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Tokyo Has More Than Two Job Openings for Every Applicant

Discussion in 'Coffee Shack (Daily News/Economy)' started by Scorpio, Mar 18, 2017.



  1. Scorpio

    Scorpio Скорпион Founding Member Board Elder Site Mgr Site Supporter ++

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    Tokyo Has More Than Two Job Openings for Every Applicant
    by
    Shoko Oda
    and
    Isabel Reynolds
    March 16, 2017, 3:00 PM CDT March 17, 2017, 12:40 AM CDT
    • Shrinking pool of graduates favor large companies over small
    • Businesses are seeking new ways to recruit and retain staff
    Graduate recruitment in Japan looks a bit like a scene from the movie "The Matrix." Hordes of students dressed in identical black suits and white shirts make the rounds of seminars, tests and interviews. Even as jobs outnumber applicants, these "Agent Smiths" still fight it out for coveted positions at big-name companies, while leaving smaller employers out in the cold.

    [​IMG]
    University students attend a job fair hosted by Recruit Career in Chiba, Japan.

    Photographer: Ko Sasaki/Bloomberg
    "Popular firms in industries like finance have seven applicants for one job. For us, we have seven competitors going after one candidate," said Shuto Kuriyama, who works in human resources at regional furniture chain Shimachu Co. He was trying to attract students to the company’s presentation at a graduate recruitment fair in Chiba near Tokyo this month, while nearby booths for big-name firms were heaving with job seekers.

    The low birth rate and slowly recovering economy are keeping Japan’s job-to-applicant ratio at a 25-year high, with the figure at 1.43 for January. In Tokyo, there are more than two jobs for every applicant. Small companies are the worst hit by the shortage of workers, but even some better-known employers are gradually changing their rigid hiring and employment practices -- and some are beginning to consider foreigners.

    [​IMG]
    With one of the lowest unemployment rates in the developed world, Japan stands in contrast with Europe and the U.S., where a lack of good jobs has fueled support for politicians who want to crack down on free trade and immigration. Only 3 percent of Japanese are out of work, compared with 9.6 percent in the euro region and 4.7 percent in the U.S., the latest figures show.

    Looking for a job in Japan means not only buying a suit and fine-tuning a resume, but learning the elaborate rituals of the nation’s business etiquette, including how to enter a room, bow and sit correctly, and the right levels of polite language to use when speaking to interviewers or clients.

    No Gap Years
    At present, big companies and elite students have exactly seven months to find one another. The hiring season for third-year university students opened on March 1 and major firms will formalize their recruitment decisions by handing out certificates at ceremonies held on Oct. 1. Most major employers will only take on recruits in April immediately after graduation -- there are no post-college "gap years" and few second chances.

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    Polls of the most popular employers among students generally find major banks, trading and insurance companies, travel agents and airlines among the top 10. While large employers offer starting salaries little different from their smaller counterparts, the steeper pay trajectory -- at least for men -- means a foot in the door promises a far higher mid-life income for those who stay the course. Some also offer benefits like company-subsidized accommodation or resort vacations.

    Michiyoshi Aoki, 22, among the 31,000 students at the recruitment fair, said his job search won’t include small companies. He already has his sights set on the big names in life insurance and automobiles, including Toyota Motor Corp., Nissan Motor Co. and Honda Motor Co.

    Bigger Opportunities
    "There’s still a lot of competition to get into big companies," he said. "But if you work at a large firm you’ll have bigger opportunities and more of a future."

    The labor shortage for small and medium-sized companies -- those with capital of up to 100 million yen ($880,000) -- is the worst since the early 1990s, according to the latest business confidence survey from the Bank of Japan.

    With a market even tighter than before the global financial crisis, large companies are beginning to loosen their hiring practices, and mid-career recruitment is growing. Big employers are widening their nets to make sure they get the best recruits, according to Masanori Ishida, senior managing director in sales and marketing at Pasona Group Inc., a temporary services and recruitment company.

    [​IMG]
    Students line up at a job fair.

    Photographer: Ko Sasaki/Bloomberg
    "Smaller companies have long accepted new recruits up to about three years after graduation," Ishida said in an interview on March 10. "Now big companies are beginning to follow suit." More inclusiveness, including for LGBT applicants, will gradually become the norm, he said.

    Food company Calbee Inc., for example, plans a new drive to recruit a handful of personnel this year who graduated as long as five years ago, in a bid to improve diversity. Trading company Mitsui & Co. is planning overnight camps in August to broaden the recruitment base to applicants who may be overseas earlier in the year. Hoshino Resorts Inc. is allowing students to answer questions by video for the first time to make it easier for them to apply from afar.

    "Japanese companies will have to improve their work environment or we won’t be able to attract people," Daiwa Securities Group Inc. President Takashi Hibino told investors on Feb. 28. The company has already made changes to better enable women and older people to continue to work, Hibino added, but more must be done.

    Big companies are waking up to another untapped source of recruits: foreign students at Japanese universities. A job fair for overseas students held at Pasona’s Tokyo headquarters on March 10 attracted 32 companies -- including all the country’s major banks. Trading company Itochu Corp. and synthetic fiber-maker Toray Industries Inc. were also represented.

    "I want to work in Japan," said Vietnamese student Tuyet Ngan, 26, dressed in a black skirt suit like her Japanese counterparts. She said she was looking for a job in food or shipping. "Japan has a lot of old people, so I think they need young people."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...like-dilemma-too-many-jobs-too-few-immigrants
     
    Hystckndle and luckabuck like this.
  2. luckabuck

    luckabuck Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    They can find employment over here easily if they can get a visa because our graduates don't know proper English or how to do simple math. Social promotions in our educational systems are showing a very small available number of qualified job applicants.
     
  3. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    The dumb Millennials are good at pouring coffee and protesting, but to do something more demanding we need an Indian or middle aged white guy.
     
  4. Howdy

    Howdy Silver Member Silver Miner

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    This is bad news for Japan. Now they will be flooded with the lowest of low life third world immigrants and the decline is on. It's better not to have a surplus of jobs.
     
  5. southfork

    southfork Mother Lode Found Mother Lode

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    Sorry don't believe it myself, how could you operate with a 50% staff shortage, its more in line with the bs they spew here about UE being in the 4s and how great a recovery we had ,they are trying to keep people spending.
     
  6. tom baxter

    tom baxter back from 2004

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    My first thought when I read the title was Fukushima. Young people don't generally have a stake in a city, not like the inhabitants who own RE. If I was applying for a job in Japan it would as far the hell away from Tokyo as I could get! Fukushima is 149 miles away and they have detected elevated levels of radiation in the suburbs of Tokyo from the disaster. Basically you'd have to have rocks in your head to want to live there and young people in University generally have a few brain cells.

    Of course the Bloomberg international recruitment drive story could be the reason...



    Study: Contamination in Tokyo suburb 3 times higher than area 1 mile from Fukushima Daiichi

    http://enenews.com/study-contaminat...amination-problems-in-tokyo-its-serious-audio

    All 23 districts of Tokyo contaminated with radiation, worse than at Chernobyl after the accident, and blood cells of children under ten are showing worrying changes; the WHO, the IAEA & the Japanese government cannot be trusted
    http://permaculturenews.org/2014/09/25/tokyo-contaminated-fit-habitation-doctor-says/

    Concentrated radiation found in Tokyo
    By North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy, wires
    Radiation levels as high as those in the evacuation zone around the Fukushima nuclear plant have been detected in a Tokyo suburb.]
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-10-25/radiation-detected-in-tokyo/3598492?pfmredir=sm


    [​IMG]

    My apologies for the gloomy story.
     
  7. tom baxter

    tom baxter back from 2004

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    Southern wind directions and rainfall explain the relatively high activity levels in the remote hot spot in Kashiwa and Yokohama, which are located close to Tokyo. Accordingly, also local environmental conditions seem to be responsible for the surprisingly low contamination levels at spots [...] quite close to the damaged reactors of Fukushima NPP [...] Our results once again evidence that distance from the source alone is no sufficient factor for the prediction of a contamination level at a certain spot after a nuclear accident.
    http://enenews.com/study-contaminat...amination-problems-in-tokyo-its-serious-audio
     
  8. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    A surplus of jobs is exactly what's needed. Ever heard of of a thing called supply and demand? It applies to labor pools as much as it applies to anything else.

    If there are more applicants than jobs, what incentive do I have as an employer to ever want to increase the wages being offered? If there are far more applicants than jobs, I don't have to offer higher wages because if one won't do the job for what I'm offering, I've got ten other people begging to.
     
  9. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    They can use more robots.
     
  10. Howdy

    Howdy Silver Member Silver Miner

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    Tell us how it works when bankers issue money they don't have.
    You offer higher wages as bankers issue more loans. They call it inflation. You don't want new employees who are untried and know nothing. You want certainty so you keep employees who are known to perform.

    Look at what has happened to the US when we have a job surplus. We get invaded by parasites who keep sucking even after the bankers contract the money supply.
     
  11. Joe King

    Joe King Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Which is why they'll pay more to keep 'em if it becomes harder to replace them.


    That's because the gov caters to employers demands for cheaper labor.
    ...and to a large degree, they cater to corporate interests because the People haven't held their Reps feet to the fire.
     

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