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5 Reasons Fixing Your Own Car Will Change Your Life

Varmint Hunter

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I'm back in business!!
But feel kinda stupid also.
The problem turned out to be only very corroded spades on the FSCM fuse #22.

Many thanks to michael59, TN_Preacher, & Someone_else. I really appreciated all the helpful information.
And, you guys kept me from goin nuts while I was way in over my head.

Anybody need a good working used fuel pump that fits a 2007 Chevy or GMC gas pickup?
 

newmisty

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TN_Preacher

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I'm back in business!!
But feel kinda stupid also.
The problem turned out to be only very corroded spades on the FSCM fuse #22.

Many thanks to michael59, TN_Preacher, & Someone_else. I really appreciated all the helpful information.
And, you guys kept me from goin nuts while I was way in over my head.

Anybody need a good working used fuel pump that fits a 2007 Chevy or GMC gas pickup?

VH
We tend to think something very unusual and complex has happened to our vehicle when many times it is something very simple. You're not the only one who has been in that position. I've done the same thing, but at least you are able to admit it :) In reality, you probably saved yourself hundreds of dollars. Someone in a car shop would have replaced a bunch of uneccessary parts before they found the issue. You ought to feel good about that!
 

michael59

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I had a rambler...63? anyways I picked up some fixit tickets for the rear running lights being out. Went on the birdog hunt at the fuse box. Picked up another fixit ticket.....finally I drilled the fuse box loose and looked behind it and a wire was barely making a connection. I let to tickets go and got caught and did 3 days for FTA on three different tickets. 9 days I did, I hate fuse box's so they are the first thing I check now.
 

Varmint Hunter

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VH
We tend to think something very unusual and complex has happened to our vehicle when many times it is something very simple. You're not the only one who has been in that position. I've done the same thing, but at least you are able to admit it :) In reality, you probably saved yourself hundreds of dollars. Someone in a car shop would have replaced a bunch of uneccessary parts before they found the issue. You ought to feel good about that!

The towing alone would have been well over a hundred.
Actually, I'm glad I went thru the process. In addition to the fuel pump problem I discovered that the rear hanger for the fuel tank was completely rusted thru & when I wacked the bottom of the tank with a 2 X 4 to see if we could persuade the fuel pump to work again, the back of the tank dropped down a few inches. So had to replace that too.
Also, I now have a much better understanding of some of the electrical components of my truck.
Thanks again for everyone's help.
 

Casey Jones

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I had a rambler...63? anyways I picked up some fixit tickets for the rear running lights being out. Went on the birdog hunt at the fuse box. Picked up another fixit ticket.....finally I drilled the fuse box loose and looked behind it and a wire was barely making a connection. I let to tickets go and got caught and did 3 days for FTA on three different tickets. 9 days I did, I hate fuse box's so they are the first thing I check now.

Your problem was in the first sentence.

My parents had a Rambler - a 1962. Rambler was the third-best-selling car that year, behind Chevrolet and Ford.

That was part of the problem - they were thrust into the Big Time with a reasonably-modern design, against the spartan Ford and the uninspired Chevrolet of that year. They didn't have the manufacturing capacity - they were rushing product through.

But that car was nothing but trouble. Everything came apart, including the aluminum engine - which started leaking oil, not at a joint or seam, but THROUGH the aluminum casting. Air pockets in the block metal.

Everything from the (Borg-Warner) automatic transmission, to the aluminum engine, to the vacuum wipers, to horrific RUST...went wrong with that thing.

I only had problems with a fuse panel on one car - a used Yugo, and even that was better than 1960s Ramblers.

Interestingly, by the time AMC finally was sold to Chrysler, they'd figured out the Quality puzzle. Jeeps of those years were absolutely top-notch; better than they are today.
 

Casey Jones

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wow, I had cast iron.....spose I just had a lot of lead in the pencil.

AMC's aluminum engine was the company's attempt to be "revolutionary" in its new technology. Remember, GM had just come out with the Corvair, with an aluminum engine; and VW's air-cooled engine had an aluminum crankcase (cylinder jugs were separate and cast iron)

It was a bridge too far. First, they tried to make the jump almost immediately from a flathead six (which they still used in the Rambler American smallest-car) to an aluminum OHV engine. They didn't have the ability to cast aluminum, so they contracted it out, to a Toledo auto-industry supplier. Which, as it turned out, didn't have the ability, either.

It was an horrific mess for the company - and the low quality of the 1961-62 Ramblers, probably, more than anything, was what doomed the company. People, including my old man, bought once, and never again. Later, as a twentysomething, I had a couple of AMC cars, well-used, and while they were crude and no driver's cars (a Gremlin and a Postal Jeep) they were reliable as winter beaters.

Aluminum was used in the engine because the AMC six, as designed, was SO...MASSIVE. When they went back to cast-iron, keeping the OHC design, the weight of that thing was over 600 pounds - one of the heaviest non-truck six-cylinder engines ever made.

FWIW, that engine, redone in iron, later became known as the Jeep 4.0 six. Lasted until 2006, made under Chrysler. That is impressive - used in cars, then adapted to Jeep vehicles (as an afterthought) then updated with fuel injection (to meet emissions) and proving so durable that even Daimler-Benz didn't want to discontinue it for Jeeps, until the latest emissions standards forced it.
 

newmisty

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AMC's aluminum engine was the company's attempt to be "revolutionary" in its new technology. Remember, GM had just come out with the Corvair, with an aluminum engine; and VW's air-cooled engine had an aluminum crankcase (cylinder jugs were separate and cast iron)

It was a bridge too far. First, they tried to make the jump almost immediately from a flathead six (which they still used in the Rambler American smallest-car) to an aluminum OHV engine. They didn't have the ability to cast aluminum, so they contracted it out, to a Toledo auto-industry supplier. Which, as it turned out, didn't have the ability, either.

It was an horrific mess for the company - and the low quality of the 1961-62 Ramblers, probably, more than anything, was what doomed the company. People, including my old man, bought once, and never again. Later, as a twentysomething, I had a couple of AMC cars, well-used, and while they were crude and no driver's cars (a Gremlin and a Postal Jeep) they were reliable as winter beaters.

Aluminum was used in the engine because the AMC six, as designed, was SO...MASSIVE. When they went back to cast-iron, keeping the OHC design, the weight of that thing was over 600 pounds - one of the heaviest non-truck six-cylinder engines ever made.

FWIW, that engine, redone in iron, later became known as the Jeep 4.0 six. Lasted until 2006, made under Chrysler. That is impressive - used in cars, then adapted to Jeep vehicles (as an afterthought) then updated with fuel injection (to meet emissions) and proving so durable that even Daimler-Benz didn't want to discontinue it for Jeeps, until the latest emissions standards forced it.
Speaking of old 6 cylinders, Scotty just told us that Mazda is bringing back the inline 6 with rear wheel drive in 2023 iirc ...
Yep, here it is: https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a32109038/mazda-6-rwd-confirmed-2022/


Next-Gen Mazda 6 Switching to RWD Layout, Inline-Six Power
Slated to arrive in 2022, the new mid-size sedan will kick Mazda's upmarket ambitions into high gear
 

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...VW's air-cooled engine had an aluminum crankcase (cylinder jugs were separate and cast iron)

VW Beetles had magnesium crankcases (with aluminum):

 

newmisty

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I'm telling ya, Scotty's a National Treasure.

 

Irons

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Driving the old girl last weekend I noticed a slight hum, vibration between 30 and 45 MPH. Of course it got louder the more I drove and kept trying to tell myself I wasn't hearing anything. Jacked the back end up and put it in neutral and I got just a little play in the rear U-joint. That's all it takes, any play and you'll get noise like that. I have been driving this truck for so long when anything changes I'm in tune to it pretty quickly.

S10 ZR2's are notoriously hard on U-joints. GM compensated for the factory lift kit on the front end CV Joints pretty well but not so much with the drive shaft. I got it out and I'll drop it off at Tim's on the way to work today and pick it up later this week.


.:meditation:
 

michael59

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'85 to '86 rangers have that problem. What I found out is when I pulled the drive shaft the caps of the U-joint fit very loosely so I went on a driveline hunt. Of all the junk yards I pulled drivelines and they all were wobbled out. So, your guy might need to find a new one/yolk than fits nicely and weld it to your currant driveline. In rangers this wear always seems to be at the pinion, IDK why but it is.
 

specsaregood

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This weekend in "Daddy homeschool" my 9yr old learned how to change the oil, replace a headlamp, and refill the washer fluid in his moms car.
Got a quiz worked up to give him tomorrow to see how much he remembers.
7xIiQT7.gif
 

newmisty

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Scotty is makin moves! Literally and figuratively.

He just launched a forum where we can ask questions and he is looking for moderators right now...

 

newmisty

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Been having some noise from the front end of the truck lately.. it's more prominent at lower speeds is affected by the condition of the road does a little louder for turn to the left gets quieter if I turn to the right. It also seems to be affected if I'm going uphill vs. Downhill. I know it could be many things so have been studying it for a while couple weeks probably. Finally got a buddy over here to help me and I ended up pointing out the front differential and when I looked at my book and said to check the fluid every 6000 miles or 6 months! Oops! I think I've put a hundred and seventy thousand miles on it and havent checked it once. Bad, bad boy.

20201107_131335~2.jpg
20201107_132442~2.jpg
20201107_132448~2.jpg
 

gliddenralston

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I'm starting a body off rebuild of a 1966 mustang that I've owned for about 30 yrs now. I have limited mechanical skills or knowledge. I have lots of free time now and motivated to stay busy doing anything but construction. I have no time deadline and so far it has been fun and interesting. I have a few friends that are very knowledgeable and lots of YouTube vids to keep me in the right direction. My wife's all for it, I wonder why?
 
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gliddenralston

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Been having some noise from the front end of the truck lately.. it's more prominent at lower speeds is affected by the condition of the road does a little louder for turn to the left gets quieter if I turn to the right. It also seems to be affected if I'm going uphill vs. Downhill. I know it could be many things so have been studying it for a while couple weeks probably. Finally got a buddy over here to help me and I ended up pointing out the front differential and when I looked at my book and said to check the fluid every 6000 miles or 6 months! Oops! I think I've put a hundred and seventy thousand miles on it and havent checked it once. Bad, bad boy.

View attachment 187815View attachment 187824View attachment 187825
I see your ball joints have zirts, I was working on my brakes on my envoy and noticed no zirts on ball joints, how ya suppose to lube them?
 

Casey Jones

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I see your ball joints have zirts, I was working on my brakes on my envoy and noticed no zirts on ball joints, how ya suppose to lube them?

"Lifetime Lubrication." Usually a short lifetime - you have to replace the whole assembly when it goes dry and wears out.

Unless you have the interest, and ability, to drill into the top and thread in a Zerk fitting. Since it has to come out anyway, you're better off leaving it alone until it's obviously dry and just replacing it.
 

Casey Jones

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My wife's all for it, I wonder why?

Keeps ya outta the gin mills.

And interested in life, instead of moping in front of the idiot box.

And...maybe...the Mustang represents something from her past, too. Just because she's not into rebuilding old cars, doesn't mean she's not at all interested in them.
 

newmisty

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I see your ball joints have zirts, I was working on my brakes on my envoy and noticed no zirts on ball joints, how ya suppose to lube them?
Maybe its age is a factor? Mines an '01 with 4x4
 

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newmisty

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Mines an 04, 4x4
Hmm. You got started down a rabbit hole...apparently my truck should have 11 fittings from the factory. For a moment I thought perhaps mine were aftermarket while yours were original but doing a brief search tells me that they came that way. A lot harder to get info on the envoy than the Sierra.
 

gliddenralston

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apparently my truck should have 11 fittings from the factory
I've searched my Envoy end to end, top to bottom, there is not one zert on this entire vehicle not even the u-joints...So when parts start squeaking you don't grease you buy new parts, brilliant.
 
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D-FENZ

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Hmm. You got started down a rabbit hole...
Yup, that rabbit hole would be life changer reason #1 on this end.

I bought a '93, F-series something or other boom/bucket truck with a 7.3 IDI diesel to clean up some tree damage around the acreage from the derecho storm a couple months ago. Figured I would repair some leaking hydraulic boom cylinders and then flip the truck when I was done using it... I got the signed title for the truck but decided that I wouldn't register it because I'll just use it around here off-road and save the title/doc fees, taxes and insurance costs. Let the next guy do that.

Anyway, got the hydraulic cylinders fixed then started to notice other issues. The engine oil cooler was leaking like a sieve, but only when when it was cold. That's kind of a big deal on that particular engine and above my aptitude and patience levels but I'm sort of locked in to fixing it myself here because the truck lacks the tags and insurance needed to get it to a mechanic's shop. I'm already into it pretty deep from the cylinder repair so I may as well fix the cooler too- but too cheap to pay somebody $600+ just to get to a couple of $10 O-rings. After spending about 6 hours and a few bucks for parts I finally got that fixed.

A side note: The gomers that are making the how-to You-Tube videos are not the same people that actually know what the fuck they're doing. Newer vehicle how-to videographers, maybe. But the ones working on old trucks are without fail, barefooted- or maybe sandal shod- drunken hillbillies poking wrenches at shit in their dirt driveway. There are likely chained mongrels yapping in the background to give the vids an authentic flavor. None of them have any expertise in basic mechanics or even focusing a camera. You may get a general idea of what the job involves and there may be a useful tidbit or two of information in them, but watching the vids is generally a waste of time.

Ok, got the leaks fixed but now there's that pesky engine starting issue unless it's plugged in- even on warm days. The glow plug relay is clicking rapidly. At least it was until I replaced the glow plugs. Now it's starting to be a decent truck- but there's that bothersome manual transmission gear rollover/ gear lash sound at idle and no load. It's not a big deal or even unusual but it sure would be easier to sell without that. So, drain the transmission and refill it with some fresh lube. Mercon was burnt looking but still had that rattling sound after changing the fluid. So I figured if I overfill the trans it might quiet it down some. I pulled the shifter to add a couple more quarts from the top (above the fill plug). And it worked! Figured I might have to add some standard gear lube for viscosity if it didn't but that was not necessary.

Now I'm starting to look at fixing some dash lights... a seeping valve cover gasket... and cosmetic issues... and... and... well, there's that rabbit hole you're talking about. The thing worked just fine for cutting my broken tree tops as it was the day I first picked it up!

But now I'm figuring out that working a pole saw, wobbling around 35 feet in the air gives me the freek'n willies. Can't fix that.

Anyone need a good bucket truck?
 

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"Lifetime Lubrication." Usually a short lifetime - you have to replace the whole assembly when it goes dry and wears out.

Unless you have the interest, and ability, to drill into the top and thread in a Zerk fitting. Since it has to come out anyway, you're better off leaving it alone until it's obviously dry and just replacing it.

My 2000 F350 diesel has no grease fittings in the ball joints, just fittings in the tie rods - I'm at 20 years old and 240,000 miles - still the original front end, no parts been been replaced (except shocks) and it still drives good. I figure I will need to do front end work at some point, and I'll put in parts with grease fittings when I do, but they may outlast the truck. I'm big on greasing - spent two years as an Oiler on a 65 ton crane - greased that thing everyday...
 

michael59

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Been having some noise from the front end of the truck lately.. it's more prominent at lower speeds is affected by the condition of the road does a little louder for turn to the left gets quieter if I turn to the right. It also seems to be affected if I'm going uphill vs. Downhill. I know it could be many things so have been studying it for a while couple weeks probably. Finally got a buddy over here to help me and I ended up pointing out the front differential and when I looked at my book and said to check the fluid every 6000 miles or 6 months! Oops! I think I've put a hundred and seventy thousand miles on it and havent checked it once. Bad, bad boy.

View attachment 187815View attachment 187824View attachment 187825
bygollie that's how I learned.
 

newmisty

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IMG_0209..jpg
 

DodgebyDave

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newmisty

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Ive got to do the tie rods on my truck. Never done suspension work before and Martin Denny advise or input it might be helpful and ask if a polar like this is necessary. I might have one that'll work but I haven't checked it yet. Any comments, advice or help is appreciated.

20201115_144912~2.jpg
 

Casey Jones

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Depends. I did tie-rod ends, ONCE. On a old mail Jeep.

If you can get a hammer in there...and if that pic is accurate, you probably can't...you can just hammer on the ball-stud, drive it up and out. Damage won't matter since you're replacing it.

Otherwise, you will need a puller. That one looks quite a bit different than the one I had, which was basically a U channel fork, driven in with a hammer. Would wedge the stud out.

You could check pawn shops' tool inventories. Or maybe an Auto Zone in your area lends tools...some do; some do not.
 

Irons

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Ive got to do the tie rods on my truck. Never done suspension work before and Martin Denny advise or input it might be helpful and ask if a polar like this is necessary. I might have one that'll work but I haven't checked it yet. Any comments, advice or help is appreciated.

View attachment 189120
I believe you can rent that fancy puller from advance auto or autozone, oreilley's maybe? I have a hammer drive pickle fork separator that works good enough for now. But, you can get an air hammer with a pickle fork attachment pretty cheap at harbor freight if you have a decent size air compressor.


.
 

newmisty

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Preciate the input fellas.
 

newmisty

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A friend turned me on to this site...just started looking and impressed @ the prices ive seen
Anyone use them before?

https://www.autoshack.com/
 

newmisty

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I believe you can rent that fancy puller from advance auto or autozone, oreilley's maybe? I have a hammer drive pickle fork separator that works good enough for now. But, you can get an air hammer with a pickle fork attachment pretty cheap at harbor freight if you have a decent size air compressor.


.
Hey! Turns out i had one of those in a drawer. This should work perfectly.

s-l1000.jpg
 

DodgebyDave

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first you have to weld the paperclip to the fork