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Random Pictures thread !

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by GOLDZILLA, Apr 4, 2010.



  1. lumpOgold

    lumpOgold Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    I thought there were signs posted about nudity?
     

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  2. tom baxter

    tom baxter back from 2004

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    One for the deniers
    Apollo 17 footprints captured by a lunar orbiter

    [​IMG]
     
  3. tom baxter

    tom baxter back from 2004

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    Meanwhile, in Japan...

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  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Admiral Togo at Brooklyn Navy Yard 15th August 1911
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Wounded US Troops taken off Hospital Ship Solace 1917
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Wounded of HMS Pegasus being Taken onto Hospital Ship Gascow at Zanzibar October 1917
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Loading Food for Russian Pows at Hamburg 3rd August 1918
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    French Wounded being Transferred onto Hospital Ship at Salonica December 1917
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Britannic 1915, A Ward for Dangerously Wounded Soldiers onboard 1916
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rakaia 1946-71, ex Empire Abercorn 1944-46, Cadets Painting Lifeboat 18th November 1958
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rangitira Loading 1902 Crestmobile at Wellington, going to Picton 1958
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Launceston Wharf Painting What Ship
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    This view of Aquitania's foredeck was taken during a strong Atlantic storm in 1931. Although neither her crew nor passengers would know about it, this storm was in fact so strong; it ripped the welded letter Q right out of her name on the port bow. Onlookers at Southampton noticed the brass colored letters absence, noting that all that could be seen was the outline of where the raised letter had once been, and that the original primer grey color from her launch was suddenly visible again on that portion of her hull, for the first time in years.
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Here Are 10 Notorious Female Outlaws From the Wild West
    August 27, 2017

    Perhaps no other time in America's history is as steeped in myth, legend, and adventure as the pioneering age of the "Wild West." Outlaws, lawmen, cowboys, American Indians, miners, ranchers, and more than a few "ladies of ill repute" emerged in this era, from 1865 to 1900.

    Any female settler in the West was a heroine in her own right, but listed here are a few of the more famous women of this intriguing period.

    1. Pearl Hart

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    Born in Lindsay, Canada in 1871, Hart attended an exclusive school. However, she enjoyed adventuring more than school work. At age seventeen, Pearl eloped to Chicago with gambler, Frederick Hart. But, Frederick was abusive and Hart left him at age Twenty-two. She made her way to Arizona where she met miner, Joe Boot. When Boot couldn’t make enough dough from mining, the lovers turned to robbery. They developed a routine where Hart would lure a man into her room, and, once through the door, Boot would whack the unsuspecting gentleman on the head and rob him. However, this play was risky and the couple were almost caught on several occasions. In 1899, Hart developed a plan to rob a stagecoach. More money, less risk.

    Hart cut her hair and dressed as a man. Boot held up the driver, while Hart took over $400 from the passengers. After giving a little back to ensure the victims had enough money for food and a hotel, Hart and Boot rode gallantly away into the sunset, only to get lost in the desert. After several days of wandering, they desperately needed sleep, but when they woke the sheriff and his posse had found them. They were caught a mere three miles from the scene of the crime. It was while she was being tried for her crimes that Hart is famous for saying this feminist phrase, "I shall not consent to be tried under a law in which my sex had no voice in making." Unfortunately, the judge didn't care and Hart was tried and convicted anyway.

    Being the second woman to rob a stage coach and the first one not to die while doing it, Hart instantly became the most famous woman in Arizona. Journalists came from all over to interview Hart and photograph her with her gun. Hart received a pardon after 18 months. The official reason was that the penitentiary did not have accommodations for women, although rumor had it that Hart was pregnant and the judge didn't want to have to explain how that happened. Hart later had a brief stint in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, but lived the rest of her life low key.


    2. Laura Bullion

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    Bullion was born into a life of crime. Her father was a bank robber, and Bullion, after spending her teenage years as a prostitute, joined the Wild Bunch Gang and became known at the “Rose of the Wild Bunch”. Bullion sold stolen goods and made connections that kept the bunch in steady supply of horses. She was romantically involved with several members of the gang, on and off. On certain occasions she dressed as a man and joined the rest of the gang in train robberies. In 1901, she was arrested with $8,500 worth of stolen banknotes in her possession. When she was released from prison, Bullion retired from her life of crime and became an interior designer in Memphis, Tennessee. Bullion died of heart disease in 1961. Her gravestone is embossed with a rose and thorny vines and reads “The Thorny Rose.” Bullion was the last surviving member of The Wild Bunch Gang.


    3. Madam Vestal

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    Born and raised on a wealthy southern plantation, Belle Siddons was the definition of a Southern beauty. During the Civil War, she employed her good looks and became a confederate spy at twenty-five. She was caught and imprisoned, but pardoned after four months. She later married a gambling man who taught her to play cards. Finding that she was naturally good at the game, Belle became famous as a dealer of the game 21. When her husband died, Siddons followed the gold rush and set up shop in South Dakota. As owner of her own dance hall, bar, and gambling establishment, Siddons changed her name to Madame Vestal. It was in her establishment that she met and fell in love with stage coach robber, Archie McLaughlin. Once again, Siddons used her skills and beauty to become a spy and retract information from stagecoach drivers which she then passed on to her lover. Unfortunately, Siddons’ confidence got the best of her and one night she let slip that there was going to be a robbery. McLaughlin was caught, tried and hung, and Siddons became a wandering drunk who would eventually die alone in jail.


    4. Rose Dunn

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    Born in Oklahoma in 1879, Dunn became an outlaw when she fell in love with George Newcomb, a member of the Doolin Gang. Dunn participated in the gang by providing them with ammunition and supplies when members could not go to town. Once, Dunn saved Newcomb when he was wounded by U.S. Marshals. She dodged open fire and held off the Marshals with her own rifle until he could get to safety. Dunn’s brothers, who were bounty hunters, eventually turned Newcomb in and Dunn settled down with a politician.


    5. Sally Scull

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    Sarah Jane Newman was born tough. Born in 1817 to one of the first families to settle in Austin territory, Scull grew up having to defend her family’s land from constant attack. Her mother, Rachel Newman, once cut off the toes of a Comanche Indian who was trying to get through their front door. Inheriting her mother’s spirit, Scull became notorious as a male-dressing, gun-slinging, horse-trading woman. Twice a year she would make the treacherous trip alone to Mexico and come back with horses she probably stole, but no proof could be found. She’s also rumored to have killed two of her five husbands.


    6. Big Nose Kate

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    Mary Katherine Haroney was born into a wealthy family with devastating circumstances. Kate’s parents died when she was fourteen and she was placed into a foster care system. Kate ran away from her caregiver and went on to marry a dentist. When her husband died, Kate moved to Texas and became a dance hall girl and prostitute. This is where she met Doc Holliday. Kate spent the next several years acting as Holliday’s sidekick as she followed him across the country. She is famous for burning down a building to release Holliday from incarceration.

    7. Belle Starr

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    Born in 1848 to a prosperous family in Missouri, Myra Maybelle Shirley should have become a proper young lady, married a rich man, and never done anything interesting in her life. But, as luck would have it, Starr preferred to be outdoors learning to shoot a gun with her older brother, Bud, than stay inside the all-girl’s school she attended.

    Fate changed the stars for Starr when her family moved to Texas in 1864. It was here that she would met members of Jesse James’ crew, the James-Younger Gang. In 1866, Starr married a horse thief named Jim Reed, who, in 1869, murdered a man who was said to have killed his brother. After the murder, the couple fled to California together. Jim was shot to death in 1874. Left as a widow, Belle joined the Starr Clan and married Samuel Starr. It was then that she submerged herself in outlawry. She became the mastermind behind the gang. Starr was arrested several times, but it seemed she was just as good at eluding sheriffs as she was at stealing horses, they never had enough evidence to put her away. In 1889, Starr was shot in the back while riding home from the general store. Her murderer is still unknown.


    8. Etta Place

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    Most well-known as Butch Cassidy’s girlfriend and, later, Harry Longabaugh’s (the Sundance Kid) wife, Etta Place is surrounded by mystery. Historians know that she was a sweetheart to the Wild Bunch Gang, that she assisted Cassidy and Longabaugh in certain heists and fled with them to Argentina, but her exact identity and life after Longabaugh’s death are mostly unknown. Theories have suggested that she and Ann Bassett, one of the famous, cattle-rustling Bassett sisters, were one and the same because of similar looks and their ties to the Wild Bunch Gang.


    9. Eleanor Dumont

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    Perhaps born in New Orleans to Creole parents around 1829, Dumont’s early life is not well-known. What is known is that she appeared in Nevada City, opened up a gambling house and immediately enticed men with her good looks and even better manners. Dumont fell in love with conman Jack McKnight who stole her money and sold her ranch. Dumont tracked McKnight down and shot him dead. After that, she returned to gambling. She became plump and a thick line of hair began to grow on her upper lip, earning her the nickname Madame Mustache. After that, Dumont’s fortunes continued to dwindle. In 1878 she lost $300 of borrowed money in one night of gambling. She was found dead the next morning.


    10. Bonnie Parker

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    Born in 1910 in Rowena, Texas, Parker grew up to be a bright student with aspirations to become an actress. But everything changed when nineteen-year-old Bonnie met twenty-year-old ex-con, Clyde Barrow. The two fell immediately in love and Bonnie joined Clyde’s gang to become a full-time thief and murderer. Bonnie and Clyde embarked on a two-year crime spree that crossed five states and killed thirteen civilians. They died in an ambush led by Texas Ranger, Frank Hamer, in 1934. During a brief stint in jail, Bonnie wrote a poem that foreshadowed their fate: “Someday they’ll go down together/ And they’ll bury them side by side/ To few it’ll be grief/ to the law a relief/ but it’s death for Bonnie and Clyde.”

    (via Owlcation)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/08/here-are-10-notorious-female-outlaws.html
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    31 Historical Photos of the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921)
    August 27, 2017

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    Group of women activists holding protest posters and an American flag, being directed by policemen, at an unidentified location, December 1920

    The Irish War of Independence or Anglo-Irish War or the Tan War was a guerrilla war fought from 1919 to 1921 between the Irish Republican Army (IRA, the Army of the Irish Republic) and the British Security Forces in Ireland. It was an escalation of the Irish revolutionary period into armed conflict.

    A truce was agreed in July 1921. In December 1921, the Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed, effectively ending British rule in Ireland, excepting the Six Counties: Antrim, Armagh, Down, Fermanagh, Derry/Londonderry, Tyrone.

    Following the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty in December 1921, there was a steady evacuation of British soldiers from Ireland during 1922.

    A historical photo set from National Library of Ireland that documented emotional moments of the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921).

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    The car in which Lord French was ambushed, sergeant pointing out bullet hole, Dublin, December 1919

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    A fraction of the thousands of people flocking each day to visit and pray at 'bleeding' statues set up in a yard beside T. Dwan's newsagents, Main Street, Templemore, Tipperary, August 1920

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    Aeroplane on roof at Barrack Street, Waterford, November 1920

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    Dublin and Cork fire brigade appliances, December 1920

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    Friends of the victims and members of the military outside Jervis Street Hospital during the military enquiry into the Bloody Sunday shootings at Croke Park, 21 November 1920

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    Funeral procession of Major E. Smyth and Captain A.P. White on the quays in Dublin, 14 October 1920

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    Group of women activists holding protest posters and an American flag, being directed by policemen, at an unidentified location, December 1920

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    Black and Tans man in uniform on duty, smoking and posing with a Lewis gun, Dublin, circa 1920

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    R.I.C. military and armoured car leaving Limerick on a scouting expedition, 1920

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    Sinn Féin Bank at No. 6 Harcourt Street, Dublin, November 1920

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    The Burning of Cork, 14 December 1920

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    'Up Sinn Féin' on Austin armoured car outside Mounjoy Prison in Dublin, 12 April 1920

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    A crowd gathered outside the Mansion House in Dublin, one day before a truce was signed in the War of Independence,
    8 July 1921

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    A group of men who were interned in Ballykinlar together, 1921

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    A prayer vigil, during the Irish Civil War, in London, 14 July 1921

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    A young man repairing a house that had apparently been damaged in a raid, Templemore, 1921

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    Aftermath of a fire at the British and Irish Steam Ship Co. Warehouse, May 5, 1921

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    Armed Royal Irish Constabulary outside a shop in Patrick Street, Cork getting the news from the street vendor, 1921

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    2British soldiers searching trains on Kerry line for republicans, 1921

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    Clean up after fire at former munitions factory, Parkgate Street, Dublin, June 4, 1921

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    Cork Funeral with military escort, 27th March 1921

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    Military carrying out official reprisal following an ambush in Meelin, Co. Cork, 5th January 1921

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    'Mother of God, open the prison gates'; 'Release our Fathers and Brothers'; and 'Mother of Mercy, pray for prisoners',
    23 July 1921

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    Sir Hamar and Lady Margery Greenwood arriving for the opening of the Ulster parliament, Belfast, 22 June 1921

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    Tank pulling three ton military truck from the banks of the Liffey, Dublin, 17 May 1921

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    Tans glad to have escaped the bombs thrown at their headquarters in Dublin, 11 April 1921

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    Three huge casks of tobacco being guarded by soldiers, May 17, 1921

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    British soldiers marching out of a barracks, Dublin, 17th May 1922

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    Firing party giving three volleys over the grave of Joseph McGuinness T.D. at Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin, June 2, 1922
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Soldiers marching across the bridge in Athlone for the handover of Custume Barracks, just one of the many barracks around the country to move from British to Irish control, 25 February 1922

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    Soldiers of a British cavalry regiment prepare to leave Ireland with their horses at North Wall, Dublin, 1922

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/08/31-historical-photos-of-irish-war-of.html
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    25 Amazing Vintage Photographs That Capture Everyday Life of Inuit People From the Early 20th Century
    August 22, 2017

    The Inuit people live in the far northern areas of Alaska, Canada, Siberia, and Greenland. They originally made their home along the Alaskan coast, but migrated to other areas. Everything about the lives of the Inuit is influenced by the cold tundra climate in which they live.

    The typical materials for making homes such as wood and mud are hard to find in the frozen tundra of the Arctic. The Inuit learned to make warm homes out of snow and ice for the winter. During the summer they would make homes from animal skin stretched over a frame made from driftwood or whalebones. The Inuit word for home is "igloo".

    The Inuit needed thick and warm clothing to survive the cold weather. They used animal skins and furs to stay warm. They made shirts, pants, boots, hats, and big jackets called anoraks from caribou and seal skin. They would line their clothes with furs from animals like polar bears, rabbits, and foxes.

    Check out these 25 amazing black and white photographs below that capture everyday life of Inuit people from the early 20th century.

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    The Eskimo seesaw is much more rugged then the familiar version. (Photo by Corbis via Getty Images)

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    An Eskimo family wear heavy parkas to keep themselves warm in the cold Alaska climate, circa 1910. (Photo by Michael Maslan/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)

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    The Klondike Goldrush. Eskimo handmade baskets, Teller, Alaska, with two native Eskimo boys, 1904. (Photo by F. H. Nowell/Bettmann Collection)

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    An Eskimo family living near the Mackenzie River, Canada. (Photo by Bettmann Collection)

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    An Eskimo group of men, women, and children dressed in fur coats in Port Clarence, Alaska in 1894. | Location: Port Clarence, Alaska. (Photo by Corbis via Getty Images)

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    A Point Hope hunter sits on the carcass of a whale which has been hauled onto the ice to be butchered. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)

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    Two Inuit children at Point Barrow, Alaska, holding the tusks of a large walrus, probably killed for food, circa 1930. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

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    A young inhabitant of the Melville Peninsula uses a small sled to transport a block of frozen snow home to melt for tea. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)

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    An Inuit mother dresses her young child in a fur snowsuit. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)

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    An Eskimo building an igloo. Undated photograph. (Photo by Bettmann Collection)

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    Eskimo with spear. Still from early documentary “Igloo” directed by Ewing Scott, 1932. (Photo by Bettmann Collection)

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    Scene is in Greenland, off Canada and at Cape York, with a young native, circa 1927. (Photo by Bettmann Collection)

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    A group of Inuit villagers dragging home a walrus, Alaska, circa 1930. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    Inuit (Eskimo) with snow goggles, 20th century. Yellowknife, Prince Of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)

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    Eskimo family admiring their modern conveniences, a victrola (C), a sewing machine & a stove (R) as they commune in their tent, October 1937. (Photo by Margaret Bourke-White/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Eskimo woman wears the tall, floppy hood of her tribe. Eskimos are more properly referred to as Inuits. The term Eskimo is considered derogatory. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)

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    Two Inuit hunters in Canada strip the meat from a pair of reindeer carcasses, March 1924. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    A Greenlandic couple with their children. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)

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    A scene at an Inuit blubber market in Canada, with dead walruses, March 1924. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

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    An Inuit hunter in Canada drags the carcass of a seal behind him, March 1924. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    People, Alaska, circa 1920. Eskimo children helping their mother on washing day. (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)

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    An Inuit carpenter at work using a traditional bow drill which he holds with his mouth and turns with a string, circa 1910. (Photo by Earl Rossman/General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

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    Eskimo (inuit) carrying a kayak, circa 1900. (Photo by APIC/Getty Images)

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    Eskimo Family in Home, Portait, Fort Magnesia, Cape Sabine, Ellsmere Island, Canada, circa 1900. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

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    Hudson Bay fur traders hang fox pelts out to air on a clothesline, at Eskimo Point. (Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/08/25-amazing-vintage-photographs-that.html
     
    ^updated^ likes this.
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    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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  20. tom baxter

    tom baxter back from 2004

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    Black lootings matter.
     
  21. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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  22. tom baxter

    tom baxter back from 2004

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    I never donate a cent to any of them, not even the lifesavers. Their clubs are full of poker machines now and they are rolling in bucks.
     
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  27. searcher

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    24 Stunning Photographs Taken by Stanley Kubrick That Capture Street Scenes of New York City in the 1940s


    Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999) was an American film director, writer, producer, and photographer who lived in England during most of the last four decades of his career. Kubrick was noted for the scrupulous care with which he chose his subjects, his slow method of working, the variety of genres he worked in, his technical perfectionism, his reluctance to talk about his films, and his reclusiveness. He maintained almost complete artistic control, making movies according to his own whims and time constraints, but with the rare advantage of big-studio financial support for all his endeavors.

    Before Stanley Kubrick was a filmmaker, he was a New York City-based photojournalist for Look magazine. His photography career began in 1945 when Kubrick sold a photo to Look (he was just 17 at the time.) From 1946 to 1950, Kubrick worked for the magazine, completing more than 300 assignments documenting the sights and people of New York City.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2011/12/stanley-kubricks-photos-of-1940s-new.html
     
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  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Here’s How Some of Rock and Roll Legends Would Look Like Today If They Weren’t Dead


    So many musicians have passed away too fast over the past couple of decades. They left their fans heartbroken, listening to their music until today. Regardless of your taste in music, chances are you remember when the news cycle covered one of their deaths. You are probably constantly thinking about what they could have yet created if they hadn’t died. Unfortunately, we cannot possibly know that, but what we could do is imagine what they would look like today if they were still alive.

    That’s exactly what the Sachs Media Group set out to do with the project you're about to see. They have teamed up with photo restoration and manipulation company Phojoe to create speculative portraits of what rock and roll's greatest musicians might look like if they were still alive today.

    The gallery, which is described as "a heartfelt tribute to the memory of beloved artists who helped shape generations of music fans, in order to keep their memory alive for future generations" features wrinkled and grey versions of Kurt Cobain, Jim Morrison, John Lennon, Keith Moon, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Elvis Presley, and Bob Marley.

    1. Elvis Presley

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    The King of Rock passed away on August 16, 1977, aged 42. The singer, songwriter, and actor is one of the most iconic symbols of pop culture. If he was alive today, he’d be 82.


    2. Jimi Hendrix

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    The great instrumentalist passed away on September 18, 1970, aged 27. Hendrix was the best guitarist of his generation. His influence can be seen, heard and felt in pop music today. He’d be 75 years old today.


    3. Kurt Cobain

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    Nirvana’s frontman passed away on April 5, 1994, aged 27. The troubled young performer and his band rose to fame in the 90s during the heyday of grunge music. He’d be 50 years old today.


    4. Janis Joplin

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    She passed away on October 4, 1970, aged 27. Janis’ powerful blues-inspired voice is one of the most recognizable of the 1960s. She’d be 74 years old today.


    5. Jim Morrison

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    The lead singer of The Doors passed away on July 3, 1971, aged 27. After his antics-filled career with The Doors, he moved to Paris to write poetry, where he died of heart failure. He’d be 74 years old today.


    6. John Lennon

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    He passed away on December 8, 1980, at the age of 40. Known as one of the most influential Beatles, Lennon’s murder shook the world to its core and ended an era in music. He would be 77 years old today.


    7. Bob Marley

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    The Jamaican singer/songwriter passed away on May 11, 1981, aged 36. His songs blending reggae, ska and rocksteady are still loved and listened to today. He would be 72 years old today.


    8. Karen Carpenter

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    The drummer and singer of the duo The Carpenters passed away on February 4, 1983, aged 32. Her passing due to anorexia nervosa brought widespread awareness to eating disorders. She would be 67 years old today.


    9. Keith Moon

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    The English drummer and member of The Who passed away on September 7, 1978, aged 32. He would be 71 years old today.


    10. Dennis Wilson

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    The co-founder and member of the Beach Boys passed away on December 28, 1983, aged 39. He was the band’s only surfer who exemplified the dream California life. He would be 73 years old today.


    11. Bobby Darin

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    The singer, songwriter, and actor passed away on December 20, 1973, aged 37. He’s credited with iconic songs like Splish Splash, Mack the Knife, Dream Lover and Beyond The Sea. He would be 81 years old today.


    12. Cass Elliot (Mama Cass)

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    The singer, actress, and member of The Mamas and The Papas passed away on July 29, 1974, aged 32. She would be 76 years old today.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/07/heres-how-some-of-rock-and-roll-legends.html
     
  29. brosil

    brosil Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    And all those people would have looked better than me. That's depressing.
     
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  30. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    34 Colorized Historical Photos That Will Change How You Feel About The Past



    Photography has always been the most used tool to record moments and important events in everyday life. Most of photos are in color today, but there are many historical black and white photos in the past. And if you have never imagined how they would look if they were in color, look at the photographs from the list below.

    1. Japanese archers, circa 1860.

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    2. A view from Capitol in Nashville, Tennessee during the Civil War, 1864.

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    3. Abraham Lincoln, 1865.

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    4. Charles Darwin, 1874.

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    5. Oscar II, King of Sweden and Norway, 1880.

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    6. Walt Whitman, 1887.

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    7. Theodore Roosevelt.

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    8. Thomas Edison.

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    9. Nicola Tesla.

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    10. Mark Twain in the garden, circa 1900.

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    11. Madison Square Park, NYC, circa 1900.

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    12. Rowing equipment, 1911.

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    13. Charlie Chaplin at the age of 27, 1916.

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    14. Ice delivery, 1918.

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    15. Auto Wreck in Washington D.C, 1921.

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    16. Joseph Goebbels scowling at photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt after finding out he’s Jewish, 1933.

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    17. A bread line, 1937.

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    18. Hindenburg Disaster, May 6, 1937.

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    19. Young boy in Baltimore slum area, July 1938.

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    20. Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939.

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    21. Albert Einstein at Nassau Point, Long Island, NYC, Summer 1939.

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    22. British troops gleefully board their train for the first stage of their foray to the front, England, September 20, 1939.

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    23. 'Old Gold', Country store, 1939.

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    24. Anne Frank, 1942.

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    25. A deserted boy holding a stuffed toy animal, London, 1945.

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    26. Kissing the War Goodbye in V-J Day, August 14, 1945.

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    27. H-Bomb testing at the Bikini Atoll, which was a dream destination until it became a nuclear testing site in the 1940s.

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    28. Winston Churchill.

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    29. Marilyn Monroe.

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    30. The beautiful Audrey Hepburn.

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  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    18 Interesting Vintage Photographs That Capture Everyday Life in Boston, Massachusetts in the 1920s


    Boston is the capital and most populous city of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. The city is the economic and cultural anchor of a substantially larger metropolitan area known as Greater Boston. Alternately, as a Combined Statistical Area (CSA), this wider commuting region is home to some 8.2 million people, making it the sixth-largest in the United States.

    Boston is one of the oldest cities in the United States, founded on the Shawmut Peninsula in 1630 by Puritan settlers from England. It was the scene of several key events of the American Revolution, such as the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Battle of Bunker Hill, and the Siege of Boston. Upon U.S. independence from Great Britain, it continued to be an important port and manufacturing hub as well as a center for education and culture.

    Here's a collection of 18 vintage photographs from the Boston Public Library that capture everyday life in Boston during the 1920s.

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    Mounted cop in action on Tremont Street

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    Capt. Bernard J. Hoppe of the Boston Traffic squad.

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    Snow bound car in Boston

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    Street car tie up 1920, when fares were 5 cents with no transfers as seen on the side, Commonwealth Ave.

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    Police officer helps woman through blinding snow during coldest blizzard to reach Boston

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    Old-fashioned snow blizzard, Boston. Coldest snow blizzard at its height on Tremont St.

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    Revere Beach crowd

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    Arlington Street traffic

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    Biggest snow blizzard in 22 years causes narrow gauge train to turn turtle at Beachmont. House with barn is 104 Washburn Ave., Revere.

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    Workers at the Jamaica Plain Post Office, 71 Green Street, near Cheshire Street

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    Baseball crowd at Soldiers Field, Harvard Stadium

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    The widening of Cambridge Street

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    Beach and Atlantic House hotel, Nantasket

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    Circus elephants parade through Boston

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    Tea kettle sign, Oriental Tea Co., near Court Street

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    Bathing girls at Revere Beach

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    Bathing girls, Revere Beach

    (via Boston Public Library)

    http://www.vintag.es/2014/08/pictures-of-everyday-life-of-boston.html
     
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  33. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Here's a List of Top 16 Bizarre Victorian Inventions


    If you think that organs and bones crushing corsets were the most bizarre creation of the Victorian era, you could not be more wrong. Victorians have come up with its fair share of weird inventions. Even though this era was a long period of peace and prosperity, science was going through a weird phase.

    Below are 16 bizarre inventions from the Victorian era, some useful, and some... not so much.

    1. MADAM ROWLEY'S TOILET MASK (OR FACE GLOVE)

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    Did you know that you can only remove your perfections by wearing this toilet mask three times a week? Also, in the unlikely event that it somehow doesn't work, you can just keep the thing on permanently.


    2. THE TRICK PLEDGE ALTAR

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    Oh, those Victorians! They did love a practical joke. And what could be funnier than encouraging a friend to make a pledge at your new home altar... only for him to be surprised by the abrupt appearance of a human skeleton - which spits scalding water into his face!??


    3. FENCE CYCLE

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    Sometimes walking the length of a fence can be just too much like hard work. If only there were some way to take the effort out of it. Well... there almost was, as demonstrated here by none other than Vincent Van Gogh - the Scarlet Pimpernel.


    4. THE WIRELESS TRICK TELEPHONE

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    We're back to the pranks again. "Hell-o, I hear you calling me!" says your innocent victim - only for the bottom of the phone to explode unexpectedly, and for his hand and face to be showered with broiling turps.


    5. THE "NIAGARA" WAVE & ROCKING BATH

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    The makers of the "Niagara" wave and rocking bath claim that there will be ABSOLUTELY no water splashing in the room, as you rock and thrash in order to generate the FULLEST ILLUSION of a sea or river bath. Maybe not... but that won't stop your family from having you carted off to Bedlam.


    6. MULTI-PURPOSE CANE

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    This, the Swiss Army Knife of canes, caters for all the gentlemanly pastimes: catching butterflies, sheltering from the rain, smoking opium, playing the flute, and measuring a horse. Well... all the gentlemanly pastimes... bar one.


    7. INVISIBLE PADDLE MACHINE

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    "My dear fellow... are you able to lift this casket whilst straddling it?"...

    "Why of course I can, Herbert..." BANG "My arse! My eyes!".


    8. WATER HUNTING TRIPOD

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    Among the worst things about shooting birds in the face is when they fly away over water. Well... curse those avian menaces no longer - for the Victorians had a method for pursuing them. The single most unstable method imaginable. Ever heard of boats, Victorian inventors?


    9. STAMP LICKER

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    Nobody likes licking stamps: who knows where they've been? A postal worker might've touched them, and you know what they're like. Mercifully, the Victorians had a solution - an artificial, salivating dog's head.


    10. THE DEVIL'S SLIDE

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    This has it all going on. First you raise your friend on your Devil's Slide. Then you tilt him backwards. Then you let him go, and observe in silent hysteria, as he is startled by a series of small explosions, and being spattered in the face with a rancid solvent.


    11. SURPRISE CHAIR

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    Look at how the victim of this prank goes from serenity to sheer terror. Why, it would almost be worth inviting a working class person into your home for. "Why would you do this to me?!"


    12. THE FUZZY WONDER

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    No idea.


    13. VIGOR'S HORSE-ACTION SADDLE

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    This is "a perfect substitute for a live horse", apparently, in that it promotes good spirits and stimulates the liver. They're not fooling anyone. There used to be something similar available from mail order catalogues. They were called "massage wands".


    14. ELECTRIC BRANDING IRON

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    "Im going to brand you!" howls Satan, as his candidate shrieks and screams. Imagine his relief when he realises it was all a prank - instead of being scalded by a branding iron that had been left over an open flame... he's merely having the skin burnt off his back by an electrically-heated innocent joke.


    15. THE HUMAN CENTIPEDE OR NIGHT MARE

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    "Come along, chaps... let's canter around Berkley Square on my new Human Centipede!".

    "Well, this is a jolly whimsy, Cedric... what the? That searing 'animal heat' shooting into my loins... it's burning me most intimately! Your human centipede ride has gone in a way that is a terrifying night mare, Cedric!


    16. AUTOMATIC SMOKING MACHINE

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    In the Victorian era, smoking was commonplace. Opiates were as freely available as present-day crisps, and pipes filled with various types of tobacco were to be found in most every home. All this open smoking resulted in fine establishments such as bars and pubs being clouded with varying types of smoke. But what if your own establishment lacked smokers? What if you desperately desired the unpleasant stench and poor visibility which came with popularity?

    Well, it was for individuals suffering under the weight of these needs that the automatic smoking machine was invented. As is depicted in the image above, the machine was used to smoke cigars in place of a human. Thus, you could fill a room with odor without ever laying your lips upon a cigar or pipe

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/08/heres-list-of-top-16-bizarre-victorian.html
     
  34. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Mysterious Deaths of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid: Uncovered Manuscript Says They Didn't Die in a Bolivian Gunfight


    Butch Cassidy waited along the trail, hidden in the bushes. He knew the banker, with a thousand dollars in his pocket, would be coming his way shortly. He didn’t have to wait long. The banker approached in a buggy, and, as luck would have it, stopped right in front of Cassidy’s hiding place to count his money. Cassidy stepped out of the bushes, six-shooter in hand, and said, “I’ll take those.”

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    This image is known as the "Fort Worth Five Photograph." Front row left to right: Harry A. Longabaugh, alias the Sundance Kid, Ben Kilpatrick, alias the Tall Texan, Robert Leroy Parker, alias Butch Cassidy; Standing: Will Carver & Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry; Fort Worth, Texas, 1900.

    There’s nothing unusual about Butch Cassidy robbing a banker. What makes this story unusual is that it allegedly happened several years after he and the Sundance Kid were supposed to have died in a famous gunfight in Bolivia.

    According to Lula Betenson, Cassidy’s youngest sister, Cassidy and the Sundance Kid didn’t die in Bolivia. Betenson is the author of "Butch Cassidy, My Brother." She wrote the book in 1975. The information in her book came from a meeting she said she had with her brother in 1925, when Betenson was 41 and Cassidy was 59. Betenson died in 1980.

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    The childhood home of Robert Leroy Parker, alias Butch Cassidy, outside of Circleville, Utah. (Photo: Steven Law)

    Cassidy was the leader of the Wild Bunch gang, a group of 10 outlaws famous for their train and bank robberies throughout the West. According to the legend, Cassidy and Harry Longabaugh (better known as the Sundance Kid) escaped to Bolivia in 1901 to escape the increasing pressures of being pursued by the Pinkerton Detective Agency.

    In 1908, two outlaws were killed during a gunfight with Bolivian police. The two bodies were identified as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

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    A marker near San Vicente, Bolivia, which claims to be the final resting place of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

    So if Cassidy and Sundance didn’t die in a Bolivian gunfight, how did that rumor get started? Betenson says in her book, quoting from Cassidy, that the rumor was started by a man named Percy Seibert. Seibert was a native Bolivian living in Bolivia in 1908 and a friend of Cassidy and Sundance. It’s true that in 1908 two armed bandits died in a gunfight with Bolivian police. It was Seibert who identified the bodies as Cassidy and Sundance, even though he knew it wasn’t them.

    “He knew this was the only way we could go straight,” Cassidy says in Betenson’s book. Cassidy had saved the lives of Seibert and his wife on a previous occasion. Seibert saw this — the false identification of the two bodies — as a way to pay Cassidy back. And with that, word was out that Cassidy and Sundance were dead, and the heat was off.

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    Harry Longabaugh (the Sundance Kid) and Etta Place, just before they sailed for South America.

    They could come out of hiding. They were free to travel. They could finally go home. They could live out the rest of their days in relative peace if they did it under the radar and under an alias. And, Betenson writes, that’s exactly what they did.

    Cassidy was born in Beaver, Utah, in April 1866 and grew up in Circleville. His real name was Robert LeRoy Parker. Sit down in a cafe in just about any town in Garfield, Piute or Iron county and ask about Butch Cassidy and it isn’t hard to find someone who has a Butch Cassidy story. Cassidy stories drift about here like cotton from the cottonwood trees. But verifying the truth of any of these stories is difficult to do this far after the fact. Anyone who knew Cassidy is long-since dead. Like the respectable outlaw that he was, he’s still a hard man to track down.

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    Wyoming State Penitentiary mugshot of Robert LeRoy Parker, AKA Butch Cassidy, 1894. (Photo: Wyoming State Archives)

    One starts to feel like they’ve entered the realm of Sasquatch, Elvis and the Loch Ness Monster. A Butch Cassidy story often starts like this, “I heard this story from my dad/grandpa/grandma who heard it from his dad, who used to hang out with Butch Cassidy.” It’s folk hero meets conspiracy theory meets six degrees of Kevin Bacon.

    Dale Hollingshead, a resident of Beaver and owner of Arshel’s Cafe, admits this is true. “So much of it is conjecture and mystery, but that adds to the intrigue of it all.”

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    The special car of the Union Pacific Railroad for the mounted rangers organized by UP Special Agent Timothy Keliher to stop the Wild Bunch Gang led by Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, late 1890s.

    The most reliable source for what truly happened to Cassidy is Betenson, who says she heard the stories and information straight from her brother.

    The story of Cassidy robbing the banker on the side of the road is recorded in Betenson’s book, and the story is a favorite of residents of Butch Cassidy country. The rest of the story goes like this: Cassidy walked into a store (Betenson didn't give its location) to pick up some supplies. It was run by a widow, and Cassidy saw that she was “looking glum.” He asked her what was the matter. She told Cassidy that the mortgage on the store was due, she didn’t have the money and the banker was coming to take her store.

    “A thousand dollars,” she said. “I just can’t make ends meet with my husband dead and gone.”

    Cassidy told her to stop worrying and that he’d help her. Cassidy left the store and a short time later returned with ten $100 bills and told her to make sure she got a signed receipt for it, marked paid in full.

    That’s when Cassidy went a ways out of town, hid in the bushes and waited for the banker to come along. And when the banker passed by, Cassidy robbed him and took his money back. Betenson quotes Cassidy as saying, “This was so successful that I paid off more than one mortgage in the same way.”

    According to Betenson’s book, Cassidy spent very little time in southern Utah after he returned from South America, likely less than a few months. She wrote that he spent most of his remaining years in Wyoming, Oregon and California, moving often to maintain his cover, and always under an assumed name.

    After word got around that Betenson was writing a book about Cassidy not dying in Bolivia, friends and acquaintances of Cassidy started sending her letters telling of times they had seen or worked with her brother. In her book she records more than a dozen of these letters coming from all over the West.

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    Loading the horses into one of the special cars of the Union Pacific Railroad for the mounted rangers organized by UP Special Agent Timothy Keliher to stop the Wild Bunch Gang led by Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, late 1890s.

    So the big question is: where is Cassidy’s grave? And where are the letters that people sent Betenson claiming to have seen Cassidy? Cassidy is rumored to be buried in California, in Oregon, in a Salt Lake City cemetery and somewhere on a hillside outside of Circleville.

    But Betenson writes in her book that “Robert Leroy Parker died in the Northwest in the fall of 1937. Where he is buried and under what name is still our secret. All his life he was chased. Now he has a chance to rest in peace and that’s the way it must be.”

    “Lula claimed to know where Cassidy was buried,” said Bill Betenson, Lula’s great-grandson, “but if she did, she took that information with her to the grave.”

    Like Cassidy himself, she was good at covering her tracks.

    (via KSL.com)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/06/the-mysterious-deaths-of-butch-cassidy.html
     
  35. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    20 Amazing Photos That Capture Street Scenes of Ireland From Between the 1860s and 1870s


    Here is an amazing collection of 20 rare photos from National Library of Ireland that shows street scenes of Ireland from between the 1860s and 1870s.

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    George's Street, Limerick

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    Glendalough before Round Tower was restored

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    Grafton Street in Dublin

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    Grattan Square, Dungarvan

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    Horse-drawn Omnibus, Westmoreland Street, Dublin

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    Horse-drawn tram, Patrick Street, Cork

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    Knife grinder in Dundalk

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    Long vista of the South Mall in Cork

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    Main Street in Blackrock, Dublin

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    North Quay, Drogheda

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    Ruins of Olderfleet Castle, Larne

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    Sackville Street from Carlisle Bridge, Dublin

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    Stephen's Green, Dublin

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    Street in Downpatrick

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    Street in Rostrevor

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    The Court House in Sligo

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    The Tholsel, Kilkenny

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    Two gentlemen admire the statue of Edmund Burke outside Trinity College, Dublin

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    70 Patrick Street, Cork

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    Gentlemen at the Black Church Hotel in Kildare

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/20-amazing-photos-that-capture-street.html
     
  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Norrmalmstorg Robbery: Behind the Story That Was the Origin of 'Stockholm Syndrome'




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    This photo was taken by the Stockholm Police, the fourth day of a highly televised bank robbery turned hostage crisis, August 26, 1973

    Stockholm syndrome is a term that describes a psychological state in which the abductees move from fear and hatred to sympathy and loves the captors. The term was named by Swedish psychiatrist Nils Bejerot after the bank robbery at Kreditbanken Bank located near the Norrmalmstorg Square, Stockholm that shocked the world.

    On August 23, 1973, escaped prisoner Jan Erik Olsson went into Kreditbanken at Norrmalmstorg, central Stockholm, attempted to rob the bank and shouted "the party has only started." The robber seized four hostages, including three women and one man, for 131 hours. The four hostages include Birgitta Lundblad, Elisabeth Oldgren, Kristin Ehnmark and Sven Safstrom. The hostages were armed with explosives and detained in a treasury. Olsson demanded his friend Clark Olofsson be brought there, along with 3 million Swedish kronor, two guns, bulletproof vests, helmets, and a fast car. Olofsson was a repeat offender who had committed several armed robberies and acts of violence, the first committed at the age of 16.

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    A scene inside Norrmalmstorg bank during the robbery

    The next morning Olofsson was taken to the bank. Olsson asked for a car to leave the scene but was rejected. In the afternoon he was connected directly with the current Prime Minister Olof Palme. Surprised, the victim Kristin Ehnmark said: "Palme, you make me very disappointed, I'm not afraid of these two men, they protect us." She begged to be allowed to leave the bank with the kidnappers. The whole country of Sweden bewildered. What happened to that young girl?

    On the third day of the kidnapping, the radio revealed police planning to drill a hole in the wall to inject anesthetic gas. Of course the whole group of people in the bank were listening to the radio. Through the hole, the police brought food and drink. On August 28, on the sixth day of the event, Jan Erik Olsson lost his temper. He shot the ceiling and wounded a policeman. Meanwhile, the hostages completely obeyed all of Olsson's orders, even sympathizing with him. Olsson later told the court: "They made us unable to kill them." Even the AFP news agency quoted Olsson's memoirs, now an old man of over 70, saying: "There were times when the hostages shielded, so the police could not shoot me."

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    Police officers take cover behind their vehicles during the Norrmalmstorg robbery

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    Police snipers opposite Kreditbanken where Jan-Erik Olsson held workers hostage for six days

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    Armed police wait outside the bank during the four-day siege

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    Police officers outside the bank in 1973

    At 9 o'clock, when police sprayed gas through boreholes and the agents rushed in and knocked out the robbers, Kristin Ehnmark shouted: "Do not hurt them, they do not do us anything." Out of the bank, in front of hundreds of camera lenses, she called with Clark Olofsson: "See you again."

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    Swedish hostage taker Jan Erik Olsson being arrested

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    Police officers wearing gas masks escorting Jan-Erik Olsson (C) in handcuffs after a hostage drama at the Kreditbanken bank on Norrmalmstorg square in Stockholm, on August 23, 1973

    The behavior of Ehnmark and the rest of the victims made Sweden controversial. "I'm not afraid of them anymore, but I'm afraid of the police," Ehnmark said. Elisabeth Oldgren later said that at the time, she thought Olsson "very kind" when he allowed her to move on the floor of the bank. Safstrom said he was even grateful to Olsson. "When Olsson treats us well, we think he's a God," said the abducted man.

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    Jan Erik Olsson today

    "We were interrogated for days, but no one wanted to know our needs or aspirations, and we only asked about Stockholm syndrome," Ehnmark recalled. She quit the bank, studied sociology and became a psychotherapist for drug addicts. Recently, Kristin Ehnmark published a book entitled I Had Stockholm Syndrome.

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    Kristin Ehnmark is still obsessed with the case after more than 40 years

    She admitted having a special affection for Clark Olofsson. Months after being freed, she repeatedly visited him in prison, who often exchanged correspondence. Jan-Erik Olsson was granted amnesty after 8 years and his family moved to Thailand. The kidnapping was later made into a movie and an attractive subject of many novels.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/07/the-norrmalmstorg-robbery-behind-story.html
     
  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    25 Rare and Fascinating Photos of Nikola Tesla


    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a Serbian-American inventor, best known for his development of alternating current electrical systems. He also made extraordinary contributions to the fields of electromagnetism and wireless radio communications. He was a child prodigy and possessed an eidetic memory with a futuristic vision for the mankind which is evident from most of his discoveries and researches. He was a trained electrical and mechanical engineer whose discoveries and inventions included the modern electric motor, wireless transmission of energy, basic laser and radar technology, the first neon and fluorescent illumination and the Tesla coil (widely used in radio, television sets, and other electronic equipment).

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    Despite being a great inventor, his life was mostly shadowed by poverty because he was a terrible businessman. He was impractical with his money and had nobody to pass on his legacy to since he never got involved in a relationship with anyone. Although he was regarded as a generous and polite person by his friends, he had very limited social interaction with them because of his firm daily routine. He was a loner all his life and died penniless without the accolades that he would ultimately earn after his death. He was undoubtedly one of the most influential inventors of the 20th century whose discoveries in the field of electricity were way ahead of his time and continue to influence technology even today.

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    Nikola Tesla, with Roger Boskovich's book, “Theoria Philosophiae Naturalis,” in front of the spiral coil of his high-frequency transformer at East Houston St. 46, New York.

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    Photograph of the experimenter standing in the middle of the laboratory and lighting a vacuum bulb by waves from a distant oscillator — His body is, in this case, subjected to great electrical pressure.

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    Lighting a disconnected vacuum bulb of 1,500 candle power by high-frequency currents — Photograph taken by the light of the bulb itself, exposure about two seconds.

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    First photograph ever taken by phosphorescent light. The face is that of Mr. Tesla, and the source of light is one of his phosphorescent bulbs. The time of exposure, eight minutes. Date of photograph January, 1894.

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    Dr. Nikola Tesla — This immigrant from Yugoslavia invented a.c. motors and radio. A 1943 Supreme Court decision invalidated Marconi radio patents because of Tesla's prior work.

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    Nikola Tesla in his forties.

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    The hand of Nikola Tesla, taken by his wonderful artificial daylight, just perfected. This is the first photograph made by the light of the future.

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    A glow of nitrogen fills the atmosphere. Tesla is photographed sitting in front of his generator. This photograph was taken in 1899.

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    Photograph showing an incandescent lamp lighted by means of waves transmitted through space to a coil without a condenser.

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    Publicity photo taken of Tesla by a reporter during his annual birthday press event.

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    Tesla working in his office at 8 West 40th Street.

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    Tesla demonstrates “wireless” power transmission in his Houston Street laboratory in March 1899.

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    Experiment illustrating the action of a synchronized circuit energized by waves transmitted from a distant oscillator - The energy received is transferred upon another unresponsive circuit, lighting the incandescent lamp attached to the same.

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    John T. Morris, Victor Beam and Tesla pose with the alternator that had been discovered.

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    Tesla holding a gas-filled phosphor coated wireless light bulb which he developed in the 1890's, half a century before fluorescent lamps come into use. Published on the cover of the Electrical Experimenter in 1919.

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    Tesla is seen in his New York City office in 1916. The inventor often crossed the street to Bryant Park to feed the pigeons there. The drawings behind Tesla depict his steam engine design.

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    Tesla in 1879 at age twenty-three.

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    The master of lightning in his room at the Hotel New Yorker.

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    Tesla receives the Order of the White Lion from the Czechoslovak governments, July, 11, 1937.

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    Tesla in 1916 pointing to a discharge in a photograph taken at Colorado Springs in 1899.

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    Nikola Tesla photographed working in his office at 8 West 40th Street. The image was taken in 1916.

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    Pictured here is Nikola Tesla and one of his inventions. This image was taken in 1916.

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    Tesla experiments with currents of High Voltage and High Frequency in 1899.

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    Tesla near his transmitter in Colorado Springs. The device was capable of transmitting millions of volts of electricity over great distances without wires. The image was taken in 1899.

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    Tesla looks out the door of his laboratory in Colorado Springs. The image was taken in 1899.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/02/25-rare-and-fascinating-photos-of.html
     
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  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Underground Scene: 21 Amazing Black and White Photographs Document New York's Subway Commuters From the Mid-20th Century


    As difficult as it is to believe, the New York City Subway has not always been the paragon of cleanliness, courtesy and efficiency currently enjoyed by several million New Yorkers and out-of-towners each and every day. In fact, for several decades in the middle of the 20th century, what was then the world’s busiest subway system was actually something of a mess.

    Unlike today’s flawless high-tech marvels, cars back in the day were relatively rickety affairs, and frequently sauna-hot in the summer. Crime on trains and platforms was not unknown. Sharp-eyed travelers might occasionally spot litter. And while contemporary commuters can, and do, set their watches by trains’ arrivals and departures, the old subway’s schedules could often, to the initiated, seem arbitrary—nonexistent, even.

    Through the years, LIFE photographers routinely descended into the loud, dim underworld to document the singular sights found there. In the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, the likes of Cornell Capa, Ralph Crane, Eliot Elisofon and other masters found on the trains, on the waiting platforms and in all of the other areas associated with the subway a universe unto itself, where the behavior of the people below ground felt similar to—and at the same time slightly, indefinably different than—behavior encountered topside.

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Subway entrance, Times Square, 1942. (Thomas D. McAvoy—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Teenagers trying to work the subway turnstiles with slugs instead of tokens, 1958. (Stan Wayman—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    New York City subway, 1953. (Ralph Morse—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    New York City subway, 1953. (Ralph Morse—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Commuters reading of John F. Kennedy's assassination on the New York subway, November 1963. (Ralph Morse—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Department-store titan Bernard F. Gimbel rides the subway, 1949. (Eliot Elisofon—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Young woman riding the D train, 1951. (Eliot Elisofon—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York subway, 1952. (Cornell Capa—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York subway, 1959. (Stan Wayman—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York City subway, 1969. (Ralph Crane—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    Scene on the New York subway, 1958. (Stan Wayman—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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    New York City subway, 1944. (Peter Stackpole—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

    http://www.vintag.es/2012/10/old-black-white-photos-of-new-yorks.html
     
  39. EricTheCat

    EricTheCat Silver Member Silver Miner Site Supporter

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    Big spiders around outside.

    Grass spider (larger than I knew they got)
    Spider-2017-09-03-Img_4340S.jpg

    Orb weavers.
    Spider-2017-09-03-Img_4344S.jpg

    Spider-2017-09-03-Img_4353S.jpg
     
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  40. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    20 Stunning Vintage Photographs Capture Street Scenes of Southern California in the 1920s


    At the turn of the Twentieth century there were few rules for driving in American cities. The first law regulating the speed of automobiles was passed in Connecticut in 1901—12 miles per hour overall and 8 miles per hour in cities.

    When motor vehicles began to merge with existing traffic and shared the roads with pedestrians, horses, bicyclists, and streetcars there was little distinction between local and through traffic or the speed of the respective individuals or vehicles.

    Traffic controls of some type began to appear after the introduction of Ford’s mass-produced Model T and the incessant growth of the automobile population in cities. As historian Clay McShane noted, traffic lights, signs, and painted pavements not only commanded a new physical presence in cities, but “impose[d] a strong social control over the most fundamental of human behaviors, whether to move or to be still.”

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    1922 view of a Kodak Finishing shop on Vermont Ave. north of Jefferson Blvd.

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    Circa 1927 view of Fifth Street, looking east from Grand Avenue, in downtown Los Angeles.

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    1927 view of the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street, looking northeast.

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    A Santa Fe Railway train crosses Colorado Street in what is now Old Town Pasadena, 1928. The at-grade crossing was later eliminated, and today the Metro Gold Line uses the old Santa Fe right-of-way. (Part of the Automobile Club of Southern California Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Circa 1927 view of the Los Angeles Civic Center from Hill Street, showing City Hall under construction, as well as the Hall of Records, Hall of Justice, and County Courthouse.

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    Circa 1920-24 view of the William Fox Studio on Western Ave. near Sunset Blvd. (Part of the TICOR/Pierce Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Circa 1924 view of the intersection of Wilshire Blvd. and Western Ave., looking north up Western. The traffic signal device in the middle of the intersection is a remnant of a failed experiment to introduce traffic circles in L.A.’s busiest intersections. (Part of the Title Insurance and Trust / C.C. Pierce Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Intersection of Figueroa and Adams, looking north circa 1924. In the center of the intersection is an “American Bobby,” an experimental traffic control device installed by the Auto Club of Southern California. (Part of the Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Pacific Electric trolleys once ran down the median of Venice Blvd, seen here at its intersection with 5th Ave in 1929. (USC Libraries/California Historical Society Collection)

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    Today it’s home to the futuristic Westin Bonaventure Hotel, but here’s how the northwest corner of Flower and Fifth streets looked in 1927. (USC Libraries/California Historical Society Collection)

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    A Pacific Electric red car on Newport Beach’s Balboa Peninsula in 1928. (USC Libraries/Dick Whittington Photography Collection)

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    A Gilmore Gasoline station at the northeast corner of Wilshire and La Brea in 1928. (USC Libraries/Dick Whittington Photography Collection)

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    Here’s how Los Feliz looked in 1928. (Part of the Automobile Club of Southern California collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    L.A.’s Miracle Mile, looking east from Wilshire and Fairfax circa 1929. (Part of the Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Anaheim, circa 1925. Pictured here is the central business district along Center Street (now Lincoln Avenue). (Part of the Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Brand Blvd. in Glendale, ca. 1926. (Part of the Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Big Bear Village, circa 1920. (Part of the California Historical Society Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    View looking north up Vine Street toward the the Hollywoodland sign, shortly after it was installed on the Santa Monica Mountains in 1923. (Part of the Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection in the USC Digital Library)

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    Lankershim Blvd. at Weddington St. in North Hollywood, ca. 1926. The historic El Portal Theater appears on the left.

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    Vine Street at Sunset Boulevard circa 1925.

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/03/20-stunning-vintage-photographs-of.html
     

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