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Share Your RECIPES Here

Discussion in 'Coffee Shack (Daily News/Economy)' started by newmisty, Jan 10, 2012.



  1. dirt to oil

    dirt to oil Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    flapper pie


    crust

    mix 1 1/4 cups graham crumbs ( 14 wafers ) with 1/4 cup sugar and 1 tsp cinnamon add 1/4 cup melted butter and mix, line a 9" pie plate holding back about 1/2 cup , a fork works better than a spoon
    for packing the graham mix ( pack it as well as you can )

    seperate 3 eggs ( the original recipe calls for 2 but I like more meringue)

    mix 1/4 cup sugar with 1/4 cup corn starch , add the yokes and mix into a paste , add a little bit of milk
    and stir in , slowly add the rest of the ,milk

    cook over medium heat stirring all the while
    once it starts to thicken and boils stir it up a bit more , maybe about a min. add vanilla at this stage

    remove from heat set aside for no more than 5 min stir twice during this time ( while you make the meringue) then pour in to shell

    beat the 3 egg whites a bit add a pinch of cream of tartar ( seems unnecessary but I have never had a meringue fail when using it , beat a little more and gradually add about 1/3 or maybe a bit more of a cup of sugar ( I put the sugar in a bowl then tap it with the knife I leveled the sugar off with so to slowly add it to the mix), beat till stiff , its ok to stop and check pull the beaters out and see if they make stiff peaks if not beat some more ( never use a plastic bowl it can hold a bit of oil which will keep the meringue from forming ) pile on top of the hot pudding mix , spread evenly making sure to seal the meringue around the pie dish ( when cooked the meringue will shrink away from the edge if you miss this step) I also form a few peaks with the knife , then sprinkle the remaining graham mix and bake at 350 for 20 to 25 min till golden brown . remove from oven to a rack ,

    this pie is best served slightly warm ( if making a roast I will time it so it goes in right after the roast comes out , it will come out just before you serve dinner , making it the perfect temp about 45 min to 1 hour later when you serve dessert
    crust
    1 1/4 cups graham crumbs
    1/4b cup sugar
    1 tsp cinnamon
    1/4 cup melted butter

    filling
    1/4 cup cornstarch
    1/4 cup sugar
    3 egg yolks
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla ( optional 1 sliced ripe banana , add right after milk before cooking, wonderful)
    2 cups whole milk

    meringue

    3 egg whites
    pinch of cream of tartar
    1/3 cup sugar


    wonderful dessert with not that much effort
     
  2. MNeagle

    MNeagle New Member

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    Location:
    Minnesota ~ 10,000 Lakes!
    Cabin Stew

    No need to brown the meat

    2 pounds stew meat, cubed
    1 20-ounce can tomatoes
    1 box frozen peas
    6 carrots, sliced
    3 small onions, chopped
    1 cup celery, sliced
    3 medium potatoes, diced
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1/4 cup tapioca
    1 5-ounce water chestnuts, drained and sliced
    1/4 cup dry red wine

    Put all ingredients in casserole. Stir to blend. Cover.

    Bake at 275 degrees for 5 hours or longer. Freezes well.

    Serves 8.


    (Can also be done in a crockpot: low-setting). After a fresh 7 inches of new snow today, this was great to enjoy. Hope you like it too!
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How to Cook a Rabbit, Pt. 1: Butchering

    [video=youtube_share;LVPpyrA3UQo]http://youtu.be/LVPpyrA3UQo[/video]

    http://youtu.be/LVPpyrA3UQo


    How to Cook a Rabbit, Pt. 2: Rabbit Cacciatore w/Creamy Polenta

    [video=youtube_share;8H6B1g8w3Ws]http://youtu.be/8H6B1g8w3Ws[/video]

    http://youtu.be/8H6B1g8w3Ws
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    St. Patrick’s Day: Colcannon (Irish mashed potatoes and cabbage)[h=2]In colcannon, mashed potatoes and cabbage are combined to create a dish that will feel like a welcome to the Emerald Isle on St. Patrick's Day.
    [/h] By Perre Coleman Magness, The Runaway Spoon / March 17, 2014


    • 1.jpg




    Melt a pat of butter in the center of the colcannon and serve in big scoops.

    The Runaway Spoon




    Colcannon is a traditional Irish dish that showcases the true brilliance of that culture’s rustic cuisine. Simple, staple ingredients transformed into something all together luscious and comforting. Mashed potatoes and cabbage are combined with a touch of leek and lots of rich dairy to create a dish that will fell like a welcome home, even if, like me, you’ve never been to Ireland.

    I like to use napa cabbage because I find it slightly sweeter and milder, but classic green cabbage or savoy cabbage works just as well, and gives it a more traditional green speckle to the dish.

    Colcannon is a great side dish to lamb or beef, particularly corned beef for St. Patrick’s Day.



    Colcannon (Irish mashed potatoes and cabbage)
    Serves 4 to 6
    2 large russet potatoes (about 2 pounds)
    1/2 head of napa cabbage (about 2 pounds)
    2 large leeks, white and light green parts
    1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, divided
    1 cup buttermilk
    Salt to tast

    1. Peel the potatoes, cut into chunks and place in a large pot. Cover with well-salted water by about 1 inch and bring to a boil. Cook the potatoes until very tender and a knife slides in easily, about 20 minutes. Drain the potatoes and place in a large bowl. Heat the buttermilk to just warm in a small pan or the microwave and add 1/2 cup to the potatoes. Mash the potatoes with a potato masher or sturdy wooden spoon until you have a nice, creamy mash. Stir in salt to taste.

    2. While the potatoes are cooking, slice the leeks into thin half-months and rinse thoroughly in a colander. Wipe out the pot and melt 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) of the butter in it. Add the leeks with some water clinging to them and cook until they begin to soften and become translucent. Stir frequently and do not let the leeks brown. Add 1/4 cup of water, cover the pot and continue cooking, stirring occasionally until the leeks are completely soft and translucent.

    3. Cut out the tough core of the cabbage half and slice into thin shreds. Rinse the cabbage shreds in the colander, then add them to the pot with some water clinging. Stir to combine the leeks and cabbage and coat the cabbage with the cooking juices. Cover the pot and cook until the cabbage is completely soft and wilted, about 15 minutes. Stir a few times and add a few tablespoons more water if there is any worry of the cabbage scorching or sticking.

    4. When the cabbage is cooked, add it to the potatoes in the bowl and fold through. Add buttermilk as needed to create a creamy, rich texture and salt as needed.

    5. Scoop the colcannon into a large serving bowl and make a well in the center. Cut the butter into small pats and place in the well to melt. Serve scoops of colcannon with the melting butter.

    RECOMMENDED: 12 St. Patrick's Day recipes

    Related post on The Runaway Spoon: Boxty (Irish Potato Cakes)

    http://www.csmonitor.com/The-Cultur...y-Colcannon-Irish-mashed-potatoes-and-cabbage
     
  5. Brio

    Brio Midas Member Midas Member

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    Sour Cream Pie

    Filling

    2 eggs, at room temperature whisked to froth
    2 cups sour cream, at room temperature
    1/3 cup all-purpose flour
    1/4 cup sugar
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest
    salt, a pinch

    1 lb fresh fruit, sliced

    Streusel Topping

    3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    2 tablespoons brown sugar
    1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

    Layer fruit in crust, pour filling over, sprinkle streusel on and bake at 350° for 50 -55 minutes

    I use graham cracker crust. Any fruit or berry can be used, the recipe is incredibly forgiving and so easy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014
    dirt to oil and Cornelius like this.
  6. Cornelius

    Cornelius Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Pardon my green-ness Brio, but just how is a crust made with rectangular graham crackers?
     
  7. Merlin

    Merlin Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    finely ground graham crackers; a rolling pin will do. melted butter. sugar. salt. and into the oven.
     
    Brio likes this.
  8. Cornelius

    Cornelius Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Thank you for responding Merlin.

    Now let me get this straight. I grind the graham crackers and mix it with some butter salt and sugar, and take that and form it in a pie pan. Then, do I precook this in the pan alone, or just add Brio's recipe on top of it and bake?
     
  9. Merlin

    Merlin Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    Cornelius likes this.
  10. Brio

    Brio Midas Member Midas Member

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    My husband found ready made graham cracker pie crusts on sale and bought quite a few. About the same cost as making yourself.
    Sometimes a recipe (not this one) will call for baking the crust 10 minutes before filling, but there's lots of recipe for crusts online. I prefer the easy ready made crust.
    Or you can use a pastry crust.
     
    Cornelius likes this.
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Stuffed Peppers - Peperoni Imbottiti


    [​IMG]\
    \​
    Created by cooking with nonna
    Date Added: Monday, 02 August 2010


    Stuffed Peppers... with a stuffing of eggplant... very unique!



    Ingredients

    Serves
    6 Persons



    • [*=left]6 large red or yellow peppers
      [*=left]1 large eggplant, cut into 1” cubes
      [*=left]2 large cloves of garlic, chopped
      [*=left]1/2 Cup pitted black olives, cut in half
      [*=left]1 full tablespoon of capers
      [*=left]2 cups of seasoned bread crumbs (sometimes I use stale bread if I have any, that's what my mom used: soak hard bread in water, squeeze water out, and break in small pieces)
      [*=left]1 can of anchovies, cut up
      [*=left]1/2 cup olive oil
      [*=left]Salt & pepper
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD]



    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]

    Directions/Steps

    Preparation:


    • [*=left] Set your over to 300-325F degrees.

    • [*=left]Wash the peppers, leaving them whole. Place peppers onto a baking sheet or aluminum foil and place into oven. Roast peppers, turning them until the skin is blackened all around.

      [*=left]Place peppers in a paper bag and close tightly. Let them cool for 10-15 minutes.

      [*=left]Remove from the bag and peel blackened skin off. Remove the stem and the seeds. It's okay if the pepper breaks open, since it doesn’t have to be in one piece to stuff.

    Stuffing:


    • [*=left]In a large skillet, heat the olive oil and brown the garlic.

      [*=left] Add the eggplant, add salt to taste, and cook until soft over medium heat.

      [*=left] Add the bread crumbs, black olives, capers and anchovies and cook for 5 minutes.

      [*=left] Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Arrange each pepper in a baking pan with a bit of olive oil sprinkled on the bottom of the pan.

      [*=left] Fill peppers with stuffing mixture and close together with toothpicks.

      [*=left] Sprinkle a thin layer of bread crumbs and olive oil on top of each pepper.

      [*=left] Bake them for about 30 minutes.

    Buon Appetito!



    - See more at: http://www.cookingwithnonna.com/ita...-imbottiti.html#sthash.lZtHPv7B.g33HF9f6.dpuf
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    1.jpg

    Stack tomatoes, some mozzarella cheese, basil and asparagus and drizzle with some balsamic vinaigrette. Delicious.
     
    gringott likes this.
  13. Emc2

    Emc2 Seeker Seeker

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    here's an easy-squeezy recipe:

    STUFFED PEPPER SOUP

    Basically, all the ingredients you use to make your stuffed peppers, combine all (cooking the meat first of course) in a soup pot with water (I include potato chunks too, cuz I always make mashed potatoes with stuffed peppers) season to taste, and viola, tastes delish and less labor intensive than the stuffed peppers ya bake - and, makes more to go around!
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    They Called Me Mr. Tibs

    By Hank Shaw on May 22, 2014


    [​IMG]
    Photo by Holly A. Heyser




    Dinner service was over. Time to finally make myself some dinner. It was almost always the same. Blast some onions in a pan, add spiced butter, some bits of lamb, a few chiles. Dip a big spoon into our house spice mixture, toss, toss, toss. A few tomatoes, a splash of red wine. Boil like a volcano for just a minute, then you’re done. Tibs.

    This was my nightly routine at my first restaurant job, at an Ethiopian place called The Horn of Africa, in Madison, Wisconsin, back in 1992. The Horn was owned by an Eritrean woman named Meselesh Ayele, and the little bar at the back of the restaurant was a sanctuary for the expatriate African community of Madison — yes, one existed. They were mostly students, researchers or professors at UW. I learned a lot drinking with that crew.

    Once the restaurant’s dinner service was over, which normally wasn’t that late, I’d make myself some food and take a spot at the bar. It wasn’t long before this guy from Djibouti called me out on my menu choice. I forget his name, but he had this huge, booming voice like that Jamaican dude from the 7-Up commercial in the 1980s, only with a slightly French accent. I use to piss him off my calling him “My Favorite Frenchman,” since the French basically owned Djibouti. “Hey, man,” he say, “Why you always eat the same thing? Every night. Tibs. Tibs, tibs, tibs. They should call you Mister Tibs!” He thought this was the funniest thing he’d ever heard, and the name stuck. From then on, I was Mr. Tibs. (Please tell me you get the reference to the Sidney Poitier movie… )

    Tibs is the name for one of the cooler Ethiopian dishes out there. It’s a hybrid stir fry and stew that comes together in an instant, is meaty, rich and can be spicy as hell. Served with bread, rice or, more properly, injera flatbread, it was and is my favorite Ethiopian dish. I always made it with lamb, but we also served it with beef — and now I use venison.

    I remembered how to make it from back then, but I never had an actual recipe. So when I went looking, it took some time. I finally create the recipe below, from an amalgam of recipes, the best of which is in a little book called Exotic Ethiopian Cooking: Society, Culture, Hospitality, and Traditions. It’s hard to find, but it you do, buy it. It’s the best Ethiopian cookbook I know of.

    Those were fun days. I was a graduate student, cook, rookie journalist and distance runner. I worked hard and played harder. Tibs was my go-to fuel back then, and I am glad to be able to bring it back.





    Tibs, Ethiopian Stir-Fried Beef or Venison

    This dish is super easy to make, but you do need a few unusual ingredients and spices, and you need to have everything set to go before you start cooking because it comes together very fast.

    First, you must get yourself some Ethiopian berbere. It comes as either a spice mixture or a paste. You can buy it online (thus the link), or in places like Whole Foods or Cost Plus Market, or you can make it yourself. This is my recipe for berbere paste. You’ll also need clarified butter, although this tastes more authentic if you make your own Ethiopian spiced butter. Of the many spices listed in the ingredients, the most important is the fenugreek. It is this spice that makes the version of tibs we served at Horn of Africa different from most others.

    I know it sounds like a lot for a simple plate of food, but if you do this, you will not be sorry. The flavors are exotic, mesmerizing and addictive. And once you have the basic ingredients, they all last for months. So you can make it again. And again.

    Serves 4.
    Prep Time: 20 minutes
    Cook Time: 10 minutes



    • 1 large red onion, sliced thin (about 2 cups)
    • 1/4 cup niter kebbeh (spiced butter) or ghee
    • 2 pounds venison, lamb or beef, cut into bite-sized pieces
    • 2 tablespoons berbere
    • 1 teaspoon ground fenugreek
    • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom (optional)
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
    • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground clove
    • 1 teaspoon black pepper
    • 3 to 4 garlic cloves, sliced thinly
    • 2 cups whole, peeled tomatoes, broken into bits
    • 1 to 5 green chiles, such as jalapenos or serranos
    • 1/2 cup red wine



    ____________


    1. Get the saute pan or wok very hot. Stir-fry the onions without the butter for a few minutes, until they char just a little on the outside. Add the spiced butter and the venison. Stir-fry hot and fast until the outside of the meat is brown but the inside of the meat is still very rare. You need to do this on as hot a burner as you have.
    2. The moment the meat has browned, add the spices, garlic and chiles. Stir-fry another 30 seconds or so, then add the tomatoes and the wine. Toss to combine and let this cook for a minute or two. Serve at once with bread or injera.



     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Spezzatino di Vitello



    1.jpg

    Created by joanmuzzi,
    Date Added: Thursday, 09 January 2014


    Description

    This dish is from Parmesan recipe book but I have decided to alter some ingredients and steps for personal taste.



    Ingredients

    Serves
    6 persons



    • 1 kg. Veal, cubed
    • 50 gr. finely diced pancetta affumicata
    • 50 gr. finely chopped onions
    • 50 gr. finely chopped celery
    • 50 gr. finely chopped carrots
    • 1 glass warm chicken broth
    • 1 whole peeled garlic
    • 1 bayleaf
    • 1 tsp. dried Thyme
    • 100 ml. Tomato sauce
    • 500 gr. Peeled, cubed Potatoes
    • 200 gr. Green Peas
    • 3 tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    • Half a glass of dry red wine
    • Salt and Pepper to taste
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD]



    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]


    Directions/Steps


    • Saute' the pancetta with the olive oil.
    • Add the cubed Veal and let it brown.
    • Add the chopped onions, celery & carrots, letting out the natural water of the vegetables.
    • Then pour in the red wine, leave it evaporate.
    • When you see that the wine has evaporates, add the tomato sauce and the broth.
    • Cover and simmer for 20 min.
    • Then, add the potatoes, garlic, thyme, salt and black pepper, simmering for another 20min. then add the green peas.
    • After adding the green peas, leave it cooked for some minutes and serve hot.




    Additional Tips

    The Veal can be substituted with beef and green peas can be omitted.




    - See more at: http://www.cookingwithnonna.com/ita...di-vitello.html#sthash.QDj6LxfE.NZUZS89s.dpuf
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD="colspan: 2"][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="width: 100%, colspan: 2"]
    [​IMG][​IMG]LEGENDARY ROUTE 6666 Recipes - Flavors of the Mother Road
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="width: 100%, colspan: 2, align: center"][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="width: 100%, colspan: 2, align: right"][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="width: 100%, colspan: 2"][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="width: 100%, colspan: 2"]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD]From the Artison Cafe in Illinois, to Roy's Cafe in California, travelers along America's Mother Road were treated to some mighty fine cooking along the way. Route 66 enthusiasts to this day still enjoy some of that same home town cooking as they revisit this important roadway. We thought it would be good to share just a few of those delectables here in our Route 66 pages.

    Know any great recipes from a Route 66 restaurant that we should include? Let us know via our Contact page. If you're a Route 66 eatery we'll include a link back to your website!
    [/TD]
    [TD="width: 37%"]
    [​IMG]
    Litchfield's Ariston Cafe, a Route 66 icon since 1924, September, 2004, Kathy Weiser. This image available for photographic prints HERE!
    [/TD]
    [TD="width: 25%"][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="width: 75%, colspan: 2"]Ariston Cafe's Baklava
    Blue Corn Pancakes from the Sled Dog Inn
    Cactus Jack's Amarillo Shrimp & Artichoke Pasta
    Cafe Peach Cobbler
    California Jalapeno Shrimp Corn Dogs
    Chambless Camp Salsa
    Chambless Camp Guacamole
    Claremont Inn’s Pumpkin Bread
    Funk's Grove Route 66 Sugar Cookies
    Grand Canyon Green Chile Burro
    Idle Spurs Steak House’s Black Bean Salsa
    Impossible Sausage Pie from the Sled Dog Inn
    Inn at 835's Batter Dipped French Toast
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    [URL]http://www.legendsofamerica.com/66-recipes.html[/URL]
    [/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT]

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  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=1]Sweet Corn Salad[/h]by David Offutt


    [​IMG]

    Tortilla chips and salsa. About as ubiquitous as you can get. Every picnic, family get together, friends over for beverages and conversation seems to be accompanied by corn chips and salsa. The media has been telling us for years that salsa has surpassed ketchup as the number one condiment in the USA.

    Clearly many people love chips and salsa, and when I thought about the ingredients there is no wonder this snack is so popular. Corn, tomatoes, chillies, onions, these are fresh tastes of summer!

    I wondered how it would be to combine these ingredients into a fresh salad.

    Pretty . Darn. Good.

    You can call this Sweet Corn Salad, while a fancy-plate place might call it Deconstructed Chips and Salsa; but what ever the name, I call it delicious!

    Pan roasting the sweet corn till you get a little char on it gives the flavors of chips without the crunch, and the addition of sweet peppers, grilled tomatoes, and onions hit all the right notes.

    Grilling the tomatoes brings out even more sweetness to vine-ripe orbs of love. Don’t worry if you don’t have magazine worthy grill marks. That’s very difficult for a home cook to achieve. Most grills do not get hot enough.

    You don’t need to roast the sweet peppers, but it does add a smokier flavor than just sautéed peppers. Feel free to ratchet up the heat with some hot chillies if you want. I used a ripe Serrano for just a little heat.

    While there is a little prep to do – grill the tomatoes, roast and peel the green peppers – this dish comes together pretty quickly.

    [h=2]Sweet Corn Salad [/h]Serves 4 as a side, 1-2 as a light meal.

    Ingredients:

    2 medium (4” (10 cm) diameter) ripe tomatoes sliced thick – 6 to 8 slices total
    2 teaspoons (10 ml) neutral oil – (canola, safflower) divided
    4 cups of sweet corn cut off the cob (or use more – the volume will reduce as it cooks)
    1 cup (500 ml) green pepper diced – about 2 small – (for smokier flavor roast and peel them – see NOTE)
    1/2 cup (250 ml) red onion diced
    1 cup (500 ml) cherry tomatoes – halved
    1 teaspoon (5 ml) minced hot chilli – (optional)
    Salt
    Pepper
    1 tablespoon (15 ml) Lime juice (lemon juice will work just fine too)
    Cilantro to garnish


    Method:


    1. On a hot & oiled grill – gas or charcoal – place the slices of tomatoes and cook until they start to bubble on the upper surface.
    2. Using a spatula, carefully remove from grill and turn onto a plate, grilled side up. Set aside.
    3. In a large sauté pan over medium high heat, add 1 teaspoon oil. Swirl pan to coat evenly and add the sweet corn.
    4. Cook corn, stirring often until it starts to brown and char in places – 7-10 minutes.
    5. Remove corn from pan to a bowl and set aside.
    6. Wipe out pan, and over medium high heat add the remaining 1 teaspoon of oil, onion, halved cherry tomatoes, green peppers, hot chilli, and a generous pinch of salt.
    7. Cook stirring often until vegetables soften but don’t brown. 4- 5 minutes.
    8. Combine vegetable mixture with reserved pan roasted corn.
    9. Taste mixture and add salt, pepper and lime juice to your taste.
    10. To plate, spoon corn vegetable mixture into a shallow bowl, arrange grilled tomatoes on top, garnish with cilantro.




    [​IMG]


    Enjoy this on a hot August night, outside, with the crickets chirping. I did.


    Until next time, Eat Well & Keep Digging!


    NOTE: Roast the green peppers over the flame on your grill or stove top, turn with tongs until charred all over. When black and blistered, place peppers in a paperbag and let steam for about 10 minutes; this will make it easier to remove the skin. Peel the peppers, discard the seeds and dice.

    http://www.gastronomicgardener.com/sweet-corn-salad/
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Venison Souvlaki


    By Hank Shaw on August 18, 2014



    [​IMG]
    Photo by Holly A. Heyser



    Souvlaki was one of my go-to lunches when I lived back East. A staple of any decent Greek diner, which is redundant if you’re in Jersey, you’d also see good souvlaki at the “roach coaches” all over town, and especially on street corners in Manhattan. (A roach coach, if you’ve never heard the term, is what everyone used to call a “food truck.” It was a rougher time… )

    What is it? Grilled pieces of meat on a pita with cucumbers, onions, tomatoes and “special sauce,” which was either some sort of tomato-based red sauce that I’ve yet to decipher, or the more typical tzatziki (tzat-seekie), which is a yogurt-cucumber-dill-garlic sauce. Basically Greek mayo. You could commonly get pork, chicken or lamb. I’d alternate depending on my mood.

    Well, lamb is really close to venison, so here you go. Venison souvlaki. While it sounds all exotic, it’s basically Greek tacos. Really good, super fun to eat. The diners and roach coaches made the sandwiches for you, but I like to lay everything on the table and let people make their own. Depending on my mood, I will either make pitas myself using this recipe, or just buy them. Don’t want any bread in your life? Eat these with potatoes, fried with lemon and thyme. Also traditional, and what you got if you ordered the “souvlaki platter.”

    Making this dish is pretty straightforward, but you do need to remember one thing: Your grill or flattop or frying pan or whatever needs to be really damn hot. The reason is because the meat is in small pieces so it needs to cook fast in order to not dry out. Blasting it with the grill cover open will get you there pretty well. But keep an eye on your venison, as it can go from rare to medium to “aw crap I wrecked it” in about 2 minutes. Remember it is better to have nice, tender meat than pretty grill marks on the outside — this is a sandwich, after all. You can’t see the grill marks, but you sure as hell can tell of the meat’s overcooked.

    Any Greeks out there? How do you do souvlaki differently from me? I’d love to hear about regional differences.



    [​IMG]
    Photo by Holly A. Heyser



    Venison Souvlaki

    I of course do this with venison, but the base recipe in Greece would be with lamb; pork and chicken are also traditional in Greece.

    Basically this is like an American “taco night,” where you lay everything out on the table and let everyone have at it. Fried potatoes are a common alternative to the pita breads, and I see lettuce as a garnish pretty often, as well as chunks of feta cheese. Once in a while I see those awesome pickled Greek pepperoncini peppers, too. They add a nice kick.

    There are a bunch of make-ahead steps here, so if you are pressed for time you can make the tzatiki sauce up to a few days ahead, and marinate the meat a full day a head of time, too.


    Serves 4.

    Prep Time: 2 hours marinating time, at least

    Cook Time: 15 minutes


    MARINADE

    • 1 1/2 pounds venison backstrap or leg meat, cut into 1-inch chunks
    • 1/2 cup olive oil
    • 1/4 cup lemon juice
    • Zest of a lemon
    • 2 tablespoons dried oregano
    • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
    • 2 teaspoons black pepper


    TZATZIKI SAUCE


    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
    • 7 ounces of Greek yogurt
    • 1/2 cup diced cucumber, peeled and seeded
    • 1 tablespoon dill
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • Salt and black pepper to taste


    OTHER STUFF


    • Tomatoes
    • Cucumbers
    • Red onions
    • Lemon wedges
    • Pita breads
    • Skewers

    __________________



    1. When you are cutting your venison (or lamb, or beef, for that matter), make sure it is free of all silverskin and sinew. This will make the meat easier to eat in the pita. Cut them into smallish chunks — remember, you are going to eat this as a sandwich of sorts, not as a big kebab. Add the meat to all the marinade ingredients in a sealable plastic bag, mix well and put in the fridge for at least 2 hours, and up to a full day ahead.
    2. Meanwhile, make the tzatziki sauce by mixing all of those ingredients together. Keep that in the fridge until you are ready to serve.
    3. Chop all your accompaniments: Tomatoes, cucumbers, lemons, red onion, etc. If eating raw red onion isn’t your cup of tea, soak the sliced onion in lemon juice or white wine vinegar while the meat is marinating. This quick pickle will pull the harshness right out of the onions.
    4. When you are ready to rock, get your grill very hot. Make sure the grill grates are clean. Salt the venison liberally, and skewer the venison pieces together — this is not how I normally do meat skewers, but jamming them all together helps keep these small pieces of meat from overcooking. Lay the skewers on the hot grill and cook them with the grill cover open until they are medium, about 4 minutes per side depending on how hot your grill is. I use the finger test for doneness to determine when to pull the meat off. Keep it on the skewers while you take it to the table.
    5. To serve, lay everything out and let people make their own little pita wraps. Serve with a nice light Greek red wine, a dry rose or a crisp beer or three.

    [​IMG]
    Photo by Holly A. Heyser

     
  19. dirt to oil

    dirt to oil Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    unbaked frozen peach pie for gifts

    crust
    5 1/2 cups flour
    1 lb lard - room temp.
    2 + teaspoons salt
    cold water ( a cup or so )

    mix salt into flour
    cut lard into small squares in to the flour use the biggest bowl you have
    using your hand mix by grabbing handfuls and pushing your thumbs into and along your fingers
    mix till it resembles course corn meal about 3 or 4 min.
    then sprinkle cold water using a small measuring cup or larger spoon on to mix toss well with fork after each addition of water, till dough sticks together , if you have a little dough that is not stuck try adding a small amount of water to that portion and mix in with the rest

    peach pie 001.jpg
    peach pie 003.jpg
    peach pie 004.jpg
    peach pie 005.jpg
    peach pie 006.jpg
    peach pie 007.jpg

    when rolling out dough I use a very large 18 x 22 plastic cutting board , it holds flour well, I'm not good at getting a circle but no worries just go for it handling the dough as little as possible, I'm a little careful when first lifting the edge but after that use bold motions less likely to tear , just have the pie plate close
    , and if it doesn't quite fit don't start over just patch it wet your finger and blend the dough together peach pie 011.jpg


    for these three pies I will peel 12 peaches using a serrated peeler I got from Lee Valley , it will peel ripe peaches no problem , even tomatoes but I haven't tried that yet

    peach pie 014.jpg

    pie filling, per pie

    4 ripe peaches
    1/2 cup sugar
    2 tablespoons tapioca
    mix sugar and tapioca and add to peaches
    peach pie 015.jpg


    unbaked pies make great gifts cant tell you all the accolades I have gotten over the years by giving these
    for Christmas gifts or just when you want to bless someone , pies freeze well , and you will not be able to tell if it was frozen before baking, always thaw completely at least 6 hours before baking then slit the top , I like to bake at 350 for at least a hour , must bubble , and crust should be nicely golden browned

    been making pies for 37 years now and like my grandmother have been tweaking my technique for 37 years
     

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  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Sunday, September 28, 2014

    Rigatoni with Italian Sausage and Spinach



    I am the cliche. An Italian-American who loves pasta. I have to tell you, it's an amazing cliche to be a part of.

    Growing up, Sunday gravy with meatballs, sausage and braciole was something you could always count on. My breakfasts on Sunday consisted of a fried meatball, eggs and a slice of crusty Italian bread. It was awesome. Wouldn't change it for the world.

    Much to my grandmother's dismay, I don't always make Sunday gravy. For one, I don't have the time. Sundays are usually the only day I have to get to church, do my running around, catch up on laundry, cleaning. etc. etc. It is also usually my only day to sleep past 6am. So, waking up on my only day off to fry meatballs, as amazing as they are, is not always my cup of tea.

    Also, Sunday was really the only day we had pasta believe it or not. We had things like chicken cutlets, escarole and Italian style beef stew during the week. I don't work like that. I can eat pasta anytime, and it doesn't have to wait for Sunday gravy.

    I also love the freshness of a light tomato basil based marinara. It's so delicious and you can just about throw anything in it, and it is still awesome. From ceci beans to asparagus. From pork to beef. Its so versatile!!

    Here is one of my weeknight favorites. Quick, easy and amazingly scrumptious.

    rigatoni_spinach_sausage.jpg

    Rigatoni with Italian Sausage and Spinach

    Ingredients:

    1 lb of loose hot or sweet Italian sausage
    1.tsp dried pepper flakes (optional)
    1 onion, diced
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    2 TBSP extra virgin olive oil
    1 28 oz can whole peeled plum tomatoes
    6 fresh basil leaves, torn
    4 cups fresh baby spinach
    1 lb rigatoni
    salt and pepper, q.b.


    Method:

    Fill a pasta pot with cold water and place on high heat with a lid on.


    In a large 12-14 inch skillet, heat olive oil and toast pepper flakes. Add your diced onion and garlic and sautee over medium heat until translucent.


    While onion and garlic mixture is sauteing, place your can of whole tomatoes in a bowl and crush with your hands to desired consistency. (I enjoy mine rather chunky).


    Add loose sausage to onion and garlic mixture and cook over medium high heat until sausage is browned.


    Dump the tomatoes into the sausage mixture and reduce heat to medium.


    Add fresh basil and season with salt and pepper.


    By this time your pasta water, should have reached a rolling boil. Add a generous amount of salt to the water, and dump your rigatoni in, stirring for the fist minute to avoid clumping.


    At this point, you want to add your fresh spinach to the sauce and cook down gently.


    Reduce heat to low and continue to simmer


    When rigatoni is JUST al dente (has a little bite to it), drain the pasta and place into the skillet with your sauce. Crank heat up to high and sautee until pasta becomes completely al dente. Turn heat off, allow to stand for 2 minutes and serve. Top with freshly grated cheese and some more fresh basil if desired.


    http://therotundchef.blogspot.com/2014/09/rigatoni-with-italian-sausage-and.html
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=1]This Garlic Soup: 100 Times Stronger Than Any Antibiotic On The Market[/h]


    1.jpg



    This soup, made from 50 garlic cloves, 1 red onion, and some thyme, is capable of fighting off many flu viruses, colds, and even the Norovirus.

    The pharmaceutical and health care industries have massively over-prescribed antibiotics, which has lessened their effectiveness and even created antibiotic resistant diseases. With that being said, more and more people are rapidly turning back to nature to find remedies for their health problems. The winter Norovirus, also know as the the winter vomiting bug, got a lot of attention in early 2014. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps, and headaches.

    The interesting thing about garlic, is that new and mutated viruses/infections, which cannot be treated with traditional antibiotics, are still effected by the garlic. The reason behind garlic’s amazing antibiotic properties is a chemical called allicin, found within the cloves. A study preformed by Washington University has shown that garlic is 100 times more effective than 2 most popular antibiotics on the market.


    Ingredients

    50 cloves of organic garlic (5 garlic bulbs) cleaned and peeled
    2 tablespoons of olive oil
    2 tablespoons of butter
    2 large bulbs of red onion, diced
    1 tablespoon fresh cut thyme
    6 cups (250ml) of chicken broth
    fresh or dried herbs for taste (parsley, bay leaves, whatever you prefer!)
    3 cups of stale bread, cubed or crushed
    1 cup of sour cream


    Preparation

    Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). While the oven warms up, chop off the heads of the garlic bulbs, spread the cloves out on some foil, drizzle in olive oil, and wrap them in the foil. Place the foil wrapped garlic in a pan, and place them in the oven to cook for about 90 minutes. Give them some time to cool once they’re done. Next, mix 2 tablespoons of olive oil and 2 tablespoons of butter in a soup pot, over medium heat. Place the diced red onion in the mixture, cook for 10 minutes, stirring frequently.

    Now that the garlic has cooled down, grind it, and mix it together with the stewed red onion. Mix well, add the fresh thyme and other herbs. Lower the temperature and mix in the bread crumbs/cubes. Cook for about 5 minutes or until the bread softens. Remove the fresh herbs from the mixture and place in a blender or food processor until it becomes a semi-creamy mixture. Place the soup back into the pot, add in the sour cream, and feel free to add salt or pepper according to your taste preferences! Enjoy!


    Source(s):
    fhfn.org
    higherperspective.com


    http://www.healthfreedoms.org/this-garlic-soup-100-times-stronger-than-any-antibiotic-on-the-market/
     
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  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How to Make Philly Cheesesteak Dip

    [video=youtube_share;IyeCJcnMu8M]http://youtu.be/IyeCJcnMu8M[/video]

    http://youtu.be/IyeCJcnMu8M

    Published on Sep 29, 2014
    Looking for a quick, crowd pleasing appetizer? David’s Philly Cheesesteak Dip is a great game day snack! Add this slow-cooker dip to your menu and enjoy the game with your guests! Get the Kitchen Tools that David uses: http://qvc.co/ITKWDRecipeItems


    Cheesesteaks are delicious, but they can be kind of messy. They’re not exactly the perfect party food. But cheesesteaks and game day just seem to go together, so I took all the flavors of a cheesesteak and made it into a creamy, delicious game day dip. If you’d like to switch the recipe up a bit, you can switch chicken for the beef. When you’re ready to serve the dip, if you prefer to use sour dough bread, pita chips, or pretzels feel free! If you’re looking for more great game day recipes, check out my Tomatillo Guacamole or my Garden Veggie Dip in a Bread Bowl. You’ll find all of those on QVC.com. Also, my how-to videos are on YouTube.

    Philly Cheesesteak Dip
    Ingredients:

    3 Tbsp olive oil
    1 large yellow onion, chopped
    1 large green bell pepper, chopped
    1 large red bell pepper, chopped
    2 lbs cheesesteak meat, frozen and cut into 1" pieces
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 tsp ground black pepper
    1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
    1 lb cream cheese, softened and cut into 2" pieces
    1 (15-oz) jar Cheez Whiz dip
    1 lb Velveeta, cut into 1" pieces
    3 baguettes, sliced into 1/4" pieces

    Preparation:

    Pour the oil into the Ninja 4-in-1 Multi-Cooker insert and preheat for 6 minutes on the stovetop high setting. Add the onions and peppers and cook until tender, about 8 minutes. Add the frozen meat, salt, pepper, and Worcestershire sauce and cook, covered, stirring a couple of times, for 8–10 minutes, or until the meat is cooked through.

    Add the cream cheese, Cheez Whiz, and Velveeta. Cook, stirring constantly, until thoroughly melted, combined, and warm. Place the knob on the warm setting and enjoy with the sliced baguette.
     
  23. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Venison Tenderloin with Blueberry Sauce


    By Hank Shaw on November 3, 2014


    1.jpg
    Photo by Holly A. Heyser




    Venison and blueberries, or huckleberries if you live here in the West, is an ancient and well-respected combination. One that I’d hated for years. Every version I’d had was cloying, sticky, a weird sweet and not very sour flavor that just didn’t suit me. Long ago I told myself that I’d just avoid this particular classic.

    And then I read a quirky little book on, of all things, the food of Iceland. Icelandic Food & Cookery, by the memorably named Nanna Rognvaldardottir, has all kinds of cool recipes in it, and you can expect to see some here in the coming months. Her version of this dish, done with lamb, was the first one I’d seen that was not obviously sweet. Her use of mushrooms in a berry sauce was pretty unusual, too. So I studied the recipe, made a few changes and gave it a go.

    I am glad I did. This dish is a knockout.

    The venison itself is cooked very simply — just seared medium-rare in a pan with some clarified butter — but the sauce has all kinds of layered flavors. Seared onions and wild mushrooms, a little garlic, wine, stock, the mushroom soaking water, and only then the blueberries. I used wild huckleberries I had frozen, and they are smaller and more acidic than store-bought blueberries. They actually act as a zippy tart balance to the savory sauce, not as a sugary bomb.

    I served this alongside some Irish colcannon, which is a fancy name for mashed potatoes with a green thing mixed in. I used nettles I had from the freezer, but any green will do. Spinach would be easiest, but kale is pretty traditional in Ireland, and the Icelanders eat it, too.

    This is a must-try with your next piece of venison tenderloin or backstrap. It’s a date night dish that takes less than an hour to put together, too.

    2.jpg
    Photo by Holly A. Heyser




    Venison with Blueberry Sauce and Colcannon

    I love this recipe with tenderloins, but backstrap or even a well-cut leg steak would work. And of course this will work with duck, goose, beef or lamb, too. You’ll notice I use both clarified and regular unsalted butter here. I like the clarified because it has a high smoke point and is better for searing than regular butter; the milk solids burn easily. You can buy it in many markets labeled as Indian ghee, or you can make your own. Or use another fat or oil. No biggie.

    As for the mushrooms, I used some dried morels. Any good dried mushroom will do. You want that mushroom soaking water, so I don’t use fresh mushrooms here. Port wine can be a nicer kick in the sauce than red wine, but it’s strong — if you use Port instead of red wine, use only 1/4 cup. Finally, remember that this is a savory sauce, despite the blueberries (or huckleberries). If this is weird to you, add some sugar.

    I served this with a really good Spanish red wine, but any full-bodied red will work, or if you are a beer drinker, a malty Scottish ale or porter is the ticket.


    Serves 2, and can be doubled.


    Prep Time: 30 minutes, mostly for reconstituting the dried mushrooms
    Cook Time: 25 minutes



    • Tenderloins from a deer, or 1/2 pound venison backstrap
    • Salt
    • 2 tablespoons clarified butter, regular unsalted butter, lard, duck fat or vegetable oil
    • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
    • 1 small onion, peeled and sliced root to tip
    • 1 garlic clove, minced
    • 3/4 ounce dried mushrooms (wild if possible), reconstituted in 1 cup hot water
    • 1/2 cup venison stock or beef stock
    • 1/2 cup red wine
    • 1/2 cup blueberries or huckleberries, fresh or thawed
    • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced
    • Black pepper to taste
    • Malt or red wine vinegar, to taste
    • Sugar (optional)


    COLCANNON


    • 2 large russet potatoes, peeled and diced
    • Salt
    • 2 or 3 three tablespoons unsalted butter
    • 1 or 2 heaping tablespoons sour cream or heavy cream
    • 1 cup chopped, cooked green vegetable (spinach, kale, nettles, etc)


    _____________________​

    Take the venison out of the fridge and salt it well. Let it set on the cutting board while you rehydrate the mushrooms and boil the potatoes for the colcannon.



    3.jpg
    Photo by Holly A. Heyser



    4.jpg
    photo by Holly A. Heyser

    Put the diced potatoes into a pot of salted water and bring to a boil. Simmer until tender. Drain the potatoes and put them back in the pot. Turn the heat to low under the pot and let the potatoes steam for a few seconds.

    Beat in the butter, sour cream and chopped vegetables. You want nice mashed potatoes with green streaks. Add salt to taste, cover the pot, turn off the heat and set aside.

    Get a large saute pan and put 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter into it. Turn the heat to high and when the butter is hot, add the sliced onion. Saute over medium-high heat until browned along the edges, about 4 to 5 minutes. Turn off the heat, remove the onions and set aside.

    Wipe the pan with a paper towel. Pat the venison dry and put the clarified butter into the pan. Set it over high heat until the butter is very hot, but not smoking. Add the venison and sear until medium-rare. If you don’t know to tell when the meat is done, use the finger test for doneness. When the venison is done, move it to rest on a cutting board.

    Return the onions to the pan, add the mushrooms and garlic and saute over medium-high heat for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring often. Sprinkle some salt over everything and add the wine.

    Boil this down until it’s almost gone, using a wooden spoon to stir up any browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Add the stock and mushroom soaking water (strain the water if there is any debris in it) and boil this down by two-thirds.

    Add the huckleberries or blueberries and cook another minute or two, Add black pepper, salt and vinegar to taste. If you want it sweet, add some sugar now; start with a teaspoon or two. Garnish with the rosemary.


    http://honest-food.net/2014/11/03/venison-recipe-blueberry-sauce/
     
  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    FerFal: Kibble for Humans: Rice + Lentils + Veggies

    [video=youtube_share;axRwrBX5pdg]http://youtu.be/axRwrBX5pdg[/video]

    http://youtu.be/axRwrBX5pdg

    Published on Dec 9, 2014
     
  25. Argentsum

    Argentsum Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Corpse Reviver #2
    The Corpse Reviver #2 is rightfully considered by many to be the best-tasting of the Corpse Reviver cocktails.

    1 oz. gin
    1 oz. Cointreau
    1 oz. Lillet Blanc
    1 oz. fresh lemon juice
    1 dash absinthe
    Ice cubes
    Tools: shaker, strainer
    Glass: cocktail
    Garnish: orange peel

    Shake all ingredients in a shaker, strain into a chilled glass and garnish.
     
  26. brosil

    brosil Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Gluten Free Almond Cookies

    Cream 6 Tablespoons butter with 1 cup granulated sugar and ¼ tsp salt.
    Add 1 ¼ cups freshly ground blanched almonds.
    Blend in 2 cups almond flour.
    Add 1 Tbsp water and 1 Tbsp almond extract.
    I knead it a few seconds to get a good distribution. Pack it into a round tablespoon measure and pop it out to give a nice round cookie. Bake at 325 degrees F for about 15 minutes. Let cool slightly and transfer to cooling racks. Dust with powdered sugar while still warm.

    For best results, seal in a tight tin for 6 weeks to 3 months and put in a cool place to let the flavors distribute and mellow.
     
  27. Aerotox

    Aerotox New Member

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    Made this the first time with Rabbit...second time with Pheasant and Quail. Fabulous


    Rabbit Cassole,

    •1 quartered rabbit (season w/ salt & pepper)
    •Splash of olive oil
    •1 ham hock
    •1 cup white wine
    •2 cups chicken stock (more if you?d like more of a soup)
    •2 1/2 cups prepared or canned cannellini beans
    •5-6 diced carrot
    •1 large or 2 sm diced onion
    •10 diced cloves garlic
    •5 diced stems celery
    •1 diced leek
    •3 diced tomatoes or 2 cans of diced tomatoes drained
    •1 bunch parsley
    •1 bunch green onions
    •6 sprigs fresh thyme
    •4 bay leaves
    •2 tsp fresh cracked black pepper
    •Pinch of ground clove
    •Kosher salt to taste
    •Favorite all purpose seasoning (like Emeril’s Essence, Penzy’s Northwoods)

    Heat dutch oven to medium-high heat and sear rabbit in olive oil until golden brown or you can grill the rabbit on high heat for a few minutes for browning. Remove rabbit from heat and reserve. With a splash of olive oil, cook onions in dutch oven for a few minutes, then add other vegetables (except tomatoes). Cook for 5 minutes then add tomatoes. Place ham hock in with veggies. Cook another 3 minutes then deglaze with white wine. Add chicken stock, beans, herbs, and spices to dutch oven. Fold beans and vegetables gently to until mixed well. Place seared rabbit quarters back into dutch oven tucking rabbit halfway down into beans. Preheat oven to 300 F. Secure lid tightly onto dutch oven and bake in oven at least 2 hours or until rabbit is very tender. Remove lid and bake for 20 minutes. Serve in dutch oven.
     
  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  29. Brio

    Brio Midas Member Midas Member

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    I'm making salsa today and made the mistake of adding too much jolokia (4 little peppers is all) it's so hot my wooden spoon is toxic and I threw out the cutting board I chopped it up on. Damn.
     
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  30. ErrosionOfAccord

    ErrosionOfAccord #1 Global Warmer Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    Chicken n rice off of the minute rice box. One of my favorite meals from childhood. I don't have measurements cause I just make it. This is enough for two or three adults.

    Two chicken breasts. I use the big boneless ones cause I'm lazy
    two big onions
    two green peppers
    soy sauce
    corn starch
    oil
    rice
    2 chicken bullion cubes
    three or four tomatoes cut into wedges

    boil the breasts with the bullion, keep the stock, shred the chicken. Cubed chicken sucks in this meal
    while you are shredding the chicken sautée the veggies you sliced 1/4 inch thick in a little oil. Hope you used a large skillet. When the veggies are done add the chicken and broth. Don't cover the solids with broth if I had to guess I'd say 2-3 cups broth. Add soy sauce to taste, I like mine a nice rich brown. Add some pepper to taste. Whisk up some cornstarch and stir it in until the mixture until it iss just thick enough to stand on top of the rice with a little bit dribbling through the rice. Taste it again, add soy sauce if needed. Add the tomatoes just before serving so they are warm but not cooked. I usually make six servings of minute rice. Spread the rice about 3/4 to a inch thick over a plate then put the chicken over it like a gravy. If you did it right there won't be any leftovers.
     
  31. Brio

    Brio Midas Member Midas Member

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    Have you made this soup? It looks really interesting.

    Tonight I'm using up old bananas in a muffin recipe. I already burned one batch of buns.
     
  32. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

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    This is the recipe for the Chanterelle soup I posted in "Health Benefits of Hiking in the Woods".
    This is actually the benefits from ocean fishing & being in the woods.
    This is my own concoction.

    TAEZZAR’S Chanterelle/Crab Chowder
    2 cups crab meat (fresh/frozen Dungeness)
    6 cups fresh Chanterelle Mushrooms – chopped bite size
    6 slices bacon cut into small pcs.
    1 can or 4 fresh cobs of corn
    1 med/large onion chopped med.
    3 cloves garlic chopped as desired
    2 med. Yukon Gold potatoes chopped small
    2 med. Carrots chopped small
    1 can beer
    2 cups chicken broth - homemade or low sodium
    ½ stick butter
    ½ tsp each, tarragon & thyme
    ¼ tsp turmeric
    Cayenne pepper to taste, I start with 1/8 tsp
    Fresh ground pepper to taste (Start with no salt, there is enough natural salt here)
    Preparation
    In a large non-stick pan, DRY ( no oil or butter) sauté Chanterelle mushrooms, on high heat, reserve liquid, set aside in a bowl.
    Fry bacon crisp, remove bacon & add onions, caramelize onions to slightly brown, add garlic. & cook a couple of minutes more.
    Roast corn.
    In the pan used to fry the bacon, put in mushrooms & fry to hearty them up, about 3-5 min’s, add bacon & fry 2 -3 minutes more.
    In a large soup pot, add beer, chicken stock, potatoes & carrots. Bring to a boil, add spices & butter, simmer until soft enough to use a hand blender to liquefy, leave it a little course.. After liquefying, add mushrooms/bacon, onions & corn.
    Simmer for 15 minutes, stir occasionally, add crab meat & let stand 15 minutes. Serve

    IMG_0262.jpg

    IMG_0263.jpg

    IMG_0264.jpg

    IMG_0265.jpg
     
  33. Brio

    Brio Midas Member Midas Member

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    Making cranberry butter tart squares today.

    base:
    1 cup flour
    2 tbsp br sugar
    1/2 cup butter

    cut butter into flour and br sugar and pat into greased 9x11 pan, bake @ 350 for 15 min.

    whisk:
    2 large eggs
    1 1/2 cup br sugar
    1/2 cup rolled oats
    1/4 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp baking powder
    1 tsp vanilla
    1/2 cup chopped nuts
    1 cup dried cranberries
    Spread mix evenly on base and bake for 20 - 25 min

    :coolbeer:
     
  34. Merlin

    Merlin Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    Cranberry butter tart squares sounds good to me. How did they turn out, Brio?

    Has anyone on the forum ever eaten a Dublin Coddle? I found a recipe on the Internet and the pictures make it look really delicious. But it contains only sausage, bacon, diced onion, potatoes, salt and pepper, and beef broth. Seems almost too simple to be good. Anyone ever try it?

    Edit: Well, since I didn't get a response, I decided to go ahead and make it myself. Dublin Coddle should be ready to eat in about one more hour. I'll let you know how it turned out.

    Edit: Well, it was good. And not greasy at all (yeah, right.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2015
  35. GOLDBRIX

    GOLDBRIX God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh Site Supporter Platinum Bling

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    Low Calorie Cole Slaw:

    1lb. of shredded cabbage
    1 Cup of shredded carrots +/-
    1/2 Cup of Mayonaise
    1/3 Cup of Splenda / Sucralose
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/4 cup of milk
    1/4 cup of buttermilk or 2 1/2 Tablespoons of Buttermilk Salad Dressing
    2 1/2 Tablespoons of lemon juice

    EXCLUDING cabbage & carrots COMBINE remaining ingredients and mix until smooth.
    Toss cabbage and carrots to mix.
    Pour the liquid ingredients over the cabbage/carrots mix thoroughly.
    Chill at least two hours before serving.

    Great for those who are watching their sugar intake, like "dry" (No Sauce) smoked ribs or pulled pork and good roughage. ;)
     
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  36. skychief

    skychief enthusiastic stacker Silver Miner

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    This is my forte'. Ice Cubes. Extraction is important too!

    Hold the trays over an open flame until you hear the tell-tale pops and cracks of the ice separating from the ice tray.

    Linger a little past what you think is necessary. This establishes a nice water-boundary between the cubes and the tray.

    Optimally, the cubes should fall out of the tray, unmolested.

    Another great recipe:

    GRILLED BRUSSEL SPROUTS

    Wash/ Quarter the sprouts.

    Toss the quartered chunks in olive oil. Add salt/pepper/misc. seasoning to taste.

    No need to wait. The idea is simply to coat them with the oil/seasoning mixture.

    Make an aluminum-foil platter and turn up the edges so the oil doesn't run off and foul your grill.

    Throw it all on the barbie and turn the chunks as they brown.

    [15 - 20 min cooking time.] Sprinkle some parmesean cheese on top before serving.

    Yum!
     
  37. Gennie

    Gennie New Member

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    Marking my spot in here, I love to cook and since we have 4 kids, well, it's a necessity. Right now I'm trying out using homemade kefir as a base for sourdough bread. I didn't make it as a starter this time around, but used the kefir in place of water for no-knead bread. You can find some more information about the process here - http://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/milk-kefir/how-to-use-kefir-as-sourdough/ Hopefully it'll turn out good, we'll see....it's so hot today that I'll wait until this evening to make it.
     
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  38. TAEZZAR

    TAEZZAR LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH Midas Member Site Supporter

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    Just use your imagination & your taste buds to create great, sometimes, meals.
    Cooking should be fun & creative !!!

    Behold the turtle,
    for he only makes progress,
    when he sticks his neck out !!
     
    REO 54 and searcher like this.
  39. Irons

    Irons Deep Sixed Site Supporter Mother Lode

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    I eat a lot of deer and I stumbled upon a recipe that is fantastic! I usually just pan fry deer steaks in butter and sauteed onions with garlic.
    That's my all time favorite, er... it was. [​IMG]

    Well I got bored last week and went looking for the Fryin Magic that we use on Morel mushrooms in the spring.
    Not seeing any I found instead Pork Shake N Bake! Hmmmmm.

    So I shook the deer steaks in the pork shake n bake and then pan fried them in butter. IT WAS FANTASTIC! They come out dark and crispy and the pork seasoning just works great with the natural flavor of the venison.

    I called my friend out in Colorado and he tried it with elk steaks and reported it was great with them too.

    So if you are a venison eater give it a try! I had some this morning! [​IMG]

    deerneggs.jpg
     
  40. REO 54

    REO 54 Midas Member Midas Member

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    Some pics of that would nice. Mm mm, with fresh butter.....Also, add a smell O vision link too. Thanks!

    (lol)
     

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