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Rolls-Royce’s cargo ship of the future requires no onboard crew

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by BarnacleBob, Jun 27, 2016.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Japan plans to launch a fleet of 250 self-driving cargo ships by 2025 that could cut the risk of accidents at sea in HALF
    • The smart ships would utilise artificial intelligence to navigate the seas
    • Devices connected to the internet would gather data on shipping conditions
    • This would allow the ships to plot the safest, shortest and cheapest routes
    • It is hoped the move could help Japan increase its share of the shipping market


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4588626/Japan-launch-fleet-self-navigating-cargo-ships.html#ixzz4jiORW3NI
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Lloyd’s Register Announces New Code to Certify Unmanned Ships

    June 14, 2017 by gCaptain

    [​IMG]
    A conceptual design by Rolls-Royce of an 1,000 TEU unmanned feeder vessel. Image credit: Rolls-Royce
    International classification society Lloyd’s Register has launched a new code to meet the growing demand for regulatory support for unmanned ships in the marine industry.

    Lloyd’s Register describes its Unmanned Marine Systems Code as a goal-based code that takes a structured approach to the assessment of unmanned marine systems (UMS) against a set of safety and operational performance requirements.

    With current and expected developments in autonomous and remote systems, LR envisages that, within the near future, unmanned systems will enter into widespread use through many sectors of the maritime industry.

    “The LR Unmanned Marine Systems Code provides an assurance process in order to certify the safe design, build and maintenance of UMS against an established framework that minimizes the effort required by an owner or operator to achieve certification and which is acceptable to Flag States, local regulators and other parties. Whilst initially targeted at small non-convention sized UMS, including naval systems, it is scalable and is capable of application to larger, more complex vessels as technology and regulation develops,” Lloyd’s Register said in a press release announcing the new code.

    The Code has been written to support the growing innovation in the field of unmanned systems by establishing requirements for which compliance can be demonstrated using a tailored combination of standards, or where standards do not exist, the application of risk-based assessment techniques. “The benefits of using the goal-based structure is that it defines an ultimate safety objective whilst allowing for the consideration of alternative designs and solutions that meet the safety objective; thereby supporting innovation in an area that is developing rapidly,” LR describes.

    The Code, which has been validated against several existing UMS designs, has been developed against a hazard analysis of UMS design and operation and benchmarked against existing commercial and naval regulatory requirements, including SOLAS and the Naval Ship Code.

    Tim Kent, LR’s Marine & Offshore Technical Director, said: “The Code provides a unique and valuable method of providing an assurance process for the safe design of unmanned marine systems in what is a rapidly developing area of the industry. It allows for the certification of novel and emerging technologies against a structured framework and is scalable according to the risk profile and autonomy of the systems, from the very small or simple to the very large or complex. It complements our existing work on cyber-enabled ships and is also intended to support any future regulatory development by the IMO or national bodies.”

    http://gcaptain.com/lloyds-register-announces-new-code-to-certify-unmanned-ships/
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Ship Automation Without Consultation – The Problem With Robot Ships

    June 16, 2017 by Editorial

    [​IMG]
    A DARPA sponsored highly autonomous unmanned ship.


    By Capt. George H Livingstone,

    “Promise Everything, Deliver Nothing” Napoleon Bonaparte

    There is an ongoing “full court press” regarding the subject of automation in marine transportation. In the last year gCaptain alone has seen many articles on the subject; Rolls-Royce’s automated ships, automated tug boats, etc. Recently there have seen several more, Rolls-Royce to Open Remote Controlled and Autonomous Shipping Center in Finlandand “The World’s First Zero-Emission, Full Automated Container Ship”, ”Ships without Sailors? It can’t happen soon enough”. A plethora of marine transportation automation articles are being published internationally. It’s too good to pass up, they’re futuristic, high tech, glamorous and pressing all the hot buttons.

    Adam Minter of Bloomberg View says in the above cited article, ships without sailors, “If all goes as planned, it’s actually the future of shipping” “transforming one of the world’s oldest and most conservative industries.” Really? I think Napoleon made similar remarks before Waterloo. Mariners are skeptical of saying things like If all goes as planned, etc. Mr. Minty goes on to mention many negatives of manned ships; like ship crew costs account for 44% of total coast of a ship. That manned ship’s “Bridge superstructures” typically require heavy ballasting to make sure the ship is balanced…Okay, stop! Heavy Ballasting required because of Bridge Structures? Better go online and look up basic Naval Architecture. Average crew costs 44% of total ship operating costs? ‘Balder Dash’, nonsense.

    But I digress, kudo’s should be given to Kongsberg and Yara (a Norwegian fertilizer manufacturer) for announcing a partnership to build the world’s first fully autonomous cargo container ship. The first zero emission electric, automated ship. I’m just a mariner but why can’t we make the world’s first zero emission electric manned ship? The referred to ship goes into operation by 2020 and “will replace 40,000 shipments a year that had once been carried by polluting diesel trucks”. Nice but I’m not sure that the international trucking industry, which is much closer to full automation of vehicles (at much, lower per unit cost), is going to just roll over and let maritime shipping take the money and run. A fully automated 18 wheel truck just successfully made a trip from coast to coast in the United States.

    But I digress, the fascinating aspect of the international discussion on automation in marine transportation is the seeming disregard for the professionals who know most about the subject, the mariners. I guess we are considered so outdated and conservative that our opinions and thoughts don’t matter. The business innovators and disruptors apparently don’t care what maritime professionals think or how the industry will be affected by automation. Change is coming, good or bad or ugly and knowledge of marine transportation is not needed to affect that change, so they say.

    The reality is most professional mariners would agree automation is coming and there will be a day when unmanned vessels travel the oceans. There will also, however, most certainly be a transition period likely for a significant amount of time. A time when international law and treaties will have to be completely reviewed and rewritten. A time when the oceans will see a mix of automated and manned ships. A time when employment in the poorest countries will be considered and debated.

    For example, presently in international marine transportation, some of the world’s poorest countries supply a significant portion of the world’s professional mariners providing much needed income for the demographic in question. If the average crew cost of a bulk carrier worldwide is less than 10% of total operating costs and it costs 3X as much to build an automated ship as a manned ship along with very high tech, expensive shore-side operation centers, which is the better choice? It’s not an unimportant consideration, the social justice aspect.

    As long as those entities and countries pushing for automation in marine transportation keep themselves isolated through a pure PR strategy. As long as they are unwilling to engage in broad and transparent conversations with those who know marine transportation, said entities will find one self-created road block after another. I’m not suggesting automation doesn’t arrive, it will. It’s a question of the transition, which will make or break many of those presently engaged in ‘automation without consultation’.

    http://gcaptain.com/ship-automation-without-consultation-problem-robot-ships/
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    World’s First Remotely-Controlled Commercial Vessel Put to the Test in Copenhagen

    June 20, 2017 by gCaptain

    [​IMG]
    The shoreside “Captain’s chair” at Rolls-Royce’s Remote Operating Centre at Svitzer headquarters. Image credit: Rolls-Royce

    Rolls-Royce and global towage operator Svitzer have demonstrated what is believed to be the world’s first remotely operated commercial vessel, Svitzer Hermod, in Copenhagen, Denmark, Rolls-Royce said Tuesday.

    During the demonstration earlier this year, the 28-meter-long tugboat safely conducted a number maneuvers in Copenhagen harbor while controlled by a Captain ashore. From the quayside in Copenhagen harbor, Svitzer Hermod’s captain, stationed at a remote base at Svitzer headquarters, berthed the vessel alongside the quay, undocked, turned 360 degrees, and piloted it back to the Svitzer headquarters, before docking again.

    [​IMG]
    Svitzer Harmod. Image credit: Rolls-Royce

    The Svitzer Hermod, a Robert Allan ship design, was built in Turkey at the Sanmar yard in 2016. It is equipped with a Rolls-Royce Dynamic Positioning System, which Rolls-Royce describes as the key link to the remote controlled system. The vessel is also equipped with a pair of MTU 16V4000 M63 diesel engines from Rolls-Royce, each rated 2000 kW at 1800 rpm.

    Rolls-Royce says Svitzer Hermod features a range of sensors which combine different data inputs using advanced software to give the captain an enhanced understanding of the vessel and its surroundings. The data is then transmitted to a Remote Operating Centre (ROC), where the Captain controls the vessel from.

    The ROC was designed to redefine the way in which vessels are controlled, according to Rolls-Royce. Instead of copying existing wheelhouse design, the ROC was developed with input from experienced captains to place the different system components in the best place to give the master full confidence and control. The aim is to create a future proof standard for the control of vessels remotely, says Rolls-Royce.

    [​IMG]
    Credit: Rolls-Royce

    Throughout the demonstration the vessel also had a fully qualified captain and crew on board to ensure safe operation in the event of a system failure.

    “It was an honor to be present at what I believe was a world first and a genuinely historic moment for the maritime industry,” said Mikael Makinen, President of Rolls-Royce Marine, who was on-hand to witness the event. “We’ve been saying for a couple of years that a remotely operated commercial vessel would be in operation by the end of the decade. Thanks to a unique combination of Svitzer’s operational knowledge and our technological expertise, we have made that vision a reality much sooner than we anticipated.”

    The two companies have signed an agreement to continue their cooperation to test remote and autonomous operations for vessels. The primary systems involved will be autonomous navigation, situational awareness, remote control centre and communication.

    [​IMG]
    Rolls-Royce

    Kristian Brauner, Chief Technology Officer, Svitzer said: “Disruption through innovation is happening in almost every industry and sector and technology will also be transforming the maritime industry. As the largest global towage company, Svitzer is actively engaging in projects that allow us to explore innovative ways to improve the safety and efficiency of towage operations to benefit our customers and our crews. With its direct impact on our customer performance, operational cost and environmental footprint vessel efficiency remains a main driver now and going forward.”

    Lloyd’s Register, working with Rolls-Royce and Svitzer on the project, described the demonstration as a landmark moment for the maritime industry.

    “With autonomous ships likely to enter service soon, we have already set out the ‘how’ of marine autonomous operations in our ShipRight procedure guidance as it is vital these technologies are implemented in a safe way and there is a route for compliance,” said Nick Brown, Lloyd’s Register’s Marine & Offshore Director. “Lack of prescriptive Rules was no barrier for “de-risking” the project and we provided assurance against LR’s Cyber-Enabled Ships ShipRight Procedure, whilst considering the safety implications associated with the first closed demonstration. We are honored to be working as partners on this ground-breaking project in the industry’s journey to autonomous vessels.”

    Filed Under: Maritime News Tagged With: autonomous shipping, rolls royce, svitzer

    http://gcaptain.com/worlds-first-re...mercial-vessel-put-to-the-test-in-copenhagen/
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Maritime Wakes Up To Security Risks

    July 6, 2017 by gCaptain

    [​IMG]

    Security is the Achilles’ heel of connected technology. In the maritime space, cyber risks conflate with vessel safety making a multifaceted response essential, says Inmarsat Maritime security head Peter Broadhurst

    Today an estimated 30,000 vessels globally have some sort of access to always-on Internet via satellite. At the same time, a mix of increasingly sophisticated equipment – from electronic navigation systems to computer-controlled engines – is finding its way on board modern tonnage. This means ships can no longer be considered protected by an air-gap from cyber threats.

    As on land, the risks are multifaceted. Organised crime groups, ‘hacktivists’, former or current members of staff, and even nation states, might all be considered malicious actors with a motive to disrupt operations at sea. Systems can also be compromised in benign ways, perhaps due to carelessness or lack of knowledge among a vessel’s crew.

    Even if the networks on board are segregated between, say, systems for ship operation, crew welfare and remote access to suppliers, these divisions can over time be eroded through ad hoc interventions by the crew or suppliers, even when ostensibly acting with good intentions, such as to expedite an urgent maintenance task. The separations can also be compromised by manual transfer of data – a practice that appears particularly widespread at sea.

    Matters are further complicated by the fact that shipping lines operate a mix of vessels which they either own or charter for a short period. Additionally, vessels and other key systems often carry an analogue heritage, being built for analogue control, with digital solutions grafted on later often with only minimal consideration given to security issues.

    [​IMG]

    “Several welcome initiatives aimed at raising cyber-crime awareness in the maritime space and offering guidance on its prevention are underway, but there are concerns that the fragmented nature of these activities diminishes their overall impact,” says Peter Broadhurst, Vice President Safety and Security, Inmarsat Maritime.

    Industrial standards for maritime back-end systems are few and far between, resulting in an IT landscape littered with custom-built solutions, which have undergone limited systematic testing of cyber security issues. At the other end of the spectrum, some shipping companies, notably container lines, have reached a stage of electronic commerce where business operations cannot be handled manually for any extended period, making them especially vulnerable to an extended deliberate or accidental system outage.

    The intrinsically global nature of the supply chain, business relationships and the diversity and complexity of operational activities offer another weak-spot, which a determined intruder might be tempted exploit.

    With so many variables involved, the potential consequences are hard to calculate. They might amount to a simple inconvenience or extend to a missed port arrival and significant commercial penalty. The worst-case scenario would an attack that jeopardises the safety of the vessel and its crew. “Cyber-security and safety are now so entwined that there is a growing realisation that they must be viewed through the same lens,” says Broadhurst.

    As the industry turns to greater automation and digital solutions such as the Internet of Things, Big Data etc., in pursuit of cost efficiencies and becomes more tightly integrated within the connected economy, these risks are likely to intensify. “Until recently, it was relatively straightforward to distinguish between information technology and operational technology systems. The former processed data to generate information, while the latter used data to control or monitor physical processes. However, the Internet of Things is beginning to blur the boundaries between the physical world and cyber world,” explains Broadhurst.

    Of course, the industry and its regulators are not blind to the cyber threat. In early 2016, BIMCO issued a set of guidelines comprising high-level recommendations on cyber-risk management accompanied by a selection of more practical self-help measures that concerned vessel owners can take immediately.

    Prepared with input from a range of organisations, shipping lines, a handful of relevant manufacturers and Inmarsat, these guidelines were well-received, to the extent they were tacitly endorsed by the IMO, which used it as the basis for its own best-practice.

    Recognising that no two organisations in the shipping industry are the same, and that prescriptive regulations are unlikely to keep up with rate of technological change, these guidelines take a risk management approach rather than impose hard and fast rules. “The risk-based approach offers greater resilience as policies and actions can be adapted in response to evolving threats. It also dovetails with existing safety and security management practices,” says Broadhurst.

    The five principles at the heart of the Guidelines are: 1) to identify cyber-risks; 2) to take steps to protect against these cyber-risks turning into cyber-events; 3) to detect cyber-events in a timely manner; 4) to have plans to respond and get necessary systems up and running again; and 5) to have measures to recover and restore all systems impacted by a cyber-event. These tasks will be developed concurrently and continuously, rather than sequentially. They will also require engagement from senior management, so that a culture of cyber risk awareness can be embedded into all levels of any organisation.

    As a major provider of satellite connectivity services to the maritime industry, Inmarsat has a keen interest in minimising its customers’ exposure to cyber-risk. This has grown more pressing following the market launch of its new high-throughput Fleet Xpress service, powered by the I-5 constellation of Ka-band satellites, which enables much more data to flow between ship and shore.

    To that end, the company is devising specialised software solutions and stepping up its involvement in industry-wide initiatives to help vessel owners minimise the exposure to cyber-risk. It will soon introduce a unified threat management (UTM) service customised for maritime end-users. Designed to function as an integrated part of Fleet Xpress, it will provide ship owners and operators a pathway for putting the BIMCO guidelines into practice.

    Based on the Trustwave platform (now owned by Singaporean telco Singtel), the UTM component is continually updated with incoming intelligence on new cyber-risks. This will be utilised when inspecting data going to and from a vessel. As well as seeking out potential intrusions via the satellite connection, it will also look for incursions stemming elsewhere on the vessel LAN, perhaps the result of an infected USB sticks or devices belonging to crew or visiting contractors.

    Inmarsat is also supporting the activities of a joint working group set up by the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS) to formulate a set of recommendations focused on the cyber-security.


    Filed Under: maritime security Tagged With: cyber security, Inmarsat

    http://gcaptain.com/maritime-wakes-security-risk/
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Bourbon Joins Project to Build World’s First Autonomous Offshore Vessel

    July 11, 2017 by Mike Schuler

    [​IMG]
    An illustration of the unmanned, fully-autonomous prototype vessel. Image credit: Hrönn Project

    French offshore services company Bourbon Offshore announced Tuesday it has signed on to a project which is aimed at building of the world’s first fully-autonomous, unmanned offshore vessel.

    Bourbon entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Automated Ships Ltd to support the building of the first-of-its-kind vessel in collaboration with the project’s primary technology partner, KONGSBERG.

    The project, called the Hrönn project, is seeking to build the first autonomous, fully-automated and cost-efficient prototype vessel for offshore operations. The offshore vessel, dubbed Hrönn, will be designed and built in Norway, and could enter service as the world’s first full-size unmanned ship as early as 2018.

    [​IMG]
    The Hrönn could enter service as early as 2018.
    For its part, Bourbon will use its expertise in building and operating a standardized fleet to provide detailed input to the development and design of the vessel, ensuring flexibility, reliability, and cost efficiency to operate safely and effectively in the demanding offshore environment.

    Hrönn will be built as a light-duty, offshore utility ship servicing the offshore energy, hydrographic & scientific and offshore fish-farming industries. It would also be utilized as an ROV and AUV support ship and standby vessel, able to provide firefighting support to an offshore platform working in cooperation with manned vessels. Automated Ships Ltd has progressed the original catamaran design of Hrönn since the project launch last November, opting for a monohulled vessel of steel construction, to provide more payload capacity and greater flexibility in the diverse range of operations.

    BOURBON’s entry to the Hrönn project follows the recent news that it has joined forces with KONGSBERG in a new collaboration to develop digital solutions for next generation connected and autonomous vessels. The two companies will execute joint projects to develop new ways of efficient operations in the offshore services industry, with a fast time-to-market.

    KONGSBERG will contribute its technical expertise and deliver all major marine equipment necessary for the design, construction, and operation of Hrönn, including all systems for dynamic positioning and navigation, satellite and position reference, marine automation and communication. Its vessel control systems including K-Pos dynamic positioning, K-Chief automation and K-Bridge ECDIS and Radar will be replicated at an Onshore Control Centre, allowing full remote operations of Hrönn.

    Hrönn’s sea trials will take place in Norway’s officially designated automated vessel test bed in the Trondheim fjord and will be conducted under the auspices of DNV GL and the Norwegian Maritime Authority (NMA). The Hrönn will ultimately be classed and flagged, respectively.

    “In this era of digitalization of industrial services, we are pleased to join this forward-looking project thus demonstrating the positioning of BOURBON as a world reference in terms of operational excellence and customer experience,” said Gael Bodénès, Chief Operating Officer, BOURBON Corporation.

    “BOURBON is a world leading marine services company and we are confident that alongside KONGSBERG as technology lead, they will provide a valuable contribution to the design and operation of Hrönn,” said Brett Phaneuf, CEO, Automated Ships Ltd.

    “We are pleased to be collaborating with such expert partners in the development of Hrönn, a vessel that will show how digitalisation and autonomy have the potential to revolutionise the offshore services market,” said Stene Førsund, EVP Global Sales and Marketing, Kongsberg Maritime.

    http://gcaptain.com/bourbon-joins-project-to-build-first-autonomous-offshore-vessel/
     

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