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Peyton Manning’s squeaky-clean image was built on lies, as detailed in explosive court documents sho

Discussion in 'Golf, Football, and all Ball sports' started by Ahillock, Feb 13, 2016.



  1. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    Peyton Manning’s squeaky-clean image was built on lies, as detailed in explosive court documents showing ugly smear campaign against his alleged sex assault victim

    Shaun King
    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Updated: Saturday, February 13, 2016, 1:46 PM


    Thirteen years ago, USA Today obtained 74 pages of explosive court documents on Peyton Manning, Archie Manning, the University of Tennessee, and Florida Southern College that revealed allegations of a sexual-assault scandal, cover up, and smear campaign of the victim that was so deep, so widespread and so ugly that it would've rocked the American sports world to its core. Yet USA Today never released those documents for reasons I can't explain.

    Mel Antonen, now a baseball writer for Sports Illustrated, wrote about the documents for the paper on Nov. 3, 2003. Three days later, Christine Brennan, longtime sportswriter for USA Today wrote an op-ed about Peyton Manning and the documents entitled, “Do you really know your sports hero?” but the scandal pretty much died right there.

    [​IMG]Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images
    Peyton Manning visibly reacts on the sideline to a loss to the Florida Gators at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee.

    Facebook wouldn’t be invented for three more months. Twitter didn’t come for three more years. The word “viral” was still only being used to describe the spread of infectious diseases.

    But when the documents were sent to me on Tuesday, two days after the Super Bowl, it was immediately clear to me that had the world actually known what they contained, it’s doubtful that Peyton would have ever been the “swell, golly, gee-whiz” pitchman for Nationwide Insurance, DirecTV or Papa John’s Pizza. Certainly, evangelical op-eds calling him “squeaky clean” and positioning Peyton as the arbiter of all things good and decent in the world simply wouldn’t be the case.

    But as his career winds down, we're left to grapple with the reality that there is credible evidence that Peyton and the Manning family knowingly, willingly, wantonly ruined the good name and career of Dr. Jamie Naughright, a respected scholar, speaker, professor, and trainer of some of the best athletes in the world.

    On the morning after Super Bowl 50, I posted a picture on my Facebook page of Cam Newton smiling and embracing Peyton Manning after the game and simply asked why that warm photo wasn't being talked about instead of Cam being frustrated at the post-game press conference. It has since been shared more than 234,000 times and seen by more than 20 million people. It now has nearly 6,000 comments, but on that morning, just one leaped out at me, which mentioned something to the effect of "Peyton sexually assaulted a girl in college."

    Now, I get a lot of crap posted on my Facebook page, but I decided, on a whim, to Google "Peyton Manning sexual assault University of Tennessee." That's how I discovered the two old USA Today articles about the case. Later that day, when I wrote an article on the racial double standards in the media between Peyton Manning and Cam Newton, I decided to mention the sexual assault case, and how the allegations had somehow slid right off of Peyton like virtually every other mistake he has ever made in his career.

    Less than 24 hours later, a source who claimed to see my article on the racial double standard, sent me a 74-page court document from Polk County court in Florida. Sitting in the San Francisco airport, waiting for a flight home, I opened the PDF, began reading, and felt like I had stumbled on to state secrets. I literally moved to where nobody could see my computer screen.

    While Peyton Manning is not the president of the United States, in a land where football is king, he is the Captain America of sports and certainly one of the best quarterbacks of all time. He's also a prolific pitchman, the friendly face of several multi-billion dollar corporations.

    This document says, in essence, that it's all a facade, an act, a well-designed for-profit creation, maintained and manicured at all cost. For me, it was like reading proof that the first Apollo moon landing was really a fictional tale filmed in a Hollywood studio designed to dupe us all. That flag, planted in the moon, seemingly blowing in the wind, was a ruse after all. Maybe B.o.B. was right on this one fact.

    I read every single page in the airport before I boarded my flight. Maybe a good hundred times, I wondered to myself, Why — and how — had all of this been kept secret for so long?

    Titled "Facts of the Case," and submitted to the court by the plaintiff's lawyers, the document, which warrants many more takes and reflections than what I will offer today, is simultaneously shocking, disgusting, painful, and infuriating. It offers us the living, breathing human names and faces of the individuals the American sports machine is willing to mow down in the name of profit and fame.

    To begin with, Dr. Jamie Naughright was not "a girl" sexually assaulted by Peyton Manning; she was an esteemed professional widely admired by students and peers alike at the University of Tennessee, where she was the Director of Health & Wellness for the Men's Athletic Program. Originally from New Jersey, Naughright had made Knoxville her home away from home.

    In 1991, she earned her B.A. from the University of Tennessee in Exercise Physiology with a Minor in Football Coaching (I didn't even know such a minor existed). A year later, with a 3.7 GPA, she earned her Master's Degree in Health Education and Promotion. A few years later, with a 3.925 GPA, she earned her doctorate from the University of Tennessee in Health Education and Wellness.

    In fact, Jamie Naughright had been a staple across all sports programs at the University of Tennessee and had more tenure than most of the football staff, including the head coach at the time, Phillip Fulmer.

    [​IMG]Tatiana Orellana/Youtube
    Dr. Jamie Naughright is a respected scholar, speaker, professor, and trainer of some of the best athletes in the world.

    Starting as a student in 1988, Naughright devoted her entire life to the University of Tennessee athletic program. She was a student trainer for the women's athletic programs and a supervisor for intramural sports on campus. From 1989-91, she was the student trainer for the men's athletic department. After earning her bachelor's degree and entering grad school, she became the graduate assistant trainer for the men's athletic program for two years. Gifted and respected throughout the campus, she was hired as the assistant trainer for the entire men's athletic program in 1993, following a year as a full-time intern.

    After two years in that role, she was hired as the Director of Health and Wellness for the Men's Athletic Program. In that position she developed widely acclaimed educational and medical programs for students and oversaw the drug testing of all of the male athletes. She presented academic papers, served as an instructor and lecturer for college courses, and traveled frequently with students and staff to conferences all over the country. She started successful community projects and raised funds for local charities.

    While serving as the Director of Health and Wellness, Naughright also was the head trainer for Tennessee's track and field program, which includes cross country, indoor, and outdoor athletics. In that position she hired and trained 25 staff members, oversaw all medical care for every track and field athlete, served as the medical director for large events, coordinated annual physicals and supervised weekly drug testing. So many athletes — which would eventually include medal-winning Olympians — developed such a deep respect for Dr. Naughright that she would be requested to travel with them to international events and world championships.

    In addition to all of her other responsibilities, Naughright served as the associate athletic trainer for the men's football program. Where you live probably determines how much you know or care about Southeastern Conference football. But in small- to medium-sized cities across the south — places like Knoxville, Tuscaloosa, Baton Rouge, Gainesville — SEC football is just a little more important than God. The years Naughright was employed as the associate trainer by the men's football program, from 1996-98, were arguably the three best years in the modern history of the program, as the team won back-to-back SEC championships and the national title. Dr. Jamie Naughright was as an absolute force of nature in the University of Tennessee's sports program.

    At that time, Naughright's education, training and ascension through the ranks of the University of Tennessee's athletic program should have culminated, after more than 10 years of service to the institution, with her being able to land any job she wanted. When football teams win SEC championships and national titles, key employees can pretty much dictate where in the sports world they want to work next. If Dr. Jamie Naughright was a man that likely would've been the case for her as well.

    As an undergraduate in 1989, Naughright, who had interned for a year with the women's athletic programs (including the world-famous UT women's basketball team), was transferred to the men's programs. According to court documents and affidavits, her boss, associate trainer Mike Rollo, perceived Naughright to be a lesbian. Rollo, who had just left working with a group of young women he also thought to be lesbians, allegedly began calling Naughright "c--t bumper." This wasn't a rare occurrence or something he said to her only in private; he allegedly called her that in front of others. For three years, until 1992, when Naughright built up enough courage to complain, she said she was almost exclusively called "c--t bumper," or "bumper" for short, by a variety of staff members in the program (see court documents, pages 5-7; all subsequent references are to these).

    According to the allegations in the documents, Rollo regularly referred to the women's teams, known as the Lady Volunteers, as the Lady Lickers. Naughright, who is not a lesbian, said she was told by Rollo that she would just have to get used to hearing such vulgarities. Since she was one of the first women to work in the men's program, the 20-year-old Naughright decided to endure the abuse if it meant she could serve as a pioneer of sorts for women in sports. After Naughright issued a formal complaint, Rollo and other staff members allegedly were ordered by administrators to cease the practice. While the name "c--t bumper" ceased, Rollo and the staff continued to call her "bumper" and would frequently add other sexual adjectives to it (see page 8).

    Determined to persevere without jeopardizing her career, Naughright began writing policies for the program prohibiting foul or abusive language. First she instituted the policies for athletic training rooms, then later the male cheerleading program. Eventually she would train a variety of student athletes on the proper and professional use of appropriate language.

    In the fall of 1994, Peyton Manning entered the University of Tennessee football program as the already-famous son of legendary college and pro football star Archie Manning. That semester, his first on campus, some type of incident involving Manning and Naughright occurred. By request of the counsel of Peyton Manning, the details of that incident have been sealed and three-and-a-half pages concerning it have been redacted from the permanent record (see pages 11-14).

    Whatever happened, Naughright claims it colored and informed the professional interactions between Naughright and Manning from that time on and caused Manning to consistently harbor anger toward her. Yet in spite of the drama, Naughright served as the medical director for the NCAA Track and Field Championships in 1995 and was a member of the training staff for the Olympics trials for the 1996 Games in Atlanta.

    To say that her problems with Peyton Manning boiled over in 1996 would be understating it.

    On Feb. 29 of that year, Naughright, at that point the university's director of health and wellness, was in a training room, examining what she thought might be a possible stress fracture in Manning's foot. At 6 feet, 5 inches, his feet dangled off the edge of the table. Manning allegedly then proceeded to scoot down the training table while Naughright examined his foot. At that point, she said, he forcefully maneuvered his naked testicles and rectum directly on her face with his penis on top of her head. Shocked, disgusted, and offended, Naughright pushed Manning away, removing her head out from under him (see pages 14-15). Within hours, she reported the incident to the Sexual Assault Crisis Center in Knoxville (see page 18).

    According to the court records, Manning initially denied the incident ever took place. It was a calculated risk. He was the star quarterback, a Heisman trophy hopeful, and a likely No. 1 pick in the NFL Draft. While Naughright was now a respected member of the staff, Manning was the star, the savior of Tennessee football. It was his word against hers.

    [​IMG]Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
    When Rollo learned of the complaint, he allegedly concocted a story that Manning actually pulled down his pants to moon another student-athlete, Malcolm Saxon, who was nearby. According to Rollo, after mooning the student, Naughright just happened to move her head right into Manning's pelvic region. Rollo acknowledged under oath that he was the first person to use the word “mooning.”

    One person, though, could settle all of this: Malcolm Saxon.

    And, in fact, he did settle it. In an affidavit, Saxon refuted Manning's story and made it clear that Manning never mooned him. In a letter to Manning, Saxon, who stated that he lost his eligibility as a student-athlete over it, practically begged him to come forward and tell the truth (see page 20). Here's an excerpt from the letter:

    "First, I have stuck to my same story throughout this drama. I told Mike Rollo the next day and Coach Fulmer a week or two afterwards. I had nothing to hide at that point and I have nothing to hide today. I have never been on Jamie's side or on your side (contrary to what the athletic department was telling you and telling her). I stuck to the truth and I lost my eligibility for it. My redshirt request sat on Mike Rollo's desk for months as the process was going forward. I'm not angry about it anymore, just getting a little tired of it!!

    "Peyton, you messed up. I still don't know why you dropped your drawers. Maybe it was a mistake, maybe not. But it was definitely inappropriate. Please take some personal responsibility here and own up to what you did. I never understood why you didn't admit to it...."

    Saxon goes on to tell Peyton things like:

    "Coming clean is the right thing to do.

    [​IMG]AJ Mast/AP IMAGES PAPA JOHN�S
    NFL stars Peyton Manning (r.), Jerome Bettis (l.) and Papa John's Founder John Schnatter enjoy Papa John's pizza and Pepsi MAX during a commercial shoot.

    You have shown no mercy or grace to this lady who was on her knees seeing if you had a stress fracture.

    You might as well maintain some dignity and admit to what happened.

    Your celebrity doesn't mean that you can treat folks this way."

    For anybody other than Peyton Manning, such damning statements from a fellow student who had no dog in the fight would have been the nail in their coffin. As a general rule, it's not just gross to smash your testicles on a woman's face, it's a crime.

    I'm embarrassed to even be typing such things, but imagine if a grown man forced his genitals on to the face of your daughter or sister or mother or beloved colleague. What would you think about that? Would you tell your wife, "Well, that's gross, honey. How was the rest of your day?" Would you ask your daughter, "What she did to deserve that?" Of course you wouldn't. You'd be outraged.

    When Rollo was asked, under oath, if the woman he had known for more than seven years would respond in such a way to being mooned, he repeatedly said no (see pages 15-16). Yet he allegedly concocted the mooning narrative, nonetheless.

    Instead, the school asked Naughright to leave. Having poured her heart and soul out to the University of Tennessee for nearly 10 years, she agreed, as a part of a settlement agreement, to part ways.

    Before she left, though, two staff members of the school, according to the documents, asked Naughright if she would consider blaming the entire incident not on Manning, but on another athlete — a black one. According to Naughright, the staff members (named as Mr. Wyant and Mr. Rollo), went so far as to actually name a specific black athlete she could blame it on. Of course, she refused (see pages 18-19).

    In her remaining time at the university, Naughright testified that Manning, in her presence, on two separate occasions, deliberately reenacted the sexual assault on other student athletes to terrorize her. On another occasion he allegedly called her a "bitch" in front of other athletes after snatching a marker used to label drug-test specimens from her hand and throwing it across the room (see page 22).

    When Naughright finally left the University of Tennessee it was both heartbreaking and a great relief. She was hired to be an assistant professor and the program director of the Athletic Education Training Program at Florida Southern College. For more than three years she served Florida Southern with great distinction. She received, according to the court documents, regular raises, outstanding reviews, and was credited for helping grow the program in measurable ways.

    In 1998, she served as the head athletic trainer for the U.S. women's track and field program in Beijing. Two years later, she was hired to be the head athletic trainer for the both the men's and women's USA track and field teams in their competition versus Canada. Her professional life had clearly turned a corner. Beloved both by athletes and her colleagues, Naughright had decided she'd never discuss the sexual assault by Manning publicly. In fact, both she and Manning signed a confidentiality agreement when she left the University of Tennessee that they would not discuss it.

    Yet, in 2001, after moving on and revitalizing her career, everything came crashing down again. Now a quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts, and more famous than ever, Manning violated the confidentiality agreement in a way that could not be undone. It has scarred Naughright like a scarlet letter to this very day.

    On May 16th, 2001, Naughright returned to Florida after accompanying her students on an educational and medical trip to South Africa. When she arrived at her office, she found a large manilla envelope in a receptacle on her door with the words "Dr. Vulgar Mouth Whited" printed on it (see page 1). Whited was Naughright's married name for most of her time at the University of Tennessee. She was immediately disturbed. Other employees testified that the envelope had been there for a few days before she arrived home from South Africa.

    In it, were Xerox copies from some type of publication. It appeared to be written by Peyton Manning and it was about her. Colleagues who saw her after opening it testified that she was shaken up by what she read. Manning and his father, Archie, had written a book called "The Mannings" and perhaps wanting to put their stamp on the incident in Knoxville before it ever reached the public, they threw Naughright under bus.

    Her supervisor at Florida Southern had already opened the envelope and read what was in it. What Manning said about her ruined her career at Florida Southern and in college athletics once and for all. After years of amazing reviews and great work at the university, the controversy from the book and the stress it created eventually caused Dr. Jamie Naughright to be let go, once again, for doing nothing wrong.

    It appears that Peyton and Archie Manning thought Naughright would accept what they did to her quietly. They were wrong. This time, she did file suit against Peyton Manning, Archie Manning, the ghostwriter John Underwood, and the publisher Harper Collins. Manning and his lawyers asked for the case to be dismissed, but Polk County Circuit Judge Harvey A. Kornstein not only denied the motion but put Peyton Manning, his father, and the others on blast. In his statement, he said:

    "Even if the plaintiff is a public figure, the evidence of record contains sufficient evidence to satisfy the court that a genuine issue of material fact exists that would allow a jury to find, by clear and convincing evidence, the existence of actual malice of the part of the defendants.

    "Specifically, there is evidence of record, substantial enough to suggest that the defendants knew that the passages in question were false, or acted in reckless disregard of their falsity. There is evidence of record to suggest that there were obvious reasons to doubt the veracity of Peyton Manning's account of the incident in question. The court further finds that there is sufficient evidence to permit the conclusion that the defendants entertained serious doubts as to the truth of the passages in this case."

    In other words, Judge Kornstein said that there is evidence to support the conclusion that Peyton Manning lied in his book about the incidents and knew that he was lying about the incidents.

    Under deposition, it was learned from their ghostwriter, John Underwood, that Archie Manning, speaking of Dr. Jamie Naughright said, "He didn't really like this girl" (see page 24).

    Playing a bit of good cop, bad cop, Peyton said, "I certainly didn't dislike her. I thought she had a vulgar mouth, but I always tried to be nice." Peyton went on to describe a few favors that he did for Dr. Naughright, including one on a trip to Virginia, where, at Naughright's request, he gave some younger students a ride somewhere (see page 25).

    When forced to testify about this incident in a deposition, attorneys asked Peyton to describe a specific incident when Dr. Naughright had a "vulgar mouth." He could only think of one — it was during the Virginia trip. According to Manning, Dr. Naughright said to him, "These motherf---ers are yours. Get these motherf---ers off my hands for a little while."

    [​IMG]Jonathan Bachman/AP
    Archie Manning walks on the sideline before an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in New Orleans.

    It appears that Manning, who was under oath, completely concocted this story out of thin air. Again, just as he expected the student athlete, Malcolm Saxon, to go along with the story of his mooning Naughright, he assumed that the plethora of witnesses in Virginia would also go along with his new lie. Unfortunately for him, they didn't (see page 26).

    On the trip to Charlottesville, Va., five University of Tennessee students were selected to go to the NCAA's annual APPLE Conference, a training symposium on substance-abuse prevention and health promotion for student athletes and athletic department administrators. One was Manning. Three were teammates from the football team: Eric Lane, Scott Pfeiffer and Tyrone Hines. The last, Geno Devane, was a track and field athlete.

    The other four students, all juniors and seniors, were all older than Manning, who was a sophomore. Under oath, they each testified that Manning never gave them a ride anywhere that night and never would have. It was a peculiar story. But the strangest — and most damning — part of their testimony, though, was that they each made it abundantly clear that they never heard Naughright say one vulgar word that night or any other. Devane, a medical student at the time of his testimony, said, "I can assure you that I would remember. I would have been very upset if that had occurred. That type of language would have been completely out of character because she was always very professional around me and other student-athletes."

    Furthermore, Devane recalls very clearly who drove the athletes that night and it wasn't Manning; it was Eric Lane (see page 28).

    Devane's testimony gets even more damning. Line by line, and statement by statement, he repeatedly testifies, "I unequivocally state that this did not occur," regarding virtually every aspect of the story Manning concocted.

    For some, the testimony of Eric Lane can be considered even worse than that of Devane. Lane was not only Manning's teammate, but also his fullback on offense. At the time of his testimony he was an employee of the University of Tennessee and in the final year of law school. He also testified that he could not recall any such thing ever being said or done by Naughright (see page 29).

    Jill Griffin, the head of the Metropolitan Drug Commission in Knoxville, who was also on the trip, roomed with Naughright and spent a great deal of time with her, testified that she never heard Naughright say a vulgar word over the entire history of them knowing each other and, furthermore, that she never heard her calling students by vulgar names. In fact, Griffin testified that Naughright was exceedingly professional at all times with the students (see pages 30-33).

    While not personal friends, Griffin and Naughright worked together on the drug commission for over three years. She testified that she was an "excellent board member," and that she "had a good reputation in the Knoxville community and on the Metropolitan Drug Commission."

    [​IMG]ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A 1997 photo of Peyton Manning.

    But it gets worse. Much worse.

    Soon after the alleged sexual assault, records show that Manning told the school, "I have never approved of Jamie's vulgar language. It has always been my opinion, along with the majority of the team, that Jamie wants to be one of the guys."

    To his father, he concocted far worse lies that were torn apart, one by one, when he and others were forced to testify under oath. He told his father, Archie, "she's kind of trashy," and "had the most vulgar mouth of any girl he'd ever seen" and "was unattractive but had big breasts" and had "been out with a bunch of black guys" and "had a toilet mouth."

    Under oath, the ghostwriter, John Underwood revealed that Archie Manning suggested to him that Naughright was going into the dorms and having sex with large numbers of black student athletes. After saying that she was up in the dorms with black students, Archie, states:

    "And, she'd, she'd, been up in the dorm before, I mean hey, you know, they could have, you know, could have pulled off stuff on her too. Ah, she, toilet mouth, ah Peyton told me he never did like her, but he always did, cause what I'd told him to do, ah, I instructed him to be nice to the tr- … don't ever look down on a trainer or an equipment person you know."

    According to the records, attorneys for Naughright drilled person after person, staff member after staff member, asking them to identify an instance where they heard Naughright use vulgar language. Not a single person could do so. One after another, those who claimed she was promiscuous admitted under oath that they didn't have any evidence to support such claims. Instead, everyone, to the person, claimed they had just heard such charges from somebody who heard from somebody that it might be true (see pages 37-40). No one with firsthand knowledge testified to her ever being vulgar or having sexual relationships with student athletes.

    In fact, the opposite was true.

    Lawrence Johnson, an Olympic silver medalist and gold medalist at the World Indoor Games, testified at great length to the character, compassion, professionalism, and overall amazing nature of Dr. Jamie Naughright (see pages 42-43). He testified that he believed he had attended at least 80 different local, national, and international events with her and that he had not heard her a single vulgar word in the 10 years he had known and worked with her. He testified that she was "professional and proper" in her conduct, appearance, and demeanor. He went on testify how she came to check on him at his bedside after surgeries and traveled with him to meets all over the world to ensure his peak performance.


    Another student athlete, Antonio Brewer, who has known Naughright since 1995, testified that he personally knew her to have high moral character and that her reputation for being a moral person was actually well-known at the university. He testified that he had never heard her use vulgar language of any kind (see page 43) and that he was deeply offended by the racist suggestion made by Archie Manning that she was sleeping around with black athletes.

    Until this very day, have you ever seen a single interview with Dr. Jamie Naughright trashing Peyton Manning? Me neither. I never knew that any of this happened until last week. My understanding is that she has not worked in college athletics since being let go from Florida Southern.

    The defamation suit was settled in 2003 but terms were not disclosed. Naughright settled her suit againt the University of Tennessee for a reported $300,000.

    The book, which trashes the character of Dr. Jamie Naughright, continues to be sold to this very day, while Peyton Manning continues to benefit from his reputation not only as a superstar quarterback, but also an individual of high moral character. In fact, he has reaped tens of millions of dollars in endorsement deals based on a fraudulent mystique he's cultivated as a good guy, an upstanding citizen, the ideal professional athlete.

    This document alone puts the lie to all this. He hasn't come close to apologizing for sexually assaulting Dr. Jamie Naughright. Quite the contrary, he besmirched her stellar reputation and character. The price he should have paid for what he did her — at very least — she has ended paying over and over again, both at the University of Tennessee and, later, at Southern Florida.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nat...eaky-clean-image-built-lies-article-1.2530395
     
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  2. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    I apologize for not reading all of this before I respond but I'm amazed and disappointed at the raw hatred for these star athletes once we percieved them to be used up (add Tom Brady to the list although he still has some gas in the tank). It's all based on hate, jealousy and envy. It's the very sauce of what makes our species so contemptible. We always hold others to higher values than ourselves. For the most part, we all suck!
     
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  3. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    Ok.....now go back and read the article. ;)
     
  4. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    ^^^That's what I would have said!^^^^ :dduck:
     
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  5. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    I don't think this is a smear campaign. The above article is pretty convincing that the Manning family + friends did a good job of covering this up for Peyton to keep his image "clean." Those in high places with power and connections always get deals us peasants don't get.

    Add to that the report than Peyton's wife was getting HGH shipments and you start connecting the dots. All I know is that the corruption, fraud, manipulation in the government, politics and the economy don't end there. No reason not to believe it extends to sports figures and others.
     
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  6. Merlin

    Merlin Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    Well, I read the article and was shocked. I had bought--hook, line, and sinker--the story that Manning is a class act. If the opening post article is true, Manning is, instead, a slime ball. Very bad news; there goes another hero. ;(
     
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  7. <SLV>

    <SLV> Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Most disturbing is the testimony that the coaches encouraged her to blame a black man instead of Manning. Humanity is so corrupt.
     
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  8. southfork

    southfork Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

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    Yah I reckon your right, I doubt theres one percent of us that hasn't done something in our past we regret doing, judge not least ye be judged.
     
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  9. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    I don't think anyone is saying we haven't done things we regretted in our past. We all have.

    But I sure as hell have paid the price (Manning hasn't yet), admitted it when I was wrong (Manning hasn't yet), took my punishment (Manning hasn't yet) and didn't cover up my crime with more lies and deceit (Manning did).

    These athletes are held to a different standard than us peasants are. How many times do we see the rich and famous get off with a slap on the wrist (if that) for a crime when us peasants would have the book thrown at us?
     
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  10. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    I remember the story, but it was painted as a prank. It makes a lot more sense now. He had bigger problems because he was perceived more as a choke artist than a rapist. In fact, the Broncos won last week despite him, not because of him. He lost the ball his last 2 out of 3 pass attempts. He also failed to win a National Championship in college where the game was more dependent on him without a great defense or star running back.
     
  11. Mujahideen

    Mujahideen Black Member Midas Member

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    The guy is just a football player, he isn't a saint or hero.

    Do we really think that of all people, football players conduct themselves at a higher standard? These guys are leaking testosterone everywhere.
     
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  12. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    Or HGH from all the needle holes in their butt!
     
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  13. Flight2gold

    Flight2gold Silver Member Silver Miner Site Supporter ++

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    Without defending Peyton in any way, I find the oxymoronic nature of the words political agenda and coincidence and timing to be just hilarious.
    Documents just showed up two days after the Super Bowl. Of course, "I'm unable to reveal the source due to journalistic integrity."
    All of us know full well the politically correct agenda the NFL has been on for the past couple years. Basically taking a pick axe to the foundation of certain leading NFL figures.
    This agenda has been to break the barriers of accomplishment and reform to a more suitable real history. The history we should have all been living since the beginning, at least according to the NFL home office. A sort of "hope and change" sudo revisionist history, if you will.

    If this article was 100% about Peyton it would have been more believable out right but these sports reporters can't help but to
    mention Cam Newton.
    Plugs about this or that. The slow build back up from his reputation of acting like a 10 year old and spewing racist remarks.
    Needless to say, no documents showing up anywhere about Newton.

    But there is always more to the story......

    It doesn't long to explore and find Cam was aware of rape scandals in the past.
    He committed misdemeanor larceny after he stole the sign of a Packer fan and tossed it away.
    That he stole a laptop and lied to police about its location and his theft until a text message from a friend gave him up.
    We all know of his involvement in the scandal him and his father admitted, "Pay for Play" at Auburn.

    I'm guessing from his childish behavior streak, that continues to this day, he wouldn't know how to respectfully actually talk to a woman,
    much less get involved to a point to rape someone.

    This all from the latest NFL MVP savior.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2016
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  14. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    Here's an idea - don't make athletes role models for anything except the game they are playing.
     
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  15. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    Author is a lawyer and legal analyst for Sports Illustrated.


    Breaking down sexual assault allegations against Peyton Manning
    BY MICHAEL MCCANN
    Posted: Sat Feb. 13, 201


    According to sworn testimony detailed in an article by Shaun King in Saturday’s New York Daily News, Peyton Manning “forcefully maneuvered his naked testicles and rectum directly” onto the face of Dr. Jamie Naughright, the University of Tennessee’s director of health and wellness, in 1996 and then “smirked” and “laughed” about it. At the time, Manning was the 19-year-old star quarterback for the Volunteers. Naughright was 27 years-old and examining Manning for a possible foot injury. Manning initially denied the incident took place but later acknowledged that a possibly “crude” but nonetheless “harmless” event occurred. Associate team trainer Mike Rollo believed that any contact between Manning and Naughright was accidental since Manning was mooning another student-athlete (Malcolm Saxon) right as Naughright moved her head. Yet Saxon—the alleged “mooned” player—later signed a sworn affidavit saying he was never mooned.

    Not surprisingly the incident had an aftermath at the University of Tennessee, although one largely out of public view. Several hours after believing that she had been assaulted by Manning, Naughright filed a report with the Sexual Assault Crisis Center in Knoxville, Tenn. According to Naughright, university officials seemed intent on downplaying the incident and protecting Manning, arguably the best and most celebrated player in Tennessee’s history. In fact, she claims one university official asked her to blame whatever transpired on an African-American athlete and she refused.

    Naughright also asserts that Manning would thereafter harass and mock her around campus and in front of her coworkers and Manning’s teammates. Naughright eventually left the school as part of a financial settlement, and reportedly she and Manning signed a non-disclosure agreement to not discuss the alleged incident. Florida Southern College hired her as a professor and program director.

    The 1996 incident was not the only one between Manning and Naughright. In 1994, Naughright says an incident occurred that “explains the genesis of Peyton Manning’s dislike” of her. Naughright, however, agreed to keep the 1994 incident confidential, though only as a “courtesy” to Manning. It stands to reason that she could eventually retell what occurred.

    Even though Manning and Naughright had moved on from the University of Tennessee and signed a mutual non-disclosure agreement, Manning would write about the 1996 incident in Manning: A Father, His Sons, and a Football Legacy, a book he co-authored with his father, Archie Manning, and a ghostwriter, John Underwood (a former Sports Illustrated writer who had left the magazine by the time the book was written). Naughright testified that portions of the book were mailed to her office in 2001 and addressed to “Dr. Vulgar Mouth Whited”—in an apparent attempt to harass and discredit Naughright (whose last name was Whited for much of her time at Tennessee), and to embarrass her among her academic colleagues. In the book, Peyton Manning describes a training room incident as “crude maybe, but harmless” and, though not by name, he portrays Naughright in a disparaging light. In particular, Manning describes Naughright as “vulgar.”

    Naughright filed a defamation lawsuit against Manning and Underwood. Prior to the parties reaching an out-of-court settlement, Manning gave damaging testimony. He described Naughright as habitually vulgar and particularly profane during a 1995 trip to Charlottesville, Va. Manning’s testimony appears contradicted by other witnesses, which raises the possibility Manning may have exaggerated or lied about Naughright. Moreover, testimony by Peyton Manning and Archie Manning revealed that the son told his father that Naughright “was unattractive but had big breasts” and that she liked to hang out “with a bunch of black guys.”

    Implications of accusations against Manning and connection to HGH controversy
    Who’s telling the truth? Why is a 1996 controversy, which was also the subject of a Big Lead article by Jason McIntyre in 2014 and several other news stories, surfacing in ’16? Why should we care about how Manning, who’s a month away from turning 40, may have acted when he was a college student?

    The first question can only be answered with the following: it’s unclear who’s telling the truth. The accusations and denials were made under oath and thus under penalty of perjury. It would seem that someone is lying, but we likely won’t ever find out who that might be. We do know, however, that Manning was not charged with sexual battery or other crimes for the unknown 1994 incident or for the disputed ’96 incident. Likewise, no records have surfaced indicating that he was ever investigated by law enforcement for either incident. While star college athletes have been known to receive favorable treatment by law enforcement, that alone does not prove Manning’s guilt. Moreover, relevant statutes of limitation under Tennessee Law have long since expired, so law enforcement will not be launching an investigation. For its part, the NFL will not investigate a story that it was likely aware of and the key facts of which took place prior to Manning starting his NFL career in 1998.

    Also, Manning settling the defamation lawsuit should not be equated with an admission of guilt. Many celebrities settle lawsuits by paying accusers even when those celebrities insist the accusers are lying. The celebrities do so because the very filing of a lawsuit —and its accompanying media coverage—poses reputational risk. A lawsuit can also lead to pretrial discovery, which in turn may reveal unflattering information about the celebrity. In short, the 1996 incident will remain a disturbing mystery and we should not assume we know what occurred.

    The second and third questions—why is a 1996 incident the subject of a high-profile 2016 news article and why should we care about how a nearly 40-year-old Peyton Manning behaved in college—prove more complicated. As mentioned above, the 1996 incident has been explored in other news articles, though not nearly with the level of chilling detail and insightful analysis provided by King. In my view, the timing of King’s article is noteworthy because of allegations made against Manning in a December 2015 Al Jazeera America report and how Manning, the media and NFL have responded to them. According to the report, the Indianapolis anti-aging clinic Guyer Institute sent human growth hormone (HGH) to Peyton Manning’s wife, Ashley Manning, in 2011 for the purpose of Peyton Manning to use. HGH is banned by the NFL and can only be lawfully prescribed by physicians for three very limited uses, none of which are relevant to playing in the NFL. The NFL is investigating the HGH allegations, which implicate a group of NFL players, and there is no timetable for the league to announce its findings. The league has thus far declined to hire a law firm to conduct an “independent” investigation for HGH allegations, a departure from how the league investigated Tom Brady and the New England Patriots over Deflategate.

    While Manning has not denied that HGH shipments were mailed to his wife, he adamantly insists that he has never used HGH. Yet, unlike Washington Nationals first baseman Ryan Zimmerman and Philadelphia Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard, Manning has not (yet) filed a defamation lawsuit against Al Jazeera America or against, because (Al Jazeera America is closing) the parent company Al Jazeera. If Manning sues, he would be required to give sworn testimony and could eventually be exposed to pretrial discovery about any substances and medicines he takes.

    Instead of suing, Manning hired private investigators to research his accuser, Charlie Sly, who later recanted. The private investigators even went so far as to visit the parents of the 31-year-old Sly presumably in hopes of uncovering unflattering information about their son. Manning’s aggressive response to rebutting HGH accusations appears consistent with how he responded to the 1996 allegations of sexual assault: dispute the allegation and pressure the accuser. Whether that approach is ethically laudable can be debated, but Manning’s popularity with many in the national media—normally a skeptical and critical group—suggests it seems to work. That said, Manning’s decision to include discussion of a then-forgotten 1996 controversy in his book raises questions about his judgment: had he not done so, he would not have been sued for defamation and no court records would have surfaced.

    The timing of an in-depth story about 1996 allegations against Manning is also interesting because Manning’s storied NFL career may soon be over. Rumors persist that Manning, fresh off his Broncos winning Super Bowl 50, will announce his retirement prior to the start of the 2016 season. If Manning retires, the NFL would have no grounds to punish him for any findings that he used HGH; presumably the league would either stop investigating Manning or decline to publicly share whatever is found.

    Manning would again be one step ahead of potential trouble.

    http://www.si.com/nfl/2016/02/13/pe...e-sexual-assault-allegations-Jamie-Naughright

     
  16. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    I don't know why the story came out now, but I am happy it did. I remember hearing some negative press about Manning when he came out of college, but recall it was brushed off as college stupidity. But this article really shows the crime was more than just immaturity, but that the cover up was even worse! In my opinion, I don't care when truth comes up as truth is never convenient for someone that committed a crime. I'm just happy that the truth seems to be finally coming out.

    Regarding the timing, here are a few interesting paragraphs from the McCann article I posted above regarding the timing issue:


    "The second and third questions—why is a 1996 incident the subject of a high-profile 2016 news article and why should we care about how a nearly 40-year-old Peyton Manning behaved in college—prove more complicated. As mentioned above, the 1996 incident has been explored in other news articles, though not nearly with the level of chilling detail and insightful analysis provided by King. In my view, the timing of King’s article is noteworthy because of allegations made against Manning in a December 2015 Al Jazeera America report and how Manning, the media and NFL have responded to them. According to the report, the Indianapolis anti-aging clinic Guyer Institute sent human growth hormone (HGH) to Peyton Manning’s wife, Ashley Manning, in 2011 for the purpose of Peyton Manning to use. HGH is banned by the NFL and can only be lawfully prescribed by physicians for three very limited uses, none of which are relevant to playing in the NFL. The NFL is investigating the HGH allegations, which implicate a group of NFL players, and there is no timetable for the league to announce its findings. The league has thus far declined to hire a law firm to conduct an “independent” investigation for HGH allegations, a departure from how the league investigated Tom Brady and the New England Patriots over Deflategate.

    While Manning has not denied that HGH shipments were mailed to his wife, he adamantly insists that he has never used HGH. Yet, unlike Washington Nationals first baseman Ryan Zimmerman and Philadelphia Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard, Manning has not (yet) filed a defamation lawsuit against Al Jazeera America or against, because (Al Jazeera America is closing) the parent company Al Jazeera. If Manning sues, he would be required to give sworn testimony and could eventually be exposed to pretrial discovery about any substances and medicines he takes.

    Instead of suing, Manning hired private investigators to research his accuser, Charlie Sly, who later recanted. The private investigators even went so far as to visit the parents of the 31-year-old Sly presumably in hopes of uncovering unflattering information about their son. Manning’s aggressive response to rebutting HGH accusations appears consistent with how he responded to the 1996 allegations of sexual assault: dispute the allegation and pressure the accuser. Whether that approach is ethically laudable can be debated, but Manning’s popularity with many in the national media—normally a skeptical and critical group—suggests it seems to work. That said, Manning’s decision to include discussion of a then-forgotten 1996 controversy in his book raises questions about his judgment: had he not done so, he would not have been sued for defamation and no court records would have surfaced."
     
  17. Mujahideen

    Mujahideen Black Member Midas Member

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    This is interesting, but really who cares?

    Manning is a great QB, nothing can change that. If he put his nuts and ass on a female doctors face, that kinda sucks for her, but I'm not losing any sleep over it... And it's 20 years after the fact.

    It doesn't change anything for me true or false. Plus I'm sure, at least I hope, that he is a different man now. I bet he was a stupid spoiled kid with a really big ego back then.
     
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  18. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    Or maybe not? The whole thing about the HGH story is interesting and how that kinda of disappeared. I doubt he has changed much as a person. Those that grow up rich and spoiled as a kid, tend to end up spoiled and douche bags as an adult.
     
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  19. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

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    I guess I should say I am more intrigued and fascinated by the cover up of stories like this and to learn how deep the rabbit hole goes. According to this statement, it looks like even ESPN (MSM for sports) is in on the coverup by just ignoring the situation completely. Isn't that how MSM (CNN, MCNBC, ABC, CBS, NBC...etc.) deal with news items related to politics and the economy?

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  21. Mr Paradise

    Mr Paradise Midas Member Midas Member

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    There's always a sports talk lull between the Super Bowl & the beginning of March Madness so they held on to the story for a time when it would make headlines and grab listeners.
     
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  22. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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  23. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    "she was the Director of Health & Wellness for the Men's Athletic Program."

    Political Correctness gone awry... I'm sure he did it as a prank. If you can't take a joke, get out of the kitchen.

    How many men would complain if a woman stuck her girls in their face? or even the bootie call?

    So much for 'equality'....
     
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  24. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    This is very deflating news......oh wait....this isn't a Brady thread? Sorry :oriental:
     
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  25. Usury

    Usury Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    EXACTLY.....if you're a member of the athletic program seeing to male atheletes in the locker room, what do you expect to see? Not that it makes his prank right, but filing sexual assault charges and suing for multiple six-figures is a little over the top. Don't like your job? Find a new one....

    It's ridiculous to me that this article exists about this situation painting Manning as some sort of deviant, but yet there is basically zero press about former president Clinton's sexual romps and alleged rapes in the past.
     
  26. Usury

    Usury Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    Well they were just allegations, not proven with actual evidence (despite the tone of the article), and OF COURSE THEY WERE OUTRAGEOUS...they were submitted by the her lawyers! What else would you expect them to say? Having been unfortunately involved in a few legal cases in my life, it seems pretty standard operating procedure in civil litigation cases for the plaintiffs attorneys initial filing to include all manner of outrageous allegations, including ones that the plaintiff's attorneys either know to be untrue or have absolutely zero evidence to indicate. They do this to legally allow a discovery process so that they can legally pry into the defendent's life and look for something they can base a claim on. It's nothing but blackmail and utterly disgusting that some judges allow it.

    When I read shit like this I can't help but thinking that perhaps if nearly every lawyer were hanging from a lamppost then perhaps we could get back to resolving differences face to face with some honesty again....
     
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  27. Mr.Jens

    Mr.Jens Seeker Seeker

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    I'm not sure that is what happened if one reads some of the accounts of that event. Not to mention, the Manning family aftermath of trying to cover things up and asking Dr. Naughright to lie and state it was a black student and the Manning family and people pressuring the other students to lie about the event.
     

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