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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by searcher, Feb 13, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Mexican Luger
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 1, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Mexico’s President for nearly 30 years, Porfirio Diaz was very interested in modernizing the Mexican Army. He invested in new artillery, magazine guns, and small arms - such as the Mondragon semiautomatic rifle. In addition, Mexico tested the Luger pistol circa 1903-1905. They found it to be quite satisfactory, and appear to have been interested in purchasing them for artillery and cavalry use, but never followed through - presumably political or monetary problems prevented doing so (and Diaz was removed from power by 1911). Mexican property Lugers are extremely rare, as only a small number were purchased for testing. They can be identified by an “EJERCITO MEXICANO” mark engraved on the left side (done in Mexico, not by DWM). They are otherwise standard Old Model Lugers, in 7.65mm, with the typical traits such as dished toggles and a flat leaf mainspring.

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  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Beretta AR70
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 2, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    After failing to acquire a license to produce the M16 rifle, Beretta worked with SIG from 1963 through 1968 to develop 5.56mm infantry rifles. When the companies parted ways, SIG went on to produce the SIG-540 and Beretta developed the AR-70. It was introduced on the market in 1972, and was adopted by the militaries of Jordan and Malaysia, as well as Italian special forces units (the Italian Army at large would adopt the 70/90 version in 1990).

    The AR-70 takes several cues from the AK series of rifles, including the rock-in magazine with large rear paddle release and a two lug rotating bolt. In a somewhat unorthodox choice, the rifle uses a coil spring in tension for its mainspring, located around the gas piston and in front of the bolt. While this would likely cause heat-related problems in a light machine gun, it appears to have been acceptable in a rifle, as the improved 70/90 version maintain the same system. It does also allow simple use of folding or collapsing stocks, as there are no working parts in the stock.

    Only a relatively small number of commercial AR70/223 rifles came into the United States in the 1980s, and they are a relatively unknown member of the black rifle family.

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  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The French MAS-38 Submachine Gun
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 4, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The MAS-38 was France’s first officially adopted submachine gun, rushed into service in 1940. It was basically too late to help with the defense of France, with less than a thousand delivered by June 1940. The Germans kept the gun in production, making 20-30 thousand under the designation MP722(f). French production picked up immediately after the war, and 203,000 were made by the end of 1951. The gun would see service mostly in Indochina.

    Mechanically, the MAS 38 is a simple blowback SMG, although it has a few unusual features. One is the approximately 6 degree angle between the barrel and receiver, which was done in order to drop the stock and allow a sight picture with shorter iron sights. As a result, the bolt face is also cut at about a 6 degree angle off perpendicular. The safety is the trigger itself, which folds up and forward to engage, locking the bolt in place. The weapon is chambered for the 7.65 French Long cartridge, which was also used in the 1935A and 1935S pistols. It is lighter than most other military submachine gun rounds, roughly on par with 9x18mm Makarov. That reduced ballistic peer does make for a very comfortable and controllable weapon, however.

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  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    SA80 History: The First L85 Mockups (Sterling and Stoner)
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 5, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/british-e...

    The British military had been working towards a reduced-power cartridge since the end of World War 2, and the ultimate adoption of the FAL/SLR in 7.62x51mm NATO did not end their interest in the concept. It would not be long before the roots of SA80 would take hold, and today we are looking at the very first mockups of the concept that would become the L85A1 and L86A1.

    As part of a preliminary study to decide the basic layout and capabilities of a future new individual weapon and light support weapon, five wooden and metal mockups were produced in conventional and bullpup layouts, and also with/without ‘dropped’ stocks to facilitate sighting. The favored mockup was the bullpup seen here, which gave rise to the whole Enfield Weapon System/SA80 family. It is relevant to note that the concept included a universal standard optical sight from the very outset, as this was a cutting edge concept at the time. In addition, note the small features like safety, sling swivels, and magazine catch, as these would vary back and forth through the development program.

    After the wooden guns, two functional (or mostly functional) guns were produced. These were standard off-the-shelf rifles converted into bullpup configuration - one Stoner 63 and one Sterling AR18. Neither company was contacted for licensing or technical assistance.

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  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Could a Tankgewehr Really Take Out a British MkIV Tank?
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 6, 2017
    The Tankgewehr antitank rifle was developed by the Mauser company and adopted by the Imperial German military as an emergency measure to counter the introduction of tanks to the WW1 battlefield. The question is, did they really work? Could a 13.2mm AP bullet from a Tankgewehr really perforate the armor of a British tank? Well today we find out!

    The armor on a British tank was steel plate of 6mm, 8mm, and 12mm thickness, through-hardened to Brinell 440-480. We have replicated this with a plate of AR450 (ie, Brinell 450) armor, which we will be shooting at a distance of 50 yards. The ammunition we are using is original 1918 production German AP, and the rifle is a Tankgewehr captured by Allied troops late in the war and brought home as a souvenir.

    This video was only made possible with help from three very helpful folks:

    MOA Targets provided the steel (and on short notice!): https://www.moatargets.com

    Mike Carrick of Arms Heritage Magazine provided use of the T-Gewehr: https://armsheritagemagazine.com

    Hayes Otoupalik provided the original ammunition: http://www.hayesotoupalik.com

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  6. mtnman

    mtnman Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Cool but flawed. The metal plate fell when hit at a 45, this absorbed much shock. The tank would not have moved and that lost shock would have most likely caused penetration.
    Nice rifle too, I've got the tanks, wish I had the rifle!


    P1070194.JPG
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2017
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  7. Irons

    Irons Deep Sixed Site Supporter Mother Lode

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    I have always been obsessed with the Le Mat revolver. I try not to think about them so I don't hunt down a buy a modern reproduction.

    LeMat Grapeshot Revolver



     
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  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Dreyse 1910: An Attempted WW1 9mm Pistol
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 8, 2017
    Designed by Louis Schmeisser, the Dreyse Model 1910 was an attempt to build a blowback pistol in 9x19mm for German military or police service, expanding on the existing market for the popular smaller .32ACP (7.65mm) Dreyse pistols. In order to make a safe blowback action, Schmeisser made a very stiff recoil spring, which then required a mechanism for the shooter to disengage or bypass the spring in order to manually cycle the action.

    The guns were excitedly received by several German agencies, and several thousand were ordered when the gun was announced. Unfortunately for Rheinische Metallwaaren- und Maschinenfabrik (the manufacturer, now known as Rheinmetall), production turned out to be quite difficult, and only about 500 were actually produced before the plan collapsed.

    Today we will take a look at two standard production examples and two prototypes...

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  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Suppressed OSS M3 Grease Gun and Bushmaster Booby Trap Trigger
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 9, 2017
    Today, we have a chance to take a look at a suppressed M3 "Grease Gun", as purchased and issued by the Office of Strategic Services (the OSS; predecessor to the CIA). Thanks to its readily removable barrel, the M3 (and M3A1) submachine gun was an easy gun to adapt to use with a suppressor (or as it was called at the time, a silencer). During World War 2, such a unit was developed for clandestine use by OSS and British SOE agents in occupied Europe, and they would see use for many decades in all manner of conflicts.

    The suppressor itself is quite different than modern designs, being a two-part device using tight wire mesh instead of baffles. The barrel itself is heavily perforated, and extends only through the large diameter section of the suppressor. Around it is wrapped a large roll of wire mesh, which acts as an expansion chamber to slow down the exit of gas from the muzzle. The smaller front section of the unit is filled with small discs of the same wire mesh, similar to wipes but made of mesh.

    Allegedly, the suppressor was effective enough to reduce the noise of the gunshots below the level of the action cycling, which is all that one can reasonable want from a suppressor. This particular example has an excellent provenance, having been provided by OSS to a European resistance fighter for a specific mission right at the end of WW2.

    In addition, we also have a piece of the OSS sneaky tricks catalog to see. Specifically, a "Bushmaster" remote trigger mechanism to allow the M3 (silenced or otherwise) to be made into an autonomous booby trap in conjunction with a time delay, tripwire, or other triggering device.

    Many thanks to the anonymous collector who let me take a look at this piece and bring you a video on it!

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  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Experimental Lightweight Browning High Power
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 3, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    One of the handguns that resulted from the post-WW2 interest in standardizing arms among the future members of NATO was a lightweight version of the Canadian produced Browning High Power. Experiments began in 1947 to create first a lightened slide by milling out unnecessary material, and then additionally with the use of machined and cast aluminum alloy frames. The first major batch of guns consisted of six with milled alloy frames, with two each going to the Canadian, American, and British militaries for testing.

    This would reveal that the guns were in general quite serviceable, except that the locking blocks tended to distort their mounting holes in the alloy frames under extended firing. The cast frames were generally unsuccessful, suffering from substantial durability problems. The program was cancelled in 1951 by the Canadian military, and the last United States interest was in 1952. The example in today’s video is one of the two milled frame guns sent to the US for testing.

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  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    SA80 History: XL60 Series in 4.85mm
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 10, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/british-e...

    Once the basic configuration of the new British rifle was determined, the next step was to build a series of prototypes. The design that took form was basically a bullpup copy of the Armalite AR-18. The design team at Enfield were mostly senior draftsmen, with virtually no firearms experience among them. To make things worse, most of the design team was regularly rotated onto other projects, preventing them from developing any project experience on the rifle.

    Several prototype batches were made (typically of a dozen guns each, both IWs and LSWs), all in the unique British 4.85x49mm cartridge, with a variety of different feature sets. Through the different patterns, configurations would change on the safety (push button vs lever) fire selector (push button vs lever), and magazine catch (straight-in side lever vs rock-in side lever vs rock-in rear paddle). At this time, plans still existed to make both left- and right-handed versions of the final gun, so prototypes of both were manufactured.

    Because cost-cutting measures had not yet been forced on the project, these XL-60 series guns were generally reliable, at least in normal conditions. They are quite comfortable to fire, with a cartridge very similar to the 5.56mm NATO in practical terms. There is nothing particularly wrong with that cartridge, but it would be dropped when it lost NATO trials to the Belgian SS109...but we will address that in the next episode of the SA80 history.

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  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Egyptian Hakim 8mm
    Iraqveteran8888



    Published on May 10, 2017
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    In this video we shoot and discuss the Egyptian Hakim chambered in 8mm Mauser. These rifles were based off the Swedish AG-42 Ljungman and were built to utilize the massive stockpiles of 8mm ammunition the Egyptians owned post WW2. The Hakim differs slightly from the AG-42 in that it features an adjustable gas system and a more substantial muzzle break to combat recoil from the more powerful 8mm cartridge. This particular example was produced in 1960 and is just an absolute joy to shoot as you will see. Stay tuned, much more military surplus content inbound.

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    Disclaimer: Our videos are for entertainment purposes only, imitation or the use of any instruction shown in the videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. Iraqveteran8888 will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos.

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  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Kiraly 43M: Hungary's Overpowered Submachine Gun
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 12, 2017
    The 43M submachine gun was developed by Pal Kiraly, based on the MKMO and MKPS series of submachine guns he had worked on for SIG in Switzerland before returning to Hungary (we would go on to make the San Cristobal carbines for the Dominican Republic after WW2). The initial version of the gun was the 1939 39M, with a 3” longer barrel and fixed buttstock. This was adopted by the Hungarian military, but only ordered in small numbers (about 600), which led the FEG factory to delay production until they could get enough other orders to economically justify tooling up. That finally happened in 1942, and in the meantime Kiraly and the factory had nearly finished the improved and shortened 43M version.

    Ultimately about 13,000 39M SMGs were made from 1942 to 1944, and about 5,000 43M SMGs in 1944. At that point Allied bombing ended production, and the tooling was eventually confiscated during Russian occupation of Hungary.

    Mechanically the 43M (and 39M) are lever-delayed blowback actions, firing the 9x25mm Mauser Export cartridge - the most powerful submachine gun cartridge in use at the time. The 43M stock feels very flimsy and uncomfortable, and it folds under the action of the gun. In addition, the 40-round magazine folds forward into the stock (much like the SIG MK series guns) to make it a much more compact gun to transport. Note that the 39M and 43M use different magazines!

    Thanks to the Institute of Military Technology for allowing me to have access to this magnificent piece and bring it to you! Check them out at: http://www.instmiltech.com

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  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    SA80 History: XL70 Series Final Prototypes (Individual Weapon and LSW)
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 13, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/

    By 1980, the scheduled deadline for adopting the L85 and L86 was rapidly approaching, and the weapons should have been in the last stages of fine-tuning before production began. This was not the case, however - testing was still uncovering critical problems in the guns.

    The goal for these weapons was 8000 MRBF (Mean Rounds Between Failure) for the LSW and 2500 MRBF for the IW. As real testing began, the numbers were actually 100-300 MRBF. In many cases, the guns could not run three magazines in a row without a malfunction, and this was literally an order of magnitude below the requirements. But what truly led to the massive problems with the L85/86 was that RSAF Enfield did not fix these problems. Instead, they moved the goalposts. With so many problems, it was decided to only count malfunctions that occurred in the endurance testing (ie, when the guns were not put under any environmental stress at all) and to only could "critical" malfunctions in the tally. A "critical" failure was one which could not be resolved by the shooter, such as a split barrel. Simple feed or ejection failures were not counted, nor were malfunctions that required gun disassembly to correct. Even under this new paradigm, MRBF over 3000 could not be achieved.

    In addition, the LSW was showing a problem that would become endemic; split groups. The weapon shot very good groups in semiautomatic, but in full auto fire it would produce two discreet groups. The first shot in each burst would land about 6 minutes of angle low and right compared to the remaining rounds in the group. This would be the subject of significant work, and was never fully rectified.

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  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    CZ99
    hickok45



    Published on May 13, 2017
    Shooting and discussing an old CZ99 made in Yugoslavia. We appreciate The Mosin Crate sending us this pistol.
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    1891 Salvatore-Dormus: The First Automatic Pistol
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 15, 2017
    The Salvatore-Dormus has the distinction of being the world’s first semiauto pistol, being patented in 1891. It is chambered for the 8mm Dormus cartridge, and holds 5 rounds in a Mannlicher type clip. Only about 50 of these pistol were made, mostly for an Austrian military trial in 1896/7 (this particular one has an 1897 Austrian military acceptance mark). The gun uses a delayed blowback action, with the shooter’s finger pressure on the trigger acting as the delaying force - not exactly an ideal system!

    In Austrian trials (which were the only trials the gun entered) it was rejected in favor of the 1898 Gasser revolver, which would serve until Austria began adopting semiauto handguns in 1907. However, it does hold the distinction of being the earliest automatic pistol to actually be manufactured in more than toolroom prototype numbers (even if its military trials didn’t actually take place until after other guns had come on the market).

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  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Tours of WW1 - Yorkshire Trench, Flanders
    InRangeTV



    Published on May 16, 2017
    We're going to be bringing you a number of tours of WW1 trench systems, starting with this one.

    This particular trench system was buried and forgotten until the 1990's during some construction work. It was restored and turned into a monument to those brutal days.

    Between the start of work in 1992 and 2008, the remains of 205 soldiers of three different nationalities were recovered.

    There were many approaches to WW1 trench system architecture, and it is interesting see the different approaches towards hopefully solving the same problem.

    We hope you find this series interesting and educational.
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    SA80 Series: The Pre-Production XL85 and XL86
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 17, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/

    The SA80 saga continues today with the final pre-production versions of the L85A1 and L86A1, although at this point they still both carry XL designations, as they were not yet formally adopted weapons. In these weapons we can see a couple last distinctive mechanical changes, but perhaps more importantly by this time the worker morale at RSAF Enfield was thoroughly in the tank. It had become well known that the factory complex was going to be taken public or sold outright, and it was widely expected that Enfield would be shut down as a result. A new facility would be built in Nottingham, but none of the rank and file staff expected to transfer. They would be laid off, and they knew it. Not surprisingly, quality control suffered as a result.

    As for the guns themselves, the first distinctive visible improvement was in the magazine well. In the XL70 weapons, the bottom half of the magazine well had been simple welded onto the bottom of the lower receiver, in order to retain the easy stamping of that element. On these guns, that have been replaced by a separate box which encompassed the magazine and was spot welded into the lower receiver. This change in construction method allow the magazine well to be much more precisely located in the receiver, and then fixed in place without the risk of warping the thin sheet metal of the lower receiver - while still retaining the simple stamping of that lower.

    The other visible change was to the Light Support Weapon, and it consisted of a long "girder" support added below the barrel. This was intended to mount the bipod onto, in the hopes of resolving the long-running problem of split groups in the LSW. This was a problem in which the first round of a burst would hit substantially low and left relative to the rest of the burst. While the LSW was a quite accurate weapon in semiautomatic mode, this split group problem was a substantial detriment to its effectiveness as a proper support weapon.

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  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Q&A #10: Collectible Surplus Guns, Dumb US Decisions, and Lots of French Stuff
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 16, 2017
    We do have some great questions this time around! Specifically:

    0:25 - Gain twist rifling, description and application
    5:40 - The 6.5mm Arisaka compared to modern 6.5mm cartridges
    7:44 - US abandonment of the M1917 Enfield in favor of the 1903 Springfield after WW1
    12:02 - Guns I am hyped to get my hands on
    14:00 - Guns I have bid on or won at James Julia and Rock Island
    15:14 - Would Stoner still use gas impingement today?
    20:10 - Modernization of the BAR
    23:43 - How & why of military firearms surplus and US dealers thereof
    35:46 - What to look for in collectible firearms
    38:36 - Camera operators and other FW assistants
    39:57 - What killed the rimmed and/or rimfire cartridge
    42:00 - Binary trigger systems
    44:08 - Rotating barrel pistols today?
    45:20 - My biggest surprise opportunity
    46:27 - Cooper's Scout Rifle concept
    49:32 - Shooting matching numbered guns
    52:36 - Will I be covering more early firearms?
    54:40 - Why French arms got a bad reputation
    1:00:19 - The L85A2, and its potential availability in the US
    1:04:02 - On-location footage from battlefields and such

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    Final Prices: RIA April 2017 Premier Auction (and what I bought!)
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 18, 2017
    Apparently, a lot of people really preferred the expended discussion of auction prices that I did with the recent James Julia auction, so I did the same for the recent Rock Island auction. This one had a bunch of submachine guns (both transferrables and dealer samples), so we will take a look at the differences in those two markets.

    The next RIA auction is a regional in late June, so we will start running new videos on some of those guns in a couple weeks!

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    SIG KE-7 Light Machine Gun - More Complex Than Most
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 19, 2017
    The KE-7 was the product of two Swiss designers, Pal Kiraly and Gotthard End, and was introduced in 1929 by the Swiss manufacturer SIG. It was a recoil operated design and fired from an open bolt. The guns were not adopted by the Swiss military, and were exported primarily to Latin America, Ethiopia, and China, being mostly made in 8mm Mauser. They were tested by many European nations, and were offered in a wide variety of calibers. The rate of automatic fire would vary depending on caliber, but was not less than 550 rpm. Magazines were typically 25 rounds - although this example has a 50-round magazine.

    The gun could fire in either single shot or automatic mode. It didn’t use a selector switch, though – pulling the trigger back slightly gave single shots, and a further pull gave automatic fire. This was a relatively common feature of submachine guns at the time, although not seen so much in light machine guns.

    Thanks to the Institute of Military Technology for allowing me to have access to this magnificent piece and bring it to you! Check them out at: http://www.instmiltech.com

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    SA80 History: L85 A1 vs A2 (and the coming A3)
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 20, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/british-e...

    At last, we have reached the L85A2, when the rifle was finally made into something reliable and effective. In 1995, after extensive public scandal from the L85A1's shortcomings being blatantly exposed in the first Gulf War, Heckler & Koch was given a contract to retrofit the rifles. At the time H&K was owned by British Aerospace, so this remained an arguably British program. The H&K retrofit consisted largely of subtle changes to materials, tolerancing, and finish, but it would lead to very significant improvements in performance (these were the ares where the original Enfield design team had the least experience). The parts changed included:

    Cocking handle, bolt, extractor, extractor pin, ejector, ejector pin, firing pin, cam stud, hold-open, barrel extension, gas system, handguard, magazine, bolt carrier, hammer stop, hammer, barrel, ejection post, and all springs.

    The new A2 rifles were introduced into service starting in 2001, and have receiver widely positive reviews. This is the rifle that the L85 could have and should have been from the very beginning. In addition, further improvements will likely lead to an A3 variant in the relatively near future. Currently the main improvement is HK's "A3" (not yet a government designation) upper receiver, which is stronger and has an improved optics mounting rail.
     
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    Mauser C96
    hickok45



    Published on May 20, 2017
    Shooting and discussing a Mauser C96 bring-back from WWII. The WWII vet who brought it back is 95 years young and still living.
     
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    Laumann 1891 and Schonberger-Laumann 1894 Semiauto Pistols
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 22, 2017
    Josef Laumann was an Austrian designer of early ring-trigger manually repeating pistols, and was one of the first to develop that type of handgun into a semiautomatic. He took an 1891 pattern ring trigger gun and adapted it with an 1892 patent into a simple blowback self-loader - coming very close to being the first self-loading pistol actually built in the process (although he was just beaten out by the Salvator-Dormus).

    He continued to refine the design with the financial aid of the Schonberger brothers, who were his financiers in the endeavor. With their assistance, he produced two patterns of 1894 semiauto pistol, although neither would prove successful enough to see substantial production.

    I have the great opportunity today to bring you both an 1891 ring-trigger Laumann as well as examples of both the first and second pattern 1894 Schonberger-Laumann semiautos!

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    MGD PM9 Rotary-Action Submachine Gun
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 23, 2017
    The PM9 was an interesting an unique submachine gun designed by Louis Debuit for the French firm Merlin and Gerin (hence the MGD name – Merlin, Gerin, Debuit) in the late 1940s and early 50s. The design was intended to provide a very compact package, which it did with a very short action, folding stock, and folding magazine.

    The PM9 uses a delayed blowback action, and the delaying is done by a rotating flywheel-type block and clock spring. The bolt and flywheel act somewhat like the piston and crank in an engine. As the bolt (piston) moved rearward in a straight line, it forces the flywheel (crank) to rotate because the two are connected. In the case of the PM9, the connection is a nub on the flywheel that rides in a vertical slot in the bolt. The flywheel is pushing against the clock spring to rotate, and the combination of the its inertia and spring pressure keep the bolt closed long enough for pressure to drop to a safe level. The rotary action allows this to be done in a much smaller package than typical submachine guns.

    The PM9 was initially chambered for 7.65 French Long, but quickly changed to standard 9mm Parabellum for the production models. It used the same magazine as the German MP38/MP40, giving it a 32-round capacity. In addition to the model with a skeletonized folding stock, the PM9 was also available with a fixed wooden stock and either short barrel of long carbine barrel. A relatively small number of guns were produced in France in 1954 and 1955, but they failed to find commercial success. In 1956 the German Erma company acquired a license to build the PM9, but abandoned the idea after making a few prototypes.

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    SA80 History: L22A2 and Experimental L85 Carbines
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 24, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/

    One of the original design intentions of the SA80 project was to replace the infantry rifle and the submachine gun with a single weapon that could fulfill both roles - hence the choice of a bullpup configuration. This would, theoretically, allow rifle ballistics and also SMG handling and maneuverability. As with most bullpup projects, however, this plan did not last. It quickly became clear that a shortened version of the L85 rifle could be made, which would be more suitable for troops who would previously have been issued submachine guns - notably aircraft and armored vehicle crews.

    Today we take a look at a couple early prototypes of these carbines which did not go into production. We also examine an L22A2 carbine, which did become standard issue in 2003 for some units. This carbine includes all of the H&K A2 pattern upgrades, and was given the A2 designation despite there never being an adopted L22A1.
     
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    Webley 1913 Semiauto Pistol: History and Disassembly
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 25, 2017
    William Whiting and the Webley company had high hopes for their self-loading pistols being adopted by the British military - but they never got the success they were hoping for.

    After the poor performance of the Webley 1904 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hT38...) at trials, William Whiting decided to make sure his next attempt would be fully developed before he put it in the hands of the military. He did very well at that too, as the gun which would become the Model 1913 Webley did very well from its very first military tests. The Royal Navy was, in fact, quite enthusiastic about it, although the Army was not. The Navy would ultimately adopt the gun and purchase about 8,000 of them during World War One, while the Army acquired just a couple hundred and preferred to stick to its revolvers.

    Thanks to Mike Carrick of Arms Heritage magazine for loaning me these pistols to bring to you!
     
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    Webley 1913 Semiauto Pistol: Shooting
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 26, 2017
    Following up on yesterday's history and disassembly of the Webley 1913, today I am taking one of them out to the range. Courtesy of Mike Carrick from Arms Heritage magazine, I am shooting original WWI British .455 SL ammunition. We don't have a lot of it to work with here, but we will try out some magazine fire as well as some single loading, since the magazine cutoff was one of the relatively unique features of the 1913 Webley.

    Overall, from this admittedly limited firing experience, I think the Webley is a rather underrated pistol, probably because of its short service live and unavailable ammunition. Despite its awkward appearance, it handles and points pretty well, and has felt recoil not unlike the Colt 1911, despite having a more powerful cartridge.
     
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    Fulton Armory M14 Service Rifle an American Icon
    Military Arms Channel



    Published on May 26, 2017
    The M14 is one of the most recognizable US military service rifles despite being one of the shortest serving service rifles in US history. It has been pressed back into service in the last decade or so due to a need for a .308 rifle in the field. Fulton Armory makes one of the best, if not the best, reproductions of this classic American service rifle.

     
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    Egyptian FN-49 8x57mm
    Iraqveteran8888



    Published on May 26, 2017
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    In this video we take another old Egyptian workhorse to the range for some fun. The FN-49 is a great autoloading battle rifle used by several countries in many different calibers including 8mm Mauser, 30-06, 7.65x53mm, 7mm Mauser, and 7.62x51mm NATO. These rifles have a rich history and are extremely collectable. Hopefully you enjoy this look at an interesting military surplus rifle, many more to come.

    Disclaimer: Our videos are for entertainment purposes only, imitation or the use of any instruction shown in the videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. Iraqveteran8888 will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos.

    Copyright 2017, 88 Industries, LLC
     
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    SA80 History: L98A1 Cadet Manually-Operated Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on May 27, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/

    The Army Cadet Force is a British quasi-military organization that acts general as a precursor to military enlistment. With the adoption of the L85A1 as the British service rifle, a manually operated copy was also developed for use by Cadets. Designated the L98A1, this rifle was built without a gas system, and had a specialized charging handle to provide more leveraged extraction than the standard bolt handle.

    This L98A1 was phased out of use in 2009, being replaced with the L98A2, which is essentially an L85A2 without fully automatic capability.
     
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    Browning A-5 Buck Special
    hickok45



    Published on May 27, 2017
    Shooting and discussing the classic Browning A-5 shotgun.
     

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