1. Thurs am and USD regains some lost ground, now over 101
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Good Thur Morning! To start we have Gold down 9 to 1202, while Silver is down 31 to 1695. We have Crude up on supply info after a big downswing, +31 to 5221. The USD is back above 101 at 101.12.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Week of 1/7/2017 Closing prices & Chg Over Last Wk---- Gold $1173.40-- UP 21.70 Silver $16.52-- UP 54 Oil $53.99 -- UP 27 TICS USD $102.21 -- DOWN 7 Based on near term futures contract--- At JMB Current price AGE 2017 $1243.95 (1), SAE $19.53 (20)
  4. Added Heartland Precious Metals out of OK and LA to the map, Added Texas Precious Metals, and Added Provident Metals.

Random Pictures thread !

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by GOLDZILLA, Apr 4, 2010.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Glamorous Flying – The First Color Photos Show the Real Class of Airline Travelers in the 1950s

    Ever wonder what it was really like to fly during the golden age of flying?

    Sipping cocktails, puffing on cigarettes and dressed to the nines - flying in the 1950s was a world away from the budget airlines of today.

    These pictures of the golden age of aviation show what flying was like before it became accessible to the masses, and only the very wealthiest could afford it.

    Men dressed in morning suits, women showed of their most elegant ensembles and children were trussed up in their Sunday best.

    The photographs have been restored in full color and compiled by Airlineratings.com, to hark back to those heady days before tasteless plane food and minuscule baggage allowances became the norm.

    [​IMG]
    Passengers dressed in their finest chat before take-off. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Passengers order drinks in the on-board bar of a Pan Am plane. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    1950s fliers smoke in the lounge on board a DC-7 jet. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Passengers alight onto a carpeted walkway on arrival. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Passengers relax in the roomy cabin of a Pan Am Stratocruiser. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Planes in the ‘50s had living areas for passengers to chat in. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Forget a miniature packet of cardboard flavor crisps, fliers in the ‘50s were brought fresh fruit on demand. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Elaborate headwear and sizable corsages were all the rage for passengers. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Fliers in the golden age of aviation didn’t have to stuff a crumpled jacket into an overhead locker - there were air hostesses on hand to hang your coat in a cupboard for you. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    A boy in a bow tie accepts a glass of water before taking off. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Meals were served in a comfortable restaurant area, rather than on a grubby seat-back tray. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Passengers show off their stylish attire as they land on the runway. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    Families and groups could sit together at tables during flights. (Airlineratings.com)

    [​IMG]
    A young passenger in a smart dress gets a drink from two air hostesses. (Airlineratings.com)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/glamorous-flying-first-color-photos.html
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    20 Surf Photos That Show Women Making Waves from the 1930s through the 1960s

    In the early 20th century, wooden surfboards were long and heavy — measuring 15 feet long and weighing nearly 100 pounds — which prevented many women from taking up the sport.

    But by the 1940s and 1950s, Malibu surfers had developed "girl boards," also known as the "Malibu chip." These were made of balsa wood and were easier for women to handle.

    Whilst surfing was spreading across the globe and growing organically it was a 1959 film about a girl with big ideas called Gidget which catapulted surfing culture into the stratosphere. The film, set around Malibu in California, was a wild success, bringing surfing massive mainstream exposure and nothing would ever be the same again.

    Surfing went through the roof in the 1960s. Hollywood jumped on the Gidget bandwagon and filmed more surf movies.

    Here are 20 interesting vintage photos of women surfers from between the 1930s and 1960s:

    [​IMG]
    Six young women are ready with their surf boards on a beach in southern California, circa late 1920s/early 1930s. (Underwood Archives—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Women surfboarders form a star as they lie on their huge hollow surfboards on Santa Monica beach, circa 1935. (General Photographic Agency—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Surfers in the water in Hawaii, 1938. (Toni Frissell—Condé Nast/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Geraldine Mathis being pulled along on her surfboard by a car driven along the sand near the mouth of the Necanicum River in Oregon circa 1940. (FPG—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    A lifeguard teaches four women how to handle a surfboard on the beach at Newquay in Cornwall, 1950. (J. R. T. Richardson/Fox Photos—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Expert surfer Betty Hunt riding the waves at Newquay, Cornwall, 1952. (John Chillingworth/Picture Post—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Three surfing girls (left to right, Marilyn Ridge, Lyn Connelly, Dee Delaney) prepare to ride the swell and maybe catch a tube or two down on Newquay beach, Cornwall, 1955. (Russell Knight/BIPS—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    16 yr. old surfer Kathy (Gidget) Kohner on the beach with her surfboard, 1957. (Allan Grant—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Kathy Kohner (aka Gidget) surfing, 1957. (Allan Grant—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    American actor Sandra Dee walks on the beach, carrying a surfboard in a still from the film, 'Gidget,' directed by Paul Wendkos, 1959. (Columbia Pictures—Courtesy of Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Two women carrying their surfboards at the beach, 1960. (Marka/UIG—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Members of the North Bay surfing club upload their surf boards from a station wagon at Malibu Beach, Calif. on July 12, 1961. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Linda Benson of the United States in competition for the women’s title of the World Surfboard Riding Championships staged at Sydney’s Manley Beach, Australia on May 17, 1964. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Maureen Horsley, 18, of Sydney, Australia, left, and American champion Linda Benson, 20, of the Encinitas Club of California, prepare for a dip in the Australian surf on May 16, 1964, in a warm-up for the World Surfboard Riding Championships at Sydney’s Manly Beach. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    A woman carries her surf board down to the water on a beach near Sydney, Australia, circa 1965. (Archive Photos—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Sally Field from the television series, 'Gidget,' posing in a swimsuit with a surfboard on the beach, circa 1965. (ABC Television—Courtesy of Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Water ski champions demonstrating their skills as they ride the wake of the waves without the use of a tow-line, at Cypress Gardens in California, 1965. (Keystone-France/;Gamma-Keystone—Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Surfers enjoying the warm waters of Miami Beach, Fla., 1966. (Joe Migon—AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    US surfer, Kathie Lacroix, during the Woman's World Surfing Championships, 1966. (Charles Bonnay—The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    A woman in a checkered bikini leaning on a surf board Circa 1967 in Los Angeles. (Michael Ochs Archives—Getty Images)

    (via TIME)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/07/20-surf-photos-that-show-women-making.html
     
    ^updated^ and Fjpod like this.
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Face-off Beatles Fangirls from 1964-1965

    The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. They became perhaps the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed act in the history of popular music. In the early 1960s, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania", but as their songwriting grew in sophistication, they came to be perceived by many fans and cultural observers as an embodiment of the ideals shared by the era's sociocultural revolutions. Here are some funny and awesome photos of face-off Beatles fangirls from 1964-1965.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    http://www.vintag.es/2012/09/face-off-beatles-fangirls-from-1964-1965.html
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]
     
    Son of Gloin, Weatherman and Fjpod like this.
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    10 of the Most Beautiful Cars of the 1930s – The Decade Gave Birth to Some Iconic Designs That Were Ahead of Their Time

    The 1930s were a tough time for all involved. The Great Depression brought the world economy crashing down and millions of workers were forced to live a back-to-basics lifestyle, with few of the daily luxuries that we now take for granted. However, this didn’t stop car manufacturers from pushing the boat out and the period gave birth to some iconic designs that were ahead of their time.

    1. 1939 DELAHAYE TYPE 165 CABRIOLET

    [​IMG]

    Only five of these French beauties were ever made and it’s unknown how many are still on the roads today. Its swooping lines give it a suitable futuristic feel and its fast too, with a 4.5 litre V12 engine. Just imagine seeing one drive past in 1939.


    2. 1931 DUESENBERG MODEL J DERHAM TOURSTER

    [​IMG]

    This stately machine is one of only eight left in the world. It’s rare, gorgeous and preposterously large and features a 265bhp straight eight powerplant.


    3. 1935 AUBURN B/T SPEEDSTER

    [​IMG]

    This stunning little sports car can boast the title of one of the most attractively designed American coupes ever. It’s most powerful iteration featured a 4.5 litre supercharged engine, providing around 125bhp.


    4. 1938 BUGATTI TYPE 57SC

    [​IMG]

    This is one of the most recognisable Bugattis ever, thanks in no small part to its curvaceous front fenders and rear split window. The Type 57SC’s supercharged engine pumped out an impressive 200bhp, making it one of the quickest cars of the era.


    5. 1932 DAIMLER DOUBLE-SIX

    [​IMG]

    Its striking road presence was matched by its huge V12 engine, which was about as un-refined as the view from the cabin.


    [​IMG]
    Many cars were influenced by the Art Deco movement during the 1930s, but the T150 SS was arguably the best looking – it’s essential a rolling work of art.


    7. 1935 MERCEDES-BENZ 500K ROADSTER

    [​IMG]

    In this combination of candy red paint and pale cream leather, we can’t think of a car in the world we want more than the Mercedes 500K Roadster.


    8. 1938 PHANTOM CORSAIR

    [​IMG]

    The Phantom Corsair was the Batmobile of the 1930s. It also has the best name of any car. Ever.


    9. 1938 ALFA ROMEO 8C 2900B

    [​IMG]

    Alfa Romeo are known for producing some of the most aesthetically pleasing cars of today, but their automobiles of yesteryear weren’t so bad either. The 8C is right up there with the best, featuring those curved fenders that were so popular during the era.


    10. 1930 MERCEDES-BENZ SSK ‘COUNT TROSSI’

    [​IMG]

    This one-off Mercedes features a redesigned exterior, specially constructed for the famous Italian race-driver Carlo Felice Trossi. It is, quite simply, stunning.

    (This original article was published on Gentleman's Journal)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/10-of-most-beautiful-cars-of-1930s.html
     
    ^updated^ and Fjpod like this.
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    40 Ridiculous and Outrageous Ads From The Past That Offend Women

    One vintage ad warns women, "Don't let them call you SKINNY!" while another promises that smoking cigarettes will keep one slender. If the task of morphing their bodies into the current desirable shape isn't enough of a burden, women are also reminded that they stink.

    In these vintage ads, a woman may be emitting a foul odor from any body part—her armpits, her mouth, her hair, her hands, her lady parts—but she never knows it until her husband is walking out the door, suitcase in hand. And what about her skin? According to such ads, she might drive that man away with her so-called coarse pores, old mouth, tan lines, zits, wrinkles, middle-age skin, hairy legs or lip, visible veins, or horror of all horrors, dishpan hands.

    Here's a gallery of 40 ridiculous and outrageous vintage ads any woman would find offensive.

    1. Without the right deodorant, this Odo-ro-no ad admonishes, one’s physical appeal is rendered worthless.

    [​IMG]


    2. An example from a series of 1930s Waldorf ads about bad toilet paper ruining family life.

    [​IMG]


    3. In the 1930s, dancing was an important social activity, and shampoo companies wanted women to worry about yet another way they could smell bad.

    [​IMG]


    4. Ads in 19th century magazines sold devices to reshape one’s face.

    [​IMG]


    5. Lysol disinfectant, which was sold as a douche in the ’30s, produced endless ads showing a man leaving his wife over unspeakable “feminine hygiene” problems.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    7. Strangely enough, this 19th century device promised to shrink the bust. Perhaps some breasts were considered too disproportionately large for the Victorians’ hourglass ideal?

    [​IMG]


    8. “Husbands admire wives who keep their stockings perfect.” In the 1930s, advertisers wanted women to worry about their “S.A.” or “Stocking Appeal.”

    [​IMG]


    9. In 1930s ads, “dishpan hands” threatened marriages.

    [​IMG]


    10. In this ad, pretty Joan has no idea why she’s so unpopular. At night, her undergarments gossip about her careless washing habits and the odor they’ve been emitting.

    [​IMG]


    11. “She’s a girl in a million! Pretty and smart. Dances divinely. Can even cook. But she’s ruining her chances by having ‘gap-osis.’” That is, gaps where her skirt buttons.

    [​IMG]


    12. According to Tangee in the 1930s, a woman’s lips could be too red, smeary, glaring, and painted for a man to kiss.

    [​IMG]


    13. The qualifications for Eastern Airlines stewardesses in the 1970s: “Sure, we want her to be pretty… That’s why we look at her face, her make-up, her complexion, her figure, her weight, her legs, her grooming, her nails, and her hair. But we don’t stop there.”

    [​IMG]


    14. On the surface, this 1930s Lysol ad is about a woman's vaginal odor. But Lysol was also used as a contraceptive spermicide, which the "organic matter" line alludes to.

    [​IMG]


    15. In this ad, Lysol turns a monster husband into a sweetheart.

    [​IMG]


    16. This Lysol ad neatly catalogs all the expectations of good wives in the 1930s.

    [​IMG]


    17. In Lysol ads, failures of "feminine hygiene" led to aloof husbands.

    [​IMG]


    18. In addition to smelly lady parts, a woman also had to worry about her breath.

    [​IMG]


    19. Apparently, some completely lovely ladies just didn't know how to wash properly.

    [​IMG]


    20. If you didn't use the right soap or deodorant, ads warned, your girlfriends would gossip about you behind your back.

    [​IMG]


    21. Early Midol ads encouraged women to get things done on their periods.

    [​IMG]


    22. It was also emphasized that women on their periods should not make men suffer.

    [​IMG]


    23. In this ad, a woman has to stay pretty and youthful to impress her husband's boss.

    [​IMG]


    24. According to this 1930s ad, all it takes is one zit to destroy a blossoming romance.

    [​IMG]


    25. Given the pressures, you might understand why this woman with acne wants to hide.

    [​IMG]


    26. Love, Romance, Popularity—all are attracted by feminine charm. And the outstanding charm of beautiful womanhood is a full, shapely bust.”

    [​IMG]


    27. However, according to this ad, one's chest-line can bulge too much.

    [​IMG]


    28. Whether it was stylish to be busty or flat-chested, one constant in the 20th century was the desire to hide and control the belly.

    [​IMG]


    29. Even in the '70s, ads offered ways to change the body into a more ideal shape.

    [​IMG]


    30. According to this ad, constipation isn't just uncomfortable for the woman, it also kills her personality, and hence, her dating life.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    31. "Dishpan hands," apparently, were such a serious matter that they could drive a woman to tears.

    [​IMG]


    32. And, according to these ads, "dishpan hands" were traumatic to husbands—who, of course, never had to wash a dish.

    [​IMG]


    33. Somehow, this woman of 20 could lose her husband over her supposed "middle-age skin."

    [​IMG]


    34. And if your husband encounters a younger-looking woman, forget it.

    [​IMG]


    35. Looking old was also a liability for a woman in the workforce.

    [​IMG]


    36. Ads also wanted women to feel anxious about the smoothness of their lips.

    [​IMG]


    37. In this ad, a couple gossips about an "unloved" woman with a mustache.

    [​IMG]


    38. But, naturally, a woman should never appear to be vain.

    [​IMG]


    39. In these ads, most husbands had a wandering eye, that could even been tempted by whiter teeth.

    [​IMG]


    40. And the perfect woman always fed her husband "he-man" food and not "sissy-sweet salads."

    [​IMG]

    (All images courtesy of Do I Offend?, via Collectors Weekly)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/40-ridiculous-and-outrageous-ads-from.html
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Beauties of Silent Film – 23 Charming Vintage Photos of American Actresses in the 1910s-20s

    Silent film era had spawned a lot of actresses not only talented but also beautiful. A small collection of 23 American beauties from between the 1910s and 1920s will tell you more.


    [​IMG]
    Alice Joyce

    [​IMG]
    Clara Bow

    [​IMG]
    Colleen Moore

    [​IMG]
    Corinne Griffith

    [​IMG]
    Doris Kenyon

    [​IMG]
    Ethel Teare

    [​IMG]
    Gloria Swanson

    [​IMG]
    Hope Hampton

    [​IMG]
    Janet Gaynor

    [​IMG]
    Joan Crawford

    [​IMG]
    Jobyna Ralston

    [​IMG]
    Julia Faye

    [​IMG]
    Leila Hyams and Myrna Loy

    [​IMG]
    Marguerite Clark

    [​IMG]
    Mary Fuller

    [​IMG]
    Mary Miles Minter

    [​IMG]
    Nancy Carroll

    [​IMG]
    Natalie Moorehead

    [​IMG]
    Norma Shearer

    [​IMG]
    Norma Talmadge

    [​IMG]
    Shirley Mason

    [​IMG]
    Theda Bara

    [​IMG]
    Virginia Pearson

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/beauties-of-silent-film-23-charming.html
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Portraits of 30 Incredibly Beautiful Hollywood Actresses of the 1930s

    1930s Hollywood introduced us to many of the greatest actresses of all time. There was a wealth of female film talent during this decade and they have all earned the right to be remembered as a permanent part of Hollywood history.

    The following actresses, in no particular order, represent just a sampling of the talent that women brought to the silver screen during the 1930s. For film fans of any generation, you would be doing yourself a huge favor by viewing as many of their pictures as possible. Here's a selection of 30 incredibly beautiful Hollywood actresses from the 1930s.

    1. Sari Maritza

    [​IMG]


    2. Karen Morley

    [​IMG]


    3. Amo Ingraham

    [​IMG]


    4. Priscilla Lane

    [​IMG]


    5. Alice Faye

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    7. Muriel Angelus

    [​IMG]


    8. Ida Lupino

    [​IMG]


    9. Wynne Gibson

    [​IMG]


    10. Constance Cummings

    [​IMG]


    11. Mae Clarke

    [​IMG]


    12. Juliette Compton

    [​IMG]


    13. Marion Martin

    [​IMG]


    14. Edna Callahan

    [​IMG]


    15. Bess Ehrhardt

    [​IMG]


    16. Marian Marsh

    [​IMG]


    17. Thelma Todd

    [​IMG]


    18. Frances Drake

    [​IMG]


    19. Gail Patrick

    [​IMG]


    20. Jean Parker

    [​IMG]


    21. Judith Barrett

    [​IMG]


    22. Joan Blondell

    [​IMG]


    23. Alice White

    [​IMG]


    24. Eleanor Powell

    [​IMG]


    25. Elsa Lanchester

    [​IMG]


    26. Victoria Vinton

    [​IMG]


    27. Pat Royale

    [​IMG]


    28. Rochelle Hudson

    [​IMG]


    29. Sari Maritza

    [​IMG]


    30. Fay Wray

    [​IMG]

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/02/portraits-of-30-beautiful-actresses-of.html
     
    Fjpod likes this.
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    30 Interesting Vintage Photos of Roller Skating Girls

    The first patented roller skate was introduced in 1760 by Belgian inventor John Joseph Merlin. His roller skate wasn't much more than an ice skate with wheels where the blade goes. They were hard to steer and hard to stop because they didn't have brakes and as such were not very popular.

    In 1863, James Plimpton from Massachusetts invented the "rocking" skate and used a four-wheel configuration for stability, and independent axles that turned by pressing to one side of the skate or the other when the skater wants to create an edge. This was a vast improvement on the Merlin design that was easier to use and drove the huge popularity roller skating, dubbed "rinkomania" in the 1860s and 1870s, which spread to Europe and around the world, and continued through the 1930s. The Plimpton skate is still used today.

    [​IMG]
    Vogue 1970

    [​IMG]
    Roller skating, ca. 1930s

    [​IMG]
    Rockabilly roller girl posing

    [​IMG]
    Wendy Parker skating at Wellington Pier, ca. 1950

    [​IMG]
    Members of the Great Yarmouth roller skating club at Wellington Pier, ca. 1950

    [​IMG]
    Marilyn Monroe roller skating in 1952

    [​IMG]
    Roller skating girls, ca. 1950s

    [​IMG]
    Marie Prevost on roller skates

    [​IMG]
    A gorgeous Vogue card featuring a photograph of a girl skating with her luggage. Photography by Jean-Francois Jonvelle, 1972.

    [​IMG]
    Roller skating in Manhattan, 1933

    [​IMG]
    Roller skating girl, 1966

    [​IMG]
    Gloria Nord, headliner of the Skating Vanities skating show of the 1940s

    [​IMG]
    A waitress on roller skates skillfully delivers a tray full of food to hungry customers in the 1940s.

    [​IMG]
    Pin-up roller girl, ca. 1950s

    [​IMG]
    Natalie Wood skating in the 1970s

    [​IMG]
    Roller skating, 1970s

    [​IMG]
    Stylish girl on roller skates, ca. 1900s

    [​IMG]
    Co-eds at the University of Chicago go to school on skates, 1930

    [​IMG]
    Emma Willard School girls, NY, 1950s

    [​IMG]
    Betty Grable on roller skates, ca.1937

    [​IMG]
    The Lesson, Central Park, New York, 1936

    [​IMG]
    Roller skating girls having fun, ca. 1940s

    [​IMG]
    Adrienne Dore

    [​IMG]
    Debbie Reynolds on skates, ca. 1950s

    [​IMG]
    Roller skate friends, 1944

    [​IMG]
    Becky Howe roller skating with a sling at the Venice Pavillion in 1978

    [​IMG]
    English roller skaters, 1926

    [​IMG]
    Roller girl, ca. 1930s-40s

    [​IMG]
    Betty Grable on skates

    [​IMG]
    Fashion photo by Herman Landshoff, Junior Bazaar, 1946

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/06/30-interesting-vintage-photos-of-roller.html
     
    Fjpod likes this.
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Caravanning and Camping in the Past: 20 Vintage Photos of Holidaymakers in the Great Outdoors From Between the 1930s and 1960s

    It was before the 20th century when camping holidays really started. The first real holiday camp was in the Isle of Man, called the “Cunningham Camp”. The only strange thing about this camp was that all the campers were men! This “all mens” holiday camp opened in 1894, and they all helped with chores so the day to day running of the camp went as smoothly as possible.

    In the 1920s and '30s, many camps of this kind were in operation, and there was an obsession at the time for people to enjoy a healthy outdoor life which added to the number of campers.

    Camping and caravanning holidays became popular in the '60s as an alternative holiday to stopping in a hotel or boarding home. People loved the freedom they got from caravanning holidays compared with staying in a hotel or boarding home. The savings they could make were brilliant, too!

    Here, we take a historical look back at how we would spend our spare time under canvas and inside mobile sheds.

    [​IMG]
    Supported by the roof of a car, the tent sleeps two and there is a 'ground floor' apartment for dressing, circa 1961. (Keystone/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    A party of holidaymakers with their caravan and aeroplane at Abingdon, Berkshire, 1932. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Holidaymakers show how to look busy on a campsite in 1937. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    The chaps take it easy while their dinner is prepared with the cricket tuned in on the wireless. (Everett Collection/REX)

    [​IMG]
    A camping car on display at the Motor Show, Olympia, showing how the inside can be adjusted to make a bed. Built by A C Penman Ltd of Dumfries in 1929. (Edward G. Malindine/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Designed for comfort the Bedouin B collapsible caravan converts from a compact trailer into a spacious home for two in four minutes flat, circa 1956. (Harry Kerr/BIPs/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    What a beautiful awning! (Central Press/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    With his tent set up for an adventure holiday, a camper realises that his camp bed is too large for the tent, circa 1955. (Jacobsen /Three Lions/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Two models showing how a Dormobile Roma motor caravan can be extended, 1969. (George W. Hales/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Disc jockey Simon Dee (right) and actress Francesca Annis at the International Caravan Exhibition at Earls Court, London in 1967. (Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    The vicar of Carnmenellis and Pencoys in Cornwall conducts a service in a caravan, which is being used as the local church in order to cope with the large and remote nature of the parish. (John Pratt/Keystone Features/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    In 1935 David Weatherhead, an unemployed shipyard worker from Sunderland, toured the county looking for work in this one man caravan which he designed and made himself. (Fred Morley/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Two girls sit outside their tent at the Caravan Club Annual Meet at Stratford on Avon, 1915 (Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    A cyclist towing his caravan, 1940. (General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    A complete camping outfit, including a folding canoe and a pneumatic tent which uses air tubes instead of tent-poles, on display at the 4th National Camping and Open-Air Exhibition at the Imperial Institute, London, 1938. (Stephens/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Man's best friend gets his own caravan so he doesn't have to sleep with his owner. (David McEnery/REX)

    [​IMG]
    A couple of women make a cuppa by the side of their caravan in 1931. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    A caravan for two that can be drawn by a motor cycle. It is only 9ft 6ins long and 5ft wide, circa 1939. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Two women wave to each other after arriving on holiday with their caravan, 1939. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    A family setting up its caravan for a night's camping at Lynmouth in Devon, 1930 (General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

    (via The Telegraph)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/caravanning-and-camping-in-past-20.html
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    American Outlaws & Criminals – 14 Notorious Female Gangsters in History You Wouldn't Want To Mess With

    The world has been always been a scary place and the women on this list did nothing to make it better. These women are robbers, gang queens, fraudsters and much more. Men have generally dominated the world of crime, but not many have gripping stories like the women of the crime world. Below are 13 famous notorious female gangsters. These dames can kill with more than just their looks!

    1. Bonnie Parker

    [​IMG]

    Undoubtedly the most famous of the female American gangsters, Parker was half of the iconic crime duo Bonnie and Clyde. The two were notorious bank robbers in the "public enemy era" of 1931 to 1934, when the exploits of outlaws made them celebrities.

    Parker was born in Rowena, Texas, where she earned a reputation for being smart and outspoken. She met Clyde Barrow in 1930. Though she was married, the two hit it off immediately. Apart from their robberies and killings, the legend of Bonnie and Clyde grew in part because of a photo shoot they did near their Joplin, Missouri hideout, images that still inspire re-imaginings of their lives. But those lives were cut short in a gruesome shootout with police in 1934. She was 23; he was 25.


    2. Ma Barker

    [​IMG]

    Don't let the nickname of this godmother of crime throw you. Arizona Donnie Barker (aka Kate Barker) was considered a merciless matriarch. At 19, Arizona Clark married George Barker and the two went on to have four sons: Herman, Lloyd, Arthur, and Fred. But the Barkers weren't just a family; they were a crime family, pulling off highway robberies as early as 1910.

    These heists led to murder, and soon captivated the press and public of the Midwest. But fate took a turn for the Barkers in 1927, when Herman committed suicide to avoid arrest. Shortly thereafter, the other three sons ended up in jail. Arizona faced some lean years, but she reunited with Fred upon his release in 1931, spurring a new crime spree that led to her death and his.

    Both were killed when the FBI stormed her hideout in Lake Weir, Florida on January 8, 1935. Posthumously, her role in the Barker gang has been the matter of debate. Those close to the family insisted she could have played no active role in the criminal dealings of her sons, but J. Edgar Hoover called her "the most vicious, dangerous and resourceful criminal brain of the last decade."


    3. Mary Surratt

    [​IMG]

    Mary Surratt ran a tavern with her husband in Maryland, where they welcomed Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War. When her husband died, Surratt moved to Washington, D.C., and opened a boardinghouse. The boardinghouse became a meeting place for John Wilkes Booth and his fellow conspirators. Surratt herself became entangled in the plot to kill U.S. Pres. Abraham Lincoln. She is thought to have been in regular conversation with Booth about his plans and assisted in concealing the weapons used for the murder at her tavern in Maryland. She was tried and found guilty of conspiracy and became the first woman to be sentenced to death by the United States. She was hanged with the other conspirators on July 7, 1865.


    4. Belle Starr

    [​IMG]

    Born in 1848, Belle Starr was known as an infamous outlaw in the Wild West—the western edge of the expanding United States in the second half of the 1800s. She associated with famous outlaws, like Frank and Jesse James, and was arrested several times. In recent years, however, historians have gathered data that suggests that she committed far fewer criminal acts than her legend would suggest, with the men in her life being the main purveyors of illicit acts. Belle Starr was killed in 1889, with her murderer having never been brought to justice.


    5. Stephanie St. Clair

    [​IMG]

    She was called "Queenie" in much of Manhattan, but in her Harlem home she was known only as Madame St. Clair. An immigrant of French and African descent, St. Clair set up her numbers bank ten years after moving to the U.S. and became fiercely protective of her neighborhood. She testified against corrupt cops, getting them fired from the force. Even more impressive, she thwarted the invasion of downtown mobsters once the end of Prohibition sent them uptown in search of new revenue.

    With the help of her chief enforcer Ellsworth "Bumpy" Johnson and an alliance with Lucky Luciano, Madame St. Clair kept the likes of Dutch Schultz out of Harlem. She later gloated when Schultz lay dying from a gunshot wound, sending a note to his hospital bed that read, "As ye sow, so shall ye reap." When she retired, St. Clair handed her operation over to Bumpy, who became known as The Harlem Godfather.


    [​IMG]
    Believed to be born in Texas, Long earned the nickname "Mack Truck" because of her size (though it's said no one called her this to her face). She was a member of John Dillinger's Terror Gang, brought in as the wife of Russell Clark. A caretaker by nature, Long—who preferred to be called Bernice Clark—happily cleaned the hideout and cooked for the whole gang, who she considered family.

    Things soured when her husband was arrested in Tucson, Arizona on January 25, 1934. She attacked the police who made the arrest, and later begged Dillinger for money to fund an appeal of Clark's case. Her demands ultimately ostracized her from the group. That summer she, too, was arrested. She never squealed on her cohorts, yet earned parole by November 1934. She lived out her days in Chicago.


    7. Helen Gillis

    [​IMG]

    At 16, Helen Wawrzyniak made a fateful move marrying Lester Gillis, the man who came to be known as Baby Face Nelson. By 20, she had two babies—and a spot on the "shoot to kill" list of Public Enemies, thanks to him. She's regarded more as an accomplice than a gangster in her own right, but Gillis was present at the "Battle of Barrington" in Illinois on November 27, 1934. There, Nelson spotted a cop car, and with Gillis and fellow thug John Paul Chase in tow, chased it down, guns blazing. This led to a shootout that killed Nelson along with two police officers.

    Gillis earned her place on the Public Enemies list by harboring her dying husband. She surrendered on Thanksgiving Day. Bitter over Nelson's ugly demise, Gillis testified against Chase, helping secure his life sentence. She died more than fifty years later, but was buried next to her beloved Baby Face in Chicago's St. Joseph's Cemetery.


    8. Virginia Hill

    [​IMG]

    Known as The Flamingo as well as "Queen of the Gangster Molls," Hill became notorious as the girlfriend of Brooklyn mobster Bugsy Siegel. She came from a poor background, telling people she didn't own a pair of shoes until age seventeen. Born in Alabama and raised in Georgia, she moved to Chicago to seek fame and fortune. She found a bit of both working as an accountant for Al Capone.

    When she moved to Los Angeles to pursue her acting ambitions, she met Siegel, for whom she'd soon be lover and courier. He'd later name his Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas after her. But this proved a bust business, bringing an abrupt end to Siegel's career, and arguably his life. He was gunned down in Hill's Hollywood home on June 20, 1947.

    Hill was coincidentally out of the house, and claimed, "If anyone or anything was his mistress, it was that Las Vegas hotel. I never knew Ben was involved in all that gang stuff. I can't imagine who shot him or why." Her underworld dealings had her take the stand increasingly as the years went on. In 1961, Hill was found dead in an Austria snowdrift, the victim of an apparent overdose of sleeping pills—although some speculate this too was a hit.


    9. Pearl Elliott

    [​IMG]

    She shared ties with John Dillinger and Harry Pierpont, but Elliott was no hanger-on or gun moll. Instead, she was a notorious madam. She owned a whorehouse in Kokomo, Indiana that boasted police protection. To help keep things at her rural brothel safe, they had a system where she'd shine a flashlight out a window to signal for help should some john get out of hand.

    Her establishment also served as a hideout for Pierpont's crew following a 1925 bank robbery. Later, her role as "treasurer" for Dillinger earned her a spot on the 1933 Public Enemies list, which ordered officers to "shoot to kill." Despite her illegal operation and dangerous dealings, Elliott did not die in a hail of gunfire or in prison. She passed away on August 10, 1935, from an illness that may have been cancer. She was 47.


    10. Evelyn "Billie" Frechette

    [​IMG]

    She became infamous as John Dillinger's devoted girlfriend, but Frechette came from an unexpected background for a gun moll. A child of French and Native American descent through the Menominee tribe, she attended Catholic grade school, then went on to graduate from high school. Even with an education, finding work was difficult, which led Frechette to Chicago. After her first husband was jailed for a post office robbery, Frechette met Dillinger, and traveled with him through a cross-country crime spree. The pair survived several shootouts.

    She was later convicted for harboring a fugitive, and served two years in prison, during which Dillinger died. Upon her release in 1936, Frechette spun her criminal past into a new career, setting out on a lecture tour called "Crime Does Not Pay." She died of cancer 33 years later.


    11. Helen Julia "Buda" Godman

    [​IMG]

    From 1907 to 1910, Godman had been married to Chicago music publisher and composer Tell Taylor. But six years after Taylor divorced her, Godman was arrested and convicted for participating in a scheme to blackmail a wealthy business executive widower.

    Godman attempted a scheme, known as a "badger game," of framing a victim in an embarrassing and illegal situation that resulted in a staged arrest by fake law enforcement officials. Godman, who was strikingly beautiful, posed as an unmarried woman being held against her will in a hotel room across state lines, which, if true, would have been a violation of the Mann Act. The ensuing fake arrest went awry when the victim, a prominent and wealthy widower, reported the incident to authorities.

    In 1932, at the trough of The Great Depression, Godman, under the name of Helen Smith, was convicted for grand larceny and sentenced to prison in New York.

    Her date of death (1944) is not verified. She is believed to be buried in Tippecanoe County, Indiana.


    12. Kathryn Kelly

    [​IMG]

    In September of 1930, "Machine Gun" Kelly and Kathryn Throne tied the knot. It was the start of a career that would span just three years. But Kathryn was a criminal in her own right before she ever laid eyes on Kelly. She was born Cleo Mae Brooks in 1895. By eight-grade she was going by Kathryn to sound more elegant. At 15 she married for the first time. After giving birth to her daughter, she divorced and quickly remarried. Her second marriage didn’t last long, and she soon moved in with her mother and new step-father on his farm near Fort Worth, Texas.

    She married for a third time to Charlie Thorne a bootlegger in the area. They sometimes quarreled, and after one alteration, Charlie was found shot to death with a suicide note. The judge overlooked the fact that Charlie was illiterate and looked the other way. Soon after Kathryn was arrested for robbery under an assumed name, but let off on a technicality.

    She continued to live in Fort Worth and her husband’s money, and the stolen cash, allowed her to thoroughly enjoy the Roaring Twenties and all Prohibition had to offer. Her vivaciousness and striking good looks caught the eye of George Kelly. They soon became the leading bootleggers in the city. However, Kelly was also a convicted bank robber, and in April 1931 he helped robe the Central State Bank of Sherman, Texas of $40,000. He continued robbing banks until 1932.

    By then banks were beginning to run out of cash because of the Great Depression. Kelly soon turned to kidnapping. After his second failed attempt, Kathryn began talking him up to everyone she knew in Fort Worth. She bought him a machine gun and gave him his famous nickname. After the Barker-Karpis Gang got a ransom for $100,000, Kathryn and Machine Gun began plotting their next kidnapping. They kidnapped a local oil baron, and not be outdone, they demanded $200,000—the largest payout ever paid at that time. They hid the man at her mother’s farm. When he was released, he used his photographic memory to lead the FBI right back to their door. By then the Kellys were long gone. The FBI arrested Kathryn’s parents and their accomplices.

    The Kellys were arrested 56 days later after a failed attempt to negotiate for the release of Kathryn’s mother and herself. Kathryn received a life sentence, but was released 25 years alter with her mother when they appealed claiming the FBI had intimidated their lawyers. When the FBI refused to release documents proving otherwise, the women were released. Kathryn never saw Machine Gun again; he died in prison. Kathryn spent the rest of her life in relative anonymity in Oklahoma. She was one of the last "Molls" to go and died under the assumed name Lera Cleo Kelly in 1985.


    13. Patty Hearst

    [​IMG]

    At the time of her kidnapping, Patty Hearst was a wealthy heiress and actress who was targeted by the radical left movement known as the Symbionese Liberation Army. After she was kidnapped, Hearst was later shown to have renounced her parents and to have joined the SLA in order to support their cause and rob banks with them.

    Despite the defense’s courtroom claims that she was brainwashed, Hearst was later imprisoned for her role in the SLA robberies. Eventually, though, Hearst was released; President Jimmy Carter commuted her sentence and President Clinton wiped her record wiped clean via a Presidential pardon.


    14. Arlyne Brickman

    [​IMG]

    Born in 1933 to a Jewish family in East Harlem, Brickman grew up idolizing the glamor and thrills of Virginia Hill. "In my eyes, here was a broad that really made good," she later told biographer Teresa Carpenter. She worked for the mob as a numbers runner, drug dealer, and loan shark. Yet her Jewish heritage was an obstacle to rising up the ranks of the Sicilian-run crime syndicate. Still, the money and power was good enough to please her.

    Years later, after a loan shark threatened her daughter, Brickman turned informant. Her spying and testimony ultimate led to the conviction of Anthony Scarpati and several associates for racketeering. In 1992, Brickman told her story in Mob Girl: A Woman's Life In the Underworld.

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/11/american-outlaws-criminals-14-notorious.html
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    17 Impressive Vintage Photographs by John Albok Showing Clotheslines in New York City in the 1930s and 1960s

    Living in New York City, one becomes accustomed to the grey area between public and private space. Intimate details are exposed through the most mundane daily tasks. Laundry is one of those inevitable rituals that most New Yorkers have to perform in public. Before laundromats, the clothesline was an intrinsic component of the urban landscape. It is impossible to imagine the archetypal tenement building complete without several strands of white linen connecting each structure.

    Hungarian-born and New York-raised photographer John Albok spent his career trying to document the hustle and bustle of the big city in a poetic and human way. From images of isolation to lively urban dwellings to the myriad of clotheslines filling the skyline in the Lower East Side of Manhattan from the 1930s, Albok's visions draw up the human complex within the tumultuous era of the Great Depression.

    These impressive photographs by John Albok, were selected as a testament to his eye and his search for art in the most common places of the densely populated city of New York.

    Throughout most of his life his photographs were taken just outside his tailor shop and home on Madison Avenue bordering Spanish Harlem. In several of these photographs you will see his “backyard”. This of course is an airshaft designed to provide air circulation through each apartment.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (via PDNB Gallery)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/11/17-impressive-vintage-photographs-by.html
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Haunting Photographs of the Prostitutes of Storyville, New Orleans' Legalized Red Light District, circa 1912

    First of all, the pictures are unforgettable – photography’s ultimate standard of value. And it’s not hard to see why the trove of glass negatives by a hitherto unknown photographer working in New Orleans in the early years of this century became one of the most admired recoveries in photography’s widening, ever incomplete history.

    E. J. Bellocq (1873–1949) was an American professional photographer who worked in New Orleans during the early 20th century. Following his death in 1949, eighty-nine glass plate negatives of portraits of female prostitutes from New Orleans’ Storyville district were found in his desk. All of the images were taken circa 1912. Photographer Lee Friedlander acquired them and made contact prints of the 8 x 10 negatives on the same gold toned printing-out paper that Bellocq used in his rare prints. Friedlander is credited with salvaging and promoting the work. The mystery surrounding the photographs and the personality of E.J. Bellocq is furthered by the fact that many of the plates were cracked, scratched, or damaged at the time when Friedlander acquired them.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    http://www.vintag.es/2016/11/haunting-photographs-of-prostitutes-of.html
     
    brosil likes this.
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Damn Cool Vintage Cars – 50 Strange and Weirdest-Looking Cars from between the 1900s and 1960s

    Car companies are always trying to innovate, just check out these 50 vintage cars that went too far.


    [​IMG]
    Circa 1900. Two Victorian ladies out for a drive with their chauffeur. (Keystone/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    2nd June 1911. Traveling to the Derby by chauffeur driven car. United Kingdom. (Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1st May 1911. A motor car at Brooklands race track which has been fitted with a propeller for extra speed. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    9th April 1913. A demonstration of a vacuum cleaner for the London streets, with representatives of the London Corporation in the car. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1916. A very early Carden [Lightcar] being driven along the street. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1920. Queen Mary (1867–1953) with Princess Mary, the Princess Royal (1897–1965) being driven across rough ground in a tracked car by Army officers. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    June 1924. English aircraft manufacturer Sir Edwin Alliott Verdon Roe riding his Avro Mobile, which he invented, at Southampton. (Kirby/Topical Press Agency)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1925. Baker Mr. Sillitoe has constructed a delivery van with the drivers cab and the van in the shape of loaves of bread. (Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1925. Dr. Manfred Curry standing beside his invention, the Curry-Landskiff, a man-powered vehicle which can reach speed of up to 35 miles per hour. (General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1926. A vehicle invented by George McLaughlin which was designed to travel on ice and snow. (Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    October 1926. The Peugeot motor-boat car, on a river bank. The front end is shaped like the bow of a boat, the middle part like a car and it has wheels. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    October 1928. A fruit importers lorry at Covent Garden, London, with its drivers cabin in the shape of an apple. (Harold Clements/London Express/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    September 1928. A man cycling a [One-Man Car Cycle] in a street in the West End of London. (Crouch/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    27th February 1928. Back views of an English invention capable of being used as a car, boat and plane. Showing are a tail fin, rudder and propeller. It also has two wings which can fold back and another propeller at the front. (London Express/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1st March 1929. A man and a woman riding in an [Auto Red Bug], Americas latest electric 2-seater runabout, in a London street. Driven by a 16 volt battery, it is capable of 12 mph. (J. Gaiger/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    April 1929. A three-wheeled car made by Mr. A. Graham of Kingston, Surrey. The vehicle, designed in a nautical style, reaches a maximum speed of 70 miles an hour with a body made entirely of sheet iron. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1930. A car driven by gas held in a large balloon on the roof and pulling a gas trailer. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    20th March 1931. Captain Malin with an amphibian Riley car going down the Severn. He is taking a convoy of these cars for a London to Cape Town venture.The car is mounted on a portable balloon apparatus and driven by its own power through small paddles on the rear wheels. (A. Hudson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    August 1931. Mr. Grahams novel three-wheel car designed to look like an armoured car, being used to take himself and his bride on honeymoon after their wedding. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1st September 1931. Swiss engineer M. Gerder at Arles, France on his way to Spain in his [Motorwheel], a motorcycle with a wheel which runs on a rail placed inside a solid rubber tyre. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1931. Three tricycles make car for two. Dr. J. B. Hanson and wife demonstrate their car. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    24th November 1933. A view of the motor car that will be display at the Motor Show, which has only three wheels, and sells at £100. It is made by B.S.A. and the annual tax of £4 and running costs are the same as a heavyweight sidecar outfit. (G. L. Davison/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1933. Customers buying snacks at the bar of a bus. (Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1935. A pioneering experimental streamlined car with bodywork designed by Hungarian-born German aerodynamicist Paul Jaray being driven around the streets of Berlin for the first time (the Brandenburg Gate is in the background). (Keystone/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    22nd January 1935. The newly built one horsepower Rytecraft lorry, believed to be the smallest motor lorry in the world, on the North Circular Road with other traffic. (Reg Speller/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1st December 1937. A submarine motor car, which can travel both on land and underwater and is equipped with a 4 hp engine and steel fins on both sides. (Horace Abrahams/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1937. Staff at work behind guarded doors at a workshop near Wolverhampton on the streamlined car in which designer and motor racer George Eyston will attempt to reach 400 mph on the salt beds near Salt Lake City, Utah. (David Savill/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    22nd February 1940. Navy recruits riding in car and trailer at the HMS Royal Arthur training centre formerly Butlins holiday camp, Skegness. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    24th April 1940. Gas-driven taxis in a street in Birmingham. The gas bags on the roofs of the taxis last about 15 to 20 miles without a refill. (Photo by A. J. OBrien/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1950. A tent that balances very neatly on top a car. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]
    1951. Designer Harley J. Earl of General Motors examining a full scale model of the Buick Le Sabre, a custom made sports car which will be used to test design features for other vehicles. United States. (Keystone/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    14th November 1952. The Regal four-seater coupe, produced by the Reliant Engineering Co., Tamworth, Staffordshire, on show at the Cycle and Motor Cycle Show at Wasrls Court in London. (Ron Case/Keystone/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Circa 1954. A new [Peoples Car], with an entirely plastic body, designed to seat three adults and two children and marketed as the cheapest car on the road. (Express/Express/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1955. French model Suzette Clairy takes her boyfriend for a spin in a Reyonnah, a narrow runabout vehicle named after its inventor, Monsieur Hannoyer. The front wheels can be drawn in to enable the car to pass into a tight parking space, or even through a doorway. (Serge Berton/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    4th November 1955. Model Gay McGregor shows off the latest 1956 model Bond Minicar three-wheeler, at its London preview. (Folb/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    December 1956. Designed for comfort the Bedouin B collapsible caravan converts from a compact trailer into a spacious home for two in four minutes flat. (Harry Kerr/BIPs)

    [​IMG]
    10th January 1957. Mr. J. L. M. Meikle, a member of the 500 Motor Racing Club of Ireland at his him in Bangor, Wales, with a jet-propelled racing car that he has built. (MacMullan/Fox Photos)

    [​IMG]
    1958. A Fulgar show-model car made by French car manufacturers, Simca. Designed for the year 2000 it is intended to be atomically powered, guided by radar and using only two wheels balanced by gyroscopes when driven at over 150 kph. (Central Press/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    July 1958. Fernando Ruiz Luciarte driving his invention, the Oto-Pedal, through the streets of Paris. The car, specially designed for elderly people, is modeled on the child's pedal car and travels at a speed of 25 miles per hour. (Karel Berg/BIPs)

    [​IMG]
    September 1958. Fixing the laminated fibreglass body onto the chassis of the new streamlined kit-car designed by engineers Anthony Bullen and Bill Woodhouse. (BIPS)

    [​IMG]
    September 1959. Clive Talbot Of Chiswick, London, in his car built with the body of a boat. (June Lander/BIPs/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    9th August 1960. The sun powered car, a 1912 Baker Electric Mode which has been adapted to run from energy obtained from the suns rays. Dr. Charles Alexander Escoffery, the cars inventor, explains the workings of the solar panel. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    9th November 1960. Lord Brabazon, the pioneer British aviator, demonstrates the hover scooter at Long Ditton in Surrey. The machine has been developed by American engineer Charles Rhoades, and combines the hovercraft with a scooter powered by a 250cc twin cylinder 2-stroke motorcycle engine. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    16th January 1964. On the day after the official opening of the Tay Salmon Rod Fishing Season, Duncan McGregor catches an 8lb salmon from Ian Cameron's amphibious car “Ay-Ell”. United Kingdom. (Central Press/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    December 1964. The [Urbania], the worlds smallest working car, invented by Marquis Piero Bargagli of Poggio Adorno to solve the problem of limited parking space. The engine is situated in the centre of the chassis and the seats rotate on a circular rail, enabling the passengers to descend from any side. (Franco Sestili/BIPs/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    December 1964. The [Urbania], the worlds smallest working car, invented by Marquis Piero Bargagli of Poggio Adorno to solve the problem of limited parking space. The engine is situated in the centre of the chassis and the seats rotate on a circular rail, enabling the passengers to descend from any side. (Franco Sestili/BIPs/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    1966. A man inspecting the engine of his miniature, motorised car, “The Scamp”. (Evening Standard/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    12th June 1967. Prototype for a car-about-town, La Quasar, designed by Quasar Kahn. The car allows easy access from all four sides and can reach speeds of 95kph. (Keystone/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    27th May 1968. A full size working replica of the pink limousine used by Parker to chauffeur Lady Penelope in Gerry Anderson's television series “Thunderbirds”, unveiled at Woburn Abbey. United Kingdom.(Jim Gray/Keystone/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    11th November 1969. Two models showing how a Dormobile Roma motor caravan can be extended. (George W. Hales/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/11/damn-cool-vintage-cars-50-strange-and.html
     
    ^updated^ and brosil like this.
  17. EricTheCat

    EricTheCat Silver Member Silver Miner

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Southern MN
    It was nice and clear here last night. Here is what I captured. :)

    M33 (The Triangulum Galaxy)
    M33-2016-11-03-P1C1SS.jpg

    Date: 11/3/2016
    Camera: Canon Rebel T4i (modified)
    Telescope: 110mm f/7 ED refractor (Orion)
    Exposure: 71x300 sec (5hr 55min total) at ISO 800
    Captured using Backyard EOS
    Stacked using DeepSkyStacker
    Processed in DeepSkyStacker and Gimp
    About: M33 (The Triangulum Galaxy) at magnitude 5.7 is 3 million light years away and is part of the local group of galaxies.
     
    ^updated^ and Weatherman like this.
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    40 Haunting and Beautiful Portraits of Native American Peoples, Shot by Edward S. Curtis from the Early 20th Century

    Edward S.Curtis is an American hero who created one of the most enduring and iconic visual records in the history of the photographic medium, a record that has informed our vision of who we are and where we came from. The images he created during his extraordinary, thirty-year odyssey have touched viewers throughout the world. Today he is believed to be the world’s most widely collected and exhibited fine art photographer.

    In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on Native Americans. This work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. Morgan's funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis received no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. Under the terms of the arrangement, Morgan was to receive 25 sets and 500 original prints as repayment.

    Once Curtis had secured funding for the project, he was able to hire several employees to help him. Eventually 222 complete sets were published. Curtis's goal was not just to photograph but also to document as much of Native American traditional life as possible before that way of life disappeared.

    Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Native American language and music. He took over 40,000 photographic images of members of over 80 tribes. His work changed the way an entire nation viewed Native Americans. He accomplished this at a time when some individuals were actively advocating for the extinction of all Native people on this continent. His images have also moved and inspired extraordinarily broad and diverse audiences, transcending economic, cultural, social, educational, and national boundaries.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    ^updated^ and Fjpod like this.
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    42 Vintage Photographs Documented Street Scenes of New York City During the Great Depression and World War II

    John Albok (1894–1982) was a Hungarian photographer who immigrated to the United States and documented street scenes in New York City during the Great Depression and later.

    In 1921 and opened a tailor shop on Madison Avenue, between 96th and 97th Streets, which he also used as a location for his pursuit of photography.

    For sixty years, using a 5x7 view camera and then a twin lens reflex camera, Albok took as his subject people and passersby outside his shop, and New York City life during the Depression, and World War II. Central Park, children, street scenes, and people at leisure were also among his preferred subjects.

    Of his Depression photographs, Albok remarked: “I photographed many poor souls, trying my best to leave them their most precious heritage-their dignity. There was nothing else left.”

    He printed and developed his photographs in his tailor shop.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    ^updated^ likes this.
  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    28 Amazing Vintage Photographs That Capture People Showed Up to a New York Farm for Woodstock ’69, The Greatest Music Festival of All Time

    Woodstock was the pop culture music event of the decade and arguably to this day the single most profound event in the history of music. Acts from all around the world met at Max Yasgur‘s Farm in Bethel, NY on August 15-18, 1969 for a celebration of peace and music. What began as a paid event drew so many viewers from across the world that the fences were torn down and it became a free concert open to the public. 500,000 youthful individuals gathered peacefully at Woodstock 1969 creating the largest gathering of human beings in one place in history. Woodstock 1969 defined an entire generation and its effects on music and American culture can still be felt today.

    Woodstock ’69 featured one of the most prolific musical lineups in history including such icons as Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker, Santana, and The Who. Fans got a taste of a variety of music styles which came together in perfect harmony. The crowd at Woodstock in 1969, which reached near a half a million people sent a message to the world that individuals could come together peacefully to celebrate peace and music.

    The music at Woodstock in 1969 embodied extraordinary popular acts from all over the world. Legendary performances by such music icons as Jimi Hendrix, Joan Baez, Joe Cocker, Santana, the Grateful Dead and Janis Joplin are still considered landmarks in music history. Woodstock in 1969 was also among the last performances of Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin who are seen as some of the best in their respective fields. The entire psychedelic music vein became popularized at Woodstock 69 and still influences bands of all ages to this day.

    [​IMG]
    Woodstock Festival of Arts and Music at Bethel, New York, August 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Music fans are treated for cuts and bruises after falling from the outside of a car on the grounds of the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival at White Lake in Bethel, N.Y., on Aug. 15, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Woodstock Rock music fans gather at a stand outside a motel near the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival in Bethel, New York, Aug. 16, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Hundreds of rock music fans walk along the wet highway leading from Bethel, New York, Aug. 16, 1969 as they try to leave the Woodstock Music and Art Festival. Two hundred thousand persons spent a rainy night at the festival. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Hundreds of rock music fans jam highway leading from Bethel, New York, Aug. 16, 1969 as they try to leave the Woodstock Music and Art Festival. Two hundred thousand persons spent a rainy night at the festival. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Hundreds of rock music fans jam highway leading from Bethel, New York, Aug. 16, 1969 as they try to leave the Woodstock Music and Art Festival. Two hundred thousand persons spent a rainy night at the festival. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    This is an aerial view of traffic jam on Route 17B in White Lake, NY, near Bethel, site of the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival, Aug. 16, 1969. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler)

    [​IMG]
    Music fans seek shelter is a grass hut at the Woodstock Music and Art Festival in Bethel, New York, Aug. 17, 1969. Sign above reads "Have a Marijuana." (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Rock music fans hike from the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival in Bethel, N.Y., Aug. 17, 1969. Some 300,000 fans began to leave as the festival ended in the rain. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Volunteers pick up trash in the mud on the grounds of the Woodstock Music and Art Festival in Bethel, New York, Aug. 17, 1969. Festival sponsors asked for volunteer help in removing the debris left by some 300,000 rock music fans. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Rock music fans hike from the Woodstock Music and Art Festival in Bethel, New York, Aug. 17, 1969. Some 300,000 fans began to leave as the festival ended in the rain. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Workers carry medical supplies that arrived by helicopter on the grounds of the Woodstock Music and Art Festival in Bethel, N.Y., Aug. 17, 1969. Helicopters were pressed into service when some 300,000 person attending the festival blocked all roads. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Young people leave debris-strewn scene where hundreds of thousands congregated over the weekend to enjoy the rock music festival held in field in Bethel, New York, Aug. 18, 1969. In background is stage where musicians performed. (AP Photo/Bob Scott)

    [​IMG]
    Woman sweeps debris from the street in front of her home in Bethel, NY, as rock music fans leave the Woodstock Music and Art Festival, Aug. 18, 1969. Many of the 300,000 persons attending the festival were still making their way home. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Young people leave the debris-strewn scene where hundreds of thousand congregated over the weekend to enjoy the rock music festival held in a farm field in Bethel, New York, Aug. 18, 1969. In background is stage where musicians performed. (AP Photo/Bob Scott)

    [​IMG]
    Young people begin leaving the grounds of the Woodstock concerts after spending a rainy night, Aug. 16, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    This is an aerial photo of the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival held on 600 acres of cow pasture leased from a farmer at White Lake in Bethel, Sullivan County, N.Y., in Aug. 1969. The festival, billed as "Thee Days of Peace and Music," started on Friday, Aug. 15 and ended Monday morning, Aug. 18. More than 450,000 persons attended. (AP Photo/Steve Starr)

    [​IMG]
    A girl naps on top of her car, while trying to reach the music festival at Woodstock, N.Y., Aug. 16, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Woodstock Festival of Arts and Music at Bethel, New York, August 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    A mud-caked music lover lies atop his motorcycle at the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival, Aug. 14, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    This is a general view of the crowd at the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival, Aug. 14, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    A girl helps herself to a free food ration in the camp area at the Woodstock Music Festival in Bethel, N.Y. on Aug. 15, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Rock music fans relax during a break in the entertainment at the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair in Bethel, N.Y., on Aug. 16, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    About 400,000 people attend the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival in Bethel, N.Y., August 16, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    This is a view of part of the crowd at the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival held on a 600-acre pasture in the Catskill Mountains near White Lake in Bethel, N.Y., in Aug. 1969. The festival, billed as "Thee Days of Peace and Music," started on Friday, Aug. 15. More than 450,000 persons attended. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Concert-goers sit on the roof of a Volkswagen bus at the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair at Bethel, N.Y., in mid-August 1969. The three-day concert attracted hundreds of thousands of people, and became a landmark cultural event of the late '60s. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Rock music fans sit on a tree sculpture as one leaps mid-air onto a pile of hay during the Woodstock Music and Art Festival held on a cow pasture at White Lake in Bethel, New York on Aug. 15, 1969. (AP Photo)

    [​IMG]
    Young people abandon their trucks, cars and buses as some 200,000 persons try to reach the Woodstock Music and Art Festival on a leased cow pasture at White Lake in Bethel, New York Friday, Aug. 15, 1969. Cars were backed up for 10 miles. The festival closed the New York State Thruway, creating the nation's worst traffic jam. (AP Photo)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/11/28-amazing-vintage-photographs-that.html
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    20 Rare Color Photographs of the Continuation War from the Early 1940s

    For the sovereign Finland, the Continuation War is the longest and in many ways the most exhausting struggle, which still today occasionally causes heated discussions.

    The Continuation War refers to the hostilities between Finland and the Soviet Union during World War II, from 1941 to 1944.

    At the time of the war, the Finns adopted this name to clarify how they viewed it in relation to the preceding Winter War. The Soviet Union saw the war as part of its struggle against Nazi Germany and its allies, on the Eastern Front of World War II. The war was known in the Soviet Union as the Great Patriotic War. Germany regarded its operations in the region as part of its overall war efforts on the Eastern Front, and it provided Finland with critical material support and military cooperation.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (These color photos are published at the Finnish Defence Forces photo archive)

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/01/rare-and-interesting-color-photos-of.html
     
  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    40 Hilarious Vintage STD Propaganda Posters from World War II

    Propaganda-style anti-STD campaigns from the 1940s cautioned the Army that another sinister enemy was causing trouble off the battlefield.

    During World War II, the government issued a series of eye-catching posters urging soldiers and sailors to resist the temptations of disease-ridden prostitutes.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    ^updated^ likes this.
  26. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]

    Sophie Anderson It’s Touch and Go, to Laugh or No
     
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]

    John William Godward Atalanta
     
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]

    Edwin Henry Landseer Doubtful Crumbs
     
  29. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]

    Władysław Czachórski Lady in a Lilac Dress with Flowers
     
  30. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]

    Georg Günther Deutsches Mittelgebirge
     
  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]

    Daniel Ridgway Knight Coffee in the garden
     
  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    [​IMG]

    Edward Wilkins Waite Evening, Brockham
     
  33. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    25 Rare Photos That Captured Incredible Moments from History

    Sometimes, one simple picture can tell you more about history than any story you might read or any document you might analyze.

    These photographs all tell stories about the historical figures or events that they represent. Once taken simply to document their present, they now help us witness the past.

    Many photographs only become iconic shots years later, once we understand their importance and historical context. From historical landmarks and famous people to the basic daily routines of the past, these pictures portray the past in a way that we can empathize with and understand more intimately.

    1. Carving eye on Mount Rushmore, 1930s.

    [​IMG]


    2. Soviet troops scrawled graffiti in the Reichstag after they took Berlin in 1945.

    [​IMG]


    3. Finalizing the Fat Man atomic bomb, which was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. On its nose it had stenciled the acronym "JANCFU"- Joint Army-Navy-Civilian F*** Up.

    [​IMG]


    4. 7-foot Bolaji Badejo, a Nigerian design student and one-time actor, wearing his costume from the now classic sci-fi thriller Alien, 1978.

    [​IMG]


    5. Mafia boss Joe Masseria lays dead on a Brooklyn restaurant floor holding the ace of spades, 1931.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    7. Jennie MacGregor, arrested by Minneapolis police on April 10, 1924 for dispensing alcoholic beverages from life-preserver flasks .

    [​IMG]


    8. Hungarian Jews being selected by Nazis to be sent to the gas chamber at Auschwitz concentration camp, Auschwitz Album May-June 1944.

    [​IMG]


    9. Boxing match aboard the U.S.S. New York, July 3, 1899.

    [​IMG]


    10. Bob Dylan with Mick Jagger and Keith Richards at Jaggers 29th birthday party, July 1972.

    [​IMG]


    11. The Statue of Liberty under construction in Paris in 1884.

    [​IMG]


    12. Robert Williams Wood, Max Planck and Albert Einstein in the front row of a session of the Physical Society in Berlin on July 28, 1931.

    [​IMG]


    13. Richard Nixon's last meal at the White House, in 1974. On the day that he announced his resignation, Nixon ordered cottage cheese, pineapple slices and a glass of milk.

    [​IMG]


    14. About 100 people participate in a lottery to divide a 12 acre plot of sand dunes, that would later become the city of Tel Aviv, 1909.

    [​IMG]


    15. A group of men posing in front of Lynch's Slave Market, St. Louis, Missouri, 1852.

    [​IMG]


    16. Scottish piper in a Kilt on the battlefield during World War One.

    [​IMG]


    17. US Coast Guard Cutter Spencer destroys the Nazi submarine U-175, April 17, 1943.

    [​IMG]


    18. Marilyn Monroe filming her iconic scene in The Seven Year Itch. This shot was taken in New York in front of a large crowd of bystanders and press to create hype, 1954.

    [​IMG]


    19. Columns of Hoover Dam being filled with concrete, February 1934 (looking upstream from the Nevada rim).

    [​IMG]


    20. Crew of the Japanese carrier Zuikaku give one final banzai cheer before the ship sinks, 1944.

    [​IMG]


    21. Eduard Bloch, the Jewish physician of the Hitler family in his office c. 1938. Bloch was later called a ‘noble Jew’ by Hitler and stood under his personal protection.

    [​IMG]


    22. An American evacuee punches a South Vietnamese man for a place on the last chopper out of the US embassy during the evacuation of Saigon in 1975.

    [​IMG]


    23. Da Vinci's Mona Lisa is returned to the Louvre after WWII.

    [​IMG]


    24. Tsar Nicholas II allows his daughter, the Grand Duchess Anastasia, to smoke.

    [​IMG]


    25. These are Titanic survivors boarding the Carpathia in 1912.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/07/25-rare-photos-that-captured-incredible.html
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
  34. EricTheCat

    EricTheCat Silver Member Silver Miner

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Southern MN
    More galaxies!

    NGC678, 680, 694, 697 and others
    NGC-678-680-694-697-2016-11-05-P2SS.jpg
    Date: 11/5/2016
    Camera: Canon Rebel T4i
    Telescope: 110mm f/7 ED refractor (Orion)
    Exposure: 74x300 sec (6hr 10min total) at ISO 800
    Captured using Backyard EOS
    Stacked using DeepSkyStacker
    Processed in DeepSkyStacker and Gimp
     
  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    14 Fascinating Color Photographs of Germany in the Late 19th Century

    All of these amazing color photographs of Germany were originally made by the Photochrom process, a method of transferring black and white photographic negatives to lithographic and chromographic printing stones which was popular in the early 20th century.

    The Photochrom process was invented in the 1880s in Switzerland by the Zürich-based printing firm Orell Füssli. In 1888 the firm created a new company, Photochrom Zürich (later renamed to Photoglob Co.), to handle worldwide distribution of Photochrom prints.

    In 1897, the Detroit Photographic Company, led by William A. Livingstone, obtained exclusive rights to print and distribute Photochrom prints in the United States. Livingstone hired the well-known photographer William Henry Jackson who brought with him thousands of his own negatives that would form the core of Detroit Photographic's Photochrom catalog. The company continued producing Photochrom prints until the early 1930s, when cheaper production methods used by other photographic companies forced the company out of business.

    [​IMG]
    A girl of the Black Forest, Black Forest, Baden, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Beach and park, Colberg, Pomerania, Germany (now Kołobrzeg, Poland), ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Building sand castles, Westerland, Sylt, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    General view, Ahlbeck, Pomerania, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Hotel and beach, Colberg, Pomerania, Germany (now Kołobrzeg, Poland), ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Jungfernsteig at 10 a.m., Hamburg, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Kaiser Strasse, Karlsruhe, Baden, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Kaiserstrasse, Helgoland, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Market place, Darmstadt, the Rhine, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Potsdam Square, Berlin, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    The "New Guard" and street scene, Berlin, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    The chalets, Westerland, Sylt, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    The chalets, Westerland, Sylt, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    [​IMG]
    Victoria Hotel, Unter den Linden, Berlin, Germany, ca. 1890-1900

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/11/14-fascinating-color-photographs-of.html
     
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    These Pages from a 1902 Weird Phrenology Book Can Help You Ascertain a Person’s Character by the Shape of Their Features

    Illustrations from Vaught’s Practical Character Reader, a book on phrenology by L. A. Vaught published in 1902. As he confidently states in his Preface:
    The purpose of this book is to acquaint all with the elements of human nature and enable them to read these elements in all men, women and children in all countries. At least fifty thousand careful examinations have been made to prove the truthfulness of the nature and location of these elements. More than a million observations have been made to confirm the examinations. Therefore, it is given the world to be depended upon. Taken in its entirety it is absolutely reliable. Its facts can be completely demonstrated by all who will take the unprejudiced pains to do so. It is ready for use. It is practical. Use it.The book lays out the 42 known elements of human nature and how they're made manifest in people's heads, noses, ears and chins.

    It's both fascinating and disturbing to look through the diagrams from old phrenology texts. Although phrenology was at the height of its popularity during the first half of the 19th century, it enjoyed a bit of resurgence in the early 20th century.

    While the author expounds with conviction on “cruel eyes,” “selfish ears” and “gross, sensual chins,” the illustrator provides diagrams and pictures which have cemented the book as a classic in the genre of unintentional humor.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    18 Strange Thanksgiving Dinner Ideas from Vintage Ads

    It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without a pack of cigarettes and some hearty Spam Birds, would it? Let’s dig in!

    1. Old Gold Cigarettes w/Turkey

    [​IMG]


    2. Holiday Vegetable Loaf With Apple Rings, Mashed Potatoes and “Cranberry Turkey”

    [​IMG]


    3. Butter On All The Things

    [​IMG]


    4. Hot Dr. Pepper Cocktails

    [​IMG]


    5. Mayonnaise On All The Things

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    7. Beer with All The Things = Freedom

    [​IMG]


    8. Mayonaise, Jell-O & Cranberry Sauce Candles

    [​IMG]

    9. Orange Mallow Yam Yums

    [​IMG]


    10. Cigarettes With All The Things

    [​IMG]


    11. Bugles, Whistles and Daisy’s Trim-a-Tree Dip

    [​IMG]


    12. Pumpkin Pie With Black Splotches Of Flavor Magic

    [​IMG]


    13. Clear Mushroom Soup With Whipped Cream

    [​IMG]


    14. Leftover Turkey WIth Mayonaise and Jell-O

    [​IMG]


    15. Cranberry Surprise

    [​IMG]


    16. Frozen Jellied Turkey Vegetable Salad

    [​IMG]


    17. Duck in a Box

    [​IMG]


    18. Banquet Frozen Thanksgiving TV Dinner

    [​IMG]

    (via Autostraddle)

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/11/18-strange-thanksgiving-dinner-ideas.html
     
  39. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    When Airplane Food Was First Class – A Mouthwatering Look At What In-Flight Meals Used To Be Like in the Golden Age of Flying

    Have you ever had any complaints about the meals served up to you during a long-haul flight? They are admittedly not the same as they were before. You can now travel back in time to the golden age of flying when airline food was actually first class.

    [​IMG]

    To mark their 70th anniversary, Norway-based Scandinavian Airlines released a collection of vintage photographs of onboard dining in the 1950s to 1980s depicting passengers being served some tasty bites in such an elegant way that is nowhere to be seen today. Plane food has just changed so much compared to the last couple of decades. Guests were supplied by everything from juicy lobsters and caviar to freshly sliced ham and meat.

    Check out these awesome mouthwatering vintage photos that show passengers being served the finest dishes including lobsters and caviar.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (Images: The SAS Museum)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/07/when-airplane-food-was-first-class.html
     
  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    96,797
    Likes Received:
    33,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Soviet Subcultures of the 1980s: Goths, Punks and Metalheads of the USSR

    The 1980s brought fashionable perestroikas and a perestroika of fashion. A period that saw the emergence of new styles and new creative spaces. Charged by the energy of anticipated change, Soviet youth created new musical styles, street fashion, communal squats...

    This alternative to the Soviet regime originated from subcultures formed in the early 1980s. Their participants and heroes occupied squats and street stages, enticing ordinary passers-by to join them in a celebration of civil disobedience. The exaggerated dress code, hairstyles, tattoos and make-up were intended to shock, it was a demonstration of freedom and independence pushed to the limit, challenging 'normal', conventional Soviet imagery.

    When the first subcultures appeared in the USSR the government simply considered those youngsters to be crazy. But when the movement went out of control it was already too late. Metalheads, rockers, punks, rappers, bikers, etc. came out to the streets of the already crumbling Soviet society.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1987. Photo by Asa Kari Frank.

    [​IMG]
    Volgograd, 1988.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1989. Photo by Petra Gall.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1986. Photo by Sergey Borisov.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1986.

    [​IMG]
    Leningrad, 1987. Photo by Yaroslav Mayev.

    [​IMG]
    A note in The Face magazine, 1988.

    [​IMG]
    A note about Moscow rockers in a Spanish magazine, 1990.

    [​IMG]
    Punk girl. 1988. Photo by Yaroslav Mayev.

    [​IMG]
    Shooting for the German magazine Blickpunkt. Moscow, 1987. Photo by Petra Gall.

    [​IMG]
    1987.

    [​IMG]
    Article about Moscow rockers in a German magazine. 1988.

    [​IMG]
    Cover of the Blickpunkt, 1988.

    [​IMG]
    Leningrad, 1986. Photo by Natalia Vasilyeva.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1988. Photo by Yaroslav Mayev.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1987.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1987.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1987.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1988. Photo by Petra Gall.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1988.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1989. Photo by Sergey Borisov.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1988. Photo by Petra Gall.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1989.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1988. Photo by Yaroslav Mayev.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1985.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow region, 1985.

    [​IMG]
    1988.

    [​IMG]
    1986.

    [​IMG]
    Moscow, 1987.

    [​IMG]
    1988.
     

Share This Page