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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by searcher, Feb 13, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Gevelot 11mm Sliding-Chamber Pinfire Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 9, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

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    This rifle design was developed by the Gevelot cartridge company to compete with the Modele 1866 Chassepot for French military use, although it was not successful in that attempt. The weapon has an uncommon sliding chamber mechanism in which the cartridge does not move forward into the chamber, but rather stays fixed in place while a cylindrical chamber slides over it when the action is closed. The cartridge itself is a modified type of pinfire with the pin located in the center of the cartridge case head, in line with the barrel and cartridge (as opposed to being offset 90 degrees like typical pinfire revolver ammunition).

    Thanks to the Institute of Military Technology for allowing me to have access to this rifle so I can bring it to you! Check out the IMT at:

    http://www.instmiltech.com
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Final Prices: Rock Island December 2017 Premier (#72)
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 10, 2017
    The lesson from this recent Rock Island auction? Custom huge rifles are like custom cars: you will put a lot more money into them than you will ever get out if you decide to sell them. Also, if you find a needle-fire combination pocket gun at a yard sale, buy it!
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Q&A with Larry Vickers: German WW2 Gun and Modern Small Arms
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 11, 2017
    Larry Vickers has published the newest book in the Vickers Guide series, and it looks at German small arms of World War II - the first of two volumes to do so.

    https://www.vickersguide.com/ww2germany

    I had a hand in the project writing a substantial chunk of the text, and so I met up with Larry to sign copies of the book. And since we were in the same room together, what better to do than a Q&A? These questions, as always, were provided by my wonderful group of supporters at Patreon...

    1:02 - Any guns you regret selling?
    2:08 - Condensed bio
    5:13 - Is the DI system in the AR good or bad?
    8:03 - What was Larry’s involvement in the HK 416?
    9:04 - Why is the AK so good?
    11:16 - 7.62x39 or 5.45x39?
    12:39 - What gun do you want to add to your personal collection?
    13:31 - Why is the AR guy (Vickers) doing a book on German WWII guns?
    15:00 - Was the massive German R&D in WWII good or bad for them?
    17:22 - If you were in WWII, what rifle and what job would you want?
    19:40 - Thoughts on the Stoner 63
    22:26 - As a lefty, how do you shoot bolt action rifles?
    24:18 - What is the most interesting piece of firearms history development?
    25:28 - What handgun would you have picked for the new Army handgun?
    27:56 - Before the M4, what rifles/carbines did elite units use?
    31:48 - Plans for another 1911 build class?
    33:42 - Why were the Germans unique in developing a GPMG?
    36:44 - Why does H&K hate 10mm?
    39:38 - Preference for Inglis vs FN High Power?
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Converting the Lebel to 7.5mm: The M27 Lebel
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 12, 2017
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    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    In the aftermath of World War One, the French military instituted a plan to introduce a completely new roster of small arms. This would begin with the development of a modern rimless rifle cartridge, which was adopted in 1924. With the new cartridge in hand, programs were begun to develop a light machine gun, bolt action rifle, and semiautomatic rifle using it. To supplement these new arms - especially during their development and production - plans were also made to convert existing 8mm rifles to the new cartridge.

    The two rifles in large supply, of course, were the Lebel and the Berthier. The St Etienne arsenal was tasked with developing a Berthier conversion (this would become the M34 Berthier), and the Tulle arsenal was assigned to do the same with the Lebel. The first prototype was ready for testing in 1927. That first example was not satisfactory, and iterative development would continue into the early 1930s. Ultimately, the Lebel conversion was simply not as well liked by troops or as effective as the M34 Berthier, and so the Berthier was chosen for mass production. A total of about 1500 Lebel M27 conversions would be made by 1940, in a wide variety of configurations including different barrel lengths, rifling patterns, and optics mounting setups. While this did not result in a successful production rifle, it would inform the development of the MAS-36, and not go to waste. In addition, a number of M27 rifles would be converted into pressure testing guns to assist in ammunition development.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  5. Alton

    Alton Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    French firearms, though well built and often found in good to excellent condition, really are the bastards of the firearms world precisely because of their chamberings. The French seemed to go out of their way to select and standardize the most obscure cartridge sizes and calibers. Their long history of this is a tiny part of why NATO came into existence so small arms calibers and cartridges would be standardized amongst all NATO members.
     
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  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Khyber Pass Handmade Bolt Action AK Lookalike
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 13, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    Today we are looking at a unique rifle in the National Firearms Centre collection - at first glance it appears to be an AK in a full-length rifle cartridge, using a Bren gun magazine. A closer look will show that it is actually a bolt action rifle, and a careful inspection just makes things stranger.

    The entire weapon is manufactured from scratch, not using scrounged parts. While the magazine looks like a Bren magazine and the bolt looks like a P14 Enfield, both are actually handmade. The "gas tube" is entirely decorative, and the "cleaning rod" is fake; both too short and too large in diameter to fit down the barrel. Intriguingly, the caliber of the rifle is a bit of a mystery - it is crudely marked "7MM", but the barrel is larger than 7mm in diameter. The most likely cartridges for a rifle from this area of Afghanistan or the Khyber Pass / Darra region of Pakistan would be 8mm Mauser, .303 British, or 7.62x54R - and none of these fit. It is entirely possible that the rifle is intended to be just a decoration. I would certainly not want to the the first person to try firing it...

    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of this rifle-like object, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Firearms Basics: Rifle Length Terminology
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 14, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

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    If you starting looking carefully at military bolt action rifles, you will find that they generally all fall into one of three categories:

    Rifles: 30-32 inches / 760-810mm
    Short Rifles: 24-26 inches / 610-660mm
    Carbines: 17-20 inches / 430-510mm

    How did these different standard lengths come about, and why are the Italians and the Russians different? Let's have a look...

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Shpagin's Simplified Subgun: The PPSh-41
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 15, 2017
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    After making the decision to mass produce a submachine gun, the Soviet Union adopted the Degtyarev PPD-38 and PPD-40, but this design was too expensive for the huge scale of production that the USSR intended. A new design was needed, and was put into development almost as soon as the PPD was entering production.

    Shpagin won the design competition with the PPSh-41, a weapon which required virtually no lathe work at all. It was assembled from a combination of heavy-gauge stampings and simple milled parts, and it fit the Soviet requirements quite well. Shpagin retained the high rate of fire and large drum magazines from the PPD, and even had a semiauto selector switch in his submachine gun, a bit unusual in a weapon intended for minimum expense.

    The drum magazines proved to be the weak point of the design, being only somewhat interchangeable between weapons and being rather complex to manufacture as well as bulky to carry and fairly easy to damage. A 35-round box magazine was introduced later on which ameliorated some of these issues, although not all of them. The PPSh-41 would go on to be deemed itself too complex, and supplemented by the PPS-43 submachine gun, although it was never fully replaced during World War Two. In addition to Soviet service, it would be copied and manufactured by several other nations.

    Thanks to Marstar for letting me examine and shoot their PPSh-41! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Iconic "Burp Gun" - Shooting the PPSh-41
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 16, 2017
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    The Soviet PPSh-41 submachine gun is most distinctive for its very high rate of fire - approximately 1250 rounds/minute - and large drum magazine. What may come as a surprise to those who have not tried it is how this very high rate of fire does not actually make the weapon difficult to control or hold on target. In fact, the PPSh-41 is an easier SMG to shoot effectively than the later PPS-43, at leas tin my opinion.

    The Soviets and the Germans make quite different choices in magazines and rate of fire with the PPSh and the MP40, but both turned out to be very good submachine guns. The glaring weak point of the PPSh are its magazines, and the difficulty in finding a drum that would run reliably in this particular example is why today's shooting session is done with one of the 35-round stick magazines instead.

    Thanks to Marstar for letting me examine and shoot their PPSh-41! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Papuan Vrijwilliger Korps Mauser Carbine
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 18, 2017
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    During the transition from Dutch colonial rule to independence, the Dutch government armed a group of Papuans to help defend the territory from Indonesian military incursion. This organization was the Papuan Vrijwiliger Korps (Papua Volunteer Corps), and the Dutch provided them with Mauser carbines converted to 7.62mm NATO.

    These carbines were originally Dutch police carbines chambered for 8mm Mauser, which the police forces were replacing with M1 Carbines. This left a group of several thousand compact and simple carbines that made an ideal basis for the Papuan arms. A total of 2700 were rechambered for 7.62mm (it was not known at that point which new semiauto rifle would be adopted by the Dutch military, but it would definitely use the 7.62mm NATO cartridge). Magazine blocks were installed to fit the shorter cartridge length, and the guns were fitted with rubber buttplates, given new bayonets, and parkerized to make them more durable in the Papuan environment.

    It is not known how many of the carbines actually made it to New Guinea, but a substantial number certainly did. They are extremely rare carbines today, as the Papua Volunteer Corps was an ill-fated group and only lasted from 1961 until 1963, with most of their arms being ultimately seized by the Indonesian military. This example was shared with me by a generous Dutch collector.
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Repurposing Obsolete Rifles: The Lebel R35 Carbine
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 19, 2017
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    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    The French military had investigated the possibility of a Lebel carbine in the 1880s, but by the 1930s a different set of priorities was in place. In an effort to make some use of the vast stockpiles of obsolete Lebel rifles France had, a plan was put in place to shorten then into carbines for auxiliary troops like artillery crews and engineers. These men needed some sort of rifle or carbine, but they did not need the best and newest weapons. By giving them shortened Lebel carbines, it would free up more modern rifles like the M34 Berthiers in 7.5mm and the new MAS-36 rifles to go to the front line infantry who needed them most.

    The R35 conversion was developed by the Tulle arsenal and adopted in January of 1936. The French government ordered 100,000 to be made, and deliveries began in April of 1937. Production would accelerate and continue right up to the spring of 1940, with a total of about 45,000 being actually delivered before the armistice with Germany. The conversions were all assembled at Tulle, but 4 other factories manufactured barrels for them: Chatellerault (MAC), St Etienne (MAS), Société Alsacienne de Constructions Mécaniques (SACM), and Manufacture d'Armes de Paris (MAP). These barrels were 450mm long (17.7 inches), and with the similarly shortened magazine tube, the R35 carbines held just 3 rounds. Production would not continue after the liberation of France in 1944.
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Vietnam Mk18 Mod0 Hand-Crank Grenade Launcher
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 20, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    The Mk18 Mod0 grenade launchers was developed by the Honeywell corporation in 1962, and was the first weapon in what would became a category of high volume grenade launchers used by the US military. The modern iterations are all self-loading, but this first example was fired by a manual crank handle, like a Gatling gun. The Mk18 used the same 40x46mm grenade cartridge as the single shot M79 launcher, and this round's low pressure allowed the Mk18 to use a rather unusual breech mechanism.

    Unlike most belt-fed weapons, the cartridges in the Mk18 never left the belt. Instead, the breech consisted of two rotating spindles which would form the top and bottom halves of the chamber, closing around each shell as the handle was cranked. As a result, a loaded belt of grenades fed into the weapon, and a belt of empty cases came out the other side. Another effect of the low pressure cartridge was a rather short effective range, which limited adopted of the weapon to the US Navy, which bought 1200 and used them primarily on riverine patrol boats. In this application, the short effective range was not much of a hindrance, and the volume of high explosive firepower was a significant asset.

    Armament Research Services (ARES) is a specialist technical intelligence consultancy, offering expertise and analysis to a range of government and non-government entities in the arms and munitions field. For detailed photos of this very cool early grenade launcher, don't miss the ARES companion blog post:

    http://armamentresearch.com/
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Q&A #15: Disappointing Guns, 7.92x41 CETME, and 1873 Revolvers
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 21, 2017
    Today's question topics:

    0:00:36 - Have I considered designing the perfect gun?
    0:02:38 - Dealer sample machine gun market
    0:07:20 - Stocked pistols and pistol-carbines
    0:10:53 - P14 & M1917 nomenclature
    0:12:45 - Particularly good and bad manuals of arms
    0:16:10 - CMP 1911s
    0:18:57 - What could compete with the AR-15/M-16?
    0:21:04 - What are the criteria for something being a "forgotten weapon"?
    0:22:52 - Why did the Japanese switch from 6.5mm to 7.7mm?
    0:26:23 - Why side-mounted magazines on SMGs?
    0:28:47 - Could the 7.62mm Tokarev make a resurgence?
    0:31:00 - 7.92x41mm CETME ammunition Get a copy of "Full Circle" here: http://amzn.to/2kDuN5X

    0:36:02 - Disappointing guns and filming injuries Dangerous things are dangerous: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FhFw...

    0:39:45 - Difference between RIA and James Julia auction houses?
    0:43:35 - What was my first gun?
    0:44:21 - Sterling SMG magazines
    0:45:14 - Revolver cartridge conversions of the 1870s
    0:48:15 - My off-grid living experience and videos
    0:49:52 - Forgotten Weapons logo, supporting the channel, and my FN-FAL
    0:53:25 - Constant recoil systems
    0:55:00 - Lack of British arms developments
    0:57:37 - Single-rune K98ks and fake collectibles
    1:00:25 - Practical application of the SAW/LSW
    1:04:43 - Last ditch weapons in WW1?
    1:07:42 - French 1873 vs Colt 1873
    1:10:40 - C&R shooter that isn't a Mauser?

    Want to submit a question for the next Q&A? Sign up to help support Forgotten Weapons on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Prototype Friberg/Kjellman Flapper-Locking Semiauto Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 22, 2017
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    The origins of flap-locking (as used in the G41(W), G43, DShK, DP, and RPD, among others) goes back to a Swedish Lieutenant Friberg in 1870, who patented the system. At that time, however, the fouling endemic to black powder made self-loading firearms effectively impossible and so the concept would have to wait until the invention of smokeless powder to become practical. The first to actually build a rifle or machine gun (he did both) was a man named Kjellman working at the Stockholms Vapenfabrik factory in Sweden, at the turn of the 20th century. The factory was the former Nordenfelt facility, and was trying to expand into small arms manufacture by making this Friberg/Kjellman rifle for international military contracts.

    About 50 examples were made in a variety of calibers and configurations, but no contracts were obtained and the rifle never entered mass production. Mechanically, it locks using the flapper system and cycles with a short recoil action. What is particularly unusual about the design is the use of a lever arm to both open and close the bolt without the aid of a recoil spring. This actually works, but feels very counterintuitive to handle by today's standards!
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Captain Fraser's Webley-Fosbery: WWI in Microcosm
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 23, 2017
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    Captain Percy Fraser, DSO was born on January 22, 1879 and died in Ypres on the night of February 23, 1915 while attempting to aid men wounded outside their trench. His unit of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders would suffer horrendous casualties at Ypres, and today we will look at his Webley-Fosbery automatic revolver and his service in the British Army.

    Thanks to Mike Carrick of Arms Heritage magazine for sharing Captain Fraser's story and revolver. See his regular column here: https://armsheritagemagazine.com
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Did the StG-44 start it all? (Cold War Rifles)
    LegallyArmedAmerica




    Published on Dec 24, 2017
    Continuing with our Cold War Rifle series, we touch on the significance the Sturngewehr 44 (StG-44) had on box fed semi-automatic rifles. I'm thinking the rabid AK-47 fans aren't going to like this one!

    * Be sure to join the web's ONLY 100% pro-gun social community, Gun District at GunDistrict.com. It's much like Facebook, but without the discrimination against gun owners.
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Early Submachine Guns of Switzerland 1919 - 1945
    jmantime



    Published on Feb 22, 2014
    Early Submachine Guns of Switzerland 1919 - 1945 --

    Between 1919 and 1945 Swiss firearms desigers developed many submachine guns and submachine gun prototype for the Military and for export.Including World War 1 and World War II submachine guns

    Furrer Model 1918 -- http://www.brueckenkopf-online.com/?p...

    Furrer Model 1919 - http://world.guns.ru/smg/switch/w-f-l...

    http://forum.guns.ru/forummessage/36/...

    Flieger-Doppelpistole M1919 - http://guns.wikia.com/wiki/Flieger-Do...

    http://galerie.valka.cz/showphoto.php...

    Solothurn S1-100 -- http://world.guns.ru/smg/switch/steyr...

    http://www.ww2incolor.com/japan/C__pi...

    SIG Brevet Bergmann 1920/1930 - http://world.guns.ru/smg/switch/sig-1...

    http://guns.allzip.org/topic/36/12619...

    SIG MKMS -- http://world.guns.ru/smg/switch/sig-m...

    SIG MKPS -- http://world.guns.ru/smg/switch/sig-m...

    SIG MKMO -- http://world.guns.ru/smg/switch/sig-m...

    SIG MKPO - http://world.guns.ru/smg/switch/sig-m...

    http://forum.guns.ru/forummessage/36/...

    Gazette des Armes n°421 juin 2010

    SIG MP-40 -- http://s946.photobucket.com/albums/ad...

    SIG MP-41 -- http://www.encyklopediezbrani.cz/ency...

    W+F MP-41 or MP-44 Furrer - http://www.armeetpassion.com/sigmp41....

    http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopi...

    SIG Neuhausen MPS 1944 / MP-46 --
    http://cumsoline.tumblr.com/post/3545...

    - Solothurn S-17-100 --

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fil...

    http://www.brueckenkopf-online.com/?p...

    Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft

    7.65x21mm Luger Schweiz Suisse Svizzera Svizra

    No Copyright Infringement Intended
     
  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rare Weapons of France 1893 to 1950
    jmantime



    Published on May 19, 2013
    Rare weapons of France like -

    Clair M1893 - http://qikan.tze.cn/Template/default/...
    Clair Freres - http://collectionarme.voila.net/clair...
    Darne M1922 - http://world.guns.ru/machine/fr/machi...
    Hotchkiss M1922 - http://world.guns.ru/machine/fr/hotch...
    Berthier Model 1911 - http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/r...
    Ribeyrolle M1918 - http://forums.gunboards.com/showthrea...
    Chauchat-Ribeyrolles M1918 - http://www.securityarms.com/20010315/...
    Berthier Automatic Rifle - http://ww3.rediscov.com/springar/VFPC...,
    MAS-40 - http://forum.reseau-js.com/topic/7585...
    RSC M1917 - http://world.guns.ru/rifle/autoloadin...
    RSC M1918 - http://world.guns.ru/rifle/autoloadin...
    A6 Meunier M1916 - http://world.guns.ru/rifle/autoloadin...
    Berthier Semi Automatic Rifle - http://www.nps.gov/spar/historycultur...
    Hagen M1912 - http://www.pic2fly.com/French+Rifles....
    Puteaux Arsenal M1910 -
    Halle M1904 & 1906 Rifle - http://vintagesemiautorifle.proboards...
    Daudeteau 1896 - http://encyclodesarmes.free.fr/pays/f...
    Buffalo-Lebel - http://pics5.this-pic.com/key/chiappa...
    Clair Brothers Flash M1898 - i65.photobucket.com/albums/h224/Hardrada55/00007_Fusil-semi-automatique-eclair-freres-Clair-calibre-12_zpsbe58e0a5.jpg

    i65.photobucket.com/albums/h224/Hardrada55/00006_Fusil-semi-automatique-eclair-freres-Clair-calibre-12_zps1c5be339.jpg

    MGD ERMA PM-9 - http://world.guns.ru/smg/fr/mgd-pm-9-...
    MAS Model 1948 - http://armesfrancaises.free.fr/PM%20M...
    PETTER Mle.1939 - http://forum.guns.ru/forummessage/36/...
    ETVS Model 1933 -
    CEI M1924 -
    STA/ MAS M1922/1924 - http://armesfrancaises.free.fr/PM%20S...
    Le Français Pistols - http://world.guns.ru/handguns/hg/fr/l...
    Unique/Peugeot Pocket -
    French ww2 weapons
    French weaons of ww2
    ww2 weapons of france

    No Copyright Infringement Intended
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Forgotten Weapons Field Test: 90-Round AK Magazine
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 25, 2017
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    Today I am joined by Forgotten Weapons Field Research Assistant Clay to test out one of those super-extended 90-round AK mags that are so often seen at the junk tables of gun shows. How bad are they? Or do they actually work? Let's find out...

    Thanks to Marstar for letting me use their RPK to test out this mag! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
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    Danish Madsen M47 - The last military bolt action rifle
    Military Arms Channel



    Published on Dec 25, 2017
    After WWII Denmark thought there might be a market for an affordable bolt action rifle for countries who couldn't afford to adopt new self loading rifles, which were all the rage in the 50's. The Madsen M47 had one military taker, Columbia. Even then, the Columbians don't appear to have used them much, if at all. The rifle featured in this video is a 1950's era Columbian contract rifle.
     
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    Just Shooting Compilation: 2017
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 26, 2017
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    The year in review with shooting! In order of appearance:

    EM-2 (.280/30)
    vz61 Skrpion
    kp/44
    kp/31 Suomi
    ZB-26
    RK-95/S
    American 180
    Finnish Maxim
    KVKK-62
    DP-28
    Prototype Friberg/Kjellman
    SIG MP48
    Dreyse light rifle
    PSM
    RSC-1918
    RSC-1917
    Norinco M-305A
    Yugo M84 (PKM)
    Trejo Model 1
    Vickers-Berthier
    Medusa M47
    Solothurn S18-1000
    Madsen LMG
    Colt Monitor
    ZK-420S
    XL-60
    M2 Carbine
    Vickers HMG
    L85A2
    Wheellock musket
    Webley 1913
    Walther WA-2000
    Semiauto DPM
    SIG PE-57
    Webley-Fosbery
    Howell Automatic Rifle
    MAC PA-50

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Improvised & Craft-Built Firearms w/ Jonathan Ferguson & Nic Jenzen-Jones
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 27, 2017
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

    Today I am joined for a round table discussion (well, octagon table, technically) by Jonathan Ferguson (Curator of the National Firearms Centre collection at the Royal Armouries) and Nic Jenzen-Jones (Director of Armament Research Services) to discuss a variety of improvised and craft-produced firearms. All three of us are contributors to a research paper being published by the Small Arms Survey on this subject, and we thought we would take a few minutes to discuss it on video.

    Cool Forgotten Weapons merch! http://shop.bbtv.com/collections/forg...
     
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  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Machine Gun Terminology - LMG, MMG, SAW, LSW, HMG, GPMG
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 29, 2017
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    Today we will look at the various different categories of machine guns - what makes them, why they exist, and what their place in military history is. Specifically...

    Automatic Rifle: Shoulder or hip fired, limited magazine capacity, minimal sustained fire capacity. Examples: M1918 BAR, Chauchat.

    LMG: Magazine fed, rifle caliber, bipod fired. Examples: Bren, Madsen, Lewis.

    HMG: Belt fed, usually water cooled, minimal portability, fired from tripod only. Examples: Maxim, Vickers, Hotchkiss 1914. Evolved into guns of caliber 12.7mm - 20mm, like the M2 and DShK.

    MMG: Air cooled, tripod fired only, belt fed. Examples: Browning 1919A4, SG-43.

    GPMG: Bipod or tripod fired, belt fed, rifle caliber, quick-change barrel. Examples: MG42, PKM, M240.

    SAW/LSW: Intermediate caliber, magazine fed, bipod fired. Examples: L86A1, FN Minimi, RPK.

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Italian Trials Czech ZK-391 Semiauto Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Dec 30, 2017
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    The ZK-391 is one in a series of Czech developmental semiautomatic rifles designed by Josef Koucký. It was developed initially in 1939 (hence the "39" in the designation), and was tested by the Italian military in 1943. It was ultimately not put into production, but nonetheless is an interesting detail of rifle development - a Czech design made under German occupation (note the Waffenwerke Brunn marking) for Italian trials (note the Italian safety markings).

    Mechanically, the rifle shared many elements with the M1 Garand, including the two-lug rotating bolt, the long stroke gas piston, and the removable gas tube. It has several unique elements as well, like the trigger guard doubling as a lever to recock the hammer and the out of battery safety mechanism incorporating the receiver top cover.

    Thanks to the Institute of Military Technology for allowing me to have access to this rifle so I can bring it to you! Check out the IMT at:

    http://www.instmiltech.com
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Forgotten Weapons: State of the Channel 2018
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jan 1, 2018
    http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

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    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow

    Thanks to all my viewers (and readers), new and old alike! I have some really exciting plans for 2018, and I'm happy to have you all along with me for them! This year I will be traveling to South Africa and France to film, touring American battlefields of World War One, writing a reference guide to French rifles, and posting a video every day. InRangeTV with Karl and I will be collaborating with Indy Neidell and a bunch of other great channels to help create the biggest documentary on World War Two ever made. There will be more shooting matches, more book reviews, more history, more mechanics, and more odd and unusual guns like you have become accustomed to.

    Happy New Year!
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Lepage Wax-Bullet Dueling Pistols
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jan 3, 2018
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    In the early years of the 20th century, before the Great War tempered society's interest in the martial arts, dueling came into the popular vogue. Not the lethal kind, but rather a more sporting style using pistols firing wax balls instead of lead bullets. It was even demonstrated at the 1908 Olympics (although not made an official part of the Games, as some claim).

    Today we are at the Institute of Military Technology looking at a beautiful early 1900s set of Lepage Brothers wax-ball dueling pistols made in Paris, along with their specialty ammunition and protective gear. For the record, we did try firing these, and found that the primer caps were all sadly destroyed by time and would not fire. A shame, because I was hoping to bring you a proper duel between myself and the IMT's Curator!

    Anyway, the sport bears quite a lot of similarity to today's innovative new (*cough*) trend in force-on-force firearms training, just styled more like fencing than a HEMA melee. The protective gear was just what you would expect today - a handguard to protect the knuckles and a mask to protect the head, with a clear solid visor over the eyes and a metal shield to protect the mouth. Add a heavy coat, and you're all ready to go!

    Thanks to the Institute of Military Technology for allowing me to have access to this very cool gear so I can bring it to you! Check out the IMT at:

    http://www.instmiltech.com
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rhodesian FAL - with Larry Vickers
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jan 5, 2018
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    The iconic weapon of the Rhodesian Bush War is the FN-FAL, painted in a distinctive "baby poop" yellow and green pattern. Because Rhodesia was under international embargo, its options for obtaining weapons were limited. Some domestic production was undertaken, but one large source was neighboring South Africa. Both South African production FALs and also Belgian-made South African contract FALs were provided. This rifle is one of the latter, with the South African crest and proof marks defaced for some theoretical deniability should it be scrutinized.

    Larry Vickers will talk us through this FAL, pointing out the different elements that are distinctly Rhodesian, as well as the unique Halbeck Device - and detachable muzzle brake.

    Thanks to Larry Vickers for sharing this rifle with us!
     
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    Rhodesian FN FAL 4k
    Vickers Tactical



    Published on Jan 5, 2018
    Larry show off a very rare, authentic, Rhodesian Bush War era FN FAL.
     
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  33. Crockett

    Crockett Seeker

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    That rifle is awesome. As an FAL aficionado and a Rhodesian in spirit, I have always wanted an original Rhodesian rifle.

    Rhodesians Never Die


    I spit on the all communist bastards in west who would not recognize Rhodesia as a country and forced the Rhodesians to their knees.
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Meunier A6: France's First Semiauto Battle Rifle
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jan 6, 2018
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    France began experimenting with self-loading rifle designs in the late 1890s, although most of this work is mostly unknown today. The work was done by the State arsenals, and kept as military secrets, without patents being filed or commercial sales considered. All sorts of systems were developed experimentally, including short recoil, long recoil, and direct gas impingements. The most successful result of the various programs was the A6 model designed by one Etienne Meunier. This rifle was approved for limited production in 1910, but the ever-present bureaucracy meant that by 1913, the production line was still being worked on at the Tulle arsenal.

    Semiautomatic rifles were set aside when the Great War broke out in 1914, but when it became clear that the war would not be over quickly, weapons development came roaring back as a priority. The French put the Chauchat automatic rifle into production as a close support weapon, and were looking for a semiautomatic infantry rifle as well. The natural choice was the A6 Meunier, and its production tooling was finished in 1916 and 1013 rifles were built - with 843 of these being sent to the front for combat use.

    Unfortunately, while the A6 was the best that had been available in 1910, it was not ready for the rigors of World War One combat. Tight clearances in the long recoil mechanism led to problematic reliability, and the use of a non-standard cartridge really hobbled the rifle. The A6 used a proprietary 7x57mm round (unrelated to 7mm Mauser). This cartridge was quite advanced at the time, and much better than 8mm Lebel, but given the logistic choice between a few hundred semiauto rifles and literally millions of bolt action rifles and machine guns, the 7mm Meunier cartridge was obviously untenable. The project was ended in the summer of 1917 when the RSC 1917 rifle began to come off production lines in substantial quantities.

    Special thanks to Paul for letting me share his Meunier with you! Check him out on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/canadiangun...
     
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    Rifles of the World: U.S. Rifle Model of 1917
    Mike B



    Published on Jan 6, 2018
     
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    Top 10 Surplus Firearms You Need to Get in 2018. They're Drying Up!
    Mike B



    Published on Jan 7, 2018
     
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    "Carbine" Williams' Battle Rifle: The Winchester G30R
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jan 8, 2018
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    The Winchester G30R is the final iteration of David Marshall Williams' work on a full power .30 caliber military rifle. The project began with a design by Ed Browning (John Browning's half brother) using a tilting bolt an annular gas piston, manufactured for US military trials by Colt. It moved to the Winchester company, which assigned Williams to the project when Browning died in 1939. Williams first replaced the annular gas piston with his gas tappet system, creating the G30M rifle. This performed poorly in trials, and the next iteration was the replacement of the tilting bolt with a Garand-type rotating bolt, creating the Winchester M2 rifle.

    The US military was not interested in the M2 in .30-06, but thought the concept could be ideal for the Light Rifle trials then underway, and Winchester scaled it down to .30 carbine, and won the Light Rifle trials with it. That weapon would go on to become the M1 Carbine. Once it was in mass production, Winchester returned to the M2 design and improved it into this G30R. It was tested by the Marine Corps, but not adopted. The Canadian military also expressed an interest, but the US government opted to not allow any exports, and so Canada never tested it.

    The US Army was quite satisfied with the M1 Garand, but suggested that this rifle might be made into a replacement for the BAR if it were redesigned a bit for greater sustained fire capacity. Winchester did so, creating the Winchester Automatic Rifle (WAR), which was on track for adoption until World War Two ended and immediate arms development became a much less important priority for the military.

    Thanks to the Institute of Military Technology for allowing me to have access to this rifle so I can bring it to you! Check out the IMT at:

    http://www.instmiltech.com
     
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    Rifles of the World: Finnish M39 Mosin Nagant
    Mike B



    Published on Jan 8, 2018
     
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    Croatian Šokac SMG - A PPSh-41 Copy from the 1990s
    Forgotten Weapons



    Published on Jan 9, 2018
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    The Šokac is just one of more than a dozen different submachine guns developed and produced domestically in Croatia during the Yugoslavian civil war of the early 1990s. It is a mechanical copy of the Soviet PPSh-41 made in 9x19mm and a folding stock modeled after the vz25 family of submachine guns. Like the PPSh, it has a selector for semiauto or fully automatic fire, and used stick magazines of 25- and 30-round capacity. The Šokac was first tested in August of 1991, and it appears that as many as 5,000 were produced in total.

    Today we are looking at both an early metal-framed example with a wooden grip and a later (and more typical) type with a plastic grip and magazine housing. There were also at least a few made with underfolding MP40-type stocks.

    Thanks to Kessler Auktionen AG for letting me film some of their guns! If you are looking for interesting and unusual arms in Europe, make sure to check them out: http://www.kesslerauktionen.ch

    If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
     
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    Rifles of the World: Brazilian IMBEL FN FAL Battle Rifle
    Mike B



    Published on Jan 10, 2018
     

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