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100 Things You Will Wish You had Stored

MNeagle

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#1
100 Things You Will Wish You had Stored:
http://prepare4emergency.blogspot.com/

How To Be Prepared:
In order to get through any major catastrophe you need to think in terms of survival, protection, food, water, clothing and shelter. Now I'm not Ewell Gibbons but, I don't need to be. Here is one person's opinion on what you will need in the event of a "financial collapse" or other disaster.


1. WATER:

Don't try and store a water supply that's too big to take with you. Buy water filters instead. Portable ones. Also Bleach (chlorine Bleach can "sterilize" water: 1 teaspoon for every 50 gallons.)


2. FOOD:

Think about "high value" and compact nutrition. You can buy from my A-Store if you want. See the set of links on the right to find out how much you need per person.


3. SHELTER :

RV's Are great, but I doubt you will get very far without any available fuel. Think in terms of a high quality tent: again see my links.


4. PROTECTION:

Pepper Spray is good to start with I will explain personal protection on another blog. Sorry, I can't sell guns or ammo but I can help you find what you need. This is an accessories store. We are not going to take on the "gubernment", or any local police. The goal is to protect ourselves from hungry and thirsty criminals that are tired of sleeping on the cold, cold ground.


The dollar is heading towards worthless...

I will blog on other reasons for preparation after I get this done. This is a work of love, not greed. Those that know me know that I have great love for my family and friends.

Those that know me also know that I am right when I tell you something. I was right about stocks, gold, real-estate, the dollar and a host of other things I won't go in to. I am well-educated; well versed, and know money better than any other man on the planet. I don't raise false alarms. This post is dated March 18, 2008. In a matter of weeks for some, months for others, your life is going to change in some very drastic ways. Please follow my advice for your benefit and the benefit of your families.


1. Generators

2. Water Filters/Purifiers

3. Portable Toilets

4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 - 12 months to become dried, for home uses.

5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)

6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.

7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.

8. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.

9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar

10. Rice - Beans - Wheat

11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled etc.,)

12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid (Will become scarce suddenly)

13. Water Containers (Urgent Item to obtain.) Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC ONLY - note - food grade if for drinking.

16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.)

17. Survival Guide Book.

18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)

19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.

20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)

21. Cookstoves (Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)

22. Vitamins

23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous without this item)

24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products.

25. Thermal underwear (Tops & Bottoms)

26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)

27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty (Great Cooking and Barter Item)

28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal)

29. Garbage Bags (Impossible To Have Too Many).

30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels

31. Milk - Powdered & Condensed (Shake Liquid every 3 to 4 months)

32. Garden Seeds (No n-Hybrid) (A MUST)

33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)

34. Coleman's Pump Repair Kit

35. Tuna Fish (in oil)

36. Fire Extinguishers (or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)

37. First aid kits

38. Batteries (all sizes...buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)

39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies

40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)

41. Flour, yeast & salt

42. Matches. {"Strike Anywhere" preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go first

43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators

44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in Wintertime.)

45. Workboots, belts, Levis & durable shirts

46. Flashlights/LIGHTSTICKS & torches, "No. 76 Dietz" Lanterns

47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings, experience; Historic Times)

48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water, transporting - if with wheels)

49. Men's Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc

50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)

51. Fishing supplies/tools

52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams

53. Duct Tape

54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes

55. Candles

56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)

57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags

58. Garden tools & supplies

59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies

60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.

61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)

62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)

63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel

64. Bicycles...Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc

65. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats

66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)

67. Board Games, Cards, Dice

68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer

69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets

70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)

71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap (sav es a lot of water)

72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.

73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)

74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)

75. Soysauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soupbase

76. Reading glasses

77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)

78. "Survival-in-a-Can"

79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens

80. Boy Scout Handbook, / also Leaders Catalog

81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)

82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky

83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts

84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)

85. Lumber (all types)

86. Wagons & carts (for transport to and from)

87. Cots & Inflatable mattress's

88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.

89. Lantern Hangers

90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws,, nuts & bolts

91. Teas

92. Coffee

93. Cigarettes

94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)

95. Paraffin wax

96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.

97. Chewing gum/candies

98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)

99. Hats &

100. cotton neckerchiefs

http://prepare4emergency.blogspot.com/
 

wallew

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#2
Here is a copy of this list from back in 2005, which was the last time I saved it. Item #17 shows this to be from Y2k (pre-2000) - also note that item #100 IS DIFFERENT

#1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy.. target of thieves; maintenance, etc.)
#2. Water Filters/Purifiers (Shipping delays increasing.)
#3. Portable Toilets (Increasing in price every two months.)
#4. Seasoned Firewood (About $100 per cord; wood takes 6 - 12 mos. to become dried, for home uses.)
#5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)
#6. Coleman Fuel (URGENT $2.69-$3.99/gal. Impossible to stockpile too much.)
#7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots
#8. Hand-Can openers & hand egg beaters, whisks (Life savers!)
#9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugars
#10. Rice - Beans - Wheat (White rice is now $12.95 - 50# bag. Sam's Club, stock depleted often.)
#11. Vegetable oil (for cooking) (Without it food burns/must be boiled, etc.)
#12. Charcoal & Lighter fluid (Will become scarce suddenly.)
#13. Water containers (Urgent Item to obtain. An size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC ONLY)
#14. Mini Heater head (Propane) (Without this item, propane won't heat a room.)
#15. Grain Grinder (Non-electric)
#16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur by September, 1999.)
#17. Michael Hyatt's Y2K Survival Guide (BEST single y2k handbook for sound advice/tips.)
#18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)
#19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula/ointments/aspirin, etc
#20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
#21. Cookstoves (Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)
#22. Vitamins (Critical, due 10 Y2K-forced daily canned food diets.)
#23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous without this item.)
#24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products
#25. Thermal underwear (Tops and bottoms)
#26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets & Wedges (also, honing oil)
#27. Aluminum foil Reg. & Hvy. Duty (Great Cooking & Barter item)
#28. Gasoline containers (Plastic or Metal)
#29. Garbage bags (Impossible to have too many.)
#30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, paper towels
#31. Milk - Powdered & Condensed (Shake liquid every 3 to 4 months.)
#32. Garden seeds (Non-hybrid) (A MUST)
#33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)
#34. Coleman's Pump Repair Kit: 1(800) 835-3278
#35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
#36. Fire extinguishers (or.. large box of Baking soda in every room...)
#37. First aid kits
#38. Batteries (all sizes... buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)
#39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
#40. BIG DOGS (and plenty of dog food)
#41. Flour, yeast & salt
#42. Matches (3 box/$1 .44 at WalMart: "Strike Anywhere" preferred. Boxed, wooden matches will go first.)
#43. Writing paper/pads/pencils/solar calculators
#44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in Wintertime)
#45. Workboots, belts, Levis & durable shirts
#46. Flashlights/LIGIITSTICKS & torches, "No. 76 Dietz" Lanterns
#47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (Jot down ideas, feelings, experiences: Historic times!)
#48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water transporting - if with wheels)
#49. Men's Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc
#50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)
#51. Fishing supplies/tools
#52. Mosquito coils/repellent sprays/creams
#53. Duct tape
#54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
#55. Candles
#56. Laundry detergent (Liquid)
#57. Backpacks & Duffle bags
#58. Garden tools & supplies
#59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
#60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
#61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)
#62. Canning supplies (Jars/lids/wax)
#63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
#64. Bicycles... Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc.
#65. Sleeping bags & blankets/pillows/mats
#66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
#67. Board Games Cards, Dice
#68. d-Con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
#69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
#70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks...)
#71. Baby Wipes, diapers, tampons, oils, waterless & Anti-bacterial soap (saves a lot of water)
#72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
#73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)
#74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
#75. Soysauce, vinegar, boullions/gravy/soup base
#76. Reading glasses
#77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
#78. "Survival-in-a-Can"
#79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
#80. BSA - New 1998 - Boy Scout Handbook (also, Leader's Catalog)
#81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)
#82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
#83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
#84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
#85. Lumber (all types)
#86. Wagons & carts (for transport to & from open Flea markets)
#87. Cots & Inflatable mattresses (for extra guests)
#88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
#89. Lantern Hangers
#90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws, nuts & bolts
#91. Teas
#92. Coffee
#93. Cigarettes
#94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc.)
#95. Paraffin wax
#96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.
#97. Chewing gum/candies
#98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
#99. Hats & cotton neckerchiefs
#100. Goats/chickens
 

thriftee

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#4
I wish I had the old posts from this forum.

I know progress has to be made, but there was a lot of searchable knowledge there.

If I had known, I'd have stored it, or at least the threads worth saving.
 

Maddie

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#9
I'd add an awl for stitching leather and webbing, Shoe Goo because you can repair and patch an amazing variety of things with the stuff, a manual strainer (if you have babies, elderly, people who can't eat solid foods), waterproof paper and pens (such as a survey book; you never know when you'll want to leave a note or map something), collapsible lawn chairs (no camp site or refugee camp is complete without them), topographical maps for your area, dish soap, paper plates, Zip Lock freezer bags (will hold anything and keep it dry), Nalgene bottles (will keep important things like medication dry if you're on the move), condoms, and I'm sure I'll think of some other stuff.
 

Lt Dan

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#10
Bump, just because it needs to be.
 

Mr. Shiny

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#12
And without the redundancy it's a list of 70.....hmm........maybe fifty.

Example:

#39 is Garlic, Spices, Vinegar, Baking Supplies. Yet #41 is Flour, Yeast, Salt. (Baking Supplies)
 

goldie40

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#14
scrap 90 of those things and you'll live just as good as most of the people in the Great Depression did
 
Last edited:

beercritic

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#15
Krazy Glue - Fix busted fingernails, cracked hands, close small wounds after cleaning them. Great for bug out bags and camping gear as well. I always stow a tube in my first aid kits. Once opened, consider it a one-use item, unless you can store it upright, it WILL leak. I can't tell you how many shirts I've ruined by assuming I could carry a tube in the pocket.
 

MNeagle

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#16
Cash
Coins
PMs

Also, the lists are assuming there's no electricity. There are a ton of things to stock up on FOR electrical use; i.e.: furnace/AC filters, light bulbs, fuses, vacuum bags, extra car parts (wipers, lights, filters, oil, fuses, tires), etc.
 

5150female

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#17
My dad just mentioned to me that I should have a few cans of Wasp Spray. Better than pepper spray for absolutely dropping a fool at 23 feet.
 

<===Foolsgold

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#18
After shooting someone in the face with Mace you might want some large zip ties to handcuff them.
 

5150female

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#19
Damn! More details I forgot. I can always count on you FG. :cool:
 

Irons

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#20
300 gallons of Vodka. If you have booze to trade you will end up with almost everybody elses preps.
 
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#21
A few solar panels and a couple marine batteries.
 

5150female

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#22
300 gallons of Vodka. If you have booze to trade you will end up with almost everybody elses preps.
Oh Irons you know me so well.
 

Nickelless

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#24
I wish I had the old posts from this forum.

I know progress has to be made, but there was a lot of searchable knowledge there.

If I had known, I'd have stored it, or at least the threads worth saving.
Don't we still have a link somewhere on the board where people can download the Survival Prep archives?

scrap 90 of those things and you'll live just as good as most of the people in the Great Depression did
Or start stocking up now and live BETTER than they did back then. ;)
 

HistoryStudent

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#25
THIS should be a STICKY on the TOP - hey, gatekeeper!

HELLO

\\thanks HS
 

hypervel

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#26
I always enjoy reading these lists. I'm a horribly slow typer, so I can't get into wordy detail.....but after food, water, shelter,clothing (and most of the bigger obvious concerns) I see so little about PROPER lighting. It's all good and well to list lamps/wicks/oil, but LED stuff is scads better than storing up fuel. Mind you-I have lamps and fuel, but really don't plan on breaking it out except for possible barter.
Without seeing at night time or in dark spots you're pretty well screwed, aren't you?
May I offer some ideas to the folks who aren't flashlight whores?
***as always, two is one and one is none. 3 is the magic number***
Headlamps: at least one that accepts front loaded batts. I'm thinking AAA variety, and low on the lumen count. Somewhere in the teens should do. You want front batteries to avoid discomfort while doin' stuff on your back. I'm amazed when i go to the local store and see button cell units and STILL some incan units. You also might want a more capable unit. Frequently these have a rear mounted batt pack, but not always. They are most often multi-mode. The key is water resistance and at least some power. (throw and wattage) There seems to be a lot of competition for buyers based on light output alone. Careful. Physics "is" and can't be avoided. High output is high power consumption. The only real way out of that is a focused beam-but it'll deprive you of beam width-not terribly helpful at the woodpile.
Regular flashlights: Oh, for crying out loud will you please quit buying those 3-packs of B.S. 5mm multi LED paper thin aluminum units at the local home mart? ASKING for a bad time!!!! Otherwise, all I really have to note to the non-enthusiast is to get a multimode unit-please get one with a "low" mode somewhere in the teens of lumens output range. High power is nice, and impressed friend and foe alike. If you want good constant light you'll want the lower output. By way of reference, I seem to recall the old AA Maglites were in the teens or 20's of lumens output. I'm happily corrected on that stat, as I haven't done my diligence in the past little while. By contrast, the old Surefire 6P incans were something like 60lumens and were considered "tactical" (whatever that really is-any bright light is marketed as tactical) New LED units aren't uncommon in the 100-200 lumen range on high.
Gotta go soon, so to be quick-
Batteries: AA and AAA lithiums or "hybrid NiMH" cells. The old NiMH cells self discharge fairly quickly. CR123 and 18650 batts are more for the "tactical" lights (I'm using the "" as ridicule) great if you got them, and primaries (non-rechargeables) last a decade or so unused.
Good for grabandgo.
Chargers: a fast charger AT LEAST! If power is spotty, a good 1 hr charger seems the way to go.
Gotta go.
parting shot-------HEADLAMPS!!!!!
 

Irons

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#27
I use a led headlamp for about 20 minutes each morning walking my dog before work. Its a energizer, has 6 led's and 4 settings, one red, and uses 3 aaa. I have been using the same one for over a year now and haven't changed the batt's yet.
Seems really well made for cheap crap and cars can see you from a long ways off even if it's snowing hard. I really like the thing!~:dance:
 

shades

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#28

shades

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#29
I always enjoy reading these lists. I'm a horribly slow typer, so I can't get into wordy detail.....but after food, water, shelter,clothing (and most of the bigger obvious concerns) I see so little about PROPER lighting. It's all good and well to list lamps/wicks/oil, but LED stuff is scads better than storing up fuel. Mind you-I have lamps and fuel, but really don't plan on breaking it out except for possible barter.
Without seeing at night time or in dark spots you're pretty well screwed, aren't you?
May I offer some ideas to the folks who aren't flashlight whores?
***as always, two is one and one is none. 3 is the magic number***
Headlamps: at least one that accepts front loaded batts. I'm thinking AAA variety, and low on the lumen count. Somewhere in the teens should do. You want front batteries to avoid discomfort while doin' stuff on your back. I'm amazed when i go to the local store and see button cell units and STILL some incan units. You also might want a more capable unit. Frequently these have a rear mounted batt pack, but not always. They are most often multi-mode. The key is water resistance and at least some power. (throw and wattage) There seems to be a lot of competition for buyers based on light output alone. Careful. Physics "is" and can't be avoided. High output is high power consumption. The only real way out of that is a focused beam-but it'll deprive you of beam width-not terribly helpful at the woodpile.
Regular flashlights: Oh, for crying out loud will you please quit buying those 3-packs of B.S. 5mm multi LED paper thin aluminum units at the local home mart? ASKING for a bad time!!!! Otherwise, all I really have to note to the non-enthusiast is to get a multimode unit-please get one with a "low" mode somewhere in the teens of lumens output range. High power is nice, and impressed friend and foe alike. If you want good constant light you'll want the lower output. By way of reference, I seem to recall the old AA Maglites were in the teens or 20's of lumens output. I'm happily corrected on that stat, as I haven't done my diligence in the past little while. By contrast, the old Surefire 6P incans were something like 60lumens and were considered "tactical" (whatever that really is-any bright light is marketed as tactical) New LED units aren't uncommon in the 100-200 lumen range on high.
Gotta go soon, so to be quick-
Batteries: AA and AAA lithiums or "hybrid NiMH" cells. The old NiMH cells self discharge fairly quickly. CR123 and 18650 batts are more for the "tactical" lights (I'm using the "" as ridicule) great if you got them, and primaries (non-rechargeables) last a decade or so unused.
Good for grabandgo.
Chargers: a fast charger AT LEAST! If power is spotty, a good 1 hr charger seems the way to go.
Gotta go.
parting shot-------HEADLAMPS!!!!!

Stick with an oily rag tied around it and lit on fire. Conan can't be wrong.
 

MNeagle

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#31
:sad_m:

Bump to the top. Sad to see it was never stickied.
 

AceNZ

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#32
I wish I had the old posts from this forum.

I know progress has to be made, but there was a lot of searchable knowledge there.

If I had known, I'd have stored it, or at least the threads worth saving.
I downloaded a bunch of posts from the survival and firearms forums before GIM1 shut down. If there's anything in particular that you're looking for, let me know and I'll see if I have it.
 

gasilat

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#33
Rarely mentioned is woodstove piping. You need to have on hand woodstove piping to replace the pieces as they fail from rust or burning out. I've got 5 wood stoves in service in different buildings, standardization of size is important. Everything I have is 6 inch stuff. Piping fails after a while, the metalbestos parts last a long time but single wall from the stove up to it has a lifespan much shorter.
 

Jimfrancisco

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#34
Cement flue piping is easy to cast - I have a stove to heat the workshop at my BO place and it is now all cement - lasts very well, far better than the metal stuff. I use tin cans as the inner and outer of the mould, cast the cement and leave the cans on. Even old clay/cement soil pipe works a treat, I've had the cement stuff on for years now and it hasn't visibly disintegrated at all. Collects less creosote, as well. A sack of vermiculite would also serve you well to store, for lots of uses.
 

solarion

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#36
...so then HS shows up to necro an ancient thread.

Lotsa old faces we don't see much of in this thread.
 

brosil

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