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Overhead garage storage project

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by techguy2, May 1, 2011.



  1. techguy2

    techguy2 Meh Gold Chaser

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    Decided I need a better place to store my leftover ike plywood. We cut all the plywood for the hurricane, and i really didnt want to throw away 200 bucks or so worth of 1/2 inch plywood.

    Checked the prices online for the overhead storage units, and these things are generally 250-400 bucks for a 4x8 unit. Ouch.

    I started looking around, and figured that superstrut and allthread would do the job just fine. So I built a 7x10 overhead garage storage area for the plywood. I would have gone 8x8 but because of the beams in the garage, i couldnt do two full sheet sizes.

    Here are the pics... first one has the struts mounted, but not all the hardware added... and the second one is complete with a load on it.

    I used 3 inch 3/8 lag bolts to fasten to the ceiling joices, and 1/2 inch all thread for the downrods. There are 6 lag bolts and 4 downrods on each strut pair. The 2x4 cross members are spaced approx every 2 ft and bolted to the bottom strut.. I could have put 2x6's or more crossmembers, but for sheets of plywood i didnt need that many.

    This project easily stores 500 lbs of plywood, and could probably store much more. If I had exposed celing joices, I would have fastened carriage bolts through the board instead of up into the board. I hate placing a vertical load on a lag bolt like that.. I ended up with 16 1/2 inches of storage space. One side is 4ftx10ft the other is 40inches x10ft. I really needed 8ft, but the 10ft struts fit and I didnt want to cut them if I didnt have to.

    Overall I have approx 175 bucks in the project. It is probably over engineered, but that is what I do.
     

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    Nickelless likes this.
  2. TnAndy

    TnAndy retired guy Platinum Bling

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    Re: Overhead garage storaage project

    Excellent use of otherwise wasted space !
     
  3. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    Re: Overhead garage storaage project

    Sweet, well done.
     
  4. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    That's a cool idea! I have a 10' high garage and plenty of room above the door tracks...!
     
  5. 90%RealMoney

    90%RealMoney Midas Member Midas Member

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    Looks good TG. As long as your lags are dead center into the ceiling/floor joists. I'm assuming you have a second floor above the garage? Did you test it by jumping up, and hanging from the channel? If it'll hold a grown man at any point like that, you should be fine! I'd hate to see your Lambourghini get smashed by a load of plywood! Good job!
     
  6. techguy2

    techguy2 Meh Gold Chaser

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    Thanks...Yeah, I have a second floor above the garage...

    I actually used a stud finder to find the joices, then used a small nail and hammer to find and mark the edges of the joices. Those stud finders are just not accurate enough.

    I weigh 230, and hung from each of the struts after assembly.. then even after I put all the plywood up there. I don't think it's going anywhere.

    No lambo, but a small bass boat I would be pretty peaved about....
     
  7. 90%RealMoney

    90%RealMoney Midas Member Midas Member

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    Adding those 2X4's stiffened it up nicely I would imagine. If you find that it sways at all, when adding or removing sheets of plywood, you can install a couple flat 2X4's, or 2X6's at an angle, from one of the outer channels, to the next available joist. This should tighten it up completely. Whatever angle it takes to get to the next outer joist, cut that bevel on both ends of your flat 2X. They used to brace walls in this fashion back in the old days, also joists. They would make an "X" bridge using beveled 2X's. I used to marvel at what the Old school Carpenters could do with a hand saw! Cutting bevels like that isn't easy without a miter box. Modern worm drive saws sure sped things up, that's for sure.
     
  8. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    I just use a large rare earth magnet for that. Finds the screws or nails in the studs with ease and is a lot easier to locate the centers of the studs since you locate the actual fasteners.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Pyramid

    Pyramid Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Well done! :beer1:

    Would make a nice hiding spot for your metal as well (if you had any). :biggrin:
     
  10. TnAndy

    TnAndy retired guy Platinum Bling

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    Trouble with that is it assumes two things:


    1. The framing carpenters used straight lumber, which is a nearly extinct species, or bothered to pull the crooked stuff they send from the lumber yard back into some semblence of straight.

    2. The drunk, or the "speedy Gonzales" that hung the drywall ACTUALLY hit the stud/joist center as they flew down the sheet.

    If you want to find the ACTUAL center at the point you wish to install a critical fastener, use Techguy's method.
     
  11. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    Correct, that's why the magnet is good because it finds the actual fasteners that can be then traced from top to bottom to find the actual stud whether crooked or straight. From there it's easy to use the nail through the wall method of getting an exact placement.

    This method has helped me remove walls from the days of double nailing the drywall or those applications where drywall is nailed to plywood with fasteners that looked like they were applied with a shotgun.

    For demo and less important applications than a 500# shelf unit, the magnet method is faster and easier than a bulky plastic toy that runs on batteries. Try it, you'll like it. :)

    EDIT: BTW I was at Blown Cheapo the other day and saw a commercially made plastic housed version of the rare earth magnet being sold as a stud finder.

    Here it is:
    [​IMG]
     
  12. TnAndy

    TnAndy retired guy Platinum Bling

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    Actually, I use my knuckle and simply rap on the drywall. I can locate a stud pretty close that way, then use the nail method to find exact center. Doesn't require a plastic toy or a magnet.

    Also, most drywall on walls is often only nailed or screwed on the edges and drywall glue is used on the stud centers, with one or two fasteners to hold it in to the stud edge until the glue dries......so a magnet won't work in those cases. Drywaller prefer the glue as that is that much less to have to mud over in the finish process.
     
  13. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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    Never seen the glue used before. What's the IRC code on that?
     
  14. TnAndy

    TnAndy retired guy Platinum Bling

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    I'll confess, I don't know WHAT an IRC code is.

    But drywall adhesive comes in quart tubes that take an oversized caulk gun, and is now being replaced by adhesive foam in a can.....one can holding the equal of quite a few tubes. Look in the caulk/glue section of any Home Depot type store.

    In addition to less finish work, it also helps soundproof drywall and prevents some cracking problems later, as the sheet will flex some on the glue on the studs.
     
  15. newmisty

    newmisty Duppy Conqueror Midas Member

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  16. Eat Beef

    Eat Beef Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Nice work Techguy. We have a similar setup in the garage at church, only it's made of 2x4s and the joists are exposed. They hold a LOT.

    Next time you put up your plywood, remember to go around and paint a number on each piece, it'll speed up the process when you have to put it up. I just start at a particular corner and go in order. When it comes down, it goes in the opposite order. Takes about half the time.
     

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