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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by searcher, Feb 13, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Greene Carbine: Too Tricky for the Cavalry
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 8, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    James Greene patented this unusual breechloading carbine design in 1854, and arranged to have it manufactured by the Massachusetts Arms Company of Chicopee Falls. He managed to sell 300 of them to the US military, in .54 caliber and with 22 inch barrels. Field testing was done in 1857, although it was found that they were too awkward for use on horseback, and no further guns were purchased. However, a much larger order was placed by the British military, apparently with the intention of arming the Cape Mounted Rifles.

    The guns ordered by the British, including the one in today’s video, had 18” barrels but were otherwise identical to the American guns. The Greene uses a locking system in which the barrel rotates 90 degrees to lock two large lugs into locking shoulders on the frame of the weapon. A paper or linen cartridge is used, and a tapered needle at the center of the breechblock penetrates the base of the cartridge when the action is closed. This needle channels the fire from the percussion cap (the Maynard tape priming system was licensed and built into the carbines) into the cartridge powder charge.

    The British spent several years testing ammunition for their Greene carbines, but were unable to find a construction method which was light enough to be punctured by the firing needle but also sturdy enough for field use. But the early 1860s a superior Westley-Richards breechloader had been adopted, and the Greene carbines were put into storage in the Tower of London until eventually destroyed or sold - having never seen field use.
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Mauser C96 Broomhandle
    Iraqveteran8888



    Published on Nov 8, 2017
    LIKE WHAT YOU SEE? CONSIDER PURCHASING A MAN CAN: https://goo.gl/TCXIU7
    SIGN UP FOR OUR EMAIL LIST: http://goo.gl/6FAKIe
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    In this video we showcase the Mauser C96 or better known as the "Broomhandle" as well as an Astra Model 900 which is a high quality Spanish clone. These guns have a rich service history as well as having fired the most capable pistol cartridge of the era. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

    CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
    http://www.iraqveteran8888.com

    Disclaimer: Our videos are for entertainment purposes only, imitation or the use of any instruction shown in the videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. Iraqveteran8888 will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos.

    Copyright 2017, 88 Industries, LLC
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Springfield 1903 A3 Chapter 2
    hickok45



    Published on Nov 9, 2017
    More fun on the main range with this old "War Horse."
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Shooting the Cameron Yaggi 1903 Trench Rifle Conversion
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 10, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The Cameron-Yaggi conversion was an experimental American trench rifle that was never put into service. However, this one example has survived, and today we are going to put a few rounds through it.

    The literature says that recoil is mild, and the periscope actually moves away form the shooter when fired. This is not the case. The periscope goes right back into the shooter's eye, because it has a very short eye relief. The periscope also provides a very narrow field of view, and I expect it would have been very difficult to actually use this contraption effectively in the fighting of World War One. That said, the device is sturdy and easy to use, unlike most of the other trench rifle adaptations I have seen.
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    "Double Deuce" 2-Bore Rifle: A Gunsmithing Spectacle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 11, 2017
    Double Deuce rifle: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
    Lil' Deuce pistol: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The largest sporting rifles ever actually used in the field as more than an exhibition were 4-bore stopping rifles, firing roughly 1" in diameter (25mm) projectiles. These were intended to not simply kill a dangerous animal, but to stop it immediately in a charge, which might require shooting through thick bone or horn protection. For that purpose, the 4-bore could have some value - assuming you had an assistant to carry it when danger was not imminent!

    However, there have been a number of gunsmiths who have built 2-bore rifles, like this example named "Double Deuce" by its maker, Stolzer & Son of Kansas. At 44 pounds, this behemoth is definitely too heavy for practical use, but it sure is an impressively huge piece of work! It fires a 1.33" (33.8mm) ball weighing 3500gr (227g) at about 1250fps (380 m/s)...if you can hold it on target long enough to get an accurate shot.

    You can check out Stolzer's YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/user/cstolzer338
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Lindsay's "Young American" Martial Two-Shot Pistol
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 12, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    J.P. Lindsay was a former Springfield Armory employee when he designed and patented an idea for a two-shot, single-barrel pistol. The apocryphal story is that Lindsay's brother was killed in a firefight against two Indians, while reloading his single-shot rifle - so Lindsay was moved to design a weapon which would have saved his brother.

    The idea is a simple one, and Lindsay is not the first to have made such a gun. The single barrel has two flash holes, situated such that two stacked charges of powder and ball may be loaded and then fired one after the other. The pistol has two hammers and uses two percussion caps. Unlike the Walch revolver, Lindsay used a single trigger, which would fire first the right hammer if both were cocked, and the left hammer is only it was cocked.

    The "Young American" (Lindsay's trade name for the pistol) was made in pocket, belt, and martial sizes, with this one being a martial type in .45 caliber and with an 8 inch barrel. Only about 100 of these were made, as the concept has substantial practical problems - namely the many ways that one could wind up firing the rear charge first.
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Weirdest Shotgun Ever (PW-87)
    The VSO Gun Channel



    Published on Nov 12, 2017
    The PW87 is a lever action 12 gauge. Shotgun, it is a Chinese copy of the terminator shotgun and has some qirks that make it the weirdest shotgun I have ever shot. However, it does seem to really like the Fiocchi birdshot and nickle plated buckshot.
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Hungarian FEG AP63 32 ACP Pistol
    Military Arms Channel



    Published on Nov 13, 2017
    The guys at Classic Firearms are always unearthing cool mil-surp stuff. The Hungarian FEG AP63, sometimes called the PA63 in its 9x18 offering, is a pistol designed in 1963 for Hungarian police. It's still in use today and is available in several calibers including 32 ACP (7.65 Browning), 9x18 and .380. This is another cool "here today, gone tomorrow" mil-surp import item.
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Good Idea Fairy Strikes: American Trowel Bayonets
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 13, 2017
    1869 Bayonet: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
    1873 Bayonet and Rifle: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The United States first experimented with a combination trowel and bayonet in 1868, producing 200 experimental examples made from standard socket bayonets. This was immediately followed by an additional 500 Model 1869 trowel bayonets made new. These were distributed to a few companies of the infantry to test in the field. Remarkably, the trials reports were overwhelmingly positive.

    The US infantryman at that time did not carry any sort of entrenching tool, and so even an awkward combination tool was an improvement over a canteen cup or other ad hoc tool for digging. The bayonet was seen by some officers as becoming obsolete with the introduction of breechloading rifles, so the reduced effectiveness of the new item as a bayonet was not a substantial concern. The intended use of these tools was not to dig elaborate trenches, but rather to hastily construct a shallow ditch and embankment which would provide just enough cover to shelter a prone soldier.

    With the trials reports in, the government purchased 10,000 of the improved 1873 pattern trowel bayonet, which featured a stronger blade and a much more comfortable handle for digging. These were issued and used in the field (and in several combat engagements), but the developmental direction turned towards combination knife trowels instead of bayonets, and there would be no further development or issue of these tools after the 1870s.

    See the full trials report here: https://books.google.com/books?id=qUE...
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Japan's Type 90 3-Barreled Naval Flare Pistol
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 14, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The Japanese Navy used several different types of flare pistols during World War Two (and in the decades before), but the most impressive looking of the bunch was the three-barreled Type 90 (not to be confused with the two-barreled model also designated Type 90). The three barrels were not simply there to look intimidating, of course, but rather so that a flare of each of the three different colors in use could be kept ready at all times. The barrels were marked with colored decals to note the flare colors - one green, one white, and one red and yellow. In another unusual design decision, the entire upper assembly of the Type 90 is on a sliding spring-loaded track to absorb recoil.

    For more information on Japanese flare pistols, see Teri's page at Nambu World: http://www.nambuworld.com/fgflareguns...
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rifles Of The World: Soviet M44 Mosin Nagant Carbine
    Mike B



    Published on Nov 15, 2017
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    John Martz Custom P38s: Babies, .45s, and .38 Supers
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 15, 2017
    Baby P38: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
    .38 Super P38: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
    .45ACP P38: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    John Martz was a WWII US Navy veteran who spent a career in metalworking before turning his gunsmithing hobby into a full time occupation in the 1960s. He is best known for his custom Luger pistols, but also worked extensively with the P38. Today we are looking at an assortment of his custom P38s - a baby model with a shortened barrel and grip, a standard pattern gun converted to .38 Super, and a long barreled model converted to .45 ACP.
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    America's First Metallic Cartridge: The Burnside Carbine
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 16, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The Burnside carbine was originally invented by Ambrose Burnside - the man who would later command the Army of the Potomac and after whom sideburns would be named. Burnside came up with the idea while stationed in Mexico as a young officer, and resigned his commission in 1853. A substantial amount of money had been allocated by Congress to replace the Hall carbines, and Burnside hoped that his gun would be adopted. Despite his efforts, the attempt was unsuccessful, and Burnside sold his interest in the patents and company to one Charles Jackson in 1858.

    Jackson continued to promote the gun, and his big break came with the outbreak of the Civil War. Under Jackson's ownership, the company would manufacture 53,000 Burnside carbines by the end of the war, in 5 progressively improved variants.

    The innovation of the Burnside was its use of a metallic cartridge to seal the breech of the weapon against escaping gas. However, the cartridge did not incorporate an ignition source. Each round had a small hole in the base, and a standard percussion cap was fitted to the outside of the breechblock to fire. This cartridge was innovative and effective, but would become obsolete by the end of the war, and no serious effort was made to continue making Burnside carbines after the fighting ended.
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    "Fat Mac" - SSK Industries' .950 JDJ Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 17, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    JD Jones’ .950 JDJ cartridge is a generally described as the largest sporting rifle cartridge ever produced, producing more energy than even the 4-bore cartridges that match it in bore diameter. Only three of these rifles were made, and the original loading was a 2600 grain (168g) cast bullet moving at 2200 fps (670m/s), for a whopping 28,000 foot-pounds of muzzle energy (38kJ). There are some antitank rifles that produce more, but nothing comparable in both energy and bore diameter in the sporting realm.

    The rifle is built on a McMillan stock and action, and was originally produced on special order for a customer who wanted a really (really) big rifle that could use cast bullets. The cartridge cases were originally made from 20mm Vulcan cases trimmer down to a (mere) 70mm case length, with custom made lathe-turned cases replacing them when brass Vulcan cases became too difficult to source. The gun itself weighs a bit over 60 pounds, with nearly a third of that in the muzzle brake alone. This example is being sold with a whole bunch of ammunition components, which is a good thing since Jones/SSK stopped making the ammunition several years ago…
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Action Arms Semiauto Uzi Carbines (Model A and Model B)
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 18, 2017
    Folding stock Model A: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
    Folding stock Model B: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
    Wood stock Model B: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Although it was adopted by the Israeli military in the 1950s, the Uzi submachine gun did not generate much interest in the United States until the 1980s. The guns were used in limited numbers by the CIA covertly in Vietnam (and elsewhere), and also by various security elements of the US government - like the Secret Service. The events that would change this began in the 1970s when Uzi Gal left the Israeli military and moved to the United States, where he was hired by a company called Action Manufacturing.

    The owner of the company, Harry Stern, got the idea to market a semiautomatic variant of the weapon, and Uzi himself designed the modifications to make it semiautomatic only. The resulting gun was then produced by IMI in Israel and imported by Action Arms, a new branch of Action Manufacturing. The gun was introduced at the 1980 SHOT Show, and proved to be very popular. By the time the 1989 import ban ended importation, Action Arms sold about 72,000 of the guns.

    There were two main variations of the semauto Uzis made by IMI for Action Arms, the Model A and Model B (which replaced the A in 1983). The Model B added a firing pin safety that eliminated the possibility of the gun firing out of battery, which had been possible on the Model A. The B also incorporated some minor changes to the sights and sling swivels.

    For more detailed history of the Uzi, both in military and civilian forms, I highly recommend David Gaboury's new book "The Uzi SMG Examined": https://gunandswordcollector.com/prod...
     
  17. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    J&G is giving them away for $180 + S&H. .32 acp is more expensive than 9mm and .380acp. Then you need to figure that surplus guns would work best with all next springs and a complete work over. I just like my stuff to always work when I pick it up. I have gone through brand new out of the box pistols and reworked them, but that's different.

    http://www.jgsales.com/feg-ap-mbp-7...2acp,-blued,-needs-repair,-used.-p-99045.html
     
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  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Japanese Army 35mm Type 10 Flare Pistol
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 19, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The Japanese Army and Navy of the 1920s and 30s often used quite different equipment, and had a substantial interservice rivalry. Flare guns were one example of this separation, with the services using not just different flare pistols, but totally different flare cartridges. The Navy used a 28mm flare (mostly in double and triple barreled launchers like we saw last week), while the Army used a 35mm flare mostly in single barrel launchers like this Type 35.

    Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the Type 10 flare pistol is its similarity to the Type 26 revolver, with which is shares a number of distinctive features including the grips, spurless hammer, and trigger guard. These flare pistols were typically issued in leather holsters, but towards the end of the war a substitute type made of rubberized canvas was also issued - one of which is being sold with this Type 10.
     
  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    German P.08 Luger! Finally got one!
    Mike B



    Published on Nov 19, 2017
    FInally got my grubby little hands on one of the most infamous pistols ever. No, this isn't a complete video of the background and development of the pistol, so yes, I'm aware I probably left a bunch of info out that other channels have covered.

    Support the channel! HERE: https://www.patreon.com/mikefrigginb
     
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Gebert Custom Mauser 71 with all the Bells and Whistles
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 20, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Made by Carl Gebert, a master gunsmith in Munich, this custom sporting rifle exhibits all the fancy options available in the 1870s or 1880s! The base action is an 1871 Mauser, which was a single shot rifle. However, this specially made one had been modified to us a fixed box magazine holding 3 or 4 cartridges - and also have a magazine cutoff to allow easy single loading while retaining the loaded magazine. It is chambered for a .50 caliber round (although I'm not sure which one exactly), and also has a pair of double set triggers and a receiver tang sight in addition to barrel-mounted express sights. Clearly a rifle for someone who wanted the best that could be had!
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    A Beautiful Alsop Pocket Revolver
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 21, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Charles Alsop patented the Alsop revolver design in 1861 and 1862, and produced it in two varieties - a .36 caliber Navy and a .31 caliber Pocket. The two were made in a single serial number range, with about 500 Navies and 300 Pockets. This Alsop Pocket is in excellent condition, and shops us a glimpse of what one of these revolvers would have looked like out of the factory, with a mixture of deep bluing, strawing, and case hardening.

    The Alsop design is similar to the Savage Navy revolver, which is not a surprise when one notices that several members of the Alsop family were stockholders in the Savage enterprise. The Alsop revolvers proved too expensive to be commercially sustainable, and the company additionally faced difficulty in keeping skilled workmen employed in the face of competition from other factories in the area.
     
  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    WW1 German P.08 Luger Disassembly and Striker Mechanism: How it Operates.
    Mike B



    Published on Nov 20, 2017
    Hopefully this is helpful!
     
  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Hang-Fires and Squibs -- Not the video I intended to make.
    Military Arms Channel



    Published on Nov 22, 2017
    The Japanese Type 2 Arisaka Paratrooper takedown rifle was advanced for its time. The Arisaka is a variation of the popular Mauser action. Then there is Precision Cartridge Inc. (PCI) ammo that ruins the day and totally changes the topic of this video.
     
  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Navy 7.62mm NATO Conversion M1 Garand - Mk2 Mod1
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 22, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    When the M14 rifle was developed to replace the M1 Garand, is was met with some uncertainty by the US Navy. The Navy had a lot of things to spend money on, and not a lot of need for a replacement for the M1 Garand (note that the Marine Corps did adopt the M14 despite being a component of the Navy). So instead of buying new rifles, the Navy opted to see if it could just convert its existing M1 rifles to the new 7.62x51mm cartridge.

    Because of the similarity between the two cartridges, this seemed to be a fairly simple conversion. A chamber insert was designed which would fill the front of the chamber and allow the use of 7.62x51mm, with the resulting rifle designated the Mark 2 Mod 0. However, the chamber inserts tended to come loose with firing, so a modification was made. grooves were added to the front of the chamber to improve the adherence between insert and chamber. These also tended to come loose, and so the Navy was forced to resort to installing brand new barrels to make their conversions. This was more expensive than they would have liked, but was still much cheaper than buying new M14s, so they went ahead and bought 30,000 new barrels from Springfield Armory in 1965 and 1966. These were installed by H&R and American Machine & Foundry and became designated the Mk2 Mod1 rifles.

    The only other modification necessary for the conversion was the addition of a white plastic spacer block in the magazine well. This simply blocked a shooter from inserting a clip of .30-06 cartridges. A .30-06 would not be able to chamber or fire in the new barrels, but the spacer block provided a handy reminder of the rifle's new chambering. Because these conversions are quite simple, they are fairly easy guns to fake. This particular example includes sales paperwork from the CMP confirming its originality.
     
  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Sako Finnbear .300 Win Mag
    hickok45



    Published on Nov 21, 2017
    John shoots and discusses his .300 Win Mag Sako Finnbear.
     
  26. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Wilson's Lorenzoni Repeating Flintlock Musket
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 23, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The Wilson family was a gunmaking dynasty in London that began in 1730 when Richard Wilson was accepted as a Master Gunmaker by the Gunmakers' Company. Wilson's eldest son William Wilson would receive the same recognition in 1755, and William's son William (junior) completed his apprenticeship in 1787 and would run the company from 1806 until 1832. The Wilsons were best know for making a large quanitity of good-quality arms for the export trade, although they did also make some much fancier weapons including Ferguson pattern breechloaders and Lorenzoni pattern repeaters, like this one.

    For more information on the Wilson family I recommend this paper by DeWitt Bailey II: http://americansocietyofarmscollector...
     
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Most Ornate Knife-Gun You Will Ever See: CM-1 "Dragon"
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 24, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Combination knife-gun devices have been popular for hundreds of years, spurred initially by the single-shot nature of early firearms. The designs evolved to incorporate revolver cylinders when the revolver was invented, and remain interesting to people even to the present day. Global Research And Development (GRAD) of Las Vegas manufactured the CM-1 combination knife and revolver in the 1990s. Where most such weapons are not disguised, the CM-1 design hid the revolver and barrel mechanism inside the grip of the knife, leading to it being classified as an AOW ("any other weapon") under the NFA.

    A latch on the back of the grip allows it to open up, exposing a 6-shot cylinder chambered for .22LR cartridges and a barrel ending just above the blade or the knife. The trigger is a double action only squeeze type lever on the bottom surface of the grip which is locked in place until released for firing.

    GRAD made the CM-1 in several different variations, including multiple blade styles, a rifle-mounted bayonet type, a blade-only version without the revolver, a fancy decorated model, and this one of a kind extravagantly embellished "DRAGON" example, complete with 102 embedded diamonds.
     
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    American Viven-Bessières WW1 Grenade Launcher
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 26, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The standard American grenade launching system in World War One was the Vivien-Bessiere, borrowed directly form the French. It had been adopted by France in 1916, replacing copies of the British Martin-Hale rod grenades. The V-B was a cup type launcher using a pass-through type of grenade and standard ball ammunition. A hole through the body of the grenade allowed the bullet to pass clean through the grenade, triggering a 5-7.5 second time fuse in the process. The gas pressure behind the bullet would then launch the grenade to a distance of 80-190 yards, depending on the inclination of the rifle. It could be fired from the hip if necessary, but firing form the shoulder was just a bad idea. The intended firing method was to rest the stock on the ground - although launching racks were also built for using the system from fixed positions in trenches.

    The US would develop 4 iteration of the launcher, basically to improve its fixation to the rifle. This example is a Mk IV, with a spiral locking channel to firmly fix the launcher behind the rifle’s front sight. Two versions were made; a smooth one for the 1903 Springfield and one with a knurled ring at the muzzle for the 1917 Enfield. Both were identical in function, but dimensioned to fit the specific barrel diameters of the two different rifles. The Model 1917 V-B launcher would remain in US service until the 1930s, actually seeing some use in WWII in the Pacific theater.
     
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    US M1915 Bolo Bayonet - Dual Purpose Gear That Worked!
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 27, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    The M1915 bolo bayonet was originally the brainchild of US Army Captain Hugh D. Wise, Quartermaster with the 9th Infantry in the Philippines. In 1902, he recommended the implement in a letter to his superior officers, noting that a bolo style of bayonet (ie, one with a widened machete-like blade) would have several advantages over the standard knife bayonet then being issued with the Krag-Jorgenson rifles the US Army was using. Specifically, the wider bayonet would be easier to recover after a thrust (he noted several instances of troopers being killed while trying to extricate their bayonets from enemies) and also (and more significantly) make an excellent and necessary bushwhacking tool in the jungle environment of the Philippines.

    Wise's idea was taken with interest and Springfield produced a series of experimental bolo bayonets, but the project ended there as the 1903 Springfield was adopted with a rod bayonet instead of a blade. Of course, the rod bayonet would be shortlived, and the blade bayonet would come back. The bolo bayonet ideas resurfaced in 1911 when a commission was formed to look into special equipment for the Philippine Scouts. After another series of experimental designs, the M1915 Bolo bayonet was formally adopted on May 22, 1915 and an order was placed for 6,000 of them to be made at Springfield Armory.

    Delivery of these bayonets took place in 1915 and 1916, and they proved to be extremely popular tools with the soldiers in the Philippines. They would remain in service on the islands until World War Two, serving at last as a replacement for the M1913 cavalry saber for the 26th Cavalry.
     
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    Shooting the German P.08 Luger Pistol. "Tactical" fire, lots of Trigger Time!
    Mike B



    Published on Nov 23, 2017
     
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    Enfield No1 MkIII .410 Musket
    Iraqveteran8888



    Published on Nov 28, 2017
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    In this video we take a look at a very interesting part of Enfield history, the No1 MkIII .410 Musket. These were conversions of original .303 British rifles over to .410 smoothbores for a prison guards and police work among other things. These Enfields were originally designed to fire 98gr musket ball loads which are still available however many were opened up for modern 2 1/2" .410 shells, this example included. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

    CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
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    Disclaimer: Our videos are for entertainment purposes only, imitation or the use of any instruction shown in the videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. Iraqveteran8888 will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos.

    Copyright 2017, 88 Industries, LLC
     
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    M1903 Springfield - Stripped for Air Service
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 28, 2017

    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Edit: For additional information on these, including some unpublished documentation, see the C&Rsenal video on the 1903 Springfield: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhh4w...

    One of the more interesting and unusual - and rare - variations of the M1903 Springfield is the version that was “Stripped for Air Service”. Contrary to common belief, these were not used as in-flight aircraft armament before the use of machine guns, or as antiaircraft armament for observation balloon crews. Instead, they were developed by Springfield Armory in early 1918 as a pilot’s survival rifle - armament to be used in case one crash landed in enemy territory.

    The modifications made include cutting down the stock and hand guard to reduce weight, adding a fixed 25-round box magazine, elimination of the sling swivels, and simplification of the rear sight to a 100-yard notch. The large fixed magazine was chosen because a pilot would not be carrying extra ammunition in a cartridge belt, as would a normal infantryman. All the ammunition he would have if he needed to use the survival rifle would be what was stored in the rifle itself.

    A total of 910 of these modified rifles were made, and 908 of them shipped to France in late June, 1918. They were never put into service though, and 680 were still in a French depot at the end of the war. The remainder may have been distributed to some airfields, but they were never actually used. With the end of the war, the rifles were put into storage in the US along with the mass of other war materiel. In the mid 1920s, much of this stock was scrapped, and the surviving Air Service 1903s were either destroyed or converted to standard infantry pattern rifles. Very few survived this process, making them extremely rare today. This particular one came from the collection of Bruce Canfield.
     
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    Fight! Othais vs Ian on the Air Service 1903 Springfield!
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 28, 2017
    Astute audience members will have noted that I described the "1903 Springfield Stripped for Air Service" as being intended as a pilot's survival weapon, because it would be a laughably poor gun to actually use from the cockpit in flight. In his very recent 1903 Springfield episode, Othais of C&Rsenal described the same gun as being made specifically as a backup weapon for use in flight from the cockpit.

    So...who's right?

    Well, (spoiler alert), Othais is. He had research assistance from Andrew at Archival Research Group (archivalresearchgroup@gmail.com), who uncovered some previously unknown documents describing the request for these rifles. In a nutshell, squadrons in France wanted a backup weapon in case their machine guns malfunctioned. They really wanted Winchester 1910 self-loaders in .401 caliber (ideally with incendiary or explosive ammo), but Springfield didn't have any of those and ended up making a bunch of modified 1903 Springfields instead. Which were in fact terrible guns for the purpose, but that's what the aerodromes ended up getting thanks to poor mutual communication.

    You can see the documents in question here: https://i.imgur.com/y95sGVF.jpg

    One of the great things about the Internet is the interest it can foster in niche subjects and opportunities it creates for doing research and uncovering new information. Being wrong because previously-lose information is rediscovered is no shame, and it's very cool to see the additional insights provided by those cablegrams that the C&Rsenal team found!

    https://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons
    https://www.patreon.com/CandRsenal

    Forgotten Weapons on the Air Service Springfield: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lr87f...
    C&Rsenal on the 1903 Springfield: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhh4w...

    BTS Prolog by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license
    Source: http://freepd.com/Unclassified/BTS%20...
    Artist: http://incompetech.com/
     
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    Steyr M30S Prototype: A Repurposed WW1 Improved Mauser
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 29, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    This rifle, as best I can tell, is a prototype model made by Steyr in Switzerland in the early 1930s for use in Hungarian military trials. The Hungarians were looking to replace their old 1895 straight-pull Mannlicher rifles with something more modern. They wanted to keep their Mannlicher en bloc clips and ammunition, though - note the same distinctive magazine on this rifle and the M95.

    The action that Steyr used for this trials rifle came from an effort to produce an improved German rifle during World War One. The Gewehr 98 had a number of serious deficiencies in trench combat, and Mauser developed an improved model in 1917. It was intended to enter production in 1918, but the collapse of the German armies prevented that from happening. The 98/17 had a flat tangent leaf rear sight, a sliding dust cover, and detachable box magazines, as well as being shorter than the G98. While it was never made in Germany, it did form the basis for the Type 13 Mauser that was manufactured in Manchuria with Steyr's assistance. So when the Hungarians put out a request for rifle models, Steyr dusted off this action, fitted a Mannlicher type of magazine, and submitted it (note that the dust cover is missing from this rifle, although its mounting grooves are still there).

    Ultimately, this did not win the competition, and Hungary chose a Mannlicher action rifle as the 35M instead.
     
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    Parisian Needlefire Knife-Pistol Combination
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Nov 30, 2017
    https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

    Combination knife/gun weapons have been popular gadgets for literally hundreds of years, and this is one of the nicest examples I have yet seen. This sort of thing is usually very flimsy, and not particularly well made. This one, however, has a blade which locks in place securely and would seem to be quite practical. The firearm part is also unique, in that it uses a needle fire bolt action mechanism. This is a tiny copy of the French military Chassepot system, complete with intact needle and obturator.

    And, of course, since it is French the trigger is a corkscrew.
     
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    The Swiss Cheap Out: SIG 310, aka MP48
    Forgotten Weapons




    Published on Dec 1, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    The SIG 310, aka MP48, is the final evolution of SIG's submachine gun design from the 1920s. It began as the MKM/P/S/O with a folding magazine well, wooden stock, and fancy lever-delayed operating system. Over almost 30 years of development, the wood stock and the lever-delayed system fell away, as did the really high quality finishing work. The folding magazine well and the magazine itself remained intact, however.

    This final version is a very simple blowback mechanism with a similarly simple collapsing wire stock. It uses a 40-round double-feed magazine of 9x19mm ammunition, and fires at a zippy 1000 rpm. I was surprised by just how easily controllable it was despite the high rate of fire and short receiver - and also by the harmonic ringing of the wire stock when firing. While this may be an embarrassingly crude gun for the Swiss, it is a gun that most other countries would be quite proud of.
     
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    The .32ACP Dreyse Light Carbine
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 2, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

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    Manufactured by Rheinmetall and designed by Louis Stange, this light .32ACP (7.65mm Browning) carbine is a bit of a mysterious item. Very little written information exists about it, but we know it was sold on the commercial market as it appears in several firearms sale catalogs and it is, frankly, and wonderfully handy little small game rifle. It is a simple blowback action with a 6-round detachable magazine, sharing a number of elements with the Dreyse 1907 pistol from the same company (Johann von Dreyse died in 1867, but the brand name was owned by the Rheinmetall company). One feature of the rifle that is likely to be overlooked given today's cultural insistence on eye and ear protection is that the Dreyse carbine's small .32 caliber cartridge and long barrel made for a relatively very quiet report when firing. Not quiet enough to be considered hearing safe today, but much less unpleasant than many other firearms using higher pressure cartridges.

    Thanks to H. in Sweden for letting me shoot this handy little carbine!

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
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    Final Prices: James D. Julia Fall 2017 Auction
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 4, 2017
    As usual, I have a recap today of the final prices of the guns I filmed form the most recent Julia auction (fall 2017). While there was the usual wide variety of guns in this sale, my videos tended to focus on machine guns and Confederate Civil War arms.
     
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    Thorneycroft: A Victorian Bullpup Rifle with Volley Sights
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 6, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    The Thorneycroft was the first military bullpup rifle, developed in the United Kingdom in response to combat experiences in the second Boer War showing the British infantry rifles to be overly long and cumbersome. Scotsman James Baird Thorneycroft figured he could address this by moving the action and magazine of a rifle behind the trigger, thus shortening the overall length without reducing the barrel length - the bullpup concept. He was able to produce a series of prototype rifles using this concept beginning in 1901, which were tested by the British military. Thorneycroft's rifle was chambered for the standard .303 British cartridge, with a 5-round magazine (no provision for charger clip use), and had a nice aperture rear sight and cock-on-open two lug bolt. While it was about 10% lighter than the standard long Lee rifle and about 7.5 inches shorter, the British military turned down his idea, instead adopting a universal short rifle for the cavalry and infantry both to use.

    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of this Thorneycroft, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/
     
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    Madsen LAR: An AK for NATO!
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 8, 2017
    The Madsen LAR (light automatic rifle) was an attempt by the main Danish arms manufacturer to get into the military rifle market after World War Two (they also released a bolt action rifle around the same time, the Model 47). The first version of the LAR was chambered for 7.62x39mm and submitted to Finnish testing, where it lost out to the Valmet-made Rk-62. Madsen then scaled up the working parts of the rifle and offered it in 7.62mm NATO for testing by the rest of the international military community. Unfortunately for the company, there were no takers, and the rifle was never put into serial production.

    At its mechanical heart, the Madsen LAR is a Kalashnikov system, sharing the long stroke gas piston and the exact same style of rotating bolt and bolt carrier as the AK. It uses an aluminum alloy lower receiver with steel front trunnion, and a more complex (and much more closely fitted) receiver cover. It probably would have been a quite serviceable rifle in the field, but it was both a bit too late to market and failed to offer any substantial advantage over rifles like the G3 and FAL.

    Many thanks to the Tøjhusmuseet (Royal Danish Armory Museum) for letting me have access to these very rare rifles! Check them out at: http://en.natmus.dk/museums/the-royal...
     

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