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7 mistakes to avoid when starting your concealed carry journey

the_shootist

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#2
I'll add one. Concealed means concealed. Don't open carry unless you want to position yourself as a target. One huge advantage to concealed carry is the element of surprise. If a potential attacker in a public place sees you're carrying and is hellbent on doing his deed who do you think he'll shoot at first? If however; he's unaware that you represent a threat that will give you the time you'll need to draw and eliminate him.


Never ever EVER open carry in public! My .02
 

Stinger

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#4
OK, I'll address three of this articles seven points: (Ready?)

1. Buying too big a gun. Say what?

There are only two types of handguns in this world: (1) Comfy, easy to conceal and carry, little ‘pacifier pistols’; and (2) large, not so comfortable nor easy to conceal, standard-size ‘fighting pistols’ that (depending on your viewpoint) you will thank either God, or your ‘lucky stars’ for if you should ever really need to defend yourself.

Me? I have already had the distasteful and unexpected experience of having to defend myself; and (depending, once again, on your viewpoint) there is no way in either ‘hell’, or upon the face of this earth that I would, willingly, ever again allow myself to be caught with anything less than a full-size ‘fighting pistol’ in my hand(s).

2. Underestimating ammo needs. Maintain how?

So now it’s supposed to take a minimum of 50 fired rounds each month in order to maintain proficiency with the handgun of your choice? Really!

Well, . . . perhaps (perhaps) it is possible to maintain FAMILIARITY with your handgun by firing only 50 rounds each month; however, I’ve got more than a half century of experience with handguns, and people who use handguns, that say it takes: (1) solid training, (2) between 100 and 150 fired rounds each WEEK, and (3) repeated 15 to 20 minute sessions of dry firing and/or ‘wall drills’, that are best carried out on a daily basis, in order to be genuinely proficient with ANY handgun.

3. Overdoing mods.

While I will agree that no pistol should ever be modified until AFTER the shooter actually knows what he needs, at the same time, I have long believed that every Glock pistol I ever bought was basically ‘an erector set for a gun in a box’—All the crude parts were there, but none of the refinements!

For my own use a factory-stock Glock is no better than a ‘mechanical abortion’ that needs to be completely ‘wrung out’ with, at least, 250 to 500 fired rounds BEFORE it is actually carried for self-defense.

It is during this ‘wringing out’ process that any modifications the shooter might need, or like to, to have should become apparent. Me? I have spent, at least, the price of a Glock, again, in order to obtain those modifications I consider to be absolutely necessary; e.g.: metal ‘dim light’ sights, longer conventionally rifled and/or threaded barrels, and custom trigger parts and (proper) trigger mechanism fitting.

Other Glock modifications I always give a wide berth to include: attached tac lights (Because no individual operator who expects to engage all by himself should ever make the serious tactical error of attaching his light to his pistol.), adjustable triggers, and all caliber conversion kits.
 

gringott

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#5
After watching body cam footage of Louisville cops shooting at a single gang banger robber on a suburban type street in broad daylight, I would say they aren't following the above marksmanship guidance. One cop fired 18 shots without pause, at least 5 other cops were shooting, one cop fired at least 3 bullets through his own windshield. Somehow one of them hit the guy and killed him. Geez.

I don't know about pistols, but for me marksmanship training with a rifle was good enough every six months. Muscle memory. Sure, if the goal was to be shooting in competition, the more the better. Killing a man within 300 meters? I'm good with six months.
 

<SLV>

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#6
Revolver (Ruger LCR). Smaller, lighter, rounder, and... the brass stays in the firearm.

(Yes, five rounds is enough for a real-world defensive volley.)
 

Treasure Searcher

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#7
8. Know thy gun laws.

I work with a guy, that lives in an adjacent state. He has the concealed carry permit. Stores a firearm in his pickup. His girl occasionally uses his pickup. She does not have a concealed carry permit, but the firearm is kept in the vehicle anyways. If she were ever to be stopped, she may have alot of explaining to do, on why there is a concealed firearm in the pickup she is driving, but does not possess a concealed carry permit.

Also, if they stop at a gas station, etc. and he goes inside (pit stop, etc.) and she is sitting in the pickup while he is 25 feet away or more, she then is then possessing the firearm with out a concealed carry permit.

Know thy gun laws and stay out of trouble.
 

hoarder

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#8
After watching body cam footage of Louisville cops shooting at a single gang banger robber on a suburban type street in broad daylight, I would say they aren't following the above marksmanship guidance. One cop fired 18 shots without pause, at least 5 other cops were shooting, one cop fired at least 3 bullets through his own windshield. Somehow one of them hit the guy and killed him. Geez.

I don't know about pistols, but for me marksmanship training with a rifle was good enough every six months. Muscle memory. Sure, if the goal was to be shooting in competition, the more the better. Killing a man within 300 meters? I'm good with six months.
Shooting at moving targets is what requires the most practice.
 

gringott

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#9
Shooting at moving targets is what requires the most practice.
Excellent point. People aren't paper.

Personally, I see concealed carry as a defensive weapon for when you are personally attacked physically or threatened to be in close quarters.
If the threat is a distance away, what's going on? Are you in a duel or something? That's me, maybe I'm crazy.
If the threat is a distance away, I think I need a rifle not a pistol.
 

hoarder

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#10
Excellent point. People aren't paper.

Personally, I see concealed carry as a defensive weapon for when you are personally attacked physically or threatened to be in close quarters.
If the threat is a distance away, what's going on? Are you in a duel or something? That's me, maybe I'm crazy.
If the threat is a distance away, I think I need a rifle not a pistol.
I'd take a rifle over a handgun any day, but in the civilian world, carrying a rifle around everywhere you go attracts an awful lot of attention.