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Random Pictures thread !

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by GOLDZILLA, Apr 4, 2010.



  1. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Houston? We have a problem....


    Screen Shot 2017-09-06 at 11.12.11 AM.png
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Found in the National Geographic’s Archives, Here Are Some Rarely Seen Photos from World War II


    U.S. Army soldiers make an amphibious landing on the banks of Germany’s Rhine River. Navy sailors take a break from combat for a dip in the Pacific Ocean. A young marine cleans sand out of his shoe. These World War II–era images are part of a small collection of photographs on display in the basement of National Geographic’s headquarters in Washington, D.C.

    Tucked away among the 11.5 million photographic items housed in the National Geographic archive, the images were among those recently pulled from storage by National Geographic’s staff in homage to the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, marked earlier in 2015.

    Bringing them out of the archive provides an insight into the lives and mentalities of the past. They tell a story we don’t want to forget.

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    Two U.S. soldiers look over the ruins surrounding the Cologne Cathedral. 1945.

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    Crouching low in a DUKW for concealment and protection, men of the 89th division, U.S. Third Army, cross the Rhine River at Oberwesel, Germany. March 26, 1945. (Photograph by the U.S. Department of Defense)

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    These are the first pictures to be taken at Aldwych Shelter, the stretch of underground railway between Aldwych and Holborn which has been taken out of service to provide safe shelter for Londoners in air raids. Photograph shows the railway lines as well as the platforms provide a dormitory for Londoners during the night raids. October 5, 1940. (Photograph by Acme Newspictures)

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    Marines hit three feet of rough water as they leave their LST to take the beach at Cape Gloucester, December 26, 1943. (Photograph by the U.S. Marine Corps)

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    Crewmen of a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier banish post-battle nervous strain by taking a swim in the warm waters of a lagoon in the Marshalls only a few days after laying siege to and conquering Roi Island in the Kwajalein atoll. Released April 18, 1944. (Photograph by the U.S. Navy)

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    French mademoiselle waves tricolor in tribute to the forces which liberated her city as they march past Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France. August 26, 1944. (Photograph by the U.S. Marine Corps)

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    The bombing of this beautiful Roman Catholic Church in London did not stop Fusilier Tom Dowling and Miss Martha Coogan being married there today. After the ceremony was over, Father Finn, who performed the ceremony, assisted the bridal couple over the debris to the church exit. Fox. September 14, 1940.

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    A fighting Coast Guardsman, who gave his right arm in battle pays Memorial Day tribute at the Lincoln shrine in Washington, D.C. He is Coast Guardsman Thomas Sortino of Chicago, who participated in the North African invasion. (Photograph by U.S. Coast Guard)

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    Women employees working on the nose assemblies of Douglas “Havoc” A-20 attack bombers. (Photograph by the Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc.)

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    Of all things, Marine Private First Class Raymond L. Hubert, of Detroit, Michigan, chooses a huge unexploded naval shell for a sofa as he removes a three day accumulation of Saipan sand from his field shoes. (Photograph by Staff Sgt. Andrew B. Knight, U.S. Marine Corps)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/07/found-in-national-geographics-archives.html
     
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  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rare Glimpses Inside 'the Citadel,' Iran's Forgotten Red-Light District, in the 1970s


    The Citadel was an old neighborhood of filthy alleyways in Tehran that was established in the 1920s as a red-light district to house scores of prostitutes. In the 1930s and 1940s, the neighborhood became a thriving sex quarter with rampant crime. Female prostitutes walked the streets seminaked. One of the side streets became famous for its young male prostitutes.

    After the 1953 C.I.A.-led coup that reinstated the shah, the authorities walled off the area, turning it into a ghetto whose inhabitants were almost exclusively female prostitutes and their children; only men were allowed to access it through an iron gate.

    By the 1970s, about 1,500 prostitutes worked, and most of them lived, in the Citadel. Their daughters often followed them into prostitution; their sons often turned to drugs. Sometimes men came for sex, sometimes to drink, do drugs, watch films or sightsee.

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    In the ghetto, there was a health center, a police station, a social-work office and a crude education service that taught basic reading and writing to women and their children. But the women suffered — from poverty, violence, heroin addiction, syphilis and destitution when they became too old to work.

    From 1975 until 1977, Iranian photojournalist Kaveh Golestan captured the lives of the women in the Citadel. Although primarily known for documenting war and conflict in the Middle East, Golestan’s project involving these women gives light to a different issue, one that has not seen the spotlight in years if not never in Iranian society.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/rare-glimpses-inside-citadel-irans.html
     
  4. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    IMG_1237.jpg
     
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  5. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Screen Shot 2017-09-10 at 8.43.18 AM.png
     
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  6. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Screen Shot 2017-09-10 at 9.42.03 PM.png
     
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  7. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    IMG_1239.JPG
     
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  8. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Screen Shot 2017-09-11 at 1.52.07 PM.png
     
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  9. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Screen Shot 2017-09-11 at 6.57.54 PM.png
     
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  10. mtnman

    mtnman Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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  11. gnome

    gnome Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    21370928_873647339468390_5092385745654344169_n.jpg
     
  12. Alton

    Alton Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Ijen volcano with the Milky Way background:

    Igen_Volcano_The_Milky_Way_Above_.jpg
     
  13. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    Gnome, your post reminded me of a photo from Japan during the big wave, the store shelves were empty except for POCKY STICKS. Wish I could find that picture.
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  14. spinalcracker

    spinalcracker On a mail train. Silver Miner Site Supporter

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    Location:
    On a mail train.
    The old head frames of the Stratton gold mine in Victor Colorado....
    The ore was sent down the chute to the mill and processed...
    There has to be a lot of gold in those tailing piles and under the chutes...


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    That's the Strong mine just above the Victor sign and today it is still a working mine and they will take tourists down the hole for an underground tour.....
    image.jpg

    In the spring of 1891 W. S. Strattonpersuaded Leslie Popejoy to grubstake him in the Cripple Creek District in return for half the profits. Stratton staked two claims on the south slope of Battle Mountain on July 4, 1891. He called the two claims the Independence and the Washington in honor of the holiday. Stratton quickly sold his house and two lots, one in Denver and one in Colorado Springs, so that he could buy out Popejoy's share. His reason: some assays from the Independence lode showed a value of $380 per ton gold.

    One boulder from the Independence mine brought $60,000, which Stratton used to sink a chute. In doing so he tapped directly into a rich vein.

    The next year, in 1892, Stratton also hit gold in the Washington mine.

    Stratton became the Cripple Creek District's first millionaire.[1]

    When Cripple Creek miners went on strike in 1894, Stratton's Independence mine and the Portland mine came to an agreement with them, against the wishes of other mine owners.[2]

    Stratton had incorporated the Portland company and was its first president and largest stockholder.[3]

    Stratton developed a theory that the gold veins in the Cripple Creek District converged at a great depth, roughly in the shape of a goblet. This theory did not pan out, however.[4]

    The mining companies became concerned about ore theft, and in 1897 they began hiring the services ofPinkerton agents.[5]

    In 1900 Stratton sold the Independence mine to the Venture Corporation ofLondon for $10 million. The Venture Corporation incorporated the property as Stratton's Independence Ltd. and sold shares on the London stock exchange. The ore reserves were discovered to be less than previously thought in late 1900, and the share price crashed. Venture Corporation sued Stratton, claiming that the mine had been salted. Stratton died in 1902, but his estate defeated the lawsuit.

    In May 1900, two Western Federation of Miners (WFM) union representatives checked for union membership cards at the Independence mine. Approximately a hundred miners belonged to the union, and six or eight did not. One of the union representatives talked to the miners, who echoed the union rep's view that they would prefer not to work alongside non-union workers. Mine Superintendent Summers talked the non-union men into joining the union in order to promote harmony in the workforce.[6]

    In September 1900, the Independence mine was the first mine in the District to introduce a new stripping order requiring all underground workers to undress in one room of a change house and walk into another room in the nude while a guard observed. This was to take place at start and end of each shift. The new rule was implemented to prevent high grading (theft of gold ore) by the mine workers.

    Five hundred miners met at Victor's Armory Hall, and they decided that while they would help stop ore thieves, they refused to work under the stripping rule. A compromise was reached which allowed the miners to strip to their undergarments. But the miners were unhappy. After the new practice was in place for about a month, a Pinkerton searched the miners at the end of a shift. No ore was found, and the miners walked out.

    Three days later Independence mine manager A.H. Shipman met with the WFM Executive Board. He ultimately agreed to abolish the Pinkerton guard system, to appoint a guard for the change rooms from candidates the union proposed, and to accept a closed shop. Under the agreement, any miner suspected of high-grading could be searched by a fellow union member in the presence of a watchman. Shipman also announced that he would support membership in the WFM by miners in return for the union's help in stopping the practice of high grading.[7]

    In 1902 the miners at the Independence mine bought diamond rings for Shipman, who had negotiated the closed shop, for Superintendent Sam Lobb, and for Assistant Manager R.J. Grant. The miners and the managers enjoyed a "little smoking session" at Shipman's home after the presentation.[8]
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    18 Year-Old Boxer Cassius Clay (Later Muhammad Ali) Wins Olympic Boxing Gold at the Rome 1960 Olympics


    These were the games where one of the all-time sporting greats took his first steps on the international stage. A young boxer called Cassius Clay came to Rome intent on winning a gold medal, and left having taken a huge step towards becoming one of the most iconic figures in the history of sport.

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    1960 U.S. Olympic Boxing Team (feat. Cassius Clay)

    It seems curious to think now, but many people thought he wouldn't have enough to win the light-heavyweight gold. , the Polish fighter Zbigniew Pietrykowski, who had won bronze four years before, was considered one of the main contenders, or as was the Soviet boxer Gennady Shatkov, the middleweight champion from 1956.

    However, the American boxing writers who had watched the 18-year-old Clay in action were quietly confident. They had seen his confident emergence in the amateur ranks, and they saw how he took to the Olympic environment, introducing himself to the world's athletes, immune to pressure or fear, and picking off his opponents one at a time.

    His first fight pitched him against a little-known Belgian fighter called Yvon Becaus. Clay stopped him in the second round, despite describing his opponent as “the strongest man I've met”. This was some claim – Clay may have been young but he had already fought in more than a hundred bouts, winning around half of them by a knockout.

    His next opponent, Shatkov, was much more experienced. The Soviet boxer had fought several hundred bouts, winning most of them. He was one of the most respected boxers in the Soviet team, but he still couldn't find a way to land any decent punches on Clay. The unanimous decision went the American's way and afterwards the gracious Shatkov conceded that “there is no disgrace in losing to a boxer like that”.

    The semi-final was tougher still, with the Australian Tony Madigan giving Clay an awkward contest. Again, the bout was decided by a unanimous decision in the American’s favour.



    The final pitched Clay against Pietrykowski. The Pole showed his doughty experience over the first two rounds, landing heavy punches and taking a clear lead on points. But Clay had faith in something bigger. Realising he would have to seize the final round to put his name into the Olympic record books, that is exactly what he did. Suddenly, the timing was there – combinations landed perfectly, his movement crisp and his opponent wilting. By the end of the fight, Pietrykowski was slumped against the ropes with Clay sensing he was only seconds away from a knockout. The judges agreed, with all five awarding the victory to the young American. It was the start of perhaps the most iconic career in 20th century sport.

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    (via olympic.org)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/18-year-old-boxer-cassius-clay-later.html
     
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  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    19 Candid Photographs Documented Scenes During the Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City, 1945


    These photographs were taken by LIFE photographer Alfred Eisentaedt during the 1945 competition in Atlantic City. There were speeches and displays of genuine talent on stage. But more often than not, the images that emerged from the two-day affair featured scores of women, most of whom seemed—and who still seem—to be cut from very much the same physical mold, wearing very small bathing suits and posing or parading in high heels.

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    That the Miss America title for many decades really meant Miss Caucasian America certainly undercut the pageant's unspoken but strongly implied claim to celebrate—and judge—an entire nation's loveliest and most talented women. African-American women did not even begin competing in the pageant until the 1970s, and the first African-American Miss America, the wonderful Vanessa Williams, would not be crowned until 1984—a full six decades after the pageant began.

    But that sort of problematic history aside, the Miss America pageant remains a signature cultural happening, while the Miss America Organization provides tens of millions of scholarship dollars annually to thousands of young women who, without that money, might not be able to attend college. In fact, it just so happens that the Miss America featured in this gallery, Bess Myerson—incidentally, the first Jewish winner of the pageant—was the very first Miss America to receive a scholarship as part of her victory prize.

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    The winner of the 1945 Miss America pageant, 21-year-old Bess Myerson of New York.

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    Spectators line up during the Miss America pageant festivities in Atlantic City, 1945.

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    Bess Myerson, Miss America, 1945.

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    Scene outside the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, 1945.

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    Scene during the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, 1945.

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    Outside the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, 1945.

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    Contestants in the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, 1945.

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    Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, 1945.

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    Contestant in the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, 1945.

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    Contestants in the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, September 1945.

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    Inside the Warner Theater during the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, September 1945.

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    Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, September 1945.

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    Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, September 1945.

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    Contestants in the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, September 1945.

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    Bess Myerson, Miss America in 1945, Atlantic City, New Jersey.

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    Bess Myerson, Miss America in 1945, meets the press, Atlantic City, New Jersey.

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    Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, September 1945.

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    Miss America pageant in Atlantic City, September 1945.

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    Miss America Bess Myerson (right) and friend, Atlantic City, New Jersey, September 1945.

    (Photos: Alfred Eisenstaedt—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/19-candid-photographs-documented-scenes.html
     
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  17. mtnman

    mtnman Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    The Miss America photos are much nicer that those of the draft dodging, anti american, muslim. C. Clay
     
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  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    22 Vintage Photographs Captured Everyday Life Around the Berlin Wall in the 1950s and Early 1960s


    After the end of World War II in Europe, what remained of pre-war Germany west of the Oder-Neisse line was divided into four occupation zones, each one controlled by one of the four occupying Allied powers: the United States, the United Kingdom, France and the Soviet Union. The capital of Berlin, as the seat of the Allied Control Council, was similarly subdivided into four sectors despite the city's location, which was fully within the Soviet zone.

    Within two years, political divisions increased between the Soviets and the other occupying powers. These included the Soviets' refusal to agree to reconstruction plans making post-war Germany self-sufficient and to a detailed accounting of the industrial plants, goods and infrastructure already removed by the Soviets. Britain, France, the United States and the Benelux countries later met to combine the non-Soviet zones of the country into one zone for reconstruction and to approve the extension of the Marshall Plan.

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    Once the wall went up in 1961 life for East Berlin began to improve under the communist system. People had excellent healthcare facilities and free public transport. They enjoyed full employment, food and rents. Factory outputs also increased in the 1960s. Many East Germans believed that communism was fairer than capitalist West German. They were proud of their achievements.

    However, they lacked some key freedoms including freedom of speech, the ability to vote and they were not allowed to leave East Berlin and travel to the West. This chapter outlines the advantages and disadvantages of the communist system in East Berlin.

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    A boy stands on a coal scuttle to peer over the wall of a sports stadium in Berlin, 8th January 1951. (Photo by Keystone Features/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    Boys bring buckets to stand on for a view over the wall of a sports stadium in Berlin, 8th January 1951. (Photo by Keystone Features/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    West Berlin policemen and East German Volkspolizei face each other across the border in Berlin, circa 1955. (Photo by Three Lions/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    Soviet tanks and troops at Checkpoint Charlie, a crossing point in the Berlin Wall between the American and Soviet sectors of the city at the junction of Friedrichstrasse, Zimmerstrasse and Mauerstrasse, February 1961. (Photo by Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    American tanks and troops at Checkpoint Charlie, a crossing point in the Berlin Wall between the American and Soviet sectors of the city at the junction of Friedrichstrasse, Zimmerstrasse and Mauerstrasse, February 1961. (Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)

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    Two mothers can only wave to their children and grandchildren in the Soviet sector of Berlin from across the Berlin wall, 1961. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    On a day when the Berlin Wall is open, throngs of West Germans wait for friends and relatives to arrive from the Eastern sector, 1960. (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images)

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    Families and friends, once neighbours, now stand divided and wave across to each other over the Berlin wall, 1960. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    Two little girls in a West German street chat with their grandparents in the window of their home in the eastern zone, separated only by a barbed wire barricade, 14th August 1961. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    A citizen of East Berlin peers through barbed wire at a West Berliner over the Berlin Wall, Berlin, Germany, 1960s. The mass immigration of Germans from Communist Berlin to Western Berlin inspired East Germany military leader Erich Honeker to construct the blockade, a barricade of concrete walls, mine fields and guard posts that stretched for 100 miles. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    A woman is lowered from a window in Bernauer Strasse on a rope to escape into the western sector of Berlin after the post-war division of the city, 10th September 1961. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    Soldiers building the Berlin Wall as instructed by the East German authorities, in order to strengthen the existing barriers dividing East and West Berlin, 1961. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    Posters of Nikita Khrushchev, Walter Ulbricht, Wilhelm Pieck and the East German Premier Otto Grotewohl on an East Berlin Wall, 28th August 1961. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    Russian soldiers leaving the British sector march back into the East Sector, after laying wreaths on the Soviet monument in West Berlin on the 43rd anniversary of the Russian Revolution, 7th November 1960. The Brandenburg Gate is on the right. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    Soldiers outside the entrance to Berlin's Potsdamer Platz underground station next to a section of the Berlin Wall, circa 1961. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)

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    East German troops and police seal off the frontier between East and West Berlin with barbed-wire to control the flow of refugees, 15th August 1961. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    Walter Ulbricht (1893–1973) first Secretary of the Communist Party of East Germany and deputy Premier of the German Democratic Republic. He is reviewing workers, known as “Industry Combat Groups” who are building the Berlin Wall. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    East German military personnel supervising construction of the Berlin Wall, August 1961. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)

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    A tear gas grenade explodes next to an East German armoured car during riots on the first anniversary of the building of the Berlin Wall, circa 1960. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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    Dieter and Monika Marotz of Bernauerstrasse, Berlin, wave to relatives after their wedding, 8th September 1961. The newlyweds live in the western sector of Berlin, while their relatives living on the same street are in the Eastern sector and unable to attend the ceremony. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    Relatives of newlyweds Dieter and Monika Marotz of Bernauerstrasse, Berlin, wave to the couple after their wedding, 8th September 1961. Although the Marotz's and their relatives live in the same street, their houses are in the western and eastern sectors, respectively, of the divided city, leaving them unable to be at the ceremony together. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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    Members of the Volkspolizei, the East German national police, check an elderly man's papers at the Berlin Wall, 11th September 1961. Only those whose houses are adjacent to the wall are allowed within 100 meters of it. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

    http://www.vintag.es/2013/06/old-photos-of-berlin-wall-from-1950s-60s.html
     
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  19. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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  20. Alton

    Alton Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Arizona "wave":

    The_Wave_if_Arizona.jpg
     
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    Manhattan Project: 20 Black and White Photos Document Everyday Life in the Secret City, Oak Ridge, in the 1940s


    Starting in 1942, the U.S. government began quietly acquiring more than 60,000 acres in Eastern Tennessee for the Manhattan Project -- the secret World War II program that developed the atomic bomb.

    The government needed land to build massive facilities to refine and develop nuclear materials for these new weapons, without attracting the attention of enemy spies. The result was a secret town named Oak Ridge that housed tens of thousands of workers and their families.

    The entire town and facility were fenced in, with armed guards posted at all entries. Workers were sworn to secrecy and only informed of the specific tasks they needed to perform. Most were unaware of the exact nature of their final product until the nuclear bombs were dropped on Japan in 1945.

    Photographer Ed Westcott (the only authorized photographer on the facility) took many photos of Oak Ridge during the war years and afterwards, capturing construction, scientific experiments, military maneuvers, and everyday life in a 1940s company town (where the company happens to be the U.S. government).

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    Military Police man Elza Gate in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in 1945. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Early Construction of the K-25 uranium enrichment facility (background), with one of original houses of Oak Ridge, Tennessee in the foreground, in 1942. That year, the United States Army Corps of Engineers began quickly acquiring land in the Oak Ridge area, at the request of the U.S. government, to build production facilities for the Manhattan Project. The K-25 plant, when completed, was the largest building in the world for a time. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Lie detection tests were administered as part of security screening (U.S. Department of Energy)

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    A billboard posted in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on December 31, 1943. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Calutron operators at their panels, in the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during World War II. The calutrons were used to refine uranium ore into fissile material. During the Manhattan Project effort to construct an atomic explosive, workers toiled in secrecy, with no idea to what end their labors were directed. Gladys Owens, the woman seated in the foreground, did not realize what she had been doing until seeing this photo in a public tour of the facility fifty years later. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Workers perform maintenance on a cell housing in the K-25 uranium enrichment facility, in Oak Ridge, Tennesee. (James E. Westcott/DOE)

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    A caultron "racetrack" uranium refinery at the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the Manhattan Project. The light-colored bars along the top are solid silver. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Temporary Housing (Hutments) fill the formerly empty valleys of Oak Ridge in 1945. The sudden growth of the military's facilities caused the local population to grow from about 3,000 in 1942 to about 75,000 in 1945. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    A young entrepreneur during the days of the Manhattan Project, in Oak Ridge, Tennesee. (James E. Westcott/DOE)

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    Shift change at the Y-12 uranium enrichment facility in Oak Ridge. Notice the billboard: "Make CEW count Continue to protect project information." CEW stands for Clinton Engineer Works, the Army name for the production facility. (Ed Westcott/US Department of Energy)

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    A billboard in Oak Ridge, photographed during WWII, on January 21, 1944. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    The main control room at the K-25 uranium enrichment plant in Oak Ridge. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Welding at the K-25 facility in Oak Ridge, in February of 1945. At the height of production, nearly 100,000 workers were employed by the government in the secret city. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Kiddy Club at the Midtown Recreation Hall in Oak Ridge, on January 6, 1945. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    A Link Trainer, a type of flight simulator produced between the early 1930s and early 1950s, in Oak Ridge, in September of 1945. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    This 1945 photograph shows the giant 44 acre K-25 plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the uranium for the first atomic weapon was produced. (AP Photo/U.S. Department of Energy)

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    V-J day celebration in Jackson Square in downtown Oak Ridge in August of 1945. When the first atomic bomb was dropped on Japan on August 6, 1945, the news reports revealed to the people at Oak Ridge what they had been working on all along. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Oak Ridge's Grove Theater shows "The Beginning or The End" in March of 1947. (Ed Westcott/DOE)

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    Oak Ridge's X-10 graphite reactor, in 1947. X-10 was the world's second artificial nuclear reactor (after Enrico Fermi's Chicago Pile) and was the first reactor designed and built for continuous operation. (DOE)

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    An employee at the Oak Ridge electromagnetic process plant, where stable isotopes are concentrated, holds a vial containing the stable isotope Molybdenum 92, on January 22, 1948. Stable isotopes can be handled without risk to the person. In contrast to radioactive isotopes, they do not emit radiation and can therefore be safely handled. (AP Photo)

    (Photos from doe-oakridge, via The Atlantic)

    http://www.vintag.es/2014/06/black-and-white-photos-of-everyday-life_11.html
     
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  22. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    rocket_man.png
     
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    [​IMG]
    Port Campbell 1922-1953, Wireless Room
     
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    Marconi Wireless School, New York. Operators Copying Messages Transmitted from Ships at Sea 1912
     
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    [​IMG]
    Unloading New Locomotives at Melbourne
     
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    [​IMG]
    Hobart Wharf, inc HMS Funnel Cleaning
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Ferry Wharf North Vancouver c1911
     
  28. searcher

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    British Embarking at Mudros, Lemnos 1916
     
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    Manhattan from Coamo leaving New York December 1941
     
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    Unknown sailing ship in unknown harbour, but likely French (may be Le Havre?).
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
    Queens Wharf Wellington
     
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    View of the harbour of Harlingen (Dutch province Friesland).
     
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    The old harbour of Antwerp, estimated period 1880-1920.
     
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    Flying boat Satyrus on Sea of Galilee c1935
     
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    Batum Harbour, on the Black Sea, Republic of Georgia c1915
     
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    Ferries at Brown's River Pier, Tasmania 1910s
     
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    Unloading boxes at King's Wharf, Wellington, Photo by Ans Westra 1955
     
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    San Francisco Pier 23, Showing Coupe Overlooking Bay 1925
     
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    Rare Vintage Photos Inside the White House in 1914-15


    Although the White House is one of the most famous buildings in the world and hosts millions of visitors every year, few people have a good understanding of its layout and history.

    The building was originally referred to as the "Presidential Palace" or "Presidential Mansion." Dolley Madison called it the "President's Castle." However, by 1811 the first evidence of the public calling it the "White House" emerged, because of its white-painted stone exterior. The name Executive Mansion was often used in official context until President Theodore Roosevelt established the formal name by having "The White House" engraved on his stationery in 1901.

    Below are some rare photographs of the White House during Woodrow Wilson's presidency.

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    White House, President's Study

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    The Blue Room

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    The Red Room

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    The Green Room

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    Cabinet Room

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    White House Stairway

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    White House, East Corridor

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    White House, Dinner Sets

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    White House, Kitchen/Service Corridor

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    President Wilson and Joseph Tumulty in the White House

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    President Wilson at His Desk in the White House

    (Images via Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library Archives)

    http://www.vintag.es/2014/04/vintage-photos-of-white-house-in-1914-15.html
     
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    27 Haunting Photos of the Wreck of the Titanic When It Was First Discovered in 1985


    Titanic, the world's best-known cruise ship was launched in May 1911, the ship sank in April 1912 after colliding with an iceberg en route from Southampton, England to New York City. Titanic was carrying more than 2,200 passengers and more than 1,500 reportedly died.

    When the Titanic sank in 1912, the famous ship wasn't exactly sailing in obscurity. Yet it took decades before the wreckage was discovered. It wasn't until Sept. 1, 1985 that scientists, after years and years of searching, found what they were looking for.

    Today, the Titanic rests, disintegrating at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, approximately 12,405 feet below the water's surface. Take a look at a collection of amazing underwater images of the ship.

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    A view of the bow and railing of the RMS Titanic.

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    Two of Titanic's engines lie exposed in a gaping cross section of the stern. Draped in "rusticles"—orange stalactites created by iron-eating bacteria—these massive structures, four stories tall, once powered the largest moving man-made object on Earth.

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    A view of the bow of the RMS Titanic.

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    A view of the bow of the Titanic from a camera mounted on the outside of the Mir I submersible.

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    A view of the steering motor on the bridge of the Titanic.

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    A view of the bathtub in Capt. Smiths bathroom. Rusticles are observed growing over most of the pipes and fixtures in the room.

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    With her rudder cleaving the sand and two propeller blades peeking from the murk, Titanic's mangled stern rests on the abyssal plain, 1,970 feet south of the more photographed bow. This optical mosaic combines 300 high-resolution images taken on a 2010 expedition.

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    Detached rusticles below port side anchor indicating that the rusticles pass through a cycle of growth, maturation and then fall away. This particular "crop" probably was in a five to ten year cycle.

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    Rusticle hanging from the stern section of the RMS Titanic showing secondary growths during maturation.

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    Rusticles growing down from the stern section of Titanic.

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    China dishes are part of the debris left from the wreck of the Titanic, as she lies on the Atlantic Ocean floor south of Newfoundland.

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    The prow of the HMS Titanic.

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    This photo provided by the Institute for Exploration, Center for Archaeological Oceanography/University of Rhode Island/NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, shows a pair of shoes, lying in close proximity, are, while the visible remains of the victim have disappeared, suggestive evidence of where a victim of the Titanic disaster came to rest.

    [​IMG]
    This photo provided by the Institute for Exploration, Center for Archaeological Oceanography/University of Rhode Island/NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, shows The remains of a coat and boots, articulated in the mud on the sea bed near Titanic's stern, are suggestive evidence of where a victim of the disaster came to rest.

    [​IMG]
    This photo provided by the Institute for Exploration, Center for Archaeological Oceanography/University of Rhode Island/NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, shows The remains of a coat and boots, articulated in the mud on the sea bed near Titanic's stern, are suggestive evidence of where a victim of the disaster came to rest.

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    An officer's cabin window on the Titanic's boat deck starboard side.

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    Starboard wing propeller from Titanic shipwreck.

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    The low pressure cylinder head of the port steam engine of the shipwrecked Titanic.

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    Cooking pots from Titanic shipwreck.

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    An electric meter for the electric light from the compass of the Titanic was recovered from the shipwreck.

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    The stoking ports of a boiler in the debris field of the shipwrecked Titanic.

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    The insides of a power turbine of the Titanic lie on the Atlantic Ocean floor south of Newfoundland.

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    The prow of the HMS Titanic, as she lies on the Atlantic Ocean floor south of Newfoundland.

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    An intact glass pane from the window of Captain Edward J. Smith's cabin hangs open on the Titanic.

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    A ceramic bowl and other debris from the Titanic litter the floor of the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Newfoundland.

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    A hull fragment from the Titanic lies on the ocean floor.

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    An opening on the starboard side of the ship's hull could be damage from the Titanic's collision with an iceberg on April 14, 1912. About 1,500 people died when the ship sank, breaking in two.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/01/haunting-photos-of-wreck-of-titanic.html
     
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