1. After a week and 1/2 of straight up, stocks look for a break prior to Holiday weekend.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Good Fri Morning! Gold is up 9.6 to 1266. Silver is up 10 to 17.30. Crude is up 31 to 49.31. The USD is down 17 to 97,00.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Week of 5/13/2017 Closing prices & Chg Over Last Wk---- Gold $1227.70-- UP 0.80 Silver $16.40-- UP 13 Oil $47.84-- UP 1.62 USD $99.13 -- UP .61
  4. "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"
    Dismiss Notice

President Andrew Jackson: Great, complicated, imperfect

Discussion in 'Library and Editorials' started by Ahillock, Mar 17, 2015.



  1. Ahillock

    Ahillock A nobody Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Messages:
    12,478
    Likes Received:
    12,055
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    GIM2 server bay #5
    President Andrew Jackson: Great, complicated, imperfect
    Howard J. Kittell
    12:33 p.m. CDT March 16, 2015

    When we were debating new taglines at Andrew Jackson's Hermitage, "The People's President" was an obvious choice. He was that in so many ways — the first president not born of wealth, the voice of the common man against aristocracy and corruption, and the first to project a view of the office as the sole representative of the people.

    Many others have used that phrase to describe our seventh president. That doesn't mean he was loved by all the people. Jackson was a lightning rod in his time, and he left a giant wake. Historians still argue about him almost 200 years later. That's why our new exhibit, "Andrew Jackson: Born for a Storm," which opened Jan. 8, includes light and dark elements. They are parts of the same story.

    The new exhibit presents him as he was, a complicated and imperfect hero, revered by many in his time as the second George Washington. From Revolutionary War orphan to war hero to president, his rise became a metaphor for the emerging American identity. He was a self-made man with no formal military training yet never lost a battle. In many ways, he transformed the republic from a democracy in name to a democracy in deed.

    There are darker pieces of Jackson's story, and we make no attempt to hide those pieces. We display them and put them in context so that we can learn from them. That's the purpose of museums like ours and history in general.

    The exhibit focuses on Jackson's many accomplishments, but also addresses his role in Indian Removal and the Trail of Tears, now widely regarded as one of the more tragic events in our country's history. The goal is to present Jackson in a truthful and realistic manner, recognizing that his actions reflected the views of many people of his time and also the profound effect of his actions upon generations of Native Americans.

    These events are, of course, open to all interpretations, but as keepers of the story who balance the competing viewpoints of many historians, we would caution against reviewing them out of context. One cannot remove the man from the time.

    The Trail of Tears did not happen by fiat. The Indian Removal Act was an act of Congress, encouraged by Jackson with broad but certainly not unanimous support among the public. Likewise, one cannot talk about the Creek War of 1813 and the Battle of Horseshoe Bend without also talking about the Fort Mims Massacre, in which anywhere from 250 to 400 settlers and militiamen were killed, including women and children.

    When we provide a reference in the new exhibit to Lincoya, a Creek boy who was orphaned in the war and adopted by Jackson, it isn't done out of praise or advocacy. We do it because it's interesting. It's part of the story.

    Author Jon Meacham of Nashville put Jackson in historical context with his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, "American Lion." He wrote, "Yet of the early great presidents and Founders, Andrew Jackson is in many ways the most like us. In the saga of the Jackson presidency, one marked by both democratic triumphs and racist tragedies, we can see the American character in formation and in action."

    Meacham calls Jackson "one of America's most important and controversial presidents." Meacham points out that Jackson was an "inspiration" to Abraham Lincoln, "revered" by Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, and considered by Harry Truman to be one of the four great presidents, along with Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln.

    Generations of historians have agreed that Jackson was one of the country's great presidents. As we mark Jackson's 248th birthday today, it is a sign of his historical importance that his life and presidency continue to be debated. The new exhibit at The Hermitage will be our focal point to make sure Jackson's full legacy is known to as many people as possible.

    Jackson doesn't need the Andrew Jackson Foundation to elevate him to the status of a great leader. History has already done that. What the AJF is trying to do is remind you why and share his incredible story.

    We invite everyone to come view the exhibit and share their comments on a Post-it wall for others to see. After seeing the exhibit, people will understand what Jackson meant when he said, "I was born for a storm and a calm does not suit me."

    Howard J. Kittell is president and CEO of Andrew Jackson's Hermitage.

    http://www.tennessean.com/story/opi...jackson-great-complicated-imperfect/70284254/
     
  2. Desert Fox

    Desert Fox Seeker Seeker

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2014
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    133
    Trophy Points:
    43
    We're all at best, imperfect.
    This country could use a strong dose of a man like AJ.
    Does he exist?
     
    hoarder and blueice like this.
  3. Mujahideen

    Mujahideen Black Member Midas Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    7,344
    Likes Received:
    10,148
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Alex jones??

    Still an improvement.
     
  4. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    26,385
    Likes Received:
    28,473
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Tech
    A Brief History of the Trail of Tears

    Migration from the original Cherokee Nation began in the early 1800’s. Some Cherokees, wary of white encroachment, moved west on their own and settled in other areas of the country. A group known as the Old Settlers previously had voluntarily moved in 1817 to lands given them in Arkansas where they established a government and a peaceful way of life. Later, however, they were forced to migrate to Indian Territory.

    White resentment of the Cherokee had been building and reached a pinnacle following the discovery of gold in northern Georgia. This discovery was made just after the the creation and passage of the original Cherokee Nation constitution and establishment of a Cherokee Supreme Court. Possessed by "gold fever" and a thirst for expansion, many white communities turned on their Cherokee neighbors. The U.S. government ultimately decided it was time for the Cherokees to be "removed"; leaving behind their farms, their land and their homes.

    President Andrew Jackson's military command and almost certainly his life were saved thanks to the aid of 500 Cherokee allies at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814. Unbelievably, it was Jackson who authorized the Indian Removal Act of 1830 following the recommendation of President James Monroe in his final address to Congress in 1825. Jackson, as president, sanctioned an attitude that had persisted for many years among many white immigrants. Even Thomas Jefferson, who often cited the Great Law of Peace of the Iroquois Confederacy as the model for the U.S. Constitution, supported Indian Removal as early as 1802.

    The displacement of native people was not wanting for eloquent opposition. Senators Daniel Webster and Henry Clay spoke out against removal. The Reverend Samuel Worcester, missionary to the Cherokees, challenged Georgia’s attempt to estinguish Indian title to land in the state, actually winning his case before the Supreme Court.

    Worcester vs. Georgia, 1832 and Cherokee Nation vs. Georgia, 1831 are considered the two most influential legal decisions in Indian law. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled for Georgia in the 1831 case, but in Worcester vs. Georgia, the court affirmed Cherokee sovereignty. President Andrew Jackson arrogantly defied the decision of the court and ordered the removal, an act that established the U.S. government’s precedent for the future removal of many Native Americans from their ancestral homelands.

    The U.S. government used the Treaty of New Echota in 1835 to justify the removal. The treaty, signed by about 100 Cherokees known as the Treaty Party, relinquished all lands east of the Mississippi River in exchange for land in Indian Territory and the promise of money, livestock, various provisions, tools and other benefits.

    When these pro-removal Cherokee leaders signed the Treaty of New Echota, they also signed their own death warrants, since the Cherokee Nation Council had earlier passed a law calling for the death of anyone agreeing to give up tribal land. The signing and the removal led to bitter factionalism and ultimately to the deaths of most of the Treaty Party leaders once the Cherokee arrived in Indian Territory.

    Opposition to the removal was led by Chief John Ross, a mixed-blood of Scottish and one-eighth Cherokee descent. The Ross party and most Cherokees opposed the New Echota Treaty, but Georgia and the U.S. government prevailed and used it as justification to force almost all of the 17,000 Cherokees from their southeastern homeland.

    Under orders from President Jackson the U.S. Army began enforcement of the Removal Act. The Cherokee were rounded up in the summer of 1838 and loaded onto boats that traveled the Tennessee, Ohio, Mississippi and Arkansas Rivers into Indian Territory. Many were held in prison camps awaiting their fate.

    An estimated 4,000 died from hunger, exposure and disease. The journey became a cultural memory as the "trail where they cried" for the Cherokees and other removed tribes. Today it is widely remembered by the general public as the "Trail of Tears". The Oklahoma chapter of the Trail of Tears Association has begun the task of marking the graves of Trail survivors with bronze memorials.

    This Information is provided by the Cherokee Nation Cultural Resource Center. For information regarding culture and language, please contact: cultural@cherokee.org.

    http://www.cherokee.org/AboutTheNation/History/TrailofTears/ABriefHistoryoftheTrailofTears.aspx
     
  5. Eyebone

    Eyebone Midas Member Midas Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,172
    Likes Received:
    1,986
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Seattle
    If we 'removed' the so called cherokee' it was for a good reason.

    Probably because they posed a threat to average people.

    Cherokee, I don't believe there was any such tribe.

    A collection of blacks, halfbreeds and criminals.
     
  6. Mr Paradise

    Mr Paradise Midas Member Midas Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Messages:
    6,419
    Likes Received:
    6,450
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Lake Superior
    There is talk of replacing AJ on the twenty dollar bill with either MLK or Rosa Parks. Heard it being discussed on some Chicago talk radio show.
     
  7. blueice

    blueice Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2013
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    1,329
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The latter could go on all federally paid bus benches; and MILK could
    be placed on the 10,ooo bill...

    BTW, how come there is no conspiracy theory on the shooting of the Hon Rev Blvd Dr King.?
     
  8. hoarder

    hoarder Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2010
    Messages:
    9,204
    Likes Received:
    7,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Montana
    The Cherokee were an exemplary tribe. They were the most advanced tribe of Indians on the continent at that time. They were highly regarded by Whites (compared to other tribes) because of their adaptability to White man's ways. They had about 500 Black slaves and cotton plantations of their own and took to farming unlike any other Indians.
    Back then it was common for anyone who was part Injun to claim Cherokee as the Indian part even if it wasn't so because he knew it had higher acceptance.
    After the War of Northern Aggression, in which the Cherokee proudly served the Confederacy, the Yankees, in an act of demographic warfare, declared the Black slaves owned by Cherokees to be Cherokees. It was not until the last twenty years that the Cherokees finally declared it wasn't so and outed the Blacks.

    But I admire Andrew Jackson anyway for his stance against the banksters.
     

Share This Page