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2020 US Election thread

Buck

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LOL, but we saw it, so, here we are with disappearing evidence of what's really happening

there is no denying what we see, the turned backs, we don't see the angle from the 'troops' while the motorcade drives by, that would be great, but the jarheads around here saw the treatment at the entry to the WH, or wherever...

we're not in normal times

i'm still staying stocked with food and fuel...and i'm seeing more people leaving their masks off in the parking lots and putting them on at the entrance, stripping them back of at the exit

im thinking: 'bout time...

:summer:
 

Son of Gloin

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Apparently, I have already been stripped of my voting rights since I voted for Trump.



You?
A little detail I forgot at that moment.
 

Uglytruth

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When you voluntarily Self- Incriminate you should be arrested, go to the front of the line in Court ,be sentenced for a minimum of 5 years, disallowed to vote for 10 years, and disallowed to work or volunteer in any ballot counting for LIFE.
Problem may not be solved but will deter a vast majority of manipulators, at least the smart ones.
Um....... why go so light? The fraud you are talking about affected the entire world. That's currently in the area of 7.8 billion people. Trying to be controlled by probably well less than 100,000 dictators that are controlling everything and wanting to turn the people into slaves. Or is slavery all of the sudden legal? Death is to easy. Asset forfeiture should a minimum automatic move. It affected investments, infrastructure, jobs, incomes, people's very lives at every level.

Always remember it's not just the seen it's the unseen. Well we keep saying Trump but he had people behind him so THEY showed the world we could be energy independent, creating jobs, increasing investment, increasing jobs, making lives better. That was all of us! Or in a nutshell reversing the BS they have been force feeding us for decades. It seems their only economic plan is war and slavery.

With a stroke of the EO biden pen the destruction of jobs in energy were destroyed. Higher taxes to pay for whatever wet dream they have planned next. It will affect every aspect of our lives. Will it be cheaper to buy from amazon because either the local store is gone or you can't afford $10 a gallon gas to get to the store? Will it be cheaper to work from home or live in company housing next to the factory because you can't afford the next step like outlawing fossil fuel cars to have the freedom to move around? Sure sounds like china to me. Oh and when you think of that, remember their goals. Population control reduced to 500 million. Guess it's just a number they pulled outta their ass so they can do whatever it is they want. It's already on decline. How about dating in the age of the invisible beer flu scare bug?

Really think about it. Does this sound like any kind of reality or does it sound like some computer geeks idea of the future? You know the kind that never deals in reality. Do you really see robots drilling oil wells? Running a forging hammer? Making trim tooling? Creating beauty of any kind? After they kill off all the people and the animal population grows will they be next? They have zero respect for anything that was built before them. Their values are of a throwaway culture, yet they surround themselves with art not knowing how a bronze was created or marble mined or, or, or.

About the Q threads. Everything is tied together and feeds off each other. I got to the point where it was hard deciding what thread to even post what was discovered.

The Lin Wood zoom phone call from above was very interesting from a lot of angles.
 

the_shootist

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Ha Ha Ha! :belly laugh:

So now all these Democrats are now instantly having buyers remorse because they voted the way their party told them to and they were dumb enough to do so.

In Text Messages, Biden Voters Already Regret Their Vote
https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/20...ce=Twitter&utm_campaign=websitesharingbuttons

Biden voters are realizing they have been conned.
Text message conversations shared on Twitter show their feelings of betrayal.


Read the article and try not to enjoy the schadenfreude too much.
People are stupid, they always have been and always will be!
 

the_shootist

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One doesn't just secretly join a Zoom meeting, they would need the specific link to join the meeting and the password/code.
it's simply knowing a meeting number. I'm on Zoom and Webex calls every day so I know dialing into a call session isn't super secret stuff
 

the_shootist

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Yes, I was aware but forgot to post that. Weird scene nonetheless.
Yeah, something doesn't smell right there. He's definitely handcuffed and the cop is particularly interested in what's going on behind him
 

the_shootist

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the_shootist

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Goldhedge

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Sidney Powell, pro-Trump lawyer, forms Restore the Republic super PAC

Sidney Powell, the pro-Trump lawyer who led several failed bids to overturn the recent presidential election, announced the formation Saturday of a political action committee, Restore the Republic.

Ms. Powell said in a statement that she co-founded the group with Mike Lindell, the CEO of the My Pillow bedding company recently beleaguered as a result of his own fervor for former President Trump.

https://m.washingtontimes.com/news/2021/jan/23/sidney-powell-announces-formation-of-restore-the-r/
 

Ensoniq

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New Mexico - congrats on installing Biden. I’m enjoying the fact you’re getting it good and hard so quickly

Those 11000 jobs will be back somewhere I’m sure
 

ErrosionOfAccord

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It has become pretty clear to me as to why this is happening. It isn't because Biden is stupid, it is part of the "plan".
Under the modern energy regime we've had an exponential population explosion as can be witnessed in the following charts.

1611501669004.png

1611501720279.png

As it turns out, energy is human life. The ability to harness energy make humans the most successful entropy device on earth, created either by nature or, God if you prefer. Oil is the basic feed-stock for all of modern life. If it isn't grown it is mined. Without oil it is neither grown or mined, at least not on the scale the modern world is accustomed to. China Joe, is simply carrying out the orders of his technocratic masters. They do not give one shit about the political landscape they are creating. Their drive is focused on one thing and, that is depopulation. Georgia Guide Stones ring a bell? Shutting in energy increases the price and hurts the impoverished the most. You know, the people Joe claims to love. Don't fear, the middle class will become the poor and they too will start to extinguish. The plan is to make energy so expensive no normal person can afford it. That way, the first world becomes the third world and we live shorter brutish lives. Our infant mortality rates go up and we will start leaning on our third world peers to learn how to survive in our new third world status.

To be sure, white power will still be alive. Joe's masters will remain white and see themselves as gods and the rest of what's left of us will be mudbloods looking to them as the Mayans looked to Cortez.

The easy energy is gone. The oil needs to be fracked. The coal is the deepest it has ever been. Fusion is still a pipe dream. All available Hydro is already in use. Ask Japan about nuclear. Natural gas will become more expensive when it's main competition, coal, goes away. Wind and solar will never meet our needs as we know them today. The technocrats who replace China Joe will see these visions come to fruition. The coal mines in the PRB will be covered over if there is enough energy left to do so and the extremely costly infrastructure will be ripped up. The cost of reopening the PRB mines would be astronomical after reclamation.

If voting mattered they would make it illegal. Anyway, here's more from a useful idiot. I'll not link to those scurrilous bastards so if you want a source look to CNN. The author packed the article full of propaganda or perhaps he is just letting his idiocy show. For instance, coal and gas compete head to head regarding price.

Gillette, Wyoming (CNN)This Wyoming coal town is a place of contradictions. At dawn, the land looks heavenly: Winds rattle the sagebrush; cotton-candy skies make a dusting of snow glow in pastel hues. Later in the afternoon, though, you look to the horizon and see the Earth hemorrhaging gray dust as trucks haul coal from pits the size of suburbs.

John D. Sutter
Gillette is the hub of a region called the Powder River Basin, which produces roughly 40% of US coal. West Virginia's coal country gets more attention, but Wyoming produces more coal at this point. Gillette is the town that powers America -- at least it did for decades.
But as the urgency of the climate crisis has become more apparent, markets have shifted toward cheaper and cleaner electricity sources -- wind, solar and natural gas. Residents here know that the Biden administration, which rejoined the Paris Agreement on climate change and promises a 100% clean electric grid by 2035, could help push Gillette out of existence.
Moving away from coal is essential to fighting back against worsening droughts, storms and sea-level rise around the world. That fight will only get harder if America keeps burning coal.


To some degree, Gillette understand this. It's a place that simultaneously calls itself the "Energy Capital of the Nation" while also planning for a future in which the fossil fuel industry may not exist.
I drove here in January after Steve Gray, a 56-year-old resident who's been laid off from both the coal and oil industries in northeastern Wyoming, left CNN a voicemail after the 2020 presidential election. I've been exploring your questions about the climate crisis as part of an ongoing series for CNN Opinion, and Gray's message seemed to bring up some of the toughest questions concerning what must be a rapid transition away from fossil fuels.
"Everybody in this town is afraid that it is going to become a ghost town," he said.


Steve Gray called CNN concerned that, following the election of President Biden, that Gillette could become a "ghost town." He says he was laid off from an oil field job in 2015, then subsequently from another job in oil and then one in coal last year.
Implicitly, Gray seemed to be asking: What will happen to Gillette -- and other fossil fuel towns -- as the coal industry recedes and clean-energy goals are realized? And what difference could the Biden administration or Congress make for a dying town built on coal?
Climate advocates tend to lump solutions to all of these issues under an umbrella term: "just transition." Not like, "just get on with this transition already." "Just" as in fair.
Gray, the man who called CNN, doesn't see anything fair about it.
"People are getting left behind," he told me.
He and others I met in Gillette want the rest of the country to realize that they've worked hard, for decades, to supply the United States with electricity. They didn't own the companies that got rich off the boom in coal and other fossil fuels -- companies that hid research showing the disastrous effects of climate change, or that funded disinformation campaigns.


The Wyodak power plant, located near Gillette, Wyoming, is powered by the Wyodak mine, which is the oldest continually operated coal mine in the United States, according to the Wyodak company website.
They were just working.
Working in an industry created by federal policies that failed to price carbon pollution -- that encouraged the mining of coal on land owned by the US government.
And now they're being asked to stop.
Both by markets, which value cheaper energy sources.
And, importantly, by climate advocates like myself, who understand, based on science that's been amassing for decades, that global warming poses an existential threat to humanity.
What do we owe Gillette and its workers?
Boomtown
There's an important irony hidden in the story of Gillette.
The US government willed much of this place into existence.


The city of Gillette, Wyoming.
This nudge came in a few forms. One was federal support for domestic energy production in the early 1970s -- a time when overseas markets were seen as volatile and problematic.
Another was environmental regulation.
The Clean Air Act of 1970 and its 1990 amendments targeted, among other pollutants, sulfur dioxide, which is a component of smog and acid rain. Powder River Basin coal just so happens to be naturally lower in sulfur than coal found in Appalachia and elsewhere.
Before 1970, there were a few coal mines and oil rigs in the Gillette area, Robert Henning, director of a local history museum, the Campbell County Rockpile Museum, told me. We were standing in front of a wall-sized image of 1920s Gillette, which had the look of a sepia-tone Western outpost -- a dusty landscape with wooden fences and magnificent rolling hills on the horizon. Gillette was founded in the late 1800s as a railroad town -- named for a surveyor. But after 1970 and the Clean Air Act, Henning told me, the then-localized mining industry exploded.
In 1960, the population of Campbell County, which includes Gillette, was about 5,800.
By 1970, it had more than doubled -- to nearly 13,000.


Historical image of Gillette, Wyoming.
During the boom, the town was so crowded and chaotic that some families lived in tents, said Jim Ford, a Gillette resident who advises local government agencies and non-profits on economic and energy issues. Ford told me that when he was a child, his elementary school adopted a two-shift schedule to accommodate all the students. One group started at 6:00 AM and went until noon. Then the other started, ending at 6:00 p.m.
Steve Gray told me that his family was one of the ones that came to the region to work in the fossil fuel industry in the early 1970s. His dad worked in the oil fields, and so did Gray, at least for a time.
That was when life was good. Work was free-flowing. Wages were high.
The coal in the Powder River Basin sits near the surface and is mined with giant trucks carrying shovels so big you can fit a large family inside. The scale of the operation is difficult to comprehend. "Our largest mine is roughly 90 square miles," said Shannon Anderson, staff attorney at the Powder River Basin Resource Council, an environmental group.
These mines grew and grew.
But any boomtown worker knows that kind of growth can't last forever.
'The economy just collapsed'
The year 2016 -- that was the worst of it, according to the mayor.
That was when the "economy just collapsed."
"The energy industries always have been boom-and-bust, but this was a big one," said Gillette Mayor Louise Carter-King, who keeps an image of her father, who also was mayor of Gillette, hanging behind her desk. Her roots in the community are deep, and her husband works in coal. From her office window, you can see one of two coal-fired power-plants puffing smoke into the sky. "It was like a perfect storm because oil went down, coal went down, natural gas -- everything." The bust was caused primarily by lower natural gas and renewable energy prices, less demand from coal-fired power plants, which continue to close, and concerns about climate-change regulations, according to economists.


Mayor Louise Carter-King, the first woman mayor of Gillette, says she supports the United States rejoining the Paris Climate Accord. Her father, Herb Carter, framed in the background, served as mayor in the 1980s.
Most of the coal mined near Gillette sits on public land, meaning that the state government collects royalty payments and other taxes on its production. Wyoming doesn't have a state income tax and its property and sales taxes are notoriously low. Many years, well over half of the state's tax revenue comes from the coal, oil and gas industries.
After the bust, Carter-King said she knew Gillette would have rethink everything.
Gray told me that his call to CNN was influenced by how things fell apart with the oil and coal industries shortly before and after 2016, the year US voters elected President Donald Trump -- who'd promised to bring back "beautiful, clean coal." Nearly 90% of Campbell County residents voted for Trump again in 2020. But you won't find too many people in Gillette who believe Trump kept his promises to coal workers -- or that it was even possible to keep them.
Wyoming coal production peaked in 2008 at 468 million short tons, according to the US Energy Information Administration. By 2016, it was 297 million tons, creeping down to 277 million in 2019, nearing the end of Trump's term. Last year's figures are not yet available, but the Covid-19 pandemic's impact on demand for energy is known to have contributed to widespread collapse in the energy industry.


The Wyodak power plant, located near Gillette, Wyoming.
Gray says he was laid off from an oil field job in 2015, then subsequently from another job in oil and then one in coal last year. His wife left him shortly after the first layoff, he said.
These days, Gray is working again, driving railroad workers to and from job sites -- part of a broader industry that supports the mines and fossil fuels. (Mayor Carter-King estimates most people's jobs in Gillette are linked to coal and other fossil fuel industries -- whether directly or indirectly). But Gray said that he's eaten through his savings.
My "bank accounts were drained -- lost my house, all the repossessions," he said.
"It was tough."
He's living on the razor-thin margins of a bust economy.
'The coal industry's on its last leg'
Here's an inconvenient truth: Towns like Gillette tend to fail.
I asked economists, environmentalists and policy experts. None could provide a sunny case study -- the story of a town whose main industry didn't take the initiative to remake itself.
"There's not a sterling example," said Jake Higdon, a senior US climate policy analyst at the Environmental Defense Fund who has contributed to several reports on fossil fuel communities.
Timber towns, auto towns, military town, mining towns -- the logical progression is toward "ghost town" status if the town isn't big enough, or industries aren't diverse enough.


Lynne Huskinson, a retired coal minor, looks over the Eagle Butte mine in Gillette, Wyoming. Huskinson says she was laid off in 2019.
In even trying to rebuild, then, Gillette aims to do something unprecedented.
That doesn't mean it's impossible. "Maybe our chances of remaking our community in a generation -- so my kids have something to come back to -- are 10%," said Ford, the county consultant. "But I know if we don't try, the chances are zero."
On a recent snowy morning, I dropped by Lula Belle's Café -- "non-smoking as of 4/1/2020" -- near the railyard in Gillette. It's a welcoming, chatty kind of place -- fruit pies on display behind the diner counter. I wanted to learn whether people here were in denial about coal's demise.
"Will the mines bounce back? No," said Doug Wood, a retired coal miner with a mustache that's twirls at the tips. "The coal industry's kind of on its last leg."
What's next then?


Hundreds of train engines, used to transport coal, are parked in a train yards near Gillette, Wyoming.
"I don't know if you're familiar with a TV show called 'The Jetsons?'"
I found that sentiment -- the coal part, not the Jetsons -- to be a common refrain in Gillette. Frankly, I was stunned by the degree to which the mayor, county development officials and people like Gray accept the unsettling facts of coal's decline.
Phil Christopherson, CEO of Energy Capital Economic Development, a local non-profit that's funded by industry as well as city and county government, told me that he hopes children who are growing up in Gillette 50 years from now won't even know that this was a coal town.
"It's going to be a tough transition for this community," Christopherson said, "and we're doing our best to prepare for that, so we still have a community here in five, 10 or 50 years."
Carbon Valley
Yet, Gillette remains conflicted.
While claiming it wants something new, local and state leadership continues to push coal products and technologies -- many of them expensive and unproven -- as the future.
You'll hear some people calling Gillette "Carbon Valley" -- as in the Silicon Valley of coal. Coal research, they say, is what's next. As are new and supposedly cleaner uses for coal.
One such project, called the Wyoming Integrated Test Center, or ITC, sits at the base of a coal-fired power plant -- painted blue and white as if it might blend into the sky.
Jason Begger, the project's managing director, told me to think of the site as an "RV park" for researchers interested in capturing carbon-dioxide pollution from the power plant and doing something else with it -- potentially "sequestering" the gas deep in the rock underfoot.
The idea is that if most of that CO2 pollution is captured and stored away somewhere, coal can keep burning, because it wouldn't contribute heat-trapping gases to the atmosphere. It's reasonable to place some hope in the technology given the fact that carbon pollution needs to reach "net zero" by about 2050 in order to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement. But carbon-capture and storage has proven to be costly and troublesome compared to alternatives.


An expert's advice on talking to the climate skeptic in your life
Begger told me the world needs to recalibrate its expectations.
"I have a 2-year-old daughter, and it's kind of like saying, 'Well, in 20 years, she'll be in the Olympics," he said. "We [would] have to see if she can crawl and walk" before signing her up for the Olympics.
The state has been trying coal-spending technology for years, said Anderson, the environmentalist, with little to no results. She says she remains "very skeptical" of it -- as do I.
Wyoming, meanwhile, also has some of the nation's greatest potential for wind energy, according to the American Clean Power Association, an industry group. PacifiCorp, the massive power company that is retiring some of its coal power plants in Wyoming, recently opened a large wind farm -- 520 megawatts, enough to power about 150,000 homes, according to Laine Anderson, the company's director of wind operations -- about an hour-and-a-half drive south of Gillette.
Yet, Wyoming is a rare state that also taxes wind power -- rather than incentivizing its production as a much-needed clean energy source.
"Wyoming's leaders have done little to pivot our state's economy away from this volatile industry," the Casper Star-Tribune's editorial board wrote of coal in 2019.
Just transition
Perhaps Gillette is less a place of contradictions than one of surprises.
Steve Gray lives in a small apartment complex near the highway. He answered the door on a recent blizzardy morning wearing a denim, pearl-snap shirt and fuzzy red slippers.
After his layoffs from the oil and coal industries, he lost the house he shared with his ex-wife and son, who is now 25. For a while, he moved back in with his father. But now here's here, and when he welcomes you in you can feel the pride he takes in the place.
On the living room walls are the portraits he's taken with his son, an oil field worker in a community south of Gillette, and Steve's grandchildren. In these photos, Steve wears his trademark cowboy hat, a broomstick mustache and a contented grandfather's grin.
Nearby, you'll find the military honors -- a Purple Heart and Bronze Star -- bestowed on his elder relatives. Gray says he, too, served in the Navy and he values service to country.


Steve Gray stands outside his home in Gillette, Wyoming. After the election, he called CNN concerned that his city could become a "ghost town." He says he was laid off from an oil field job in 2015, then subsequently from another job in oil and then one in coal last year.
It's hard to talk here about a "just transition" for fossil fuel workers -- as if any transition for workers in dying US industries ever has been "just." Jason Walsh, executive director of the BlueGreen Alliance, which aims to unite labor and environmental interests around the issue of a transition for dislocated fossil fuel workers, told me there's no justice in what happened to auto workers or timber workers -- or in what's happening to fossil fuel workers now.
"We are insisting that policy makers pay attention," Walsh said. "It is not acceptable to leave any workers or any communities behind. We have an obligation to fulfill to workers and communities that have powered this country for generations and have often paid a very stiff price in terms of the health of their environments and their people and their workers."
I agree with that sentiment. In seeking a transition away from fossil fuels -- which, again, is required by science if we want to continue living on a habitable planet -- we must learn from the mistakes of the past. That's the only way America can inch closer toward justice.
Among history's lessons, according to Walsh: The investments must be bigger than before.
Walsh advised the Obama administration on a grants program -- called the POWER+ Plan -- that aimed to help diversify the economies of coal towns in the Appalachian Mountains.








These are Biden's promises on the climate crisis 01:34
That program and others failed to fully address the full needs of these communities, according to policy experts I interviewed. But there's a consensus emerging on what's needed now, including: job retraining, community college investments, wage replacement, healthcare extensions, pension extensions -- and jobs that help repair land scarred from decades of intensive mining. Advocates are, smartly, in my view, pushing the White House to create an office focused on this economic transition -- assisting fossil fuel communities and creating new jobs, according to advocates involved in these efforts.
Colorado recently took a step in this direction by creating an Office of Just Transition. Wyoming and other fossil-fuel states should do the same. And, importantly, it would be wise of the Biden administration to make good on its campaign promises to fight climate change aggressively -- getting to "net zero" emissions as soon as possible -- while also creating jobs.
Their focus should be on struggling towns like Gillette.
Listening to them -- and helping -- could be both a political and moral victory.
Wyoming is a state as red as they come.
President Joe Biden and the Democrats who now control Congress could earn respect, if not votes, for telling coal country the truth -- that coal must be phased out of the national energy mix, but that workers will not be left behind. That means they should get job training, health care, wage replacement and, when possible, jobs in the new industries that are popping up to replace fossil fuels. This suite of policy solutions is complex, but they must be taken seriously, and the discussion must forward the voices of fossil-fuel workers. Workers need to know that climate advocates respect and support them before we can move forward.
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This requires risk.
It requires trust.
That's something Gray showed when he reached across cultural lines to call CNN.
"I figured, well, yeah, I'm going to call. I'll never get any return, but it'll make me feel better, you know?" Gray said. "I just -- I'm kind of glad that you guys did contact me."
The Biden administration should answer the call, too.






 

SongSungAU

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George Stephanopoulos got his panties in a wad because he couldn't get Rand Paul to agree with him.
LOL!

Sen. Paul Joins ABC's "This Week" - January 24, 2021 (7 min 10 sec):​
Published on Jan 24, 2021 by SenatorRandPaul​
SA210124.jpg
 

the_shootist

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George Stephanopoulos got his panties in a wad because he couldn't get Rand Paul to agree with him.
LOL!

Sen. Paul Joins ABC's "This Week" - January 24, 2021 (7 min 10 sec):​
Published on Jan 24, 2021 by SenatorRandPaul​
View attachment 199523
The last time I've seen the media bitched slapped like that is when Trump was doing it! Lookie here what the cat dragged in....an actual fighting politician. I'm still not discounting that Junior Paul isn't just acting here but, this does smack of a Trump-esque beat down, a type that we had never previously ever seen from career politicians.
 
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Son of Gloin

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Stephanopoulos! What a hack.
 

itsamess

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LOL, but we saw it, so, here we are with disappearing evidence of what's really happening

there is no denying what we see, the turned backs, we don't see the angle from the 'troops' while the motorcade drives by, that would be great, but the jarheads around here saw the treatment at the entry to the WH, or wherever...

we're not in normal times

i'm still staying stocked with food and fuel...and i'm seeing more people leaving their masks off in the parking lots and putting them on at the entrance, stripping them back of at the exit

im thinking: 'bout time...

:summer:
Another missing military rejection ( "lost" by Twitter, captured video on Rumble)
Jill Biden Tries To Shake Marine’s Hand, Gets Denied
 

CopperSilverGold

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The last time I've seen the media bitched slapped like that is when Trump was doing it! Lookie here what the cat dragged in....an actual fighting politician. I'm still not discounting that Junior Paul isn't just acting here but, this does smack of a Trump-esque beat down, a type that we had never previously ever seen from career politicians.
1611524135126.png

1611524197135.png


Kayleigh did it every time there was a press conference. I miss her already.
 
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Ensoniq

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The attitude of that schmuck interviewer is the reason I've stopped watching all news, it's really repulsive
Yes that unbiased journalist that was Bill Clinton’s communication manager.

He grew up professionally as a partisan hack and never outgrew it.
 
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Yeah, it's a fake post.

Joke or is someone trying to provoke the right into real violence so that they can act "lawfully" in locking up their political opposition?

I think there is a desire to goad the right into a fight as a strategic move.
 

SongSungAU

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SongSungAU

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Ensoniq

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Stephanopoulous pronounced...Stepontopofus!
sniffakidforus - you’ll fit right in with the Biden admin

Staphylococcus - if you on Staff ;)

Suckacockforus - if you’re working for Kamala
 
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Goldhedge

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Rudy Giuliani responds to $1.3B Dominion lawsuit
by Lidia Curanaj
January 25, 2021

NEW YORK (77WABC) – Dominion Voting Systems has filed a lawsuit for $1.3 billion dollars against President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani for defamation. The election technology company is accusing Giuliani for pushing a “Big Lie” about election fraud on his podcast and TV appearances.

“Just as Giuliani and his allies intended, the Big Lie went viral on social media as people tweeted, retweeted, and raged that Dominion had stolen their votes. While some lies — little lies — flare up on social media and die with the next news cycle, the Big Lie was different,” lawyers for Dominion wrote in the lawsuit, filed in DC District Court on Monday morning. “The harm to Dominion’s business and reputation is unprecedented and irreparable because of how fervently millions of people believe it.”​

The lawsuit notes that while Giuliani spread falsehoods about Dominion being owned by Venezuelan communists and corrupting the election, he did not make those claims in lawsuits he pushed on behalf of Trump.

Giuliani, who is also a host for WABC radio, issued the following statement:

“Dominion’s defamation lawsuit for $1.3B will allow me to investigate their history, finances, and practices fully and completely. The amount being asked for is, quite obviously, intended to frighten people of faint heart. It is another act of intimidation by the hate-filled left-wing to wipe out and censor the exercise of free speech, as well as the ability of lawyers to defend their clients vigorously. As such, we will investigate a countersuit against them for violating these Constitutional rights.” – Rudy Giuliani

https://wabcradio.com/2021/01/25/new-rudy-giuliani-responds-to-1-3b-dominion-lawsuit/
 

engineear

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Rudy Giuliani responds to $1.3B Dominion lawsuit
by Lidia Curanaj
January 25, 2021

NEW YORK (77WABC) – Dominion Voting Systems has filed a lawsuit for $1.3 billion dollars against President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani for defamation. The election technology company is accusing Giuliani for pushing a “Big Lie” about election fraud on his podcast and TV appearances.

“Just as Giuliani and his allies intended, the Big Lie went viral on social media as people tweeted, retweeted, and raged that Dominion had stolen their votes. While some lies — little lies — flare up on social media and die with the next news cycle, the Big Lie was different,” lawyers for Dominion wrote in the lawsuit, filed in DC District Court on Monday morning. “The harm to Dominion’s business and reputation is unprecedented and irreparable because of how fervently millions of people believe it.”​

The lawsuit notes that while Giuliani spread falsehoods about Dominion being owned by Venezuelan communists and corrupting the election, he did not make those claims in lawsuits he pushed on behalf of Trump.

Giuliani, who is also a host for WABC radio, issued the following statement:

“Dominion’s defamation lawsuit for $1.3B will allow me to investigate their history, finances, and practices fully and completely. The amount being asked for is, quite obviously, intended to frighten people of faint heart. It is another act of intimidation by the hate-filled left-wing to wipe out and censor the exercise of free speech, as well as the ability of lawyers to defend their clients vigorously. As such, we will investigate a countersuit against them for violating these Constitutional rights.” – Rudy Giuliani

https://wabcradio.com/2021/01/25/new-rudy-giuliani-responds-to-1-3b-dominion-lawsuit/
Ok, well, bring the Kraken this time.
 

Goldhedge

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SCOTUS Tosses Emoluments Clause Lawsuits Against Trump
ED MORRISSEYPosted at 10:28 am on January 25, 2021

That sound you hear is the wail of thousands of legal geeks lamenting Donald Trump’s election loss … at least in this context. Now that Trump has departed the presidency, any lawsuits relating to his businesses and their profits are moot, the Supreme Court decided this morning. They threw out all of the remaining actions based on the Emoluments Clause, not just on their docket but throughout the federal judiciary:

The justices threw out Trump’s challenge to lower court rulings that had allowed lawsuits to go forward alleging that he violated the Constitution’s emoluments clause by accepting payments from foreign and domestic officials who stay at the Trump International Hotel.​
The high court also ordered the lower court rulings thrown out as well and directed appeals courts in New York and Richmond, Virginia, to dismiss the suits as moot now that Trump is no longer in office.​

The court had two cases before it over the Emoluments Clause: Trump v DC and Trump v CREW. Its orders today not only dismiss both as moot, but essentially renders all further legal proceedings the same. The court cites the Munsingwear case to support its dismissal, a 2008 precedent that has become the standard for mootness, and which SCOTUSBlog discusses in detail bordering on the soporific in this article.

Essentially, Trump’s exit from the office renders any remedy moot. Therefore, the court doesn’t see any point in belaboring the case any further. In truth, though, the Supreme Court would have struggled to find a role for the judiciary in this in the first place, and even apart from that link Trump’s normal business operations to a constitutional violation.

The Emoluments Clause wasn’t intended to keep presidents from running profitable businesses. It was intended to give Congress a way to deal with presidents who get bribed. That itself is a criminal offense, but as courts have repeatedly ruled, a criminal case requires a demonstrated and explicit quid pro quo to stick. The Supreme Court most recently refined that requirement in the case of Bob McDonnell, and it led to the Department of Justice dropping its corruption case against Robert Menendez as well.

The Emoluments Clause reduces this need in two ways. One, it only requires the acceptance of a personal enrichment without the quid pro quo, and two, it moves the venue from criminal prosecution to Congress. This never belonged in the courts in the first place, not without a demonstration of criminal bribery. Congress is the venue for issues relating to the Emoluments Clause.

Even in that context, though, this is still a non-starter. Even if people stayed at the Trump hotels to curry favor with Trump himself, they’re still paying for a legitimate service, not offering a gift. That’s a fair exchange at the same rates anyone else would be charged. Furthermore, voters knew full well that Trump ran luxury hotels and would continue to profit from them while in office. That’s not a bribe or an emolument, but simply the consequence of hiring a private-sector tycoon into office.

In other words, these dogs simply weren’t going to hunt in the first place. One has to imagine that the Supreme Court justices are relieved to send them off to the pound.
 

SongSungAU

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the_shootist

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SCOTUS Tosses Emoluments Clause Lawsuits Against Trump
ED MORRISSEYPosted at 10:28 am on January 25, 2021

That sound you hear is the wail of thousands of legal geeks lamenting Donald Trump’s election loss … at least in this context. Now that Trump has departed the presidency, any lawsuits relating to his businesses and their profits are moot, the Supreme Court decided this morning. They threw out all of the remaining actions based on the Emoluments Clause, not just on their docket but throughout the federal judiciary:

The justices threw out Trump’s challenge to lower court rulings that had allowed lawsuits to go forward alleging that he violated the Constitution’s emoluments clause by accepting payments from foreign and domestic officials who stay at the Trump International Hotel.​
The high court also ordered the lower court rulings thrown out as well and directed appeals courts in New York and Richmond, Virginia, to dismiss the suits as moot now that Trump is no longer in office.​

The court had two cases before it over the Emoluments Clause: Trump v DC and Trump v CREW. Its orders today not only dismiss both as moot, but essentially renders all further legal proceedings the same. The court cites the Munsingwear case to support its dismissal, a 2008 precedent that has become the standard for mootness, and which SCOTUSBlog discusses in detail bordering on the soporific in this article.

Essentially, Trump’s exit from the office renders any remedy moot. Therefore, the court doesn’t see any point in belaboring the case any further. In truth, though, the Supreme Court would have struggled to find a role for the judiciary in this in the first place, and even apart from that link Trump’s normal business operations to a constitutional violation.

The Emoluments Clause wasn’t intended to keep presidents from running profitable businesses. It was intended to give Congress a way to deal with presidents who get bribed. That itself is a criminal offense, but as courts have repeatedly ruled, a criminal case requires a demonstrated and explicit quid pro quo to stick. The Supreme Court most recently refined that requirement in the case of Bob McDonnell, and it led to the Department of Justice dropping its corruption case against Robert Menendez as well.

The Emoluments Clause reduces this need in two ways. One, it only requires the acceptance of a personal enrichment without the quid pro quo, and two, it moves the venue from criminal prosecution to Congress. This never belonged in the courts in the first place, not without a demonstration of criminal bribery. Congress is the venue for issues relating to the Emoluments Clause.

Even in that context, though, this is still a non-starter. Even if people stayed at the Trump hotels to curry favor with Trump himself, they’re still paying for a legitimate service, not offering a gift. That’s a fair exchange at the same rates anyone else would be charged. Furthermore, voters knew full well that Trump ran luxury hotels and would continue to profit from them while in office. That’s not a bribe or an emolument, but simply the consequence of hiring a private-sector tycoon into office.

In other words, these dogs simply weren’t going to hunt in the first place. One has to imagine that the Supreme Court justices are relieved to send them off to the pound.
They tried every single way they could think of to impede and hold back this man yet, he accomplished so much in 4 years. I feel like we're back to the drudgery of work after a 4 year vacation. Trump gave everyone a taste of what it can be. How many are now thinking about how those 4 years were really great and exciting times; full of results and potential, and this sucks!
 

Mr Paradise

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Uglytruth

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