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Police Issues, News & Views

Discussion in 'Politics Forum (Local/National/World)' started by searcher, Feb 21, 2014.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    'I'm an assistant district attorney so shut the f**k up': Dallas prosecutor is FIRED after Uber driver claimed she berated and hit him, called him 'a legitimate retard' and accused him of kidnapping her on a drunken ride home
    • Dallas Uber driver Shaun Platt, 26, made audio recording in which Assistant District Attorney Jody Warner could be heard hurling expletives at him
    • Platt says Warner, 32, was drunk when she threatened him with a kidnapping charge because he would not take her home
    • Warner, who works with crimes against children unit, called Platt 'an idiot,' 'a legitimate retard' and 'stupid' after he got lost
    • Woman also told Platt she was an ADA and that she 'knows people'
    • Dallas County District Attorney's Office told DailyMail.com in a statement Warner has been fired


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5078829/Uber-driver-claims-prosecutor-berated-hit-him.html#ixzz4yMUVjIgJ
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    'He has no bitter feelings but he has cried over the years': Louisiana man, 64, has rape conviction overturned after FORTY FIVE years behind bars as it is revealed the state withheld 'highly favorable evidence'
    • Wilbert Jones has spent nearly 50 years in prison but will be freed
    • Jones, now 65, was 19 when police arrested him on suspicion of abducting a nurse at gunpoint from a Baton Rouge hospital's parking lot and raping her
    • Judge overturned the Louisiana man's conviction for kidnap and rape
    • State District Court Judge Richard Anderson set Wilbert Jones' bail at $2,000
    • Lawyers expect him to be released as soon as Wednesday
    • Jones' conviction was thrown out in October after it was found authorities withheld evidence that could have exonerated him decades ago
    • Prosecutors said they will ask the Louisiana Supreme Court to review the judge's decision, but they do not intend to retry Jones


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5080307/Man-seeks-freedom-judge-tosses-decades-old-rape-case.html#ixzz4yUnA6yz1
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    'Another day at work'... not anymore! Sheriff's deputy who posed for a thumbs up Snapchat selfie with a passed out woman behind the wheel quits his job
    • John Luttrell, of Knox County, Kentucky, resigned after an internal investigation over a photo he posted on Snapchat
    • In the photo, he gave a thumbs up while standing next to an unconscious woman
    • The picture was leaked to a local news station, leading to a police investigation


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5086571/Sheriff-s-deputy-poses-pass-woman-resigns.html#ixzz4yXR2ZcyP
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    Last edited: Nov 17, 2017
  7. searcher

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    Married father-of-two police detective, 43, dies hours after being shot in the head in the line of duty
    • Det. Sean Suiter, an 18-year veteran of the Baltimore police, died just after noon on Thursday
    • The married father-of-two, 43, was shot in the head by a 'suspicious' man in the Harlem Park neighborhood Wednesday afternoon
    • Suiter worked for the Baltimore police's homicide unit


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5090463/Baltimore-police-det-dies-hours-shot-head.html#ixzz4ydAcJaae
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  10. Alton

    Alton Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    https://photographyisnotacrime.com/...fter-confusing-hibiscus-plants-for-marijuana/


    Pennsylvania Cops Terrorize Elderly Couple After Confusing Hibiscus Plants for Marijuana
    November 17, 2017
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    Pennsylvania Cops Terrorize Elderly Couple After Confusing Hibiscus Plants for Marijuana

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    Armed with assault rifles, Pennsylvania cops forced a 66-year-old woman out of her home, handcuffing her in her underwear while ransacking her home, looking for marijuana.

    They ended up finding only hibiscus plants.

    Buffalo Township police also handcuffed her 69-year-old husband at gunpoint after he arrived home and finding a dozen cops rummaging through their home, looking for the non-existing marijuana plants.

    Edward and Audrey Cramer tried to explain to the cops that they were only hibiscus plants, but Buffalo Township Police Sergeant Scott Hess refused to believe them, informing them he had “expertise” in identifying marijuana plants.

    Buffalo Township police officer Jeffrey Sneddon also claimed to have expertise in identifying marijuana when he obtained the search warrant last month, according to the Tribune-Review.

    Now the couple is suing the police department along with Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co., whose representative took photos of the hibiscus plants and sent them to police, informing them that they were marijuana plants.

    It all started on October 5 when insurance agent Jonathan Yeamans entered the Cramer property to investigate a claim that a neighbor’s tree fell on their property in September.

    While investigating the claim, Yeamans spotted the hibiscus plants and surreptitiously photographed them, sending the photos to police, claiming the Cramers were involved in an illegal marijuana growing operation.

    Two days later, a dozen cops arrived at the home, banging on the door, pointing their assault rifles at Audrey Cramer who answered the door wearing only underwear, a bra and a t-shirt.

    The cops claimed they had a search warrant, but refused to show it to her. They also refused to allow her to put on shoes or pants.

    According to the Tribune-Review:

    The suit claims Cramer asked if she could put on a pair of pants next to her, and was told “in no uncertain terms” that she could not.

    She was placed under arrest and read her rights.

    The complaint alleges that she was walked outside and made to stand — handcuffed, in her underwear and without shoes — for 10 minutes.

    The suit claims that Hess refused her request to get sandals. Police walked her down the gravel driveway, barefoot, to a police car.

    The complaint alleges that she was left in the “very hot” patrol car, with her hands cuffed behind her, for four-and-a-half hours.

    The high temperature that day was 82, according to the Accuweather company.

    When Cramer asked Hess, “What on earth is going on,” she was informed of the police’s search for marijuana.

    The suit says she explained that the plants were flowering hibiscus plants, but Hess, claiming expertise, insisted that they were marijuana.

    Her husband arrived 30 minutes later and was also placed in the back of the police car in handcuffs while the cops ransacked their home.

    They were released four hours later with no charges after the cops determined the plants were not marijuana. Police, nevertheless, confiscated the hibiscus plants, describing them as “tall, green, leafy, suspected marijuana plants.”

    Despite the fact that no marijuana was found on the property, Nationwide Mutual Insurance sent them a letter on October 26, threatening to cancel their policy if they failed to remove the marijuana plants.

    The complaint states that Yeaman “intentionally photographed the flowering hibiscus plants in such a manner as not to reveal that they had flowers on them so that they would appear to resemble marijuana plants.”

    Meanwhile, the couple have lost faith in police.

    “I’m starting to understand why a lot of the public do not trust the police officers,” Audrey Cramer told KDKA.

    “I’m starting to see a lot on TV where I thought, ‘No, you have to be wrong because the police wouldn’t make such a bad mistake.’ Yeah, they would.”
     
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  11. searcher

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    Massive manhunt in Pennsylvania for rookie cop killer: Armed officers fill the streets as police chief issues plea to find suspect who gunned down patrolman, 25, during a routine traffic stop
    • A manhunt was launched late Friday for man suspected of shooting a cop
    • Officer Brian Shaw was shot when a routine traffic stop turned into a foot pursuit
    • He was rushed to a hospital in New Kensington, Pennsylvania, where he died
    • SWAT teams and police dogs joined the hunt for the suspected shooter


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5094995/Police-officer-killed-Pennsylvania-gunman-large.html#ixzz4ynQqc73v
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  14. searcher

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    Being a Prepper vs. Being Prepared | OFF THE CUFF: EPISODE 11
    Mike The Cop



    Published on Nov 19, 2017
    Are preppers crazy? Does just wanting to be prepared make you a prepper? In this interview with author G Michael Hopf, author of some best selling post apocalyptic fiction, we explore these topics and more. This is the FULL video episode of the podcast.
     
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    Lawyer for 18-year-old girl 'raped by two cops while she was handcuffed in the back of a van' claims NINE officers turned up at hospital to bully her out of bringing charges
    • Anna Chambers accused cops Eddie Martins, 37, and Richard Hall, 32, of rape
    • Her lawyer said nine policemen turned up at hospital in Brooklyn in September
    • He said they discouraged her and her mother from reporting the alleged rape
    • One officer allegedly spoke in their native Russian and questioned victim's story


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5113427/Nine-police-intimidated-rape-victim-accusing-cops.html#ixzz4zM99DC2y
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    Fiancee of cop who was shot dead in the line of duty poses in haunting solo wedding photos a year after his death - while suspected killer is FINALLY apprehended but only after he went to on to shoot two other cops
    • Last month, Nikki Salgot, 29, was scheduled to wed police officer Collin Rose
    • But Rose was tragically shot and killed while on duty in Detroit last November
    • Instead of being overwhelmed by grief, Salgot chose to be defiant
    • She asked a friend to help her pay tribute to Rose by photographing her while posing for pictures in a white wedding dress that she had already bought
    • Raymond Durham, 60, was charged in Rose's murder
    • Durham allegedly shot Rose in the head on November 22, 2016
    • Durham was arrested when he fired on two other cops in March, injuring them
    • At the time, police said that DNA evidence linked Durham to Rose's murder
    • Defense lawyers says that Durham appears 'to be somewhat delusional'


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5115771/Fiancee-dead-cop-poses-poignant-solo-wedding-photos.html#ixzz4zPTIWGOr
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  19. searcher

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    Philly paying millions to resolve allegations of police misconduct
    Updated: November 26, 2017 — 8:50 AM EST

    by Chris Palmer, Samantha Melamed & Mark Fazlollah - Staff Writers


    Marcia Hintz was working a full-time job caring for mentally challenged adults, raising a grandchild, and providing medical assistance to her longtime companion when members of a Philadelphia police narcotics squad busted into her Mayfair home in 2006 and arrested her for selling drugs.

    Roger High, on the other hand, already had a lengthy criminal record and was out on bail awaiting trial on drug charges when that same narcotics squad picked him up that year on a new case.

    Hintz and High would seem to have little in common, but their stories intersected three years ago when the courts began overturning convictions built by the squad amid accusations of fabricated evidence, illegal searches, and other misconduct.

    And they converged again in recent months, when each received payouts from the City of Philadelphia.

    Their checks — High for $15,000, Hintz for 40 times as much — come as the city has quietly begun settling the more than 300 lawsuits against onetime members of that infamous narcotics squad. And they are just a part of what could be an onslaught of payments by the city to resolve police misconduct lawsuits, according to interviews and an Inquirer and Daily News review of court records and financial documents.

    The price tag for just three high-profile examples could approach $24 million, according to a city bond document — up to $8 million for the narcotics squad cases, and a combined $16 million for two unrelated claims of wrongful murder convictions. The murder case lawsuits may take months or years to resolve, but the city has already paid more than $2 million to settle 75 cases against the narcotics officers.

    All of that comes on top of the $9 million typically paid each year to settle dozens of less publicized civil rights claims against the police.

    Payouts for Police-Related Cases

    The amount, in millions, that Philadelphia has spent on police-related civil rights cases for the last five years. The figure for 2017 is year-to date.



    Staff Graphic

    The fact that three potentially costly examples of alleged police misconduct are cresting in court around the same time may be no more than a coincidence. But Alan Yatvin, liaison counsel for the dozens of lawyers representing hundreds of plaintiffs against the narcotics officers, contends those payouts are a consequence of years’ worth of unchecked abuses.

    “The real issue in this case was how the city, the police department responded,” Yatvin said.

    The District Attorney’s Office agreed several years ago, when allegations against the squad began swirling in the news. Prosecutors have since thrown out 1,000 criminal convictions the officers helped build, with 240 or so still under review, according to Bradley Bridge, a public defender involved in the process.

    Still, the city’s decision to settle so many civil cases with five- and even six-figure payouts ultimately shouldered by taxpayers is complicated by one unique factor: Six of the officers were vindicated in a 2015 criminal trial that aired many of the same accusations against them, such as theft, beatings, and evidence-free raids.

    And five of them — Thomas Liciardello, Brian Reynolds, Michael Spicer, Linwood Norman, and John Speiser — are back on the force.

    Jack McMahon, who led their defense during the federal corruption trial, said the fact the city was settling cases against them was “disgraceful” and a way for “lying drug dealers” to make an easy buck. The jury heard similar allegations of wrongdoing for seven weeks, he said, yet ultimately sided with the officers on every count.

    “The truth is, they didn’t do anything wrong,” said McMahon. “For [the city] to just cave in and settle like that, I just don’t get it. I think they’re just cowards, simple as that.”

    But the threshold for proving a civil claim falls below the standard for guilt in a criminal case. And paying to resolve such complaints — even questionable ones — can be cheaper than the time, effort, and legal fees required to litigate them, while also providing closure to plaintiffs without forcing them to rehash their experience in court.

    Through a spokesman, city officials declined interview requests to discuss the wave of settlements. In a statement, spokesman Mike Dunn said only that the Law Department “has evaluated the facts and circumstances of each case before making a settlement decision.”

    Long prison terms

    The largest narcotics-related settlement payment by far, $625,000, was awarded to Hintz. In her lawsuit, the onetime mental health aide, now 55, said Liciardello and six other officers fabricated evidence to put her behind bars.

    Their case, according to Hintz’s complaint, included false testimony by Liciardello that Hintz had sold Xanax pills to an undercover informant from her Mayfair home in September 2006. Hintz, in an interview this month, said the pills had been prescribed to her longtime companion to treat his renal failure.

    Two years after her arrest, Hintz opted for a trial before a judge. Liciardello testified for prosecutors; she took the stand in her own defense.

    “But he was a cop,” Hintz said, tearfully recalling the trial as she sat at her dining-room table. “Who are you going to believe?”

    The judge found her guilty, then sentenced Hintz — whose only previous conviction was decades earlier in a welfare fraud case — to five to 10 years in prison.

    She spent three years and two months behind bars before being paroled to a halfway house, according to her lawsuit.


    In 2012, the DA’s Office announced it would no longer prosecute cases brought by the officers due to concerns about the allegations against them. Bridge, the public defender, filed more than 1,000 petitions to overturn convictions connected to the squad. And with no objection from prosecutors, old cases began being thrown out by the dozen.

    Hintz’s case was eventually among them. But by that point, she’d been released from prison.

    While grateful for the settlement and the retroactive vindication, nothing, she said, can change the squad’s impact on her life.

    “It’s a lot of time they took from me,” she said. “And you can’t get that back.”

    Now, other plaintiffs are looking at Hintz’s $625,000 payout as a benchmark.

    Among them is Kareem Torain.

    He was charged in January 2001 after Reynolds, Jeffrey Walker, and other officers searched a rooming house in Overbrook and said they found drugs, according to his complaint. Torain did not live there, but he had a key and had been seen entering and leaving the building.

    Torain — who had previous convictions for robbery, kidnapping, and drug possession — was offered a deal: three to six years in prison in return for a guilty plea. He rejected it, figuring he’d be acquitted.

    Instead, a judge convicted him at a bench trial and sentenced him to 12½ to 25 years in prison. In the end, he served 13 years inside.

    “I lost so much from being incarcerated,” Torain said in an interview this month, including the ability to go to his brother’s funeral.

    His conviction was tossed in 2014. And last year, Walker — the lone narcotics officer to plead guilty to corruption charges — admitted during a deposition for Torain’s case that the warrant leading to his arrest was based on fabricated evidence, and that the drugs and guns were planted there.

    Torain’s lawyer, Michael Pileggi, said he has dozens of clients who were arrested by the squad and cumulatively served 110 years in prison. It’s unclear how much these cases might be worth, but Pileggi notes that Hintz received about $380 per day incarcerated.

    “Why would my client consider anything less?” he said.

    By that formula, Torain would be due about $1.8 million.

    Smaller paydays

    Not all complaints related to the narcotics squad involve lengthy prison stays.

    Most settlements so far have ranged from $1,500 to $85,000, according to city records. Payouts varied based on factors including the strength of the plaintiffs’ allegations, the evidence available to support their claims, and the consequences suffered as a result of the officers’ alleged conduct.

    Robert J. Levant, who, along with cocounsel Mark Tanner, represented Hintz, said the settlement costs so far appear to be a bargain for the city. Staging dozens of individual trials could be much more expensive.

    But Yatvin said the lower-value cases have settled first, with higher-priced demands or more contentious suits likely to require more negotiations or even trials.

    Rasheed Phillips, 33, said he was offered $20,000 to settle his case — barely enough to cover the debt he incurred from attending community college, where he said his career path was derailed when Walker and Spicer arrested him on bogus drug charges in 2007.

    To avoid prison, Phillips said, he took a plea deal. He served six months’ house arrest and four years’ probation, but the felony conviction disqualified him from a radiology program, throwing his life off track.

    “They stole my future, the person I was,” Phillips said last month. “And then they try to rectify the situation by offering me some money that doesn’t even cover my student loans?”

    He said he plans to take his case to trial.

    The details of the claims made against the squad range from dark comedy to horror, with accusations of physical abuse, robbery, and rampant lawbreaking by police. More than 20 people took the stand to accuse the officers of such misconduct during their criminal trial.

    By settling the civil cases, however, neither side needs to prove details in court.

    Guy Sciolla, a lawyer who’s represented several claimants, said: “When you have a question hanging over the activities of a particular squad, even those that were actually involved in criminal conduct get the benefit of the doubt.”

    Roger High may be one of those plaintiffs.

    He had a long arrest record before Liciardello and others arrested him on drug charges in 2006. High pleaded guilty in that case and was sentenced to up to three years in prison, according to his complaint.

    Since his release, High has twice been accused of breaking into the homes of his ex-girlfriends — including in August, when he was arrested and charged with assaulting and robbing a woman inside her Olney home.

    That case was dismissed on Oct. 19, when witnesses didn’t show up in court to testify.

    That same day, the city cut High a check for $15,000 to settle his lawsuit against Liciardello.

    More settlements to come

    Dunn, the city spokesman, said the city “has instituted substantive reforms that we believe will, going forward, significantly decrease the likelihood” of police misconduct and the lawsuits that follow.

    They include new police policies regarding the use of force; funding the purchase of additional police body cameras; reducing the use of so-called stop-and-frisk practices; and adding money and a new executive director to the Police Advisory Commission, a city watchdog agency.

    Commissioner Richard Ross said the department has “systems in place to identify problems when they arise and address them.”

    Still, taxpayers will cover the cost of resolving the complaints. Dunn said the city’s 2018 budget includes $44.9 million to cover liabilities resulting from lawsuits, which can include everything from police misconduct to flooding from a ruptured city pipe.

    Other cities have shouldered similarly large costs from police-related cases: In the past several weeks, suits against officers in Chicago and Baltimore have ended with payouts exceeding $10 million.

    And even with reforms, costly misconduct claims can emerge from decades-old arrests, as occurred in at least two pending Philadelphia cases.

    Eugene Gilyard claims that city homicide detectives probing a 1995 killing failed to investigate alternative suspects and coerced key witnesses to identify him. Gilyard was freed in 2014, after 16 years in prison, when someone else confessed to committing the crime.

    Anthony Wright, meanwhile, spent 25 years behind bars for a murder and rape conviction that was overturned in 2016, thanks to DNA evidence that suggested another man committed the crime. Jurors acquitted him at a retrial. In a lawsuit against the city, Wright claims detectives in 1991 coerced his confession and planted damaging evidence at his home.

    Even when those cases end, however, others are bound to continue the cycle.

    Another former narcotics officer, Stanley Davis, recently pleaded guilty to providing drugs to women in return for sexual favors last year — an admission that could inspire a wave of civil claims against him.

    And Christopher Hulmes was fired in 2015 after he was arrested for perjuring himself in a drug case he’d helped to build.

    Bridge, the public defender, said he has filed more than 500 petitions to reconsider criminal convictions involving Hulmes, and 21 people have filed civil lawsuits in federal court alleging that Hulmes lied about the evidence against them.

    Four of those cases, according to court records, were filed this month.

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/c...cases-narcotics-police-officers-20171126.html
     
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    California man, 70, who wrongfully spent 39 years in prison for murder celebrates Thanksgiving as a free man with the cop who fought for his release
    • A California man imprisoned for nearly forty years was pardoned Wednesday
    • Advanced DNA testing proved Craig Richard Coley's wrongful conviction
    • Coley, now aged 70 has maintained his innocence since his arrest in 1978
    • He was arrested after Rhonda Wicht, 24, and Donald Wicht, 4, were found dead
    • Retired detective Mike Bender began looking into Coley's case in 1989
    • He presented evidence to free Coley and the pair celebrated Thanksgiving


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5121351/Man-wrongfully-jailed-39-years-celebrates-Thanksgiving.html#ixzz4ze1eRDoa
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    Why the cost of alleged Philly police misconduct is too high | Editorial
    Updated: November 28, 2017 — 10:33 AM EST

    The Inquirer Editorial Board


    What’s the cost of alleged police misconduct in Philadelphia? For the alleged misdeeds of a few narcotics officers, it’s $2 million in civil case settlements so far, with at least $8 million more expected to come.

    The officers were cleared of criminal charges of roughing up drug suspects, stealing their money, and falsifying evidence in 2015, but the civil cases are mounting. Civil cases are a lot easier to win than criminal cases, which have a higher threshold of proof.

    The city has been quietly settling civil cases brought by a slew of people claiming to be victims. Most of the payouts have ranged from $1,500 to $85,000, but one went as high as $625,000, and future settlements could be much higher.

    Add to that the cost in human suffering. The Mayfair woman who received the $625,000 settlement spent three years in jail. She was convicted, but later cleared, of selling Xanax to an undercover informant in 2006. She testified that the drugs were used by her longtime companion to treat renal failure.

    A decade later, Marcia Hintz couldn’t hold back the tears when she told reporters Chris Palmer, Samantha Melamed, and Mark Fazlollah about her experiences.

    The judge who convicted her believed the cop. That happens too frequently even though judges are required to consider evidence with equal care whether it comes from a police officer or a person charged with a crime.

    The city and District Attorney’s Office aren’t automatically accepting police testimony. As a result, they have tossed out 1,000 drug cases so far,with 240 more under review.

    How much court time and money was wasted on these cases is unknown. As for the accused narcotics cops, five are back on the payroll. One retired. A seventh pleaded guilty, testified against his former partners, and is testifying in the civil cases.

    In the wake of these and other cases, the city is taking steps to stop bad behavior. It is buying more police body cameras and hiring a new director for the Police Advisory Commission, which has been an ineffective watchdog. The new director must step up the commission’s game and be more open with the public when police misbehave.

    Just as important, more needs to be done to address the tendency of some judges and juries to be biased in favor of police. This isn’t just a Philadelphia problem. In high-profile cases in Baltimore, New York City, suburban Minneapolis, and elsewhere, judges and juries would not convict police accused of killing or injuring black suspects despite strong evidence.

    Judges and juries need to understand that good and bad cops wear the same uniform, and that it is the judges’ and juries’ role during a trial to try their best to tell the difference. Otherwise, faith in the justice system, which has taken some well-deserved knocks recently, will be further undermined.

    District Attorney-elect Larry Krasner campaigned on a promise to go hard on bad police behavior. That task is even more important given the misdeeds of his predecessor, Seth Williams, who is in jail for selling his office for vacations, furniture, and cash.

    Unless evidence presented by police is carefully scrutinized by the DA before charging suspects, Philadelphia will continue to pay a high price for tarnished justice.

    http://www.philly.com/philly/opinio...isconduct-is-too-high-editorial-20171128.html
     
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    Wow,
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    'You'll need a lot of this in prison!' Cop pulls out a tube of K-Y Jelly in courtroom to taunt the 'smug' gunman who tried to kill him and his young son during a traffic stop
    • Kevin Rojas, 21, was sentenced to life in prison for shooting an off-duty officer multiple times during a traffic stop in Jacksonville
    • The officer was taking his son to school when he stopped Rojas for erratic driving
    • Rojas opened fire and hit the officer in the head, stomach and hand but missed the young boy
    • The officer held up a tube of K-Y Jelly during the sentencing and said 'you are going to need a lot of this'


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5133337/Cop-uses-tube-K-Y-Jelly-taunt-smug-gunman-court.html#ixzz4zx8BPXx5
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    Terrifying surveillance footage shows the moment Florida deputy cornered his ex as she walked her dog, shot her and then killed himself
    • Palm Beach County sheriff's deputy Michael DeMarco, 55, shot his ex-girlfriend Yuly Solano October 12 while she was walking her dog
    • The 41-year-old mother was shot once in the arm and twice in the chest
    • DeMarco, who was on duty at the time of the incident, then turned the gun on himself - committing suicide
    • Solano told authorities that right before shooting her, the officer said, 'You treat me worse than a dog'
    • The woman reported weeks before the shooting that she was being 'terrorized' by her ex who vandalized her property and threatened her
    • Authorities released the shocking surveillance footage of the incident Friday
    • As a result of the shooting, Solano's daughter said three of her mother’s ribs were broken and parts of her lung had to be removed
    • She said her mother’s arm and vocal cords also are paralyzed, and it is hard for her to talk


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5138479/Footage-shows-deputy-shooting-ex-kills-himself.html#ixzz506Ncj9sx
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    Emotional Police Debate with Former Cop Michael Woods Jr
    Officer Dominick Izzo - Cop / Warrior / Christian



    Published on Dec 4, 2017
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    Sanctuary Cities and Police Required Rehabilitation
    Officer Dominick Izzo - Cop / Warrior / Christian



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    What Cops Think About BLACK FRIDAY!
    officer401



    Published on Dec 1, 2017
     
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    'Please don't kill me': Cop is cleared of murder after shooting dead a sobbing father, 26, as he crawled along a hotel corridor in shocking footage which his family insists shows a 'cold-blooded execution'
    • WARNING: EXTREMELY GRAPHIC CONTENT
    • Ex-Mesa cop Philip Brailsford, 27, was found not guilty of second-degree murder in the January 2016 shooting death of Daniel Shaver
    • Shaver was staying at a La Quinta hotel in Mesa for work when police responded to a call that someone was pointing a gun out the window
    • After the verdict was announced officials released a video of the encounter
    • In it Shaver, who was unarmed, can be heard sobbing and begging Brailsford 'please don't shoot me'
    • Brailsford opened fire after Shaver reached toward the waistband of his shorts to pull them up, saying he thought the victim was reaching for a gun


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5157957/Ex-Arizona-police-officer-acquitted-fatal-hotel-shooting.html#ixzz50fQXXfaN
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    Police Officer Broke Shopper's Leg Over a Tomato
    [​IMG]
    Newsweek

    Melina Delkic
    1 hr ago




    An off-duty police sergeant in Atlanta, Georgia was trying to stop a shoplifter at his local Walmart one afternoon in October 2014.

    The problem? He broke the man’s leg over one tomato; he made up a story to cover his tracks; and, as it turned out, he was wrong about the theft in the first place.

    Former Police Sergeant Trevor King of Stockbridge, Georgia was convicted by a federal jury on Friday of using excessive force on Tyrone Carnegay, and breaking two bones in his leg with a baton. King, 49, wrote a false incident report, alleging that the shopper had assaulted him (which was not true).

    When the police officer, working off-duty as a security guard for Walmart, noticed Carnegay weigh a tomato and walk toward the store’s exit, Carnegay said he had a receipt for it, prosecutors said. Ignoring him, Carnegay struck him seven times with the baton. As Carnegay lay bleeding on the floor of the Walmart, King searched him and found the aforementioned receipt, according to the Department of Justice. However, King proceeded to make up the assault story, charging Carnegay with obstructing a shoplifting investigation and assaulting a police officer, and he took him to jail.

    “It is extremely disheartening when a law enforcement officer abuses his or her authority and the public’s trust,” David J. LeValley, Special Agent in Charge of FBI Atlanta, said in a statement about the incident.

    Carnegay, who now has a titanium rod in his leg, told local station WSB-TV that, after the assault, he was chained to a hospital bed in Atlanta's Grady Memorial Hospital, where he was treated for a ruptured artery and broken bones. Carnegay's charges weren't dropped until one year later.

    “When he found the receipt and the money and everything,” said Carnegay, “he just stared at it like he hadn’t done nothing.”

    “This defendant violated the law and his oath as a police officer when he unjustifiably beat a man with a baton, breaking the man’s leg, because he wrongly believed that the man had stolen a tomato,” Acting Attorney General John Gore, of the Civil Rights Department, wrote in a statement.

    Carnegay is suing Walmart and King. King retired from the Atlanta Police Department in January of 2017, and the trial began in July of 2017.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/po...over-a-tomato/ar-BBGr3pl?li=BBnbfcL&ocid=iehp
     
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    Thoughts on the Acquittal of Philip Brailsford
    A rare window for police reform has closed.

    inmd / 1 day ago December 11, 2017 in Culture / Law

    As those of you who follow these things may have heard, Philip Brailsford, a former Mesa, Arizona police officer, was acquitted of murder and manslaughter charges after shooting Daniel Shaver. The details of the shooting itself are disgraceful. Acquittal came despite the fact that the senselessness of the incident was captured on another officer’s body camera. The graphic video is available here, and shows Shaver crying and begging for his life. Ultimately Shaver is shot to death while attempting to comply with a barrage of aggressive, confusing commands. However, unlike many highly publicized episodes of police shootings since the killing of Michael Brown provoked unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, there were no allegations of racism. Both the officer and the victim were white.

    Also unlike the incidents in Ferguson, Baltimore, Minneapolis, Cleveland and many other places where (usually white) officers have killed unarmed black (mostly) men under at best highly questionable circumstances, there is no protest or threat of unrest in Mesa, Arizona, or anywhere else. With activist energy focused on Donald Trump, and no interest in change among the Republican Party, reforming police conduct and criminal justice policy is indefinitely on hold. From my vantage point, this shows that the Black Lives Matter movement and its allies have failed, at least for now.

    Let me unpack that a bit. First, I think it’s only natural that disproportionately impacted communities would rally together in protest of police violence. Self-interest is the mother of all political activism, and I place no fault on those that tried to take action against a problem that for a variety of reasons is much more visible in poorer, predominantly black neighborhoods. However, I believe our media’s hyper-focus on the racial angle of these killings has had the perverse effect of compartmentalizing the problem. After all, the police kill about twice as many whites as blacks, and, as writers like Radley Balko have shown, many cases of unjustified (albeit lawful) uses of deadly force involve white victims. Instead of debating substantive, race-neutral policy proposals (many of which are endorsed by Black Lives Matter) that might alleviate the problem of unjustified-but-lawful police violence, police reform remains, at best, a special interest of little relevance to policy-makers.

    Where did things go wrong? It’s tempting to place all of the blame on the populist right that now dominates conservative culture and media in the United States, and no doubt they deserve their share. Of all the political factions, these were always the most likely to oppose reform or accountability of any kind. From their perspective, law enforcement agents are perpetually assailed guardians of safety in a dangerous world. Those who end up on the wrong side of the law did something to put themselves there, and the police can’t be blamed for not taking any chances. That these arguments have no real basis in crime statistics or the relative safety of a career in law enforcement are ignored, or dismissed, sometimes with emotionally charged but unrepresentative anecdotes.

    The mainstream, culturally liberal media has unwittingly played a role as well. Dominated by the blue-state professional class, the easiest narrative for these reporters to focus on is racism. It plays well to its increasingly “woke” audiences, and is easier than trying to help people navigate Graham v. Connor and related jurisprudence, the slow but sure militarization of the police over the last 35 years, mass criminalization, and bad incentives in law enforcement and public bureaucracy. These last two I think are the most difficult for our media class. Grasping the scope of the problem would require them to question basic progressive assumptions about the effectiveness and efficacy of legislative and administrative action, not to mention the competence of public servants sent out into the world with license (and often a gun) to fix our social ills.

    As the media narratives on the right and left have taken on a predictable form, so too has the popular face of the Black Lives Matter movement, which had the best chance in recent memory of building a political coalition capable of creating change. However, instead of broadening its appeal, BLM has increasingly gone down the rabbit hole of the post-modern identitarian left. Its activists post demands that might make a race studies professor gush, but which alienate and make no sense to those outside of a certain cultural and class bubble. Even the most obvious allies in the struggle to reign in police violence are targeted for insufficient ideological purity. While success was never guaranteed, a prescient movement that makes its case across not only racial but also cultural and class lines might stand a chance of moving the needle on the larger problem of police violence. Instead BLM is marginalizing itself into just another faction of the jargon spouting, inward looking activist left.

    Before concluding, I think it’s important to state that the judiciary, law enforcement, and legislators remain first and foremost to blame for the sorry state of policing in the United States. They are the ones who have written more and harsher laws, armed police like soldiers, and treated the 4th and 5th Amendments as no more than refuges for murderers and rapists. However, while it would be naïve to pretend racial animus played no role in creating modern America’s approach to law enforcement, the focus on race has become self-defeating. This isn’t to say that unjustified killings of black citizens by law enforcement don’t deserve attention. They do. But if we’re ever to do better, the public needs to start understanding that these events stem from a huge web of bad decisions. Fixing them requires a broad coalition willing to address the problem in legislatures and court rooms, not just picket lines and social media.

    Without addressing the larger context of failed public policy and jurisprudence, great and small injustices like what happened to Daniel Shaver (and Freddie Gray, and Tamir Rice, and Eric Garner, and Philando Castile, and Justine Rusczyk and on, and on) will persist. For now, the problem has been safely put on the back burner. A moment where reform may have been possible has passed.

    http://ordinary-gentlemen.com/2017/12/11/thoughts-on-the-acquittal-of-philip-brailsford/
     
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    American hero or the biggest rat in NYPD history? New documentary explores the controversial legacy of the late Robert Leuci, whose turn undercover led to more than 50 indictments of 1970s New York cops
    • Brooklyn native Robert Leuci was a narcotics cop in the notorious Special Investigations Unit, which were known as untouchable 'Princes of the city'
    • He went undercover to expose dirty cops taking bribes, stealing drugs and setting up businesses themselves
    • He initially vowed not to implicate his friends and partners but the investigation did so in the end
    • More than 50 law enforcement officials were indicted; two committed suicide and dozens of other lives were ruined
    • Leuci remained conflicted until he died in 2015 about his role in the process
    • He met Norwegian photojournalism student Magnus Skatvold at a Rhode Island barbecue in 2009
    • The two became friends and filmmaker Skatvold, who was initially unaware of Leuci's past, became intrigued by his story
    • He and co-director Gregory Mallozzi convinced Leuci and other people involved to sit for interviews for a documentary, though Leuci died before it was finished
    • The documentary, Blue Code of Silence, last month was awarded the coveted Pitch Perfect Award at the DOC NYC festival, given to works in progress


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5179801/American-hero-biggest-rat-NYPD-history.html#ixzz51Fn9xPvo
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    Teaching Kids Not to Follow the Rules from the Womb
    Officer Dominick Izzo - Cop / Warrior / Christian



    Streamed live on Dec 12, 2017
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    'Don't move one inch. I'm serious, OK?': Body cam video shows moment a former deputy with a '1,000-yard stare' reaches for his pistol before cops fatally shoot him nine times
    • Colorado authorities released body cam footage Thursday from a fatal shooting of a former sheriff's deputy just outside of office headquarters this past October
    • The footage shows the former deputy appearing to reach for a handgun that was on his lap as he sat in the driver's seat of a car
    • On the night of October 29, former Arapahoe County Sheriff's Deputy Mark Bidon parked in front of the exit to the employee parking lot
    • In surveillance footage released this past week, a deputy noticed Bidon parked there, went to speak with him and saw he had a gun
    • The deputy, Buddy Gillespie, noticed that Bidon had a 'blank stare on his face' and asked if he could help
    • What was most frightening for the deputies was that Bidon had a gun in his lap while his hands were on the steering wheel
    • When one of the other deputies reaches inside the car in an attempt to take the pistol, a struggle ensues
    • Afterward, nine shots are fired by two deputies nine minutes after Bidon first arrived on the scene


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5187117/Body-cam-video-shows-former-deputy-fatally-shot-nine-times.html#ixzz51TmtomwZ
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