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Random Pictures thread !

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by GOLDZILLA, Apr 4, 2010.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Incredible Photographs That Show World War II in Brilliant & Immersive Color As You've Never Seen Before


    A new book has showcased an extraordinary collection of rare color photographs of the Second World War. The publication from the Imperial War Museums (IWM) includes color images, many of them published for the first time.

    The Second World War in Colour illustrates the most destructive war in history through rare color photographs from IWM's unparalleled archive. The vivid hues of flames and fabrics, the intense blue skies, the sun-tanned faces and the myriad colors of military camouflage bring an immediacy rarely felt through black and white photography. Striking and powerful, these images take away its remoteness and bring the Second World War to life.

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    1944 – Lieutenant Vernon R Richards of the 361st Fighter Group flies his P-51D Mustang, nicknamed ‘Tika IV’, during a bomber escort mission.

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    A German heavy cruiser abandoned in a dry dock at Kiel in May 1945.

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    April 22, 1944 – British paratroopers prepare for a practice jump from an RAF Dakota based at Down Ampney in Wiltshire.

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    August 1943 – Nurses and convalescent aircrew at Princess Mary’s Royal Air Force Hospital at Halton in Buckinghamshire.

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    c. 1941 – An Air Raid Precautions (ARP) warden inspects damaged buildings in Holborn, London.

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    December 1942 – An Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) ‘spotter’ at a 3.7-inch anti-aircraft gun site.

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    July 1944 – The RAF’s top-scoring fighter pilot, Wing Commander James ‘Johnnie’ Johnson, with his Spitfire and pet Labrador ‘Sally’ in Normandy.

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    Local children crowding aboard a Sherman tank of the 3rd County of London Yeomanry in Sicily, August 1943.

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    Local workers helping RAF fitters change the engine of a Lockheed Hudson at Yundum in the Gambia in April 1943.

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    March 1944 – Private Alfred Campin of the 6th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry during battle training in Britain.

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    May 1943 – A crew from the 16th:5th Lancers, 6th Armoured Division, clean the gun barrel of their Crusader tank at El Aroussa in Tunisia.

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    October 1944 – British soldiers admire the Caryatids on the Acropolis while sightseeing in Athens.

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    October 1944 – Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery explains Allied strategy to King George VI in his command caravan in Holland.

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    September 1943 – A 5.5-inch gun crew from 75th (Shropshire Yeomanry) Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery, in action in Italy.

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    September 1944 – Dutch civilians dance in the streets after the liberation of Eindhoven by Allied forces.

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    February 1944 – General Dwight D. Eisenhower and his senior commanders at Supreme Allied Headquarters in London.

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    1943 – Lancaster bombers nearing completion in Avro’s assembly plant at Woodford near Manchester.

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    B-24 Liberator bombers of the 491st Bomb Group, US Eighth Air Force, en route to a target in Germany, 1944.

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    A Churchill Crocodile flamethrower tank in action, August 1944.

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    Land Army girls saw larch poles for use as pit props at the Women's Timber Corps training camp at Culford, Suffolk, 1943.

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    Women producing bullets and cannon shells in an underground munitions factory on the Wirral, Merseyside, 1945.

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    A wounded British soldier being given a blood transfusion at an advanced dressing station in Italy, October 1944.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/05/incredible-photographs-that-show-world.html
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Here's What the Original McDonald's Menu Looked Like, And It Was Extremely Simple!


    Before the Golden Arches became world-renowned, the original menu was extremely simple.

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    A McDonald's menu from 1943 shows the wide selection on offer to early customers, and nothing costs more than 60 cents.

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    Customers queue at the original McDonald's diner in San Bernardino, California.

    When McDonald’s was first founded in the 1940s by brothers Dick and Mac McDonald, it was actually a barbecue-centric restaurant, serving items like ribs and barbecued pork sandwiches. But once Ray Kroc took the restaurant over, he streamlined the menu and cropped it down, which dates from the 1950s:

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    Early menus continued to offer just a handful of items, which proved hugely popular with customers.

    Ray Kroc got involved in 1955 and opened the first McDonald’s franchise east of the Mississippi in Des Plaines, Illinois:

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    A poster advertising the opening of the first store.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/heres-what-original-mcdonalds-menu.html
     
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  3. the_shootist

    the_shootist The war is here on our doorstep! Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Amazing Photos Reveal Simple Transport Used Before Car and Train in Japan More Than 100 Years Ago

    Before the days of high-speed trains and its 155mph bullet train, transportation in Japan was very different and far more primitive. As these stunning images reveal, simple and exhausting modes of travel were adopted by the higher classes in Japan during the 19th and early 20th Century.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2013/04/transport-in-japan-more-than-100-years.html
     
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  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    29 Fascinating Color Photos of British Women During World War II


    “The wars were a catalyst for women to work in more roles,” says Jenny Dibden, a director in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. “Now, there’s a much stronger sense that women working within the civil service is normal and natural. The real effort should now be on enabling women to progress to the higher grades.”

    Women in World War II took on a variety of roles from country to country. World War II involved global conflict on an unprecedented scale; the absolute urgency of mobilizing the entire population made the expansion of the role of women inevitable.

    This set of 29 fascinating color photos shows everyday life of British women during wartime.

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    On the River Avon, 1944

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    British war workers take a seaside break on a beach in Cornwall, 6th September 1943

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    Cambridge Market Square, 1944

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    Day Nursery, Hatfield, June 1943

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    Feeding and cleaning time, 1944

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    Flowers grow on bomb site in Gresham Street, London, July 1943

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    Hill street, Richmond in Sept. 1939

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    Land Army girls in 1944

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    Land Army girls quenching their thirst, 1944

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    London window shopping, 1941

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    Marlow, Buckinghamshire, May 1944

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    Models wearing Berketex utility fashions designed by Norman Hartnell, June 1943

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    Models wearing Berketex utility fashions designed by Norman Hartnell, London, June 1943

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    Pupils from a primary school out walking, rest beside a river path at Saxton Road, Abingdon, July 1944

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    Refugees from Plymouth at Tapeley Park, October 1942

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    Soldier embraces his wife and children at his home in Irby in Cheshire, at the start of seven days leave, 14 April 1944

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    The family butcher from Aswell, Hertfordshire, 1944

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    War Workers on holiday in Cornwall enjoy a day on the beach surrounded by rugged cliffs on a sunny day, September 1943

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    Wartime bride, 1945

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    Wartime fashion, 1944


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    Woman learns to use with gas masks, 1940

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    Women bicycling on Cambridge street, 1944

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    Women painting finished petrol self-sealing tanks, Dec. 1942

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    A Land Army girl busy with her Standard Fordson tractor in Oxfordshire, 1944

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    A woman at Anderson Shelter, 1940

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    A young woman comforts her kid on a beach in Cornwall, 6th September 1943

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    Aiding the war effort, October 1943

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    Bishop's Stortford, Essex, June 1944

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    British servicewomen enjoying a 'garden' on a bombed-out site in London, 1944

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/29-fascinating-color-photos-of-british.html
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    28 Old Photos Capture Daily Life of a Family in Gully, Minnesota From Between the 1900s and 1910s


    A fantastic photo collection from Maryellen McFadden documents daily life of members of the Brenna in the 1900s and early 1910s. Activities such as boys playing cards, harvesting, man repairing farm equipment, playing musical instruments, building the barn, and people celebrating the Fourth of July,...

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/05/28-old-photos-capture-daily-life-of.html
     
  7. EricTheCat

    EricTheCat Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    M31 - Spiral Galaxy in Andromeda
    M31-2017-09-20-P6S.jpg
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    25 Amazing Photographs Documented Everyday Life at the "Alcoholic Haven" Sammy's Bowery Follies in the 1940s


    In 1944, LIFE magazine described Sammy's Bowery Follies as an "alcoholic haven." The part-local dive, part-tourist trap always drew a huge mixed crowd. It was opened in 1934 at 267 Bowery (between East Houston and Stanton Streets) by Sammy Fuchs, who branded it as the Stork Club of the Bowery. He welcomed everyone from vaudeville acts to "Bowery bums"... or as the NY Times had put it, “drunks and swells, drifters and celebrities, the rich and the forgotten.”
    "From 8 in the morning until 4 the next morning Sammy’s is an alcoholic haven for the derelicts whose presence has made the Bowery a universal symbol of poverty and futility. It is also a popular stopping point for prosperous people from uptown who like to see how the other half staggers." – LIFE Magazine, Dec. 4, 1944Sammy’s Bowery Follies provided a home for burned out vaudeville acts that couldn't get booked anyplace else, and welcomed patrons who regularly passed out drunk on the premises. But it was raucous and fun—a place people could loosen their ties, let down their hair and sing along with popular show tunes of the day.

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    (Photos: Bettmann/Getty Images)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/25-amazing-vintage-photographs-document.html
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [​IMG]
     
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  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    30 Ghostly Photographs of the Isles of Scilly Shipwrecks From Between the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries


    From 1869 onwards, members of the family systematically recorded most of the great shipwreck disasters that occurred around the Isles of Scilly — a small group of islands off the coast of Cornwall in southern England.

    Patriarch, seaman, and pioneering shipwreck photojournalist John Gibson established his first photographic studio in Penzance in 1860 before returning to the Scillies and bringing his sons Alexander and Herbert into the family business in 1865. As brothers and business partners, they were very close. Two more Gibson men — James and Frank — carried on the tradition until Frank passed away in 1912.

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    The Mildred, Gurnards Head, 1912, from Newport to London carrying slag.

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    The Suevic, The Lizard, a 12,500 ton steamship from Australia.

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    The Cviet, Porthleven, Cornwall, 1884, travelling from St Domingo to Falmouth with logwood.

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    The Earl of Lonsdale, St Agnes, Isles of Scilly, 1885, a 1,543 ton steamship travelling from Alexandria to Portishead.

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    The Granite Slate, Porthcurno, 1895, a Yankee windjammer making for Swansea.

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    The Horsa, St Martin’s, Isles of Scilly, 1893, from New Zealand with mixed cargo.

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    The James Armstrong, 1874.

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    The Minnehaha, Penninis, St Mary’s, 1874.

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    The Noisiel, Praa Sands, Cornwall, 1905, travelling from Cherbourg to Italy with 600 tons of armorplate.

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    The Seine, Woolpack point, St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, 1900, from Iquique to Falmouth with saltpetre.

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    The Bay of Panama, Nare Point, Near Falmouth 1891, ran ashore in the Great Blizzard of 1891.

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    The T W Lawson, Annet, 1907, a seven masted Schooner from Philladelphia carrying barrels of oil.

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    The Albert Wilhelm, Lelant, 1886, a 202 ton German Brig travelling from the Isle of Man to Fowey.

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    The Glenbervie, The Lizard, 1902, travelling from the Thames to West Africa spirits and pianos.

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    The City of Cardiff, near Land’s End, 1912, travelling from Le Havre to Cardiff.

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    The Hansy, Hounsel Bay, The Lizard, 1911, from Sweden to Melbourne with timber and pig iron.

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    The Suffolk, Lizard, 1886, a steamship carrying general cargo and cattle from Baltimore to London.

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    The Pindos, Black Head, Lizard, 1912, in tow bound for Hamburg.

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    The Brinkburn, Maiden Bower, Isles of Scilly, 1898, carrying 9000 bales of cotton from Galveston to Le Havre.

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    The Voorspoed, Perranporth, 1901, travelling from Cardiff to Bahia.

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    The Aksai, White Island, St Martin’s, Isles of Scilly, 1875, Russian ship with coal travelling from Cardiff to Odessa.

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    The Cromdale, Under Lloyds Signal Station, Lizard, 1913, grounded in dense fog carrying nitrates.

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    Minnehaha, St Mary's, Isle of Scilly, 1874.

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    Seine, Woolpack Point, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 1900.

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    Albert Wilhelm, Lelant, 1886.

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    Granite State, Porthcurno, 1895.

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    Jeune Hortense, Eastern Green, Penzance, 1888.

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    Tripolitania, Penzance harbour, 1912.

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    Bay of Panama: Nare Point, near Falmouth, 1891.

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    Barca Khyber, 1905.
     
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  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    45 Amazing Photos of World War I at Sea


    The land war in Europe became a destructive machine, consuming supplies, equipment, and soldiers at massive rates.

    Resupply ships from the home front and allies streamed across the Atlantic, braving submarine attacks, underwater mines, and aerial bombardment. Battleships clashed with each other from the Indian Ocean to the North Sea, competing for control of colonial territory and home ports.

    New technologies were invented and refined, such as submarine warfare, camouflaged hulls, and massive water-borne aircraft carriers. And countless thousands of sailors, soldiers, passengers, and crew members were sent to the bottom of the sea.

    Here's a collection of 45 amazing photos of the World War I at sea.

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    A German U-boat stranded on the South Coast of England, after surrender. (Keystone View Company)

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    The former German submarine UB 148 at sea, after having been surrendered to the Allies. UB-148, a small coastal submarine, was laid down during the winter of 1917 and 1918 at Bremen, Germany. (US National Archives)

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    Interior view of a British Navy submarine under construction, Clyde and Newcastle. (Nationaal Archief)

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    Evacuation of Suvla Bay, Dardanelles, Gallipoli Peninsula, on January 1916. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)

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    In the Dardanelles, the allied fleet blows up a disabled ship that interfered with navigation. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)

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    The British Aircraft Carrier HMS Argus. Converted from an ocean liner, the Argus could carry 15-18 aircraft. Commissioned at the very end of WWI, the Argus did not see any combat. (National World War I Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, USA)

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    United States Marines and Sailors posing on unidentified ship (likely either the USS Pennsylvania or USS Arizona), in 1918. (National World War I Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, USA)

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    A mine is dragged ashore on Heligoland, in the North Sea, on October 29, 1918. (U.S. national Archives)

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    A Curtiss Model AB-2 airplane catapulted off the deck of the USS North Carolina on July 12, 1916. The first time an aircraft was ever launched by catapult from a warship while underway was from the North Carolina on November 5, 1915. (US Navy)

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    The USS Fulton (AS-1), an American submarine tender painted in Dazzle camouflage, in the Charleston South Carolina Navy Yard on November 1, 1918. (US Navy)

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    Men on deck of a ship removing ice. Original caption: "On a winters morning returning from France". (National World War I Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, USA)

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    The Rocks of Andromeda, Jaffa, and transports laden with war supplies headed out to sea in 1918. This image was taken using the Paget process, an early experiment in color photography. (Frank Hurley/State Library of New South Wales)

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    Landing a 155 mm gun at Sedd-el Bahr. Warships near the Gallipoli Penninsula, Turkey during the Gallipoli Campaign. (Library of Congress)

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    Sailors aboard the French cruiser Amiral Aube pose for a photograph at an anvil attached to the deck. (Library of Congress)

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    The German battleship SMS Kaiser on parade for Kaiser Wilhelm II at Kiel, Germany, circa 1911-14. (U.S. National Archives)

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    British submarine HMS A5. The A5 was part of the first British A-class of submarines, used in World War I for harbor defense. The A5, however, suffered an explosion only days after its commissioning in 1905, and did not participate in the war. (Library of Congress)

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    U.S. Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., the Big Gun section of the shops, in 1917. (Library of Congress)

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    A cat, the mascot of the HMS Queen Elizabeth, walks along the barrel of a 15-inch gun on deck, in 1915. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)

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    The USS Pocahontas, a U.S. Navy transport ship, photographed in Dazzle camouflage, in 1918. (San Diego Air and Space Museum)

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    Last minute escape from a vessel torpedoed by a German sub. The vessel has already sunk its bow into the waves, and her stern is slowly lifting out of the water. Men can be seen sliding down ropes as the last boat is pulling away. Ca. 1917. (NARA/Underwood & Underwood/U.S. Army)

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    The Burgess Seaplane, a variant of the Dunne D.8, a tailless swept-wing biplane, in New York, being used by the New York Naval Militia, ca 1918. (Library of Congress)

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    German submarines in a harbor, the caption, in German, says "Our U-Boats in a harbor". Front row (left to right): U-22, U-20 (the sub that sank the Lusitania), U-19 and U-21. Back row (left to right): U-14, U-10 and U-12. (Library of Congress)

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    The USS New Jersey (BB-16), a Virginia-class battleship, in camouflage coat, ca 1918. (US Navy)

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    Launching a torpedo, British Royal Navy, 1917. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)

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    British cargo ship SS Maplewood under attack by German submarine SM U-35 on April 7, 1917, 47 nautical miles/87 km southwest of Sardinia. (Deutsches Bundesarchiv)

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    Crowds on a wharf at Outer Harbour, South Australia, welcoming camouflaged troop ships bringing men home from service overseas, circa 1918. (State Library of South Australia)

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    The German cruiser SMS Emden, beached on Cocos Island in 1914. (State Library of New South Wales)

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    The German battle cruiser Seydlitz burns in the Battle of Jutland, May 31, 1916. (AP-Photo)
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Surrender of the German fleet at Harwich, on November 20, 1918. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)

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    German Submarine "U-10" at full speed (Library of Congress)

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    Imperial German Navy's battle ship SMS Schleswig-Holstein fires a salvo during the Battle of Jutland on May 31, 1916 in the North Sea. (AP Photo)

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    "Life in the Navy", Fencing aboard a Japanese battleship, ca 1910-15. (Library of Congress)

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    The "Leviathan", formerly the German passenger liner "Vaterland", leaving Hoboken, New Jersey, for France. The hull of the ship is covered in Dazzle camouflage. In the spring and summer of 1918, Leviathan averaged 27 days for the round trip across the Atlantic, carrying 12,000 soldiers at a time. (U.S. Army Signal Corps)

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    Portside view of the camouflaged USS K-2 (SS-33), a K-class submarine, off Pensacola, Florida on April 12, 1916. (U.S. Navy)

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    The complex inner machinery of a U.S. Submarine, amidships, looking aft. (Library of Congress)

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    The Zeebrugge Raid took place on April 23, 1918. (National Archive/Official German Photograph of WWI)

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    Allied warships at sea, a seaplane flyby, 1915. (Bibliotheque nationale de France)

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    Russian battleship Tsesarevich, a pre-dreadnought battleship of the Imperial Russian Navy, docked, ca. 1915. (Library of Congress)

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    The British Grand Fleet under admiral John Jellicoe on her way to meet the Imperial German Navy's fleet for the Battle of Jutland in the North Sea on May 31, 1916. (AP Photo)

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    HMS Audacious crew board lifeboats to be taken aboard RMS Olympic, October, 1914. The Audacious was a British battleship, sunk by a German naval mine off the northern coast of Donegal, Ireland. (CC BY SA Nigel Aspdin)

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    Wreck of the SMS Konigsberg, after the Battle of Rufiji Delta. The German cruiser was scuttled in the Rufiji Delta Tanzania River, navigable for more than 100 km before emptying into the Indian Ocean about 200 km south of Dar es Salaam. (Deutsches Bundesarchiv)

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    Troop transport Sardinia, in dazzle camouflage, at a wharf during World War I. (Australian National Maritime Museum/Samuel J. Hood Studio Collection)

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    The Russian flagship TSAREVITCH passing HMS VICTORY, ca. 1915. (Library of Congress)

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    German submarine surrendering to the US Navy. (Library of Congress)

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    Sinking of the German Cruiser SMS Bluecher, in the Battle of Dogger Bank, in the North Sea, between German and British dreadnoughts, on January 24, 1915. (U.S. National Archives)

    (via The Atlantic)

    http://www.vintag.es/2014/06/amazing-photos-of-world-war-i-at-sea.html
     
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  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Body Armor of the First World War, 1914-1918



    During the First World War, the size and scale of some of the weaponry produced devastating wounds and losses on soldiers. In order to provide some protection to the men in the front lines, armies explored the possibility of providing them with different types of armor.

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    Soldiers in the British army at the outbreak of the war were not provided with much in the way of protective clothing. The British military uniform for the time was made of hard-wearing brown khaki which did, at least, provide a measure of camouflage in the fields of France and Belgium but was not designed to provide any protection to the body of the wearer.

    The British and French armies began to equip men with steel helmets in 1915 in a bid to protect the heads, one of the most vulnerable parts of the body in trench warfare, of their men from falling debris and glancing blows from bullets or shrapnel. Despite the utility of these helmets, they still left something to be desired. The German-designed Stahlhelm provided better protection to both the head and the shoulders of their soldiers. These helmets became so synonymous with the German army that allied nations proved reluctant to design similar headwear in case it led to confusion in the trenches.

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    A German member of a “Trench Attack Squad” poses in steel body armor and two stick grenades. The armor, capable of stopping a pistol round but only superficially helpful against rifle fire, also helped protecting against bayonet and other edged weapons thrusts.

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    A soldier wear body armour made of linked steel plates covering his chest and abdomen, ca. 1914.

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    A suit of heavy body armour used by the Americans in France, ca. 1917.

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    American soldier trying on captured German body armor, 1918.

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    A man models a steel helmet covered with a built-on chain screen to protect a soldier's eyes from rocks, shells and other fragments during World War I. It was created by E J Codd Company of Baltimore, Maryland.

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    October 1917: A present day soldier armed with a rifle shakes hands with a soldier in a full suit of armour armed with an axe.

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    Georgian warriors of the Khevsur tribe wearing the traditional suit of armor. May/June 1918.

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    Three Irish Guards wearing German body armor, examining a captured German machine gun, at Pilckem Ridge, July 31st 1917.

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    Exhibiting pock marks and bullet holes, three members of the Ordnance Department demonstrate the effects of pistol, rifle and machine gun fire upon body armor, during testing at Fort de la Peigney, Langres, France. 1918.

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    A series of German helmets displayed as a trophy in the U.S., 1918.

    (Photos: Getty Images)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/body-armor-of-first-world-war-1914-1918.html
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    20 Vintage Photographs of the Korean War


    “If the best minds in the world had set out to find us the worst possible location in the world to fight this damnable war,” U.S. Secretary of State Dean Acheson (1893-1971) once said, “the unanimous choice would have been Korea.”

    On June 25, 1950, the Korean War began when some 75,000 soldiers from the North Korean People’s Army poured across the 38th parallel, the boundary between the Soviet-backed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north and the pro-Western Republic of Korea to the south. This invasion was the first military action of the Cold War. By July, American troops had entered the war on South Korea’s behalf. As far as American officials were concerned, it was a war against the forces of international communism itself.

    After some early back-and-forth across the 38th parallel, the fighting stalled and casualties mounted with nothing to show for them. Meanwhile, American officials worked anxiously to fashion some sort of armistice with the North Koreans. The alternative, they feared, would be a wider war with Russia and China–or even, as some warned, World War III. Finally, in July 1953, the Korean War came to an end. In all, some 5 million soldiers and civilians lost their lives during the war. The Korean peninsula is still divided today.

    Below is a collection of 20 vintage photographs of the war:

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    Korean civilians pass an M-46 tank

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    A US howitzer position near the Kum River

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    A GI comforts a grieving infantryman

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    The U.S. Air Force attacking railroads south of Wonsan on the eastern coast of North Korea

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    General Douglas MacArthur, UN Command CiC (seated), observes the naval shelling of Incheon from the USS Mt. McKinley, 15 September 1950

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    Combat in the streets of Seoul

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    Chinese forces cross the Yalu River

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    Soldiers from the U.S. 2nd Infantry Division in action near the Ch'ongch'on River, 20 November 1950

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    B-26 Invaders bomb logistics depots in Wonsan, North Korea, 1951

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    American flame thrower units advancing toward a tunnel entrance

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    ROK soldiers dump spent artillery casings

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    Supporting the 8th ROK Army Division, a Sherman tank fires its 76 mm gun at KPA bunkers at "Napalm Ridge", Korea, 11 May 1952

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    MiG Alley: A MiG-15 shot down by an F-86 Sabre

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    The KPAF shot down some 16 B-29 Superfortress bombers in the war

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    A US Navy Sikorsky HO4S flying near the USS Sicily

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    To disrupt North Korean communications, the USS Missouri fires a salvo from its 16-inch guns at shore targets near Chongjin, North Korea, 21 October 1950

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    Atom bomb test, 1951. This was the Operation Buster-Jangle Dog shot, on 1 November

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    Two Hill 303 survivors after being rescued by American units, 17 August 1950

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    An executed U.S. Army POW of the U.S. 21st Infantry Regiment killed 9 July 1950. Picture taken 10 July 1950

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    National Defense Corps soldiers in January, 1951

    http://www.vintag.es/2011/08/korean-war.html
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    14 Beautiful Black and White Photos of Kim Basinger in 1977


    An over shy young girl, Kim Basinger studied dance and entered beauty pageants as a teenager, confronting the eyes of a public. She was rapidly offered a contract with Ford Agency and became a successful model in New York before moving to Los Angeles in 1976 and focusing on acting.

    She landed a number of small parts at first, making guest appearances on such shows as Charlie's Angels. In 1978, Basinger starred in the TV movie Katie: Portrait of a Centerfold. She portrayed Lorene Rogers in the miniseries From Here to Eternity in 1979 and its short-lived spin-off series the following year.

    Basinger made her film debut in the 1981 western drama Hard Country with Jan-Michael Vincent. Two years later, her career started to skyrocket with Never Say Never Again starring Sean Connery. Basinger became the latest actress to play a "Bond girl," a love interest for super spy James Bond. More major film projects soon followed, including 9 1/2 Weeks with Mickey Rourke and Batman with Michael Keaton.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/14-beautiful-black-and-white-photos-of.html
     
  17. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    I took these pics of his & hers toilet planters in Kissimmee, FL last week. 20170921_090817.jpg 20170921_090821.jpg
     
  18. mtnman

    mtnman Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    A few years ago a man in Oak Ridge Tennessee had a toilet in his front yard planted with "Hens and Chicks" (google it). Well some neighbors were offended that he had this "Junk" in his yard and complained to Zoning Enforcement. Zoning came out and wrote the man a ticket. He took them to court. The judge sided with the man and now Toilets in the front yard are known as "Oak Ridge Planters".
     
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  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Incredible 19th Century Portraits of Native Americans Are Brought to Life in a Series of Colorized Pictures


    Incredible portraits of Native Americans from up to 120 years ago have been brought to life in a series of colorized pictures.

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    The stunning series of images include Iron White Man from the Sioux tribe — who traveled with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show wearing the police uniform he would have performed in — and a Native American on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Western Montana clutching a rifle. Contrasting spectacular pictures show Plain Owl of the Crow tribe wearing a traditional dress and holding a tomahawk in his lap.

    The amazing pictures were colorized by French artist Frédéric Duriez from Angres, Pas de Calais.

    “I see that there is a lot of humanity and quietness in the Native Americans’ faces, in their attitude there is a spirit of freedom,” he said. “I think that they look fantastic, they are very proud people.”

    “When I colourize, I look at people’s faces and I research the fashion period, in fact, I imagine myself painting a picture.” Frédéric added.

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    Peter Tall Mandan, Grandson of Long Mandan of the Sioux tribe in 1905.

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    Porrum and Pedro, a pair of Ute men wear brightly colored dress in a picture from 1899.

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    Rose Bompard Bird, of the Crow tribe, looks directly at the painter in a early 1900s red and green ankle-length dress.

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    Salish of Flathead Indian Reservation poses with a weapon in Western Montana in 1907.

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    A Native American from the Blackfeet tribe, that lived in Idaho and Montana.

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    Wiwi-Yokpa, or Mary Elmanico, a member of the Passamaquoddy tribe, sits draped in a pale pink flowery shawl, in 1913.

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    Sioux tribesman Iron White Man, who traveled with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.

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    Thunder Cloud of the Blackfeet tribe.

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    Sitting Eagle, of the Crow tribe, sports a feather neck brace and a fiery orange headdress in the 1900s.

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    Ke-Wa-Ko, otherwise known as Good Fox from the Pawnee tribe snapped in 1902.

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    Wearing a highly detailed white jacket, Plain Owl from the Crow tribe poses for the camera in 1910.

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    Yellow Feather from the Maricopa tribe wears a highly elaborate headdress.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/06/incredible-19th-century-portraits-of.html
     
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  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    26 Wonderful Color Photographs Captured Everyday Life in Belfast in 1955


    To the casual onlooker, Belfast in 1955 is a tranquil, peaceful city where trolleybuses run in a leisurely way through sparse traffic and lamplighters go about at night. Picture Post photographer Bert Hardy visited the city, wandering the bustling shipyards and lively streets.

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    (Photos by Bert Hardy/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images, via Mashable/Retronaut)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/26-wonderful-color-photographs-captured.html
     
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  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    33 Interesting Black and White Photos Capture Everyday Life of Teenagers in Florida During the 1950s


    Florida is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. It is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the north by Alabama and Georgia, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the south by the Straits of Florida and Cuba. Florida is the 22nd most extensive, the 3rd most populous, and the 8th most densely populated of the U.S. states.

    Florida is called the Sunshine State because of its subtropical to tropical climate and annual average of 230 days with sunshine. It is famous for its natural beauty with beautiful beaches, and it's the main reason for thriving tourism industry.

    People of Florida are also close and friendly, they look as fresh as the face of the city, especially for young people. These vintage photos below will show us how teenagers of this city looked like in the 1950s.

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  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    18 Vivid Color Photos of Britain's Seaside in Its Heyday


    Born in 1916 in Somerset, England, John Hinde is considered to be one of the pioneers of color photography. Following his training at the Reimann School of Photography Hinde went on to setup a studio in London working as a documentary, war and advertising photographer.

    In 1943 Hinde was made a Fellow in the Royal Photographic Society and commissioned to take pictures for books such as Citizen in War (1945), Exmoor Village (1947) and British Circus Life (1948). While working on the latter Hinde decided to quit his photographic career and join the circus as a PR manager. This was followed by a failed attempt to start his own traveling company in Ireland until finally in 1956 he returned to photography and founded his eponymous postcard business.

    At the time black and white images dominated the postcard market, however as a trained color photographer Hinde was determined to create bright and vibrant cards of English and Irish landscape.

    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, Hinde worked on his most widely known production: the Butlin Holiday Camps postcards. Billy Butlin had founded the camps as a place for working-class people to go for vacation, complete with high excitement and low cost. Butlin hired Hinde to produce postcards that reflected the spirited and enjoyable environment found at his camps. By this time, Hinde worked more as an art director than an actual photographer, so he hired two German photographers, Elmar Ludwig and Edmund Nägele, and one British photographer, David Noble. They travelled to the different camps and set up the necessary lights and photography equipment, often taking a whole day to make them just right.

    Often considered kitsch and at a time when only black and white photography was taken seriously, Hinde’s pictures never received critical acclaim. In the late ’70s color photography finally began to receive acknowledgement from museums. Around the same time Martin Parr began to renew interest in Hinde’s work, hailing it for its documentary value and exceptional technical accomplishment.

    Here, below is a collection of 18 vivid color photographs of Britain's seaside in its heyday. Many of them depict popular seaside destinations in Britain and Ireland during the Sixties and Seventies, before the arrival of low-cost flying hastened their decline.

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    John Hinde, On the road to Keem Strand, Achill Island, Co, Ireland

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    Joan Willis, Deep Sea Fishing off the Irish Coast

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    Elmar Ludwig, Pentewan Sands, Cornwall

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    Edmund Nagele, Sailing at Shaldon, Devon

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Bathing Pool, Ramsgate

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    Elmar Ludwig, Gyllyngvase Beach and Crazy Golf Course, Falmouth, Cornwall

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    Elmar Ludwig, Motor Racing at St. Ouen’s Bay, Jersey, C.I.

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Beach and Harbour, Gorran Haven, near Mevagissey, Cornwall

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    John Hinde, Aerial Chair Lift to Eagle’s Nest, Bray, Co. Wicklow, Ireland

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Promenade, Havre-des-Pas, Jersey, C.I.

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    Elmar Ludwig, Crooklets Beach, Bude, Cornwall

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    John Hinde, The Harbour, St. Ives, Cornwall

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    Elmar Ludwig, Bodinick Ferry, Fowey, Cornwall

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    Elmar Ludwig, Tamar Bridge, Plymouth, Devon

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Inner Harbour, Ramsgate

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    Edmund Nagele, The Boating Lake, Cromer, Norfolk

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    Joan Willis, The Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

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    Elmar Ludwig, The Pier, Margate

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/18-vivid-color-photos-of-britains.html
     
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  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Isolator: This Insane Anti-Distraction Helmet From 1925 Would Fit Into Any Modern Open Office


    Maybe you blame your smartphone or your open office for the fact that you can’t concentrate at work. But distraction isn’t exactly a new problem: In the 1920s, Hugo Gernsback published a design for a creepy-looking helmet that blocks out sound and vision so someone can focus on their work. As a writer, editor and inventor, he had a lot to do and no time for distractions. And yet, they lurked everywhere he looked. So, he created something he called “The Isolator”.

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    A full-face helmet made from solid wood, Gernsback’s invention claimed to cut out 95 per cent of any noise bothering the wearer. Another handy feature was the minimal vision it allowed. A small piece of glass granted the person wearing it sight, but even that was painted black, with only a thin segment scraped clear to allow you to see paper in front of them.

    The good (and maybe bad) of being both an inventor and publisher, is no one can stop you publishing images of your own ridiculous inventions. This contraption was featured in Gernsback’s own magazine, Science and Invention, in 1925.

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    Later, the inventor added an oxygen tank when it was found wearers were getting sleepy inside the quiet, dark and – as it turns out – carbon-dioxide-filled helmet.

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    Laugh all you want, but it seems as though the Isolator may have actually worked – at least for Gernsback. His editing and writing output was so vast that some now dub him the Father of Science Fiction.

    (via Smith Journal)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/the-isolator-this-insane-anti.html
     
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  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Interesting Photos of Computer Stores in the 1970s and '80s


    In the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s, if someone wanted to buy a personal computer, they had to make a trip down to a local computer store to physically check out what was available. Once there, customers typically encountered a dizzying array of incompatible platforms with widely varying capabilities.

    Depending on the era, think of computers with brand names like Apple, Atari, Commodore, Osborne, Texas Instruments, Radio Shack, Tandy, IBM, NEC, Sinclair, Panasonic, and more.

    Here's a small collection of interesting snapshots curated by PCMag.com that give a glimpse into what it was like to visit one of those stores back then.

    1. The Front Window

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    Imagine walking down the street in the 1980s and being greeted by this handsomely arranged scene of Radio Shack TRS-80 computers. That's exactly what the photographer encountered at a computer store in West Germany in 1984. From left to right, we see a TRS-80 Model III, Model 4, Model 100 (in the travel case), and a Model II -- along with various Tandy brand printers beside them. (Photo: Christopher Grabinski)


    2. The Computer Store

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    In this wonderful photo of the Los Angeles-based Computer Store from 1977, we get a rare peek at the inside of a PC shop from the dawn of the personal computer era. Here we see a teenager playing Star Trek on a then brand-new Apple II (possibly built from a kit, since it is missing its logo badge) while the store's owner, Dick Heiser, looks on. In the foreground sit a pair of Cromemco joysticks, which were used for playing Space War on S-100 bus machines. (Photo: George Birch)


    3. ComputerLand

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    During the 1980s, ComputerLand reigned as one of the most successful computer store chains in America. Here is a rare shot of an interior of one, circa 1983, that features IBM PCs, a few DEC Rainbow 100 machines, and a wall of software and removable media for sale. There's also an Osborne 1, one of the first "portable" computers, sitting on a desk near the man standing in the back. (Photo: ComputerLand)


    4. Computer Shopping in Japan

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    In this 1982 photo from a computer store in the Akihabara district of Tokyo, Japan, we see a cramped interior lined with uniquely Japanese computer goods. For example, the machine in the foreground is the Matsushita JR-100, an inexpensive machine with 16K of RAM and a rubber chiclet keyboard. Several other home PCs line the walls as customers look on. (Photo: Katsumi Kasahara)


    5. The IBM PC is Here

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    In this 1981 photo from an unknown Boston, Massachusetts area computer store, we see a display showcasing the new IBM Personal Computer 5150, which was released in August of that year in the US. Next to it we see a precarious stack of IBM PC manuals and software boxes, along with a couple of printers. (Photo: IBM)


    6. UK Computer Shopping

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    Computers hit the entertainment retail scene in a big way during the early 1980s, as can be seen in this photo of the interior of British retail giant HMV's store on Oxford Street in London. Among the movies and music you could typically buy at the shop, customers encountered a wall-filling display of home PCs such as the Atari 400/800 computers, the Sinclair ZX81, the Dragon 32, the Oric-1, and the BBC Microcomputer. (Photo: hmv)


    7. ComputerLand Up Close

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    In this snapshot from the late 1980s, we see the interior of a ComputerLand store in Tallahassee, Florida. In the foreground sits Dr. Tom Mason, who was a computer science professor at University of Illinois at Champaign/Urbana. Behind Mason on the desk, we can see (from left to right) an obscured Tandy Color Computer 3, a Tandy 3000, and a Tandy 1000. ComputerLand let customers try the machines in the store to get a feel for what they would like to purchase. (Photo: George Clark)

    (via PCMag.com)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/interesting-photos-of-computer-stores.html
     
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  26. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Hidden Secrets of the Moai: The Famous Easter Island Heads Also Have Bodies Too!


    Practically everyone has seen the iconic images of the Easter Island heads. What you may not have known is that those Easter Island heads actually have hidden buried bodies. Archaeologists have uncovered the bodies associated with the heads and found interesting discoveries that further our knowledge of the Easter Island civilization and how they created the monoliths.

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    The Easter Island heads are known as Moai by the Rapa Nui people who carved the figures in the tropical South Pacific directly west of Chile. The Moai monoliths, carved from stone found on the island, are between 1,100 and 1,500 CE. A bit of an aside, but CE refers to the "Common Era" and sometimes replaces the use of AD in historical and archaeological communities.

    The reason the bodies have been hidden underground for so long is that the statues were build on the side of a volcano, which helpfully erupted all over the statues and buried them up to their necks.

    Archaeologists have studied the statues on the island for about a century, and have actually known about the hidden bodies since the earliest excavations in 1914. The first photographs of the hidden torsos emerged in 2012, two years after Jo Anne Van Tilburg, director of the Easter Island Statue Project, began excavating the monoliths with the help of local Rapa Nui people. These amazing pictures below show moment archaeologists discovered Easter Island statues were covered in tattoos:

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/the-hidden-secrets-of-moai-famous.html
     
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  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    New York in the 1950s: 23 Fascinating Color Snapshots May Make You Softhearted


    That's what New York City looked like in the 1950s.

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    Warner Theater, New York, circa 1950

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    George Washington Bridge, circa 1950

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    Greeley Square and Broadway, circa 1950

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    Hicks, NYC, circa 1950

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    New York City from the Empire State Building, circa 1950

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    Times Square at Night, circa 1950

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    Times Square at Night, August 3, 1952

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    New York at night, 1953

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    New York at night, 1953

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    New York City, 1953

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    New York City, 1953

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    New York street in 1953

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    Times Square, New York, 1953

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    Women at Times Square, December 11, 1954

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    Aboard Marsdam, NYC, August 3, 1955

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    Macy’s, New York, 1955

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    New York street in 1955

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    Washington Square Park, Greenwich Village, NYC, 1955

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    Yankee Stadium, NYC, 1955

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    Sakser Bank, Cortland Street, New York, August 1956

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    Chrysler Building, 1957

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    Man reading paper at 59th Street, NYC, November 1958

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    Stern’s Department Store, 42nd Street and 6th Ave, New York, May 1958

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/new-york-in-1950s-23-fascinating-color.html
     
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    1940s Men's Fashions – The Trending Styles Through 6 Famous Classic Hollywood Films


    Solidifying the mood for the 1940s, the entry of the United States into World War II on December 8, 1941, following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor put another constraint on menswear. Natural fibers were now only used on uniforms and practicality outweighed any possible trend.

    Escaping from the somberness of everyday life, Americans looked to the cinema and Hollywood. The films captured the prominent styles of the era, particularly for the working man. In addition to the Esquire jacket that boasted broad shoulders and a loose fit, men found their confidence in double-breasted suits, white shirts and straight, pleated trousers.

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    Relaxed Pinstripe Suiting: Orson Welles and Joseph Cotten, pictured left to right, in the 1941 classic Citizen Kane. “Following the death of a publishing tycoon, news reporters scramble to discover the meaning of his final utterance.”

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    Portraying Rick Blaine in Casablanca (1942), actor Humphrey Bogart starred in the movie with Ingrid Bergman as Isla Lund. The famous image of Bogart in a trench and fedora is one of the most memorable of the era. “Set in unoccupied Africa during the early days of World War II: An American expatriate meets a former lover, with unforeseen complications.”

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    A still featuring James Stewart and Donna Reed in It’s a Wonderful Life (1946). Playing George Bailey, Stewart keeps his style professional in a three-piece tweed suit. “An angel helps a compassionate but despairingly frustrated businessman by showing what life would have been like if he never existed.”

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    The Common Man: Henry Fonda wears overalls as the impoverished Tom Joad in The Grapes of Wrath (1940). “A poor Midwest family is forced off of their land. They travel to California, suffering the misfortunes of the homeless in the Great Depression.”

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    A film noir classic, Alan Ladd, wearing a two-button suit and solid knit tie, joins Veronica Lake for The Blue Dahlia (1946). “An ex-bomber pilot is suspected of murdering his unfaithful wife.”

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    Suited Gentlemen: Katherine Hepburn is the center of attention as Cary Grant, James Stewart and John Howard vie for her attention in the 1940 classic The Philadelphia Story. “When a rich woman’s ex-husband and a tabloid-type reporter turn up just before her planned remarriage, she begins to learn the truth about herself.”

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/02/1940s-mens-fashions-trending-styles.html
     
  29. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    19 Wonderful Color Photos Capture Scenes of the Atlantic City Beach and Boardwalk From Between the 1950s and '60s


    The Atlantic City Boardwalk opened on June 26, 1870, as the first boardwalk in the United States. The Boardwalk starts at Absecon Inlet in the north and runs along the beach south-west to the city limit 4 miles (6.4 km) away then continues 1 1⁄2 miles (2.4 km) into Ventnor City.

    Stroll along the Boardwalk and enjoy ocean views on one side and shopping on the other, ranging from high-end retail to saltwater taffy shops. Casino/hotels front the boardwalk, as well as retail stores, restaurants, and amusements. Notable attractions include the Boardwalk Hall, House of Blues, and the Ripley's Believe It or Not! museum.

    Atlantic City beach and boardwalk activities include surfing, kayaking, windsurfing and fishing. Here are some of wonderful color photos captured scenes of the Atlantic City from between 1950s and '60s.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2015/02/wonderful-color-photos-of-atlantic-city.html
     
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  30. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    47 Beautiful Color Photographs That Capture Street Scenes of New York City From Between the 1940s and 1960s


    Amateur photographer Charles W. Cushman traveled extensively in the US and abroad from 1938 to 1969, capturing beautiful snapshots of everyday life. His archive has been donated to and maintained by Cushman’s alma mater, Indiana University.

    These images give a glimpse into what everyday life in Chinatown, the Financial District, and Midtown was like in the mid-20th century.

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    Stores near corner of Broome St. and Baruch Place, Lower East Side.

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    Wall Street New York.

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    Skyscrapers Looking toward financial District from an East River pier.

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    Downtown skyscrapers from East River pier.

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    Approaching Liberty St. ferry.

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    The old Fulton Market Manhattan's Lower East Side.

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    Looking up Fulton St. from South St.

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    Residents of lower Clinton St near East river.

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    Lower East Side Corner Broome St. Baruch Pl.

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    West side of Br'dway from Bowling Green.

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    S. O. Bldg from the Battery.

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    View east from north end of Battery Park.

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    Brewery adr. Lower end, Broadway.

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    Lower Manhattan.

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    Collecting the salvage on lower East Side.

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    Crowd gathers during Salvage collection in lower East Side.

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    Poverty, young and old, black and white.

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    Doorway - Lower East Side. Manhattan.

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    New York Street Scene, Lower East Side.

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    Corner of Broome St. & Baruch Pl.

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    N.W. corner DeLancey & Lewis Sts.

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    Lewis St. North of Delancey.

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    These boys live here. Block north of Wmsbgh Bridge.

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    Hot sweet potatoes.

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    A block between Avenues A and B.
     
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  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Lower First Avenue is spruce looking.

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    N.E. corner 1st St. and the Bowery.

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    N.E. corner 1st St. and the Bowery.

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    A corner on west Canal St.

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    Corner of Pearl St.

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    View up Moss Ave.

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    Street in New York's Chinatown

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    Chinese store windows.

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    East 7th St. between 3rd and 2nd Ave.

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    Up 4th Ave from Astor Place Cooper Union at right.

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    View north from Herald Square.

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    Peter Minuit Plaza lower Manhattan.

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    View west on Wall Street.

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    West up Maiden Lane from Pearl street Manhattan.

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    Looking west from 42nd + Broadway.

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    South from 42nd + 6th (Ave. of Americas).

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    South from 42nd and Fifth Ave.

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    Whitehall street from Peter Minuit Plaza near Battery NYC.

    (Photos by Charles W. Cushman)

    http://www.vintag.es/2014/07/beautiful-color-photographs-of-streets.html
     
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  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    26 Rare Color Photos That Capture Street Scenes of Edinburgh in 1949


    Edinburgh is the capital and the second most populous city of Scotland, also the seventh most populous in the United Kingdom. It is one of its 32 council areas, and located in Lothian on the Firth of Forth's southern shore.

    Recognised as the capital of Scotland since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh is home to the Scottish Parliament and the seat of the monarchy in Scotland. Historically part of Midlothian, the city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering. It is the largest financial centre in the UK after London.

    These found snapshots from Found Slides that capture street scenes of Edinburgh in 1949, years just after the Second World War.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/26-rare-color-photos-that-capture.html
     
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  33. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Forest_Gump.png


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  34. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rare and Fascinating Photos of Harriet Quimby, the First Licensed U.S. Woman Pilot

    She was a modern woman in a not-so modern age. At a time when her contemporaries were swathed in petticoats and corsets, Harriet Quimby was climbing into a cockpit, decked out in a satin flying suit, waving energetically to the crowd. She was as bold and tenacious as she was beautiful, and she displayed an innate understanding of marketing and salesmanship, selling herself and the fledgling field of aviation to an enthusiastic public.

    Harriet Quimby is classified among the most famous American female aviators. Her career as a pilot did not last long but was undeniably heroic. She was the first American lady to become a licensed pilot and the first woman to fly across the English Channel. She was also a movie screenwriter. Even though she died very young, Harriet played a key influence upon the role of women in aviation.

    Quimby became interested in aviation about 1910, and, following a visit to an air show at Belmont Park in October of that year, she determined to learn to fly. She took lessons at the Moisant School of Aviation at Hempstead, Long Island, in the spring of 1911, and on August 1 she became the first woman to qualify for a license (number 37) from the Aero Club of America, the U.S. branch of the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale. She was the second licensed woman pilot in the world, following the baroness de la Roche of France. For a time Quimby flew with the Moisant International Aviators, a demonstration team from the school, but she also continued to contribute articles to various periodicals.

    On April 16, 1912, after nearly a month of preparation, Quimby became the first woman to pilot an aircraft across the English Channel, guiding her French Blériot monoplane from Dover, England, through heavy overcast to Hardelot, France. She was widely celebrated for her feat. In the summer, after participating in several other air meets, she flew to Boston to take part in the Harvard-Boston Aviation Meet. On July 1, 1912, while piloting her Blériot over Dorchester Bay, Quimby lost control; she and a passenger both fell from the rolling craft and were killed.

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    Miss Harriet Quimby, 1911, (Leslie Jones Collection, Boston Public Library)

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    Harriet in the cockpit of her plane in the USA, 1911.

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    Harriet Quimby and her Blériot XI.

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    Harriet Quimby and her Blériot XI. (Library of Congress)

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    Harriet Quimby in her purple flight suit.

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    Harriet Quimby in front of the Bleriot when she became the first woman to fly across the English Channel

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    Harriet Quimby, September 1910. (Edmunds Bond/The Boston Globe)

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    Harriet Quimby first woman to fly across the Channel 16.04.1912.

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    Harriet Quimby (Theodore C. Marceau)

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    A photo of Harriet Quimby, published in the Swedish news magazine Hvar 8 Dag in 1912.

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    Harriet designed this outfit, in rich purple, to eliminate the indignity of an exposed ankle while clambering aboard an aeroplane.

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    Harriet Quimby mounting her Moisant monoplane (from The American Review of Reviews, 1911)

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    Harriet Quimby, wearing her purple satin flying suit, pulls the Chauvière Intégrale propeller of the Blériot XI to start the air-cooled Anzani W3 (“fan” or “semi-radial”) three-cylinder engine.

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    Harriet before the epic flight of 16 April 1912 at the Blériot Monument. (Courtesy of Giacinta Bradley Koontz)

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    Harriet on the day of her historic flight next to Blériot plane. (Courtesy of Giacinta Bradley Koontz)

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    Matilde Moisant (left) poses with Harriet Quimby (right), circa 1911-1912.

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    Harriet Quimby, c.1911

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    Harriet Quimby with her parents, September 1911. (Courtesy of Giacinta Bradley Koontz)

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    Harriet being carried after her epic flight to France. (Courtesy of Giacinta Bradley Koontz)

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    Page 8 of the Daily Mirror 17 April 1912. (Courtesy of Giacinta Bradley Koontz)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/09/rare-and-fascinating-photos-of-harriet.html
     
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  35. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    I dare somebody to take a knee here without praying. Arlington (17).jpg Arlington (5).jpg Arlington (1).jpg
     
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  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Major General Horatio Gordon Robley With His Collection of Tattooed Maori Heads, 1895


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    Horatio Gordon Robley (1840-1930) was a British army officer and artist who served in New Zealand during the New Zealand land wars in the 1860s. He was interested in ethnology and fascinated by the art of tattooing as well as being a talented illustrator.

    He wrote two books relating to his time in New Zealand, Moko or Maori Tattooing in 1896 and Pounamu: Notes on New Zealand Greenstone. In the first book, as well as demonstrating and explaining the art of Māori tattooing, he also wrote chapters on the dried tattooed heads or Mokomokai. Robley decided to acquire as many examples of Mokomokai as possible, and at length built up a unique collection of 35 heads.

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    Major General Horatio Gordon Robley with his collection of tattooed Maori heads, 1895

    Robley would have obtained these heads from a market and traded for them. The trafficking of the items would have likely lead to murder and foul play since they were sought after items that had value. One account recalls a market seller telling the story of a slave who was being tattooed with the intention of being executed and sold as a Maori, however he escaped. The heads would have also been traded for firearms that certain tribes would have used during the musket wars.

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    In 1908 he offered them to the New Zealand Government for £1,000; his offer, however, was refused. Later, with the exception of the five best examples which Robley retained, the collection was purchased by the American Museum of Natural History, New York, for the equivalent of £1,250.

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/05/major-general-horatio-gordon-robley.html
     
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  37. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Amazing Vintage Photos of Stockholm, Sweden in the 1910s


    Heinrich Karl Hugo Bürgel studied philology at universities in Munich, Copenhagen, and Leipzig before receiving his doctorate in 1903. He moved to Sweden in 1905, receiving citizenship there two years later. In 1915 he changed his name to Henry B. Goodwin. His first position in Sweden was as an assistant to a professor of German at the university in Uppsala. He worked there until 1909, when he moved to Stockholm and began as an author of dictionaries for Norstedt & Sons.

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    Goodwin had been fascinated by photography since 1900 and is thought to have gone to Leipzig to study with Nicola Perscheid. He was deeply interested in the creative possibilities the photographic picture offered. He gave a lecture for Svenska Fotografers Förbund [Swedish Photographers' Association] in 1914, and from that year until 1921 he was the Swedish correspondent for Photograms of the Year's annual issue from London. In 1915 he held his first one-man exhibition.

    From 1915 until 1931 he had his own professional portrait-photography studio in Stockholm. Although he was more expensive than his competitors he had a large and well-known clientele.

    Goodwin learned bromoil and charcoal-print techniques from Perscheid, but it was Alvin Langdon Coburn who had the greatest effect on him. Goodwin adopted Coburn's concept "camera pictures" instead of "photography" and became a defender of Scandinavian pictorialism into the 1920s. On a trip to Germany he became acquainted with New Objectivity, which led him to change styles and find new motifs.

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    (Photos by Henry B. Goodwin)

    http://www.vintag.es/2014/06/amazing-vintage-photos-of-stockholm.html
     
  38. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    The Haight: Love, Rock, and Revolution – Jim Marshall's Iconic Photos Capture the '60s San Francisco


    The counter-culture movement of the 1960s is one of the most endlessly examined moments of the twentieth century. Widely regarded as the cradle of revolution, San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury grew from a small neighborhood to a worldwide phenomenon—a concept that extends far beyond the boundaries of the intersection itself.

    Jim Marshall visually chronicled this area as perhaps no one else did. Renowned for his portraits of some of the greatest musicians of the era, Marshall covered Haight-Ashbury with the same unique eye that allowed him to amass a staggering archive of music photography and Grammy recognition for his work.

    Bold and beautifully crafted, these stunning photographs offer fresh insight into the Summer of Love, Haight-Ashbury, and beyond.

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    The Charlatans perform in the Golden Gate Park , 1967.

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    The Grateful Dead perform in the Panhandle, 1967.

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    Jimi Hendrix filming Janis Joplin backstage at Winterland in 1968.

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    Joan Baez and Paul McCartney doodling backstage at Candlestick Park in 1966.

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    Janis Joplin backstage at Winterland in 1968.

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    Grace Slick and Jefferson Airplane during a songwriting session, 1967.

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    Grace Slick and Janis Joplin during a shoot for TeenSet in 1968.

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    Ralph Gleason with Simon and Garfunkel.

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    Brian Jones, Nico, Judy Collins and Dennis Hopper. Hopper based his character in Apocalypse Now on Marshall.

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    Tourists observe the Haight from their cars in 1967.

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    Hippies and Hells Angels hang out together in Golden Gate Park in 1968.

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    Rolling Stone's Ben Fong-Torres interviews Haight Street residents.

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    Janis Joplin in her apartment on Lyon Street in San Francisco, California in 1968.

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    A drug den behind a store front on Haight Street in 1967.

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    Jimi Hendrix at the Pandlehandle in 1967.

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    The five original San Francisco legends photographed together: Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, Big Brother and the Holding Company, Quicksilver Messenger Service and the Charlatans, in 1967.

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    Graffiti at the intersection of Haight and Belvedere Streets in 1967.

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    Paul McCartney and John Lennon performing at the Beatles last concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California, August 29 1966.

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    Jimi Hendrix lighting his guitar on fire on stage at Monterey International Pop Festival Monterey, California, June 1967.

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    Janis Joplin and her Psychedelic Porsche, 1968.

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    Hippie

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    Jefferson Airplane, The Haight/Ashbury, San Francisco, 1967

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    The Grateful Dead flipping the bird, 1967.

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    The Grateful Dead's last free concert on Haight Street, 1968.

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    The Who, San Francisco 1967.

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    Brian Jones and Jimi Hendrix backstage at the Monterey Pop Festival, 1967.

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    Jerry Garcia and Mountain Girl on the steps of 710 Ashbury Street, 1967.

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    Dancers in the Panhandle, San Francisco, 1967.

    (Images © Jim Marshall)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/06/the-haight-love-rock-and-revolution-jim.html
     
  39. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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  40. Emc2

    Emc2 Seeker Seeker

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