fell and the purple juice got tracked in the house it made an awfull mess!:idea::thumbs_down:

    We lived in the city and we knew we could eat them but never realy concidered them as food. :thumbs_down:

    The park near my house had goose berrys but when they renovated the park they were riped out and replaced with more ornamental plants.:thumbs_down:

    the DUCK :s9:
     
  11. Lt Dan

    Lt Dan Gold Pirate Gold Chaser

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    Messages:
    3,087
    Likes Received:
    3,647
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    disabled veteran
    Location:
    VA Psych Ward
    Only kind I have access to are the wild ones. Deer love the leaves, as they kinda keep the trees pruned up as high as they can reach. I've tried the berries a few times, but never quite got the taste for them. Prefer blackberries for eating right off the bushes. Mulberries just seem to me like they require sugar and maybe something like pie crust to make them taste better. Being a diabetic, I go easy on the sweet stuff. Howsoever, I do think I'll look into planting some for my chickens. Right now the only shade they get is from some weeds and the buildings. Now is not the best time to try for some transplants, but I could be looking around for some young plants to move, once the leaves are off this fall.

    And, thanks for the info on male and female trees. I was aware that some trees or plants were (sexed), ha, but not so much that mulberries were one of the ones that did. :rolleyes:
     
  12. gnome

    gnome Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,172
    Likes Received:
    2,506
    Trophy Points:
    113

    Mulberry leaf is a traditional remedy for regulating blood sugar levels. :bear_thumb:


     
    Lt Dan likes this.

Share This Page