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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by searcher, Feb 13, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    B&T VP9 Silenced Pistol: A Modern Welrod
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 18, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/

    The VP9 "Veterinary Pistol" (um...yeah) from Brugger & Thomet is a manually operated 9x19mm handgun with a quite effective suppressor built right onto the barrel. It is, in fact, a remarkably close copy of the British SOE Welrod pistol from World War II, right down to some pretty minor details.

    The action uses a two-lug rotating bolt, which is unlocked and cycled by hand between shots. The magazine doubles as the grip, making for a compact and concealable package that would not necessarily be an obvious gun to the typical observer. The suppressor uses 4 rubber wipes which the bullet must actually make its own holes in - this makes it quieter than a typical suppressor, but only until the wipes have substantial holes shot through them (10 rounds or so). At that point the noise of each shot is still much quieter than a unsuppressed pistol, but not as quiet as when using new wipes. This is not a gun intended for a high volume of fire. That said, the suppressor body is easily removed, and the wipes are easily replaced.
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Model 1892 Berthier Artillery Musketoon
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 19, 2017
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    The original 1890 Berthier carbine was designed for cavalry, but a slightly modified version was produced (in small numbers) with a bayonet lug, for use by the Gendarmerie. In 1892, the French military would adopt that same carbine for use by an assortment of troops who were better suited with a carbine than a full size Lebel rifle. These included primarily artillery crews, but also engineers, messengers, drivers, and others.

    The Modele 1892 Mousqueton d'Artillerie was basically identical to the 1890 cavalry carbine, including the same 3-round Mannlicher type clip. It was put into production at both the St Etienne and Chatellerault factories, and by August of 1914 384,000 were in French inventory. By the time the improved 1916 model was put into production, a total of 675,000 of these carbines would be built.
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Light Machine Guns in Finland: DP-28 vs LS-26
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 20, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    Before the Winter War, the standard light machine gun adopted by the Finnish military was the Lahti-Saloranta LS-26. This was a complex and finely built weapon, using a short recoil action and tilting bolt, chambered for the same 7.62x54mm rimmed cartridge as used by Finland's Mosin-Nagant infantry rifles. The LS-26 fed from 20-round box magazines which are a bit unusual in having a single-feed presentation (which made them difficult to load without a tool, but also prevented potential problems from rimrock).

    In total, about 5,000 LS26 machine guns were made for Finland (and an additional 1,200 sold to China in 8mm Mauser). They were apparently quite accurate, but highly prone to malfunctioning in the cold and dirty field conditions of Finnish combat. When the Winter War broke out and Finns began capturing Russian equipment, the Russian DP-28 light machine gun became a very popular alternative to the LS-26.

    The Degtyarev DP-28 may not have been as refined of a weapon, but it was much better suited to real combat. It was simple and reliable, and the 47-round magazine capacity was certainly appreciated as well. By the end of the Continuation War, Finland had some 15,000 Degtyarev light machine guns in its inventory, far outnumbering the LS-26s.

    Today Karl and I had a chance to fire both weapons side by side (unfortunately, my trigger time on the LS-26 was quite limited, and I was not able to film a full disassembly of it). We both found the LS-26 to be quite a challenging weapon to use effectively, even without any malfunctions. The Degtyarev was a much more usable machine gun.

    One other interesting takeaway for us was the remarkable effectiveness of the semiautomatics DP/DPM made by SMG Guns here in the US. It delivered probably 90% of the utility of the original fully automatic version, which is quite impressive. After this comparison, I would recommend it even more heartily than before.

    Special thanks to Varusteleka for arranging this shoot:
    https://www.varusteleka.com

    All photos in this video are courtesy of the excellent Finnish Defense Forces' Photo Archive:
    http://sa-kuva.fi

    Semiauto DP/DPM rifles from SMG Guns (don't let the terrible web site fool you, the guns are excellent):
    http://smgguns.com/?page_id=321
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Colonial Berthiers: 1902 Indochina and 1907 Senegalese
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 21, 2017
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    The sharpshooters of the French colonial forces in Indochina (the Tirailleurs Indochinois) had never been issued Lebel rifles, and were still using single shot Gras rifles at the turn of the century. The Indochinese soldiers were rather short statured, and the Lebel was simply too long of a rifle for them to use efficiently. The colonial government requested a special weapon for these men, and the result was the 1902 Berthier.

    The Berthier carbine was much more compact than the Lebel, and it was also less expensive to manufacture and simpler to instruct troops with. So after some brief experimentation, a version was produced with a 25 inch (635mm) long barrel, which was a nice balance between the carbines and the Lebel rifle. In my opinion, the 1902 is the ideal size for a Berthier, and I think it handles best of all the different variations made.

    An initial production run of 22,500 of these 1902 rifles was made by Chatellerault between 1902 and 1912. A second batch of about 25,000 more would be produced in the 1920s, but we will discuss these in a separate video, as they were made with the 1916 upgrades.

    With the successful implementation of the Berthier in the Indochinese colonial forces, it would stand out as an obvious solution for the need to upgrade the arms of France's African colonial troops as well. These soldiers were not short, but also had outdated Gras rifles, and Lebel production was no longer active by 1907. As a result, a further lengthened Berthier was suggested for the Senegalese troops, with a barrel 31.5 inches (800mm) long; equal to that of the Lebel. This was accepted into service, and 25,000 were manufactured by Chatellerault between 1907 and the beginning of the Great War in 1914.

    With the urgent need for more rifles because of World War One, the 1907 Berthier (renamed to the 1907 Colonial and issued to colonial troops besides just the Senegalese as of 1908) would attract the interest of the military because it was cheaper to manufacture than the Lebel, and still in active production. The result would be the 07/15 Berthier, which would become a dual standard infantry rifle alongside the 1886 Lebel in the war.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    W+F Bern P43: A Swiss Take on the Browning High Power
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 22, 2017
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    In 1940, Switzerland began a series of trials to replace their Luger service pistols with something equally high quality, but more economical. They had squeezed as much simplification out of the Luger as they could in 1929, and by this time the guns just needed to be replaced. The first 1940 trial had only two entrants (a Petter prototype from SIG and an Astra 900), but a second trial in 1941 included a large assortment of modern handguns, including a French 1935A, a Polish Vis-35, and prototypes from both SIG and W+F Bern.

    One of the most tenacious competitors (aside form the winning SIG/Petter design) was the Bern factory's series of Browning High Power copies. In this video, we will be looking at three progressive versions of this gun as they were modified through the course of the trials (which would last until 1949). While they are all mechanically very similar to the High Power, they will get progressively less visually similar as the trials progressed. In addition, we will see features like the slide lock, manual safety, and magazine release evolve and change.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Model 1907/15 Berthier: The WW1 Standard Infantry Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 24, 2017
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    When World War One broke out in 1914, France mobilized millions of men into military service - and it became abundantly clear that a lot of new rifles would need to be manufactured. The 1886 Lebel was no longer in production and was a slow rifle to make in any case - but the 1907 Colonial Berthier was being produced already, and was a more efficient design as well. By late 1914, plans were underway to drastically increase Berthier rifle production.

    A few changes were made to the 1907 pattern, mainly changing the front end to accept the standard 1886 Lebel bayonet ("Rosalie"). After the first 80,000 had been made, the bolt handle was also changed from the bent carbine style to a heavier duty straight type. With these changes made, the Modele 07/15 was ready for mass adoption by the infantry, where it would serve side by side with the Lebel.

    The primary manufacturer of 07/15 rifles was the St. Etienne arsenal, which build between 1.0 and 1.2 million of them by the spring of 1917. The Chatellerault arsenal produced another 436,000, and the Delauney Belleville automobile factory retooled its workshops to make rifles, producing another 170,000 of them. The Remington company in the US also took a contract to make 250,000 Berthier rifles, but was unable to meet the terms of the contract. Remington had taken on more wartime production work than it could handle, and failed to meet French quality and scheduling requirements. In August of 1916 that contract was cancelled, with just 9,440 rifles sent to France for use. The remaining 5,000-10,000 that had been made by Remington were sold on the commercial market in the US.

    By 1916, it was clear that the 3-round capacity of the Berthier was a very real disadvantage (both tactically and psychologically) to the German Mauser rifles, and an upgrade program was put underway. This would ultimately become the 1916 pattern and would go into production in 1917.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Finland Shooting Montage: Maxims and Mosins and Suomis, Oh My!
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 25, 2017
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    A montage of a bunch of shooting from our trip to Finland in June 2017! Including:

    m/31 Suomi
    KP-44
    KvKK-62
    LS-26
    DP-28 (Emma)
    M91/24, M27, and M28/30 Mosins
    M32/33 Maxim
    Rk-95
    Sako TRG in 7.62mm NATO

    Thanks to Varusteleka.com for arranging this shooting trip!
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Berthier Gets an Upgrade: The Model 1916
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    Published on Jul 26, 2017
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    The "Modifié 1916" update to the Berthier system of rifles and carbines marked a major improvement in the guns combat effectiveness - really the first substantial overhaul to the design since it was developed in 1890. The two main elements of the upgrade were the addition of an upper handguard and an extension of the magazine from 3 rounds to 5, to match the capacity of the Mauser rifles used by Germany. In addition, several other improvements were made at the same time, including a redesign of the sights to favor quick target acquisition over long range precision and the addition of luminous radium elements to the sights. The upgrade package originally also included a dust cover over the bolt, but this was dropped for reasons I have not been able to determine.

    This upgrade package was formally adopted in late 1916, and would go into production in 1917. However, it took a substantial time for the weapons to filter down to the front lines, and only a small number of M16 carbines and a very small number of M16 long rifles actually saw combat service before the Armistice. The M16 pattern (particularly the carbines) would form the standard armament for the French military right up to World War II, however, with Berthier carbine production continuing until 1939.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Italy's Worst Machine Gun: The Breda Modello 30
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 28, 2017
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    The Breda Model 30 was the standard Italian light machine gun of World War II, and is a serious contender for “worst machine gun ever”. Yes, given the choice we would prefer to have a Chauchat (which really wasn’t as bad as people today generally think).

    The Breda 30 suffered from all manner of problems. To begin with, it was far more complicated than necessary. The amount of machining needed to build one is mind boggling compared to contemporary guns like the ZB26/Bren or BAR. And for all that work, it just didn’t work well in combat conditions.

    Mechanically, the Breda used a short recoil action with a rotating bolt The recoil action meant that the barrel moved with each shot, so the sights were mounted on the receiver to keep them fixed. This seems like a good idea, but it meant that the sights would need to be re-zeroed each time the barrel was changed. To compound this, the gun fired from a closed bolt which made it more susceptible to overheating and it was recommended to change barrels every 200 rounds or so. An oiling mechanism was built in to lightly oil each cartridge on feeding. This allowed the gun to extract without ripping rims off the cases, but was a disaster waiting to happen on the battlefield. In places like North Africa, the oil acted as a magnet for sand and dust, leading to quick jamming if the gun were not kept scrupulously clean.

    The next huge judgment error on Breda’s part was the magazine. The thought behind it was that magazine feed lips are easily damaged in the field, and they can be protected by building them into the gun receiver rather than in each cheap disposable box magazine (the Johnson LMG and Madsen LMG recognized this issue as well). However, Breda’s solution was to make the 20-round magazine a permanent part of the gun. The magazine was attached to the receiver by a hinge pin, and was reloaded by special 20-round stripper clips. This meant that reloading took significantly longer than changing magazines, and any damage to the one attached magazine would render the gun inoperable. As if anything else were needed, the magazine was made with a big opening on top to allow the gunner to see how many rounds remained – and to let more of that North African sand into the action.

    Most of the Breda Model 30s were made in 6.5 Carcano, but a small number were made in 7.35 Carcano when that cartridge was adopted. The rate of fire was about 500 rounds per minute, which was a bit slower than most other machine guns of the day.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    W+F Bern P47 Experimental Gas-Delay Pistol
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 29, 2017
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    The Swiss were the first country to adopt a self-loading service pistol; the Luger in 1900. They would keep those in service clear through World War 2, at which point they began seriously looking for a more economical and more modern replacement. During the 1940s, a number of experimental designs were developed at the SIG and W+F Bern factories in hopes of becoming the new Swiss service sidearm.

    This example is a P47, one of 10 guns made in 1947, at the end of W+F Bern’s developmental series. While the preceding guns had been largely based on the Browning High Power, the P47 was a gas-delayed blowback action similar to the H&K P7, Norinco 77B, and Walther CCP (although predating all of those). Its barrel had gas ports just in front of the chamber which led into a gas piston that acted to hold the slide in battery when pressurized. Thus the slide was delayed from opening until the bullet has left the muzzle and gas pressure had dropped enough for the recoil spring alone to safely control the opening of the action.

    Unlike Bern's previous experimental pistols, these 10 P47s were all identical (and have serial numbers in the low/mid 40s to low/mid 50s). I had a chance to shoot one of these (serial number 46), and it was a pleasant enough piece, although in my experience the gas delay system did not provide a substantial improvement over what was ultimately adopted by Switzerland, the SIG P210.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Old West Vignette: Raid on Columbus, NM - March 9, 1916
    InRangeTV



    Published on Jul 29, 2017
    At approximately 4 am on March 9, 1916, Pancho Villa's revolutionary army attacked the small US town of Columbus, NM.

    The reason isn't entirely clear, but it appears to have been inspired to instigate a direct war between the US and Mexico as well as to exact revenge on a local merchant, Sam Ravel.

    90 minutes later the battle ended as a tactical and political loss for the Villistas as well as ultimately 18 dead Americans.

    We discuss the fight in this video, along with some video and stills taken from the location itself and provide some historical insight into that fateful day.

    InRangeTV is wholly viewer supported, please consider it:
    https://www.patreon.com/InRangeTV

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  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Berthier After World War One
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jul 31, 2017
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    In the aftermath of World War One, France would face the need to replace virtually all of its small arms, because nearly everything it had been using was either a wartime stopgap (like the Ruby, Chauchat, and Berthier 07/15) or had been obsolete before the war began (like the Lebel and Mle 1892 revolver). The first focus of the rearming was a new light machine gun, which would be adopted in the form of the Chatellerault M24/29. Plans were made to develop a semiautomatic infantry rifle and bolt action support troops' rifle (both in the new 7.5mm rimless cartridge), but these would not prove to be as quickly realized. As a result, the Berthier Mle 1916 carbines would remain in major frontline service right up to the outbreak of World War Two.

    During the twenty years between the wars, the Berthiers would see a series of changes and upgrades including:

    - Sling bars replacing swivels
    - Revised handguard profile
    - Raised sights
    - Removal of the clearing rods
    - Adoption of the 1932N cartridge and associated rechambering
    - New metal finishes

    Production of new carbines in fact continued all the way until 1939, with at least 160,000 made in 1919 and later. Many of the alterations made during this postwar period are evident on examples found today, and there is a collecting premium on guns that do not exhibit these peacetime modifications. So, let's have a look, shall we?
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    M38 TS Carcano Carbine: Brilliant or Rubbish?
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 1, 2017
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    Carcano vs K98k Match video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAyxL...

    I would like to propose that the M38 TS Carcano carbine was, despite the poor reputation of the Carcano series of rifles, one of the best thought out bolt action weapons of World War 2. Why, you ask? Well, let's consider...

    Only a few nations actually recognized the short ranges at which combat actually took place. Germany was one, as seen with it's 8x33mm cartridge development, and Italy was another. The sights on the M38 series of carbines were made as simple fixed notches, with no adjustments to be knocked out of place unintentionally. With a 200 meter zero (or 150 meters, with the Finnish replacement front sight), the weapon needed no adjustment to make hits out to 300 meters, which is as far as anyone could realistically engage a target.

    The M38 TS is a light and handy weapon compared to its contemporaries - 8.1 pounds and 40.2 inches (3.7kg and 1.02m) - and it fired a significantly lighter cartridge as well. The 7.35x51mm round used a 128gr (8.3g) bullet at 2400-2500 fps (735-755 m/s) depending on barrel length. This produced noticeably less recoil than rounds like the .30-06 or 8mm Mauser, which made it easier for troops to shoot effectively. The Carcano also had a 6-round capacity and fed with Mannlicher type clips, which are potentially faster to load than Mauser-type stripper clips.

    Today we will discuss the M38 and these features (along with its predecessor, the M91 rifle) as they appear on paper. At the same time, over on InRangeTV, today we have the first stage of a 2-Gun Action Challenge Match in which I am shooting this M38TS Carcano against Karl, who is using a Mauser K98k - so we will see how the theory works out in the field!
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Weapons as Political Protest: P.A. Luty's Submachine Gun
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 2, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/

    Phillip A. Luty was a Briton who took a hard philosophical line against gun control legislation in the UK in the 1990s. In response to more restrictive gun control laws, he set out to prove that all such laws were ultimately futile by showing that one could manufacture a functional firearm from hardware store goods, without using any purpose-made firearms parts.

    Luty succeeded in this task, designing a 9mm submachine gun made completely from scratch with a minimum of tools. In 1998, he published the plans for his gun as the book "Expedient Homemade Firearms". Luty was not particularly discreet about his activities (actually, he was quite outspoken...) and was eventually caught by the police while out to test fire one of his guns, and arrested. He was convicted, and spent several years in prison. He continued to pursue a gun rights agenda after being released, and was facing legal trouble again when he passed away from cancer in 2011.

    Several of Luty's submachine guns are still held in the collection of the Royal Armouries' National Firearms Centre, including the one that led to his original conviction. Many thanks to the NFC for allowing me to bring that weapon to you!
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    M34: The Berthier Converted to the 7.5mm Rimless Cartridge
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    Published on Aug 3, 2017
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    With the end of World War One, it was finally possible for the French military to replace the 8mm Lebel cartridge with a modern rimless cartridge, and they wasted no time in doing so. By 1924 a new round had been adopted, and along with it a new modern light machine gun. Next, the arsenals would start working on converting 8mm rifle to the new cartridge. The first candidate was the Lebel, and in 1927 a conversion was approved and a batch of a few hundred made - but this was a more expensive and time consuming process than anyone wanted. After some brief trials, it was decided to work on adapting the Berthier instead, and in 1934 a conversion designed from St Etienne was approved as the 1907/15-M34.

    This new design used a new 22.5" barrel (570mm), a Mauser style internal 5-round double stack magazine, and new sights. The receivers and trigger parts were retained from the rifles being converted, along with the nosecaps and barrel bands, but not much else. Still, these conversions were put into production alongside the manufacture of new MAS-36 bolt action rifles. By the time of the German invasion about 63,000 M34 Berthiers had been converted, and were issued to frontline troops. They would fight in the Battle of France, and would also be used by German occupation forces as the Gewehr 241(f).
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The German WWII Standby: The MP38 and MP40 SMGs
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 4, 2017
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    The MP40 is an iconic piece of World War 2 weaponry, and it's about time we took a closer look at its development...

    Thanks to the Institute of Military Technology for allowing me to have access to these three examples so I can bring them to you! Check out the IMT at:

    http://www.instmiltech.com
     
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    Major Fosbery's Breechloading Prototype Rifle
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    Published on Aug 5, 2017
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    George Fosbery was the British officer (Major, at the time of this particular design) responsible for the quite famous Webley-Fosbery self-cocking revolver, as well as the Paradox system for shotgun slugs and many other lesser known firearms inventions. This rifle was his entry into British trials in the late 1860s for a cartridge firing rifle. Ultimately the Martini-Henry would be chosen, but a nine different guns were put through testing including Fosbery's.

    One of the aspects that Fosbery's design was particularly well suited for was the requirement that the gun be able to be loaded with a minimum amount of movement required that might interfere with men standing in close formation. Despite this, Fosbery only managed to come in 6th place in the trials, and only a small number of his guns were sold on the civilian market afterwards.
     
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    French Rifle Ammunition: 8mm Lebel and 7.5mm French
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 7, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

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    Today we are going through the French rifle ammunition used in the Lebel, Berthier, and MAS series rifles - 8mm Lebel and 7.5mm French.

    The 8mm Lebel cartridge began as simply a necked-down version of the 11mm Gras cartridge, because that cartridge was already in use in the French Navy Kropatschek rifles which were the basis of the Lebel rifle design. As a result, the Lebel cartridge was significantly tapered and had a large rim (which would cause a series of problems for use in repeating arms in later years).

    The model 1886 ammunition was a flat-nosed long conical bullet, with a lead core. The bullet weighed 15g/231gr and had a muzzle velocity of 638mps/2093fps. This was updated slightly in 1891 to strengthen the case and add a crimping groove to the bullet. Designated Balle 1886M, this cartridge would be the standard for almost 10 years.

    In 1898, trials of a new spitzer bullet concluded with the adoption of Balle 1886D. This was not just a spitzer bullet, but actually a solid 90/10 brass bullet instead of a lead cored bullet, as this type was simpler to manufacture. The bullet weighed 12.8g/198gr and had a muzzle velocity of 701mps/2300fps.

    In 1932, a new loading was developed to give better performance in machine guns, designated Balle 1932N. This was still a spitzer, but returned to the lead core type of construction. Its bullet weighed 15.05g/232gr and had a muzzle velocity of 690mps/2265fps. It was a more powerful round than the preceding versions, and incorporated a thicker neck in the brass. This required reaming out the chambered of existing weapons to avoid overpressure when firing. Converted weapons were marked with an "N" on the barrel and receiver. It is important not to fire this ammunition in unconverted firearms!

    Today on the commercial market, the primary source of 8mm Lebel ammunition is PPU (Prvi Partisan). They make a cartridge loaded basically to Balle 1886D specifications, which can be safely used in both N-converted and unconverted rifles.

    In 1924, a new rimless cartridge was adopted - the 7.5x58mm. A problem quickly revealed itself, however, because 8mm Mauser ammunition could be chambered and fired in firearms made for the new 7.5mm cartridge - with potentially catastrophic results. To solve this problem, the case was shortened to 54mm in 1929, and the new standard loading was Balle 1929C. This fired a 9g/139gr bullet at 823mps/2700fps and would be the standard French rifle cartridge until the adoption of the 5.56mm FAMAS in the 1970s.

    "Les Cartouches 8mm Lebel" can be ordered here: http://www.crepin-leblond.fr/livres/5...

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
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    BESAL: Britain's Emergency Simplified Light Machine Gun
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 8, 2017
    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of the guns in this video, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/

    The BESAL is a simplified redesign of the Bren light machine gun, developed by a BSA employee named Faulkner. The design of the gun was motivated by the disastrous retreat of the British Army from Dunkirk in 1940, where they abandoned a huge amount of weaponry and war material, including most of their Bren guns.

    The Bren gun was in production only as the BSA factory, which was at great risk to German bombing - and the Bren included a number of complex parts that could not be effectively put into production elsewhere in the UK on short notice. It was with this in mind that Faulkner designed the BESAL, which used much simpler components which could be made in a greta number of small shops. Decentralized production would have made it a much more resilient process in the case of invasion (similar to German small arms production late in the war).

    By the time the BESAL prototypes were built, tested, and approved as being reliable and effective, however, the immediate threat of invasion had passed and the Bren was in production at the Inglis factory in Canada as well as at BSA. The BESAL design was shelved for use in case it became necessary again, but it never was.
     
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    Major Fosbery's Automatic Revolver: History and Mechanics
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 9, 2017
    Cool Forgotten Weapons merchandise! http://shop.bbtv.com/collections/forg...

    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    George Fosbery, V.C., was a decorated British officer with substantial combat experience in India when he decided to design a better sidearm in 1895. True semiautomatic handguns were in their very early stages of development at that time, and Fosbery thought that one could have a more durable, more powerful, and simpler weapon by using a revolver as a foundation. He began experimenting with a Colt SAA, but soon moved to using Webley revolvers when he found the Colt internals insufficiently durable for his conversion.

    What Fosbery did was to make relocate the barrel and cylinder into an upper assembly which could move independently of the grip and trigger of the gun. Upon firing, the energy of recoil would push the upper assembly rearwards, recocking the hammer and indexing the cylinder to the next chamber. This gave the shooter the rapid fire of a double action revolver with the excellent trigger pull of a single action revolver.

    The gun was introduced at the Bisley shooting matches, where it proved quite popular as a target gun. By the time production began in the early years of the 20th century, however, semiauto handguns had improved significantly, and the opportunity for the Webley-Fosbery to be a big seller had already passed. Still, British officers were required to provide sidearms chambered for the .455 service cartridge, and more than a few opted to purchase Webley-Fosberys.

    Thanks to Mike Carrick of Arms Heritage magazine for providing this Webley-Fosbery for this video! See his regular column here: https://armsheritagemagazine.com
     
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    Shooting the Webley-Fosbery Automatic Revolver - Including Safety PSA
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 10, 2017
    Following up yesterday's look at the history and mechanics of the Webley-Fosbery self-cocking revolvers, today we are out at the range to do some shooting with one.

    In terms of handling, it is a comfortable gun to shoot, albeit with some exaggerated recoil because of the very high bore axis relative to the hand. It has an interesting two-part recoil sensation, because the upper assembly takes quite a long time to return forward into battery.

    Most importantly, we discovered that this particular Webley-Fosbery has a worn hammer engagement, which results in the firing pin coming into contact with cartridge primers even when it is in the safety notch. In other words, it can - and will - sometimes fire when the action is closed and without any manipulation of the trigger. This is a condition that could happen to any Fosbery revolver, so owners should handle them with this possibility in mind! This is also a great example of why gun safety rules are redundant - occasionally guns do have mechanical failures, so don't point them at anything you don't want to shoot!

    Thanks to Mike Carrick of Arms Heritage magazine for providing this Webley-Fosbery for this video! See his regular column here: https://armsheritagemagazine.com
     
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    image.jpeg image.jpeg I came across this ammo, it has a 120mm bore, combustionable case ( case is burnt up on discharge), has a tungsten dart ( or DU) that travels at about 5,600 fps. and will penetrate 700 plus mm of hardened armor. Big bore, used in our Abrahms tank and by other NATO nations. The blue can looking one in the background in the brass case is a 105MM APDS, the first generation.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
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    Costa Rican Breda PG: The First Burst-Fire Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 11, 2017
    The Breda PG ("Presa Gas" - Gas Operated) was developed by Sestilio Fiorini in 1931 and put into production at Breda's factory in Rome. It was offered as a weapon for commercial sale and export, as well as being one of the several entrants in Italy's semiautomatic rifle trials in the late 1930s. Unlike most of the other competitors in that trial, the Breda PG did actually find a commercial buyer (albeit a small one).

    The government of Costa Rica purchased 800 PG rifles. These were designated Moschetto Automatico, as they were equipped with a 4-round burst option as well as semiautomatic They fired from an open bolt (in both semiauto and burst modes) and were chambered for the 7x57mm Mauser cartridge, which was a common and popular round in Latin America at the time.

    The Italian military trials rifle was somewhat different. In addition to using the standard Italian 6.5x52mm Carcano cartridge, it was semiautomatic only and fired from a closed bolt. These were designated Fucil Semiautomatico, and only a few hundred were made (at most).

    Both versions used large detachable box magazines, including 20-, 30- and even 50-round varieties. The Costa Rican version of the gun shows some elements of the coming assault rifle style of firearm, but it's rifle caliber cartridge and open bolt operation (and its awkward handling) prevented it from showcasing the possibilities of that style of firearm.
     
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    Indonesian Air Force Collapsing-Stock G3
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 12, 2017

    In 1959 the German military first adopted the Spanish CETME as its standard infantry rifle, because it was able to acquire a license to manufacture the guns domestically (something FN had been unwilling to grant for the FAL). The European rights to the CETME were at that time owned by NWM in the Netherlands, and Germany negotiated a trade to allow its own production. That production was undertaken by two different firms - Rheinmetall and Heckler & Koch.

    Ultimately Rheinmetall's quality was sub-par, and production of the G3 would transfer entirely to H&K - but not before Rheinmetall made a number of international commercial sales of the gun. This particular example is one of a batch purchased by the Indonesian Air Force, and it sports a collapsing stock that was made between 1959 and 1961 - substantially predating the H&K collapsing stocks.

    These Indonesian rifles were used by Indonesian paratroops in fighting on Papua New Guinea, where the Indonesian military was attempting to take over control of the country from the fledgling independence movement (which was supported by the Dutch government). This rifle was captured by the Papua Volunteer Corps in the early 1960s, and ultimately handed over to the Dutch military, from whence it found its way into the Dutch Military Museum.

    Thanks to the Dutch National Military Museum for allowing me access to film this rifle! Check them out at: https://www.nmm.nl
     
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    Schmeisser's MP-18,I - The First True Submachine Gun
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 14, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    When Germany began looking in late 1915 for a new weapon ideally suited for the “last 200 meters” of a combat advance, Hugo Schmeisser’s blowback submachine gun would prove to be the weapon that would set the standard for virtually all submachine guns to come. It was a fully automatic only weapon with a simple blowback action and a rather slow 400 rpm rate of fire. Although relatively heavy, the only real shortcoming of the MP18,I was its use of 32 round Luger snail drum magazines, which was dictated by the German military. These magazines were unreliable and difficult to load, but they were already in production and were a reasonable logistical answer in a time when material and production shortages were an endemic problem in Germany.

    The MP18,I managed to see frontline combat only in the closing few months of World War One (50,000 were initially ordered, 17,677 were produced before the Armistice, and only an estimated 3,000 actually saw frontline combat use). During that time, however, it made a significant impression, easily convincing anyone with an open mind that this new type of weapon would play a major role in future wars.

    After the end of the war, the Germany Army was prohibited from using submachine guns, so most of the existing ones (including the example in today’s video) were transferred to police organizations instead.
     
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    The Volcanic: Smith & Wesson's First Pistol
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 18, 2017
    Guns in this video:
    S&W Navy model: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    S&W Pocket Model: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Volcanic Navy model: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    New Haven pocket model: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The deep beginnings of the Volcanic go back to Walter Hunt's Volitional Repeater, which became the Jennings repeating rifle, which then became the Smith-Jennings repeating rifle when Horace Smith was brought in to improve it. Smith was able to make it more commercially viable than the Jennings had been, but he recognized that the system needed significant changes to really become successful. He had met a fellow gun designer who had similar ideas, by the name of Daniel Wesson, and the two would spend a couple years developing and refining the system. In 1854 they thought it was ready for production, and formed the Smith & Wesson Company.

    Included in the original company was a man named Courtland Palmer, who owned the patent rights to the Jennings system. Smith & Wesson's system would probably have been deemed an infringement of Palmer's patents, and by bringing him into the company they avoided legal trouble. The fact that he was a relatively wealthy financier of the new company certainly didn't hurt!

    The pistol that S&W started producing was a manually repeating one with a tubular magazine under the barrel holding either 6 or 10 rounds. It was available in the .41 caliber Navy model (note: not actually adopted by the Navy) and the .31 caliber pocket version. In this first iteration, both used iron frames, which were all engraved lightly. The prices were pretty steep, and the guns suffered from some reliability problems and a fundamental problem of underpowered ammunition (the .41 caliber had a muzzle velocity of just 260 fps / 79 m/s). However, they did offer a much greater level of rapid repeating firepower than the muzzle loading revolvers of the period, and gained some loyal fans. In total, just 1700 of the guns were produced before the company went bankrupt, about a year after forming.

    To recover from that setback, they reformed the company into the new Volcanic Repeating Arms Company, and sold stock in the new company to generate a new supply of capital. This allowed them to get back into production, and the Volcanic company would make another 3000 pistols, all .41 caliber Navy types, before also running out of money 19 months later in 1856.

    At this point, Smith and Wesson decide to move in another direction, and one of the main creditors of the Volcanic company is able to acquire all of its assets and put the guns into production a third time. The name of this creditor? None other than Oliver Winchester. Winchester puts a new infusion of his own money into the company under the name New Haven Arms Company. This company produces another 3300 guns, both large and small frame by 1861. The New Haven company comes very near to bankruptcy itself before finally changing the design to create the Henry repeating rifle. The Henry's rimfire ammunition finally solved the reliability and power problems of the Volcanic, and became the starting point for Winchester to become one of the predominant American arms making companies.
     
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    Bergmann's MP35 Submachine Gun: It Feeds From the Wrong Side
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 19, 2017
    Pre-War MP35: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Wartime MP35/1: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The MP35 submachine gun was designed by Theodore Emil Bergmann, the son of the Theodore Bergmann who had manufactured the turn of the century line of Bergmann pistols. Unlike his father, Emil was a firearms designer, and not just a manufacturer. This design was submitted for German military testing in the early 1930s, as the German military began to seriously look for a new SMG. They were initially known as the BMP-32 and BMK-32 (Bergmann Maschinen Pistole and Karabiner; there was both a short barrel and a long barrel version made), and they were produced by Schutz & Larsen of Denmark. In 1934, production moved to the Walther company as the MP34 and MP35, and a number of commercial and international military sales were made, although the German military did not adopt them.

    Once World War Two broke out, Walther production capacity was fully occupied with making military arms, and so a license was granted to the Junkers & Ruh company to produce MP35 submachine guns for non-military buyers. These included police units as well as the SS, which was forced to acquire arms from outside the standard Wehrmacht production channels.

    Mechanically, the MP35 has a number of interesting features. Most obviously, it feeds from the right side and ejects out the left - virtually all other submachine guns with side-mounted magazines feed from the left. There is no documentation suggesting why Bergmann made this decision, but it was probably due to a different theory of how to most efficiently operate the gun. The MP35 also sort of has a progressive trigger. Firing semiautomatic shots is done by simply pulling the trigger. Firing in fully automatic requires depressing the second lever at the bottom of the trigger, which then allows the trigger to be pulled farther back and full auto fire results. Lastly, the charging handle is set up to replicate the manual of arms of a Mauser bolt action rifle (it is similar in this way to the Mauser G41). While somewhat awkward to use, this does have the benefit of removing the need for an open charging handle slot in the side of the receiver where dirt might enter the action.
     
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    MG-17 German Aircraft Machine Gun
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    Published on Aug 20, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The MG-17 is a belt-fed 8mm machine gun that was used on a large number of Luftwaffe aircraft early in World War II. The gun was developed by Rheinmetall through its subsidiary in Solothurn, Switzerland (as a way to evade the Versailles Treaty restrictions on arms development). The basic action is a short recoil system with a rotating locking nut holding the bolt and barrel together. The basic system was adopted by the Austrian and Hungarian armies as an infantry machine gun, but its main use was in an aerial role.

    For aircraft use, the MG-17 was equipped with a belt feed mechanism which was easily interchangeable for either left side or right side feeding. It used a pneumatic system of controls to allow remote charging and firing, and was mounted in the wings or cowling of the Bf 109, Bf 110, Fw 190, Junkers Ju 87, Junkers Ju 88, He 111, Do 17/215, Fw 189, and others. Later in the war the 8x57mm round would become insufficient and the Germans would move to 13mm, 15mm, 20mm, and ultimately even 30mm aircraft guns, but the MG-17 had a huge roles in the early years of the war.

    Note that the gun in this particular video has been outfitted with a homemade adapter to mount it on a tripod, so that it can be fired without needing a 75 year old airplane as an accessory.
     
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    Danish m/49 Service Pistol by SIG
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 21, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    When Denmark decided to replace its M1910/21 Bergmann service pistols, it did not have to look far for a very high-quality option. The Swiss military was just concluding several years of handgun trials that had culminated in the SIG P210. This was an extremely well-made weapon, arguably the highest quality service pistol ever widely adopted.

    Based on the French 1935A pistol designed by Charles Petter, the 210 is a single-stack 9x19mm pistol with an 8-round magazine, a single action trigger and exposed hammer. The slide rails run the full length of the frame to improve accuracy, and the fire control group is a self-contained removable unit like the 1935A and Soviet TT33.

    Denmark adopted the gun as the m/49 in 1949, and would purchase a total of just under 27,000 of them. In 1995 many were surplussed, and purchased by Hammerli for retain resale.
     
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    MP-28: Hugo Schmeisser Improves the MP18
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 22, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The MP28,II was Hugo Schmeisser’s improved take on the original World War One MP18,I design. It used a simple box magazine in place of the Luger drum magazines, and this magazine would form the basis for a long series of military SMG magazines. It was a double-stack, single feed design because Schmeisser thought this would prevent some malfunctions that were possible with double-feed magazines (and because Mauser probably had a patent on the double feed box magazine at the time). This magazine would be used in conversions of MP18 guns, and would also be the model for the MP-38/40 subsequent British Sten gun magazines.

    The MP28 also introduced a semiautomatic selector switch, where the MP18 had been a fully automatic only design. It is the presence of this selector button over the trigger, along with a tangent sight instead of a simple flip-up notch that can be used to distinguish between and updated MP18 and an MP28.

    While the MP28 was not formally adopted by the German military, it was used by police and SS units, as well as being adopted or copied by a wide selection of other nations, including Portugal, Spain, China, Japan, and Ethiopia.
     
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    The 1878 Remington-Keene: Tube Fed .45-70 Bolt Action Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 23, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    John W. Keene was an independent gun designer who developed this rifle (and took out 9 patents on its various features) in the 1870s. He did not have a factory at his disposal to produce the gun, so he went looking for manufacturing partners. The Remington company at that time had been heavily committed to their very successful single-shot Rolling Block rifle, and did not have a bolt action design to submit to the upcoming 1878 US Army rifle trials. This was a natural fit, and Remington bought the rights to make Keene's rifle.

    The Remington-Keene did not manage to win adoption at the 1878 trials (no rifle did, in fact), but it did attract the interest of the US Navy, and Remington also decided to offer it for commercial sale (as was common of repeating rifle designs at the time which had been rejected by the Army). The Navy purchased 250 examples in the early 1880s and issued them to the USS Michigan and USS Trenton. On the commercial side, the rifle remained in production from 1880 until 1888 with about 5,000 being manufactured and sold. It was offered in a variety of barrel lengths and configurations, and in three different calibers (.40-60, .43 Spanish, and .45-70) - although the .45-70 chambering was by far the most popular.

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs also purchased between 600 and 800 Remington-Keene carbines, and they were used by Indian Agents and tribal police forces.
     
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    LAR Grizzly: A 1911 on .45 Winchester Magnum Steroids
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    Published on Aug 24, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Developed in the early 1980s by Perry Arnett, the LAR Grizzly was manufactured from 1983 until 1998. It was an expensive gun (base price was $675 in 1985), a huge gun (48oz / 1.36kg), and a powerful gun - its .45 Winchester Magnum cartridge throws a 230 grain bullet at 1450 feet/sec (15g @ 450 m/s). What is such a gun good for? Well, three things. Handgun hunting, metallic silhouette competition, and when someone wants the monster truck of the handgun world.

    Mechanically, the Grizzly is basically a scaled-up 1911 Government Model - and in a wise production decision, it shares many small parts with the 1911. The Mark I Grizzly was offered in .357 Magnum, .45 ACP, and .45 Winchester Magnum, with conversion kits being offer for easy swapping between those calibers. Additional option were added later on, including 10mm Auto and 9mm Winchester Magnum.

    When the Mark IV was introduced it was chambered for the .44 Magnum cartridge, and the Mark V was in .50 Action Express. For the record, the Mark II was simply a parkerized version of the Mark I, and the Mark III apparently was a prototype that never went into production. In total, about 13,500 Grizzlies were manufactured.

    Of all the magnum automatics, the Grizzly is one of the less exotic and the more reliable, thanks to its 1911 heritage. While it had a steep price tag, it was a reliable shooter right out of the box and offered a quite good trigger pull, good adjustable sights, and quite good accuracy. Some magnum automatics are best suited to natural tinkerers; the Grizzly was a better choice for someone who just wanted to shoot.
     
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    The Italian Last-Ditch TZ-45 Submachine Gun
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    Published on Aug 25, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The TZ-45 is a late-war (some might say last ditch) Italian submachine gun made in small numbers and notable primarily for being the first SMG to use a grip safety on the magazine well. The grip safety on the TZ-45 is actually quite significant, as it locks the bolt in place when either cocked or forward. This does accomplish the important safety feature of preventing the bolt from bouncing open on impact and firing, but it also means that the bolt cannot be manually cycled without engaging the grip safety. Not surprisingly, most later submachine gun designers using grip safeties would opt to have them not block the bolt being cocked.

    Only about 6,000 of these guns were made in Cremona before the end of the war, and they were used mostly in anti-partisan fighting in northern Italy. They were chambered in 9x19mm and used standard Beretta 38 magazines, so they presented minimal logistical challenges to units already equipped with other submachine guns. After the was, the design was adopted with a few changes by the Burmese military as the BA-52.
     
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    Chatellerault M24/29: France's New Wave of Post-WWI Small Arms
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    Published on Aug 26, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    France fought the Great War with an array of weapons which were all sub-par in one way or another - the Lebel rifle was obsolescent by 1914, the Berthier was a cavalry carbine forced into rifle service, the Chauchat was an emergency wartime design optimized for production volume instead of quality, and the handguns were a mixture of old revolvers and desperate imports from Spain. Once the war finally ended, the French military would move to replace the whole lot with new and modern arms.

    This would begin by finally replacing the 8mm Lebel cartridge with a non-tapered, rimless cartridge - something that would be well suited to use in magazines and repeating arms. Simultaneously, a new light machine gun would be found, as this was deemed to most important improvement to be made. The cartridge was adopted in 1924 as the 7.5x58mm, but it would soon be realized that there was a critical problem with that round. The French military had a large supply of German arms taken as war reparations, and the new 7.5mm cartridge looked very similar to the 8x57mm Mauser cartridge. Worse, the Mauser round would chamber and fire in the new French chambers, causing serious damage to guns when the 8mm bullet was squeezed down to 7.5mm. To fix this issue, the French cut their cartridge down by 4mm, resulting in the 1929 adoption f the 7.5x54mm round - the chamber of which would no longer fit a German round.

    As for the machine gun, the first choice was to simply adopt the Browning BAR - but France insisted on obtaining the technical data package and producing the guns in France, and they could not come to an agreement with Colt over the price of such a license. So, the French held trials of other guns, looking at virtually everything then available. In the aftermath of the trials, it was decided that the Chatellerault arsenal could design its own weapon using the best features of the other existing guns. The arsenal rather quickly produced prototypes, and they were adopted in 1924 (and then updated to use the shorter version of the 7.5mm cartridge in 1929).

    The Chatellerault M24/29 is a quite good weapon, especially considering how early it was designed. It uses a tilting bolt and a top-mounted 25 round magazine. It has two triggers, the front one firing in semiautomatic and the rear one in fully automatic. The wooden front handguard allows for fire from the hip or shoulder if desired, and a set of thorough dust covers keep the gun free from ingress of mud or dirt. About 188,000 would be manufactured, and it would stay in service for many decades.
     
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    Roper Repeating Rifle - An Early Type of Cartridge
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 27, 2017
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    While the design for the Roper rifle and shotgun originally came from Sylvester Roper, Christopher Spencer played a very significant role in its production. When sales of the Spencer lever action rifle dissolved at the end of the Civil War, Spencer needed something new to work on, and Roper recruited him into his company. Roper’s design was for a shotgun that used a 4-shot rotary magazine and reusable steel cartridge cases.

    By late 1868, however, sales of the Roper shotguns had not reached a profitable level (most likely because the price of the guns began at $60, making them very expensive for the time) and the company was put up for sale. Spencer was able to put together enough money to purchase it himself, and he moved the machinery to Hartford CT and set up a new production line. In addition to shotguns, Spencer also made a .40 caliber rifle version of the gun. The prices remained too high, though, and could not sustain the company’s operations. In response, Spencer began taking on contact forging work, and that proved to be a much more profitable and sustainable business model. The company was reformed in 1872 as Spencer & Billings, and would leave the gun business behind.

    Spencer would go on to invent the automatic screw machine, and make a not insignificant fortune on that idea - which is still widely used in the manufacturing industry today.
     
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    Soviet PPD-40: Degtyarev's Submachine Gun
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 28, 2017
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    Degtyarev’s PPD-40 was the first submachine gun adopted in a large scale by the Soviet Union. Its development began in 1929 with a locked breech gun modeled after Degtyarev’s DP light machine gun, but evolved into a much simpler blowback system. It was accepted as the best performing gun of 14 different submissions in Soviet trials of 1931/2, and first entered production in 1934. In this form, it used a 25 round curved stick magazine, and was chambered for the 7.62x25mm cartridge. In 1938 Degtyarev made a number of changes, most importantly developing a drum magazine based on the Finnish Suomi m31 drum. The PPD-38 drum had a short section of feed tower to allow the gun to use either drums or stick magazines, and this was dropped with the final iteration in 1940 when the gun was agains changed, this time to accept only 71 round drum magazines of the m31 type.

    The PPD-40 finally entered serious production in 1940, with just over 81,000 made. This production would continue into early 1941 with another roughly 6,000 made before it was replaced by the faster to produce PPSh-41 submachine gun. The PPD-40 was a relatively heavy SMG at 12 pounds (5.45 kg) unloaded, and with a rate of fire of approximately 900 rounds per minute. This particular example was captured and used by the Finnish military, and appears to have a PPD38 bolt in it.
     
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    Chaffee Reece Model 1882: A Good Idea on Paper...
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 29, 2017
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    Patented in 1879 by Reuben Chaffee and General James Reece, the Chaffee-Reece rifle is an excellent example of how an idea that seems good on paper can easily become untenable in a fielded rifle. The main design premise of the rifle was to have a tubular magazine in the buttstock which held the cartridge out of contact with other, as opposed to being pressed together by a magazine spring as in a conventional design. This would notionally prevent any possibility of recoil or other forces causing the bullet of our round to impact the primer of another and cause a detonation in the magazine.

    In initial testing by the Army in 1882, the prototypes were appealing, and a field trial of 750 rifles was requested. Chaffee and Reece were unable to find a commercial manufacturer willing to take on the production (except Colt, which offered to make just 200, and at the cost of $150 etc), and they ultimately turned to the government-operate dSpringfield Arsenal to built the guns. A total of 753 rifles were made by Springfield in 1883 and 1884 (interestingly, not serial numbered) and delivered for testing.

    That testing went quite badly. The magazine was a very complex system, using two sets of basically reciprocating racks to shuttle cartridges up the magazine as the bolt was cycled, without allowing them to contact each other. It proved very prone to jamming and breakage, and was both extremely difficult to keep clean and very susceptible to, as they would have called it at the time, “derangement”. It was handily beaten by the Winchester Hotchkiss 1885 pattern rifles (among others) in field trials, and that was the end of its potential for adoption. The rifles were eventually sold as surplus, and bought by the Bannerman company, where they remained in stock and available for purchase until at least 1907.
     
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    Forgotten American Bolt Action Rifles 1871 - 1892
    jmantime



    Published on Nov 28, 2013
    Forgotten American Bolt Action Rifles 1871 - 1892

    Sources -

    Chaffee-Reese - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Bolt%2...

    Ward-Burton Rifles - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Single...
    Remington Keene Rifles - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Bolt%2...
    Winchester Hotchkiss Rifles - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Bolt%2... Rifle
    Remington-Lee Rifles - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Bolt%2...

    Mullins 1890 Rifle - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/United...

    Blake Rifle - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Sporti...
     
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    Pattern 14 MKI W (T) - The Best Sniper Rifle of World War One
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Aug 30, 2017
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    When World War One began, the British did not have a formal sniping program, and by 1915 the British found themselves thoroughly outclassed by the Germans in this area. They responded by developing tactics and equipment for sniping, and by mid 1916 they had really outclassed the Germans. However, the mid-war British sniping rifles really left a lot to be desired, even if they were being used effectively in the field. There was no single military optic, instead a wide variety of commercial scopes were rounded up and put into use. The mounts for these scopes were offset to the left side of the rifles to allow for continued use of stripper clips. Clips were arguably not really necessary on these rifles, and the offset scopes led to substantial headaches in use, as they required calculating windage as well as elevation adjustments depending on range.

    Through 1918, though, the British developed one of the best sniping rifles of the war, although it would be introduced too late to see virtually any front line service. This new rifle was a Winchester-made Pattern 1914 Enfield with a center-mounted optic, and was designated the P14 MkI W(T). The P14 rifles were more accurate than the SMLE, and the centrally mounted optic made for much simpler shooting. These rifles were deemed to be mechanically capable of 1.5 MOA shooting, with the practical expected group size being 3 MOA.

    Three thousand of these P14 snipers' rifles were assembled and kept in service after the end of the war, but in the mid 1930s a small additional batch of 79 were made for the Irish Free State by BSA. These were all eventually surplussed to the US, and the rifle in this video is one of those late-production guns.
     

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