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Random Pictures thread !

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by GOLDZILLA, Apr 4, 2010.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    An Unbelievable Set of Declassified Photos Reveal the Preparations Leading Up to the U.S. Nuclear Attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in August 1945

    On August 6th and 9th of 1945, the U.S. atomic bombs were dropped over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These rarely-seen photos give a little look into the other side of the engineering on the first atomic bombs, the mechanical and logistical work that it took to handle, store, transport, and load them; the preparations on the hours leading up to the U.S. nuclear attacks on the two cities.

    Notice the “Top Secret” stamp on some of the photos. In the last few photos notice the CRUDE sheet metal work on the casing and fins of “Little Boy” – the bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima.

    Notes: A large number of these photos were assembled from the RG-77-BT collection in the Still Photo collection of the National Archives II building in College Park, MD.

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    Manhattan Project scientists and military personnel gather around the bomb pit, ready to watch the Little Boy bomb being loaded into the Enola Gay.

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    Little Boy ready to be lifted into the Enola Gay.

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    Little Boy ready to be loaded into the Enola Gay.

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    The Enola Gay backs up over the bomb pit.

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    Little Boy is lifted via a hydraulic lift into the Enola Gay Little Boy is lifted via a hydraulic lift into the Enola Gay.

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    Little Boy is lifted via a hydraulic lift into the Enola Gay.

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    A view from underneath the hydraulic lift, in the bomb bay.

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    Little Boy has been successfully lifted into the bomb bay and is being attached to sway brackets that will keep it secure.

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    Little Boy in the Enola Gay bomb bay.

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    Bomb pit on Tinian.

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    Little Boy, covered by a protective tarp for security reasons Little Boy, covered by a protective tarp for security reasons.

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    The assembled implosion sphere for Fat Man ready to be placed in the casing.

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    Sealant is applied via spray gun.

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    Putty is applied to the forward plate.

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    Norman Ramsey signing his name on Fat Man.

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    The Fat Man bomb being towed toward the airfield with an escort.

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    The sealant has been applied. Note the signatures on the tail assembly and the "bomb" on the worker's shirt.

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    Fat Man is lowered on to a transport dolly for the trip to the airfield. Note the signatures on the tail assembly.

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    “A Second Kiss for Hirohito!” Signed by Rear Admiral W.R. Purnell, USN, on the side of Fat Man.

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    Signatures on Fat Man's tail assembly. You can see the small signature of "W. S. Parsons, USN" or Enola Gay weaponeer Deak Parsons, to the far left.

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    Preliminary pit alignment.

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    Fat Man is manually pushed to the bomb pit.

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    Fat Man's alignment with the bomb pit is checked.

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    The towing cable is disconnected. Note the MPs keeping guard.

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    Fat Man is raised on a hydraulic lift.

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    Once alignment is complete, Fat Man is lowered into the pit.

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    Fat Man is lowered into the pit.

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/08/an-unbelievable-set-of-declassified.html
     
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  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    20 Crazy and Interesting Vintage Ads from the 1910 World Almanac

    One big difference between old advertising and today’s advertisements, is that today you sometimes have to scrutinize the ad to discover exactly what it is they are trying to sell to you. Image plays a greater part in modern advertising.

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    The 1910 World Almanac cover.

    Back in 1910 it was the words that counted. When you look at old advertising you will notice that the copywriter gets right to the point about the product, though somewhat verbosely.

    One thing has remained the same: advertisers used the same swaggering claims back then that they use today. Even if they are completely false.

    Here are some sample advertisements from among the hundreds contained in the 1910 World Almanac.

    1. Fat Is Not Good Flesh

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    As long as their have been people unhappy with their weight, there have been people and companies who will exploit mankind’s battle with their waistlines. Loring & Co. marketed reducing tablets warning customers that “Fat Is Not Good Flesh.” Their reducing tablets tapped into something back then that is popular today: they contain no chemicals and are made wholly of roots and herbs.


    2. Fat Is Fatal

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    Dr. J. Spillenger of New York City uses endorsements from customers and a dramatic illustration, while warning readers that “Fat Is Fatal.” New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg would agree with the good doctor. What Dr. Spillenger does not say is exactly what his methods are to help you lose weight. Whatever his method, it involves not starving or exercising. “Rheumatism, Asthma, Kidney and Heart Troubles will leave as fat is reduced. Don’t take my word for this: I will prove it at my own expense,” the copy reads.


    3. Corpulent People

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    Then there are those people who had no desire to lose weight but merely appear slimmer. (Sounds like many products that are available today.) For that, there was a booming market in all sorts of corsets and belts to hold in your weight. The A. Parks Black Company calls out to “Corpulent People,” to use their abdominal obesity belts to help prevent the accumulation of superfluous flesh. The obesity and kidney belt also supposedly prevents hernia and appendicitis and are available for as little as $3.00. Also scrotum supporters starting at 75¢ for Stage purposes, Athletes, Horsemen, Golfers, etc.


    4. Dr. Scott’s Electric Corsets

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    Electricity would also be an additional aid in your battle against the bulge. So the amazing Dr. Scott, who had been in business for 32 years, came up with Dr. Scott’s Electric Corsets. This great invention will cure not only rheumatism and liver and kidney problems, but also lame back, nervousness and improve the circulation.

    If that wasn’t enough, Dr. Scott who does not mention where he received his medical degree, has electric hair brushes which will remove dandruff and prevent falling hair and cure all scalp disorders.


    5. How To Get Fat Free

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    On the opposite side of being fat, there was also a problem with our early 20th century ancestors being too slim. The Sargol Company advertises “How To Get Fat Free.” The copy says, “Excessive thinness is very mortifying. Thin men never look like ‘real money.’ They are pushed aside in the race for success. Bony women are seldom very popular. Dress will not hide skin and bones. All men admire fine figures.”

    A 50¢ box of their pills will be sent free to any home and “will work wonders in making scrawny undeveloped men and women plump and attractive. The illustration caption sums up everything to make you uncomfortable with your skinniness, “The Happy, Successful World Turns Its Back on Thin Folks.”


    6. Are You Too Thin?

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    The C.L. Jones Company in Elmira, NY is more discreet by simply asking in their headline, “Are You Too Thin?”

    The Jones Company goes on to ask, “Would a little more flesh make you more stylish and attractive?”

    They claim that Dr. Whitney’s Nerve and Flesh Builder (a vegetable compound), “will give you a superb figure with beautiful arms, shapely neck and shoulders, full round bust, and well developed limbs, not for the time being, but permanently.” The final bit of nonsense is that it “will positively enlarge the bust from two to six inches.”


    7. Vigorous Manhood

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    Moving on to related area of insecurity – Vigorous Manhood – which will be restored to you as promised by Dr. Alfred Sanden and his electric belt which is to be worn “every night and all night.” It will “send a great, warm flowing volume of electricity into your body through the nerve centres at small of back…you will feel and look young and strong again; women and men noticing your physical change will be more attracted to you on account of your new vitality and life: in two months you can experience the full vigor of perfect manhood.”

    Dr. Sanden will also send you his book free, which has a part entitled “Strength,” a private treatise for men only. If you were concerned about privacy and what your mailman would tell the neighbors, the package would be sent sealed by mail upon application.


    8. For The Lame With Short Limb

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    The E.L. O’Connor Mfg. Co. was very blunt when it came to advertising their wares. “We hide your lameness.” Many people needed prosthetics and advertisements for them were common. With ad copy like, “By wearing our Extension, we make you look like other people, not lame,” how could you resist buying their product?


    9. Brush Automobile

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    Shifting gears, if you wanted to buy a car there were many choices and price ranges. For only $495 you could buy Everyman’s Car, The Brush automobile from the Brush Runabout Co..


    10. The New York Auto School

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    With the growing automobile industry came the natural need for qualified mechanics. The New York School of Automobile Engineers recognized this need and became one of many schools that would furnish the burgeoning industry with the necessary staff to maintain and fix cars.


    11. Meilinks Safe

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    Safes were a big industry in the late 19th and early 20th century. The Meilink Mfg. Co. of Toledo, Ohio manufactured safes for all sorts of people and purposes.

    With prices starting at only $8.00, almost anyone with valuables to lock away could afford a safe in their house.

    The selling point in 1910 was that their safes were “the only safe guaranteed against dampness rusted bolt work and swollen walls.”

    Meilink, founded in 1899 is still in the safe business today.


    12. Red Nose and Pimple Face?

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    Bendiner & Schlesinger Druggists on 3rd Avenue and 10th Street have something to help you.


    13. Why should you read The World?

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    There are seven good reasons according to the ad.

    Considering almost every newspaper in the country had a political bias, The World claimed they were independent in politics. Another chief reason to read The World is that they were indefatigable in gathering news. As proof of their superiority, The World boasted they had more than twice the circulation of any other morning newspaper in New York.


    14. Subscribe to The New York Sunday World

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    A separate ad for Almanac readers to consider subscribing to The New York Sunday World stated that they were simply the best at everything, whether it be news, editorials, writers, humor etc. The annual cost for a subscription was $2.50.


    15. "Acme" Fire Extinguisher

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    A fire extinguisher was a necessity few could afford in 1910. Offered here straight out of a Roadrunner and Wile E. Coyote cartoon, comes the “Acme” Fire Extinguisher.


    16. No More Bald Heads?

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    William Charles Keene, president of the Lorrimer Institute asks in his ad, “No More Bald Heads? Baltimore Specialist Says Baldness Is Unnecessary And Proves It.”

    Of course it is not true.

    Keene, was just another charlatan in a long line of patent medicine fakers peddling his wares to a gullible public through an earnest appeal to try his treatment for free.


    17. A Perfect Typewriter

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    The Bennett Portable Typewriter was an affordable choice for those who wanted an inexpensive typewriter. As the ad states, “it does everything the most expensive machines can do for you, as easily, quickly and neatly as you desire.”

    The ad is not exaggerating about the portability of the typewriter. The ad describes that it is “so compact that it may be carried about in pocket or suitcase or slipped into desk drawer- yet big enough for every use.”

    The Bennett was the smallest keyboard typewriter ever built, at about the size of a small box of chocolates.


    18. Burglar-Proof Coffin

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    Many advertisements appear for coffins and burial apparatus. The Champion Chemical Company displays here “The Baker Burglar-Proof Metallic Grave Vault.”

    It offered “positive protection from water, vermin and grave robbers.”

    The copy boasts, “These vaults are made from heavy steel plates and malleable iron, securely riveted and caulked, and are just as water-tight as any steam boiler. Ten massive concealed locks make them absolutely Burglar-proof.”

    Between the fear of being buried alive and grave robber’s, coffin and vault companies did a thriving business.


    19. Trommers Evergreen Brewery

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    Moving on from coffins, we go to Trommer’s Evergreen Brewery at Bushwick and Conway Streets which was located near the The Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn.

    The brewery housed a restaurant cafe and garden.

    Trommer’s was acquired by Piel’s in 1951 and Piel’s closed the brewery in 1955.


    20. Dr. E.L. Styles Sanitarium

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    If you enjoyed beer too much you might end up at Dr. E.L. Styles Sanitarium in New Britain Connecticut, which was among the many places you could go to get weened off of liquor. The other nasty 1910 habits that Dr. Styles scientifically treated were opium, morphine and cocaine.

    Dr Styles proclaims “that over 20,000 people have been cured by this treatment over the last seven years.”

    The sanitarium appealed to “business men who feel the need of getting straightened out quickly, and with all the comforts of home surroundings.”

    (via Stuff Nobody Cares About)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/12/20-crazy-and-interesting-vintage-ads.html
     
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  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    18 Vivid Color Photos of Britain's Seaside in Its Heyday

    Born in 1916 in Somerset, England, John Hinde is considered to be one of the pioneers of color photography. Following his training at the Reimann School of Photography Hinde went on to setup a studio in London working as a documentary, war and advertising photographer.

    In 1943 Hinde was made a Fellow in the Royal Photographic Society and commissioned to take pictures for books such as Citizen in War (1945), Exmoor Village (1947) and British Circus Life (1948). While working on the latter Hinde decided to quit his photographic career and join the circus as a PR manager. This was followed by a failed attempt to start his own traveling company in Ireland until finally in 1956 he returned to photography and founded his eponymous postcard business.

    At the time black and white images dominated the postcard market, however as a trained color photographer Hinde was determined to create bright and vibrant cards of English and Irish landscape.

    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, Hinde worked on his most widely known production: the Butlin Holiday Camps postcards. Billy Butlin had founded the camps as a place for working-class people to go for vacation, complete with high excitement and low cost. Butlin hired Hinde to produce postcards that reflected the spirited and enjoyable environment found at his camps. By this time, Hinde worked more as an art director than an actual photographer, so he hired two German photographers, Elmar Ludwig and Edmund Nägele, and one British photographer, David Noble. They travelled to the different camps and set up the necessary lights and photography equipment, often taking a whole day to make them just right.

    Often considered kitsch and at a time when only black and white photography was taken seriously, Hinde’s pictures never received critical acclaim. In the late ’70s color photography finally began to receive acknowledgement from museums. Around the same time Martin Parr began to renew interest in Hinde’s work, hailing it for its documentary value and exceptional technical accomplishment.

    Here, below is a collection of 18 vivid color photographs of Britain's seaside in its heyday. Many of them depict popular seaside destinations in Britain and Ireland during the Sixties and Seventies, before the arrival of low-cost flying hastened their decline.

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    John Hinde, On the road to Keem Strand, Achill Island, Co, Ireland

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    Joan Willis, Deep Sea Fishing off the Irish Coast

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    Elmar Ludwig, Pentewan Sands, Cornwall

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    Edmund Nagele, Sailing at Shaldon, Devon

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Bathing Pool, Ramsgate

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    Elmar Ludwig, Gyllyngvase Beach and Crazy Golf Course, Falmouth, Cornwall

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    Elmar Ludwig, Motor Racing at St. Ouen’s Bay, Jersey, C.I.

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Beach and Harbour, Gorran Haven, near Mevagissey, Cornwall

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    John Hinde, Aerial Chair Lift to Eagle’s Nest, Bray, Co. Wicklow, Ireland

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Promenade, Havre-des-Pas, Jersey, C.I.

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    Elmar Ludwig, Crooklets Beach, Bude, Cornwall

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    John Hinde, The Harbour, St. Ives, Cornwall

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    Elmar Ludwig, Bodinick Ferry, Fowey, Cornwall

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    Elmar Ludwig, Tamar Bridge, Plymouth, Devon

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Inner Harbour, Ramsgate

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    Edmund Nagele, The Boating Lake, Cromer, Norfolk

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    Joan Willis, The Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Pier, Margate

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/18-vivid-color-photos-of-britains.html
     
  4. Carrion Crow

    Carrion Crow Silver Member Silver Miner Site Supporter ++

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    golf ball head.jpg

    Guy in Sweden takes a golf ball to the noggin.
     
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  5. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    ^^ that's gonna leave a mark!
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Old West Saloons: Where Real Cowboys Often Gathered in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries

    In the American Old West, a saloon designates a café or hotel. The first was established in 1822 at Brown's Hole, Wyoming, between Colorado and Utah, to serve trappers during the harsh fur season. The popularity of these establishments is attested by the fact that even a city of 3,000 inhabitants, such as Livingston (Montana), recorded up to 33 saloons in 1883.

    Who goes to the saloon? Cowboys to negotiate cattle, drink alcohol, play poker... There are trappers, travelers, gold diggers, soldiers, lawyers, railwaymen ... The myth of the smoky saloon was born. Many saloons welcome their clients 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They are often accused of being propitious to scenes of "general fights", or pistol duels that end in shootings in the street or public hangings.

    Take a look at these rare photos to see what real cowboys at saloons looked like in the 19th and early years of 20th centuries.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/old-west-saloons-where-real-cowboys.html
     
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  7. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    IMG_1067.JPG
     
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  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    James N. Lee At the Easel
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Albert Bierstadt Lake Tahoe
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Julia Beck Vinterlandskap
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Moritz von Schwind Early Morning
     
  12. searcher

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    [​IMG]
     
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    [​IMG]
     
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    [​IMG]
     
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    [​IMG]
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
     
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    [​IMG]
     
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    [​IMG]
     
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    [​IMG]
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Vought A-7 Corsair II Hellenic Air Force
     
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    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Fascinating Before and After Portraits of American Indian Students at the Carlisle Indian School from the Late 19th Century

    The Carlisle Indian School was founded in 1879 by Colonel Richard Henry Pratt under authority of the US federal government. While he championed racial equality (something he set out to showcase at the school), his idea of equality was a peculiarly 19th Century one. He aimed to prove that American Indians were the equals of whites by making them as white as possible. His slogan at Carlisle was "Kill the Indian, Save the Man."

    Students were forbidden from speaking their own languages. Their hair was cut, they were dressed in suits and ties and corseted dresses. They didn't go home for years at a time. And they were taught trades, like baking and blacksmithing, which were meant to give them a foothold in the white world after graduation. Yet many students had good experiences, and remembered Pratt as a good man... the "father of Indian education," as one student describes him in our story.

    Since Pratt's mission was to show that American Indians still had a place in a world that was destroying their homes and cultures, he was eager to hold up examples of students succeeding on his terms. Pratt commissioned these "Before and After" photos to demonstrate the transformations happening at Carlisle.

    Let's start with the Tom Torlino -- his portraits are two of the most striking (and best-known) "Before and After" images. Taken by photographer John Choate in his Carlisle studio in 1882, this "before" photo was taken when Tom arrived at school, just a few years after it opened in 1879:

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    Tom Torlino, a Navajo student at the Carlisle Indian School, 1882

    Here he is three years later, in 1885. Notice how much lighter Tom's skin appears in this photo. Barbara Landis and Richard Tritt from the Cumberland County Historical Society believe Choate manipulated the lighting to help make a point: with the proper education, Carlisle students could literally blend in with white society.

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    Tom Torlino, 1885


    Here's another early shot, also from 1882, of twelve Navajo Students -- including Tom Torlino, sitting in the front row, bottom left. And that's RH Pratt looking on from the bandstand:

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    Navajo students who entered Carlisle October 21, 1882

    Then we have "Navajo Group who entered Carlisle October 21, 1882 after some time at the school." Once again, there's Tom Torlino -- sitting in the center row, third from left.

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    Navajo Group who entered Carlisle October 21, 1882 after some time at the school.


    Here's another studio shot, this time of three Sioux boys. Richard Tritt, the CCHS photo archivist, explained that during these studio photo shoots, Choate had props and costumes on hand. It's not clear how much Choate controlled what the students wore, but it's worth bearing in mind... even though the caption on this photo describes "Three Sioux students as they arrived at the Carlisle Indian School in 1883:"

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    Three Sioux students as they arrived at the Carlisle Indian School in 1883.

    Here are the same three boys after three years at Carlisle, wearing cadet uniforms:

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    Three Sioux students after three years at the Carlisle Indian School.


    This photo of four Pueblo children is one of the few studio portraits that combines girls and boys. It was taken in 1880, just a year after the school opened:

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    Four Pueblo children from Zuni, N.M., c. 1880.

    And now with hair cuts and uniforms:

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    Zuni Pueblo students at the Carlisle Indian School


    This photo so haunting -- it's a group of Chiricahua Apaches after arriving from a prison camp in Fort Marion, Florida (Pratt ran that prison before starting Carlisle). Barbara Landis explained that these were Geronimo's people, who were not allowed to return home. Conditions were terrible at Fort Marion, and as a result, the Apaches who came to Carlisle from Florida were some of the most unhealthy students at Carlisle, and many didn't survive. The school cemetery has a large number of Apache students buried there.

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    Chiracahua Apaches as they arrived at Carlisle from Fort Marion, Florida, November 4, 1886.

    A few months later, from March, 1887: "Chiracahua Apaches four months after their arrival at Carlisle:"

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    Chiracahua Apaches four months after their arrival at Carlisle, March 1887.


    And finally, White Buffalo. White Buffalo was a student at Carlisle from 1881 to 1884. This photo was taken in 1881, when White Buffalo was 18 -- he had prematurely gray hair:

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    White Buffalo was at Carlisle from 1881 to 1884. He had prematurely gray hair -- he is 18 here, in 1881.

    Here he is some time later, hair cropped and parted, with a jacket and tie:

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    White Buffalo was a student at Carlisle from 1881 to 1884. He had prematurely gray hair.

    (Images: Cumberland County Historical Society, Carlisle, PA; via Radiolab)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/fascinating-before-and-after-portraits.html
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Glory Days of Train Travel: Inside the Pullman Train Cars, the Epitome of Luxury Palace Cars and Superliners from the Late 19th Century

    The Pullman Palace Car Company, founded by George Pullman, manufactured railroad cars in the mid-to-late 19th century through the early decades of the 20th century, during the boom of railroads in the United States. Its workers initially lived in a planned worker community (or “company town”) named Pullman.

    George Mortimer Pullman was always an inventive, innovative entrepreneur. Legendarily, an extremely uncomfortable overnight train ride from Buffalo toWestfield, New York, caused him to realize that there was a vast market potential for comfortable, clean, efficient passenger service. He had a great deal of experience with compact and efficient sleeping accommodations thanks to his experiences with canal boats on the Erie Canal. He formed a partnership with former New York state senator Benjamin C. Field in 1857, one of his close friends and neighbors from Albion, to build and operate several sleeping cars. Pullman and Field secured a contract from the Chicago, Alton and St. Louis Railroad to develop a more comfortable sleeping car. Pullman and Field converted two moderately successful cars. Field, more interested in politics than rail cars, assigned his interest to Pullman in exchange for future loans.

    In many ways, George Pullman intended his Palace Car Company to counter the discomfort, disorder, and discontinuity endemic to rail travel and modern urban life. As early as 1860, before his company had even existed, Pullman had been experimenting with railcar construction by outfitting his cars with sleeping berths that could be folded into chairs during the day. The innovation made Pullman’s cars wider than standard railcars, which initially prevented most railroads from carrying them on their narrower rails. After George Pullman secured the right for one of his cars to serve as Abraham Lincoln’s funeral car in 1865, interest in Pullman’s sleeping cars greatly expanded. In 1867, Pullman incorporated Pullman’s Palace Car Company with several investors and devoted himself to manufacturing sleeping cars.

    But Pullman did more than simply manufacture sleeping cars. He also focused on transforming the entire experience of rail travel. As the photographs and documents below convey, Pullman emphasized the palatial aspects of his railcars. Outfitted with plush seating and ostentatious decorations, Pullman cars were intended to bring order and comfort to modern rail travel.

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    The First Pullman Car

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    Pullman's Palace Hotel Car Menu

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    Interior of Rococo Period Car

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    Interior of Wood Car

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    Interior of Wood Car, Bed Room

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    Interior of Wood Car, Lounge Interior

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    Lounge Car Interior

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    Interior of Wood Car

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    Pullman's Palace Car Company Stock Certificate

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/the-glory-days-of-train-travel-inside.html
     
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    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Amazing Pictures Capture Everyday Life in Soviet Villages During WWII Through a German Soldier-Photographer's Eyes

    Asmus Remmer was a German photographer who specialized in portraiture, genre and landscape photography. From between 1940-45 he was an infantry soldier of Wehrmacht. In May 1945 he found himself in the American POW camp which he left in autumn of the same year.

    Asmus wrote he was left at the railway station in Pavlinovo, Kaluga region of Russia. At the sunrise they could see the first Russian village. The houses were covered with snow. A Russian woman at the well and pink smoke of chimneys – he felt as if reading the Bible, and he exclaimed: “Is this the place where we wage war?” He felt sick at that moment and other soldiers brought him into the wooden house.

    When he awoke, he saw A Russian girl standing on her knees in front of him and giving him a teaspoon with hot milk and honey. He told her: “I could kill your husband but you still worry about me.”

    Soon he saw more Russian villages and understood that they had to make peace with Russians as soon as possible. It can be seen on his photos that Russians didn’t pay attention to his military uniform and were rather friendly. They overcame more than a thousand of kilometers deep into the Russian Empire and he kept thinking all the time in what condition this country would be when they leave.

    All the pictures were taken in the Kaluga region in 1942-43.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2016/05/amazing-pictures-capture-everyday-life.html
     
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    The Incredible Elongated Head Culture of the Mangbetu People

    Mangbetu people live in Central Africa, in northeastern Congo. The name Mangbetu refers, strictly speaking, only to the aristocracy, which in the 19th century established a number of powerful kingdoms; in looser usage it denotes the whole amalgam of people they ruled.The Mangbetu impressed early travelers with their political institutions and their arts, especially their remarkable skill as builders, potters, and sculptors. They became renowned also for their supposed cannibalism and for their practice of deforming the heads of babies.

    Lipombo’, the custom of skull elongation, which was a status symbol among the Mangbetu ruling classes at the beginning of the century and was later emulated by neighboring groups, evolved into a common ideal of beauty among the peoples of the northeastern Congo. The tradition survived until the middle of this century, when it was outlawed by the Belgian government.

    The Mangbetu had a distinctive look and this was partly due to their elongated heads. At birth the heads of babies’ were tightly wrapped with cloth in order to give their heads the streamlined look. The practice began dying out in the 1950s with the arrival of more Europeans and westernization. Because of this distinctive look, it is easy to recognize Mangbetu figures in African art.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/the-incredible-elongated-head-culture.html
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    What Passengers Actually Ate on the Titanic? Food Menus Reveal What Was Served in First, Second, and Third Class on the Ship Before It Went Down

    Since its infamous maiden voyage 105 years ago, the RMS Titanic has served as an endless source of fascination for casual filmgoers and hard-core history buffs alike. First, second, and third class menus from the Titanic allow a glimpse into what daily life was like on the infamous steamship before it’s catastrophic collision with an iceberg just before midnight on April 14, 1912. Unsurprisingly, the differences between eating as a first class passenger and a third class passenger were pretty extreme.

    In first class, passengers were treated to as many as 13 courses for a single dinner. This menu from the ship shows what these passengers ate for luncheon on the day the Titanic hit the iceberg:

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    Clearly, first class passengers weren’t lacking in options. The second-class menu is considerably simpler than that for first class, with fewer choices, but it still offered delicacies like lamb, curried, chicken, and roast turkey.

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    Second class breakfast was also quite hearty and varied. “Grilled ox kidneys & bacon”? Yum!

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    In third class, dining options were much simpler, with fewer options:

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    Although these dishes may look a lot less exciting than the feasts served in first class, they were nevertheless substantial and filling, and were in general a lot better than the typical food served to third class passengers on similar ocean liners. Evans points out that, “[c]oming from countries like Ireland and Norway where fresh fruits and vegetables were scarce, many third-class passengers probably found their fare almost decadent.”

    (via Bustle)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/what-passengers-actually-ate-on-titanic.html
     
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    Hoovervilles in the 1930s: Amazing Vintage Photographs That Capture Everyday Life in the Shanty Towns during the Great Depression

    Many of the shanty towns that sprung up all over the United States during the Depression were facetiously called Hoovervilles because so many people at the time blamed President Herbert Hoover for letting the nation slide into the Great Depression.

    In October of 1929, the stock market experienced a devastating crash resulting in an unprecedented number of people in the U.S. without homes or jobs, a period of history now known as the Clutch Plague.

    While homelessness was present prior to the crash, the group was relatively small and cities were able to provide adequate shelter through various municipal housing projects. However, as the Depression set in, demand grew and the overflow became far too overwhelming and unmanageable for government resources to keep up with.

    Homeless people in large cities began to build their own houses out of found materials, and some even built more permanent structures from brick. Small shanty towns—later named Hoovervilles after President Hoover—began to spring up in vacant lots, public land and empty alleys. Three of these pop-up villages were located in New York City; the largest of them was on what is now Central Park’s Great Lawn.

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    (Images: Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/Retronaut)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/hoovervilles-in-1930s-amazing-vintage.html
     
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    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    24 Badass Samurai From 19th Century That Make You Want To Be Like Them

    Samurai were the military nobility and officer caste of medieval and early-modern Japan. These photos of cool Samurai from the 19th century that make you admire.


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    Oda Nobuyoshi

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    Sakuzaemon Yamanouchi

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    Ōkuma Shigenobu

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    Takasugi Shinsaku

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    Matsudaira Yoshinaga

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    Tadataka Mizuno

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    Enomoto Takeaki

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    Yamaoka Tesshū

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    Ōkubo Toshimichi

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    Fukuzawa Yukichi

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    Chikaratsunemori Yokoyama

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    Heikuro Shibusawa

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    Hidetoshi Egawa

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    Hijikata Toshizō

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    Jojiro Ogata

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    Katsu Kaishū

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    Matsudaira Katamori

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    Kogoro Katsura

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    Masayuki Okudaira

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    Tokugawa Mochinaga

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    Ogasawara Nagamichi

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    Ikeda Nagaoki

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    Nakaoka Shintarō

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    Shimazu Nariakira

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/24-badass-samurai-from-19th-century.html
     
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    30 Astonishing Portraits of London Street Children from the Early 1900s

    Around 1900, photographer Horace Warner took a series of portraits of some of the poorest people in London - creating relaxed, intimate images that gave dignity to his subjects and producing great photography that is without comparison in his era. You can find more of these breathtaking photographs are published by Spitalfields Life Books here.


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    (via Spitalfields Life)

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/03/30-astonishing-portraits-of-london.html
     
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    Peace, Love and Freedom – Pictures of Hippie Fashions from the late 1960s to 1970s

    The late 1960s produced a style categorized of people who promoted sexual liberation and favored a type of politics reflecting "peace, love and freedom". Ponchos, moccasins, love beads, peace signs, medallion necklaces, chain belts, polka dot-printed fabrics, and long, puffed "bubble" sleeves were additional trends in the late 1960s.

    Both men and women wore frayed bell-bottomed jeans, tie-dyed shirts, workshirts, Jesus sandals, and headbands. Women would often go barefoot, and some went braless. The idea of multiculturalism also became very popular; a lot of style inspiration was drawn from traditional clothing in Nepal, India, Bali, Morocco and African countries. Because inspiration was being drawn from all over the world, there was increasing separation of style; though clothing pieces often had similar elements and created similar silhouettes, there was no real "uniform".

    Fringed buck-skin vests, flowing caftans, the "lounging" or "hostess" pajamas. These consisted of a tunic top over floor-length culottes, and were usually made of polyester or chiffon.

    Long maxi coats, often belted and lined in sheepskin, appeared at the close of the decade. Animal prints were also popular for women in the autumn and winter of 1969. Women's shirts often had transparent sleeves. Psychedelic prints, hemp and the look of "Woodstock" came about in this generation.

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    [​IMG]
    Marie Egner In the Blossoming Bower
     
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    [​IMG]
    Léon Augustin Lhermitte Les Halles
     
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    [​IMG]
    Gustav Klimt Death and Life
     

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