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How the baby boomer generation is the real problem, according to 21 millennials​


Qayyah Moynihan,
Business Insider Deutschland
Updated

Oct 4, 2021, 6:12 AM

millenials

These millennials tell us about the problems they now face because of baby boomers. Business Insider Deutschland
  • Millennials are accused by some of being whiny, narcissistic, and too politically passive.
  • A number of them suggest, however, that the real problem isn't them; it's baby boomers.
  • 21 millennials told Insider why baby boomers are responsible for many problems millennials now face.
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Whiny, self-obsessed, not politically engaged enough — the accusations directed at millennials by older generations seem endless.
Millennials, or anyone born between 1980 and 2000, often get painted as pampered do-gooders with a naive worldview, whose priorities extend only to getting sabbaticals and being allowed to work from home.
That said, decades of disregard for the climate, unfair policies and structures being implemented between the generations, and questionable ideas concerning success in the workplace have left 18 to 38-year-olds with a heavy weight to bear.
Twenty-one young people from Germany told Insider of the problems the baby boomers have created and perpetuated in Germany and how they can be solved:

'Let's stop talking about what's gone wrong.'​

Felix Finkbeiner (20), environmental activist millennial

Felix Finkbeiner, 20, environmental activist. Flickr / Plant for the Planet
We're hurtling towards the edge of a cliff at full pelt — it isn't for the sake of science that we're trying to figure out the quantity by which sea levels are set to rise; it's about survival.
Together, with more than 67,000 other children and young people from our Plant for the Planet initiative, I've committed myself to combat the climate crisis. And yes, perhaps the older generation is listening to us but are they doing enough?
The climate crisis is the greatest challenge of our time. The CO2 clock is ticking. What must we do and what can we do right now? Well, we can massively reduce our CO2 emissions. And we can plant 1,000 billion trees to absorb a quarter of man-made CO2. I'd say to the older generations, to company bosses, and to politicians: "Let's stop talking about what's gone wrong or what's going wrong — let's plant trees together and save our future."

'It's older people who get to call the shots on pensions — yet they no longer have to cough up.'​

Sarna Röser (30), Chairwoman of Young Entrepreneurs

Sarna Röser, 30, chairwoman of Junger Unternehmer (Young Entrepreneurs). BJU
Most baby boomers will be retiring soon, which will put considerable pressure on our pension system. There's a massive disparity between the number of working people and the increasing number of pensioners for whom those working people are footing the bill.
I think a simple and logical solution would be if everyone had to work for a period of time during their later years. And retirement should be linked to life expectancy. I'm skeptical about who decides what's what when it comes to pensions. You only find older people sitting on the Pensions Commission, who no longer foot the bill themselves. We younger people have to hand out payments but aren't given a say.

'The biggest problem the baby boomers have left us isn't that they haven't grown out of their crap.'​

Kevin Kühnert (28), national chairman of the Jusos

Kevin Kühnert, 28, national chairman of the youth organisation of the Social Democratic Party of Germany, Jusos. Getty Images
The biggest problem the baby boomers have dumped on us isn't that they haven't grown out of their crappy habits: it's the state they've in which they've left the future of our pension system. Pay-as-you-go financing, which has been successfully practiced for decades, will come under increasing pressure as more baby boomers leave the workforce and begin receiving benefits from the pension fund. This news comes as no surprise but politics has, so far, failed to make provisions for that day, when it comes.
Fewer contributors and more beneficiaries mean great challenges will be posed for the statutory pension for a good 15 years. How these challenges will be managed isn't just a technical question. In fact, some are taking the opportunity — through scandalous inaction — to slowly chip away at the principle of solidarity when it comes to pensions and to privatize them. If all employees became contributors, we could increase contributions slightly and, if necessary, avoid shying away from tax subsidies.

'We've inherited the baby boomers' workaholic attitude and taken it to the next level.​

Stefanie Laufs, 31, Senior Communications Consultant at a PR agency  millennial

Stefanie Laufs, 31, senior communications consultant at a PR agency. Stefanie Laufs
The notion that Generation Y has no interest in professional success and thinks of the home office as synonymous with doing nothing is certainly not new — and unfortunately, it's firmly rooted in the minds of many among the older generation. I actually believe we've inherited their workaholic attitude — always better, always more, always higher — and that we've taken what the baby boomers did and pushed it much further.
Whether among friends, colleagues, or in reports in the media — no other generation linked with topics such as burnout or partly unpaid overtime as often as ours. The demands on our generation when it comes to starting a career are enormous. You're expected to have five years of professional experience after completing your studies as well as to nearly have finished your Ph.D. Of course, you can't solely blame the baby boomers, but they've always stressed the importance of establishing a career and reinforced that it was the key to a successful and happy life. Although we've taken on this attitude, we'd actually do a lot better to leave it behind. Generation Y continues to work a lot, but having a private life is much more important than money: leisure and downtime shouldn't be overlooked.
Our generation is on its way to achieving the ideal work-leisure balance and to putting the baby boomers' workaholic madness to rest.

'Too much emphasis on progress and performance is a key problem we've inherited from the older generation.'​

Jonathan Sierck, 24, author of the book Junge Überflieger millennial

Jonathan Sierck, 24, author of the book 'Junge Überflieger'. Jonathan Sierck
A serious problem we've inherited from the older generation is this fixation on progress and performance. In our tireless efforts to push boundaries, whatever the cost, there's usually little room to address the often serious consequences. There's no doubt about it: constant growth and development do pay off and, as a species, we have to take certain risks every now and then in order to move forward and survive. But pushing boundaries mustn't become the objective itself nor must it come at the cost that it currently does.
In order to steer us into a desirable future, we need those in decision-making positions to be sharp. They need both the courage to change yet the informed judgment to pick up on warning signs too. To ensure we don't continue to deplete our resources, we need a clear plan that takes into consideration the effects of our actions. Otherwise, we'll leave our future generations with more — possibly even more serious — problems than those we have inherited, whether they be nuclear waste, the bees dying off, or climate disasters.

'Our education systems barely differ to those of the previous generation — and neither has the emphasis on grades and targets in the world of work, unfortunately.'​

Magdalena Rogl, 33, Head of Digital Channels Microsoft Germany

Magdalena Rogl, 33, head of digital channels Microsoft Germany. Magdalena Rogl
I'm firm on the notion that we owe much to those who came before us. Especially the generation born in 1968, who revolutionized so much and helped break down so many structures.
But one area in which far too little has happened in recent decades is education. Our education systems have barely changed from those of the previous generation — and neither has the emphasis on grades and targets in the world of work, unfortunately.
At the age of 10, our children are still "sorted" into schools — not based on their individual talents, but purely according to their grades. Applicants are still assessed according to their qualifications on paper far too often, and not by what they actually know. And academic degrees are still worth more than emotional education.
I still remember the look of horror on the faces of my first boyfriend and his parents when I announced I was leaving high school as soon as I legally could, to follow my heart and become a childcare worker.
But I think I learned more life lessons through doing so than I could have ever done at university.
And that's exactly what our generation so urgently needs: lessons in life. More and more tasks are being taken over by machines and artificial intelligence. The skills Generation Y needs in professional life today are not obedience, authority, and academic knowledge, but empathy, flexibility, and problem-solving.
Our generation must adapt quickly to new circumstances, because the job you did yesterday may look quite different tomorrow. And the office is no longer about sitting at a desk from nine until five; it's about working at a time and place that maximizes one's quality of work, based on the individual.
That's why I'm committed to ensuring our future generations get better human and digital education, so they make our world more human and each individual person can be as he or she is — and thus achieve their own best performance.

'Those who monopolize most of the power are, on average, much too old.'​

Daniel Krauss, 35, co founder and CIO of Flixbus millennial

Daniel Krauss, 35, cofounder and chief information officer of Flixbus. Flixbus
Today's prosperity is probably the greatest legacy of the previous generation. We should definitely be grateful for it. But it's not as though it's being passed down to younger generations without its drawbacks. The downside is that his focus on prosperity means few provisions have been made for the future and we haven't adapted to our current challenges.
Those who monopolize most of the power are still, on average, far too old. Our generation is still trapped in a gilded cage. At some point, young Germans are going to escape that cage and find that the country is no longer at the top of the list of industrial nations.
This power needs to be handed over to the younger generation at an early stage. We're ready to take on the responsibility and start restructuring things.

'The older generation knows little about what constitutes a healthy and balanced diet.'​

Jörg Mayer and Nadine Horn (early 30's), vegan bloggers on Eat this millennials

Jörg Mayer and Nadine Horn, both in their early thirties, are vegan bloggers on 'Eat this'. Eat This
The abundance in food and convenience have featured heavily in the kitchens of the post-war generation. Where meat had previously featured rarely on the dining table, it was almost a compulsory, everyday part of meals in the 1950s. But it had to be simple, fast, and cheap.
It's becoming increasingly clear that this kind of practice can't go on indefinitely for future generations.
Due to this abundance and a lack of true appreciation for food, some among the older generation have little idea about what constitutes a healthy, balanced diet. What's more, over the years a lot of marketing-driven pseudo-sciences — which, simply put, is often wrong and sometimes even dangerous — have persisted.
Questions like: "Where do vegans get protein from if they don't eat meat?" or the myth that milk consumption is good for the bones (when the opposite is true) are still firmly anchored in their minds and will only be shifted with a lot of effort.
We try to set a good example and show that vegan life is anything but boring, that we don't just live off salad or tofu — that the kitchen can be a place to have fun. We're trying to show that cooking with friends, either alone or in pairs, is not another tedious chore; it's the best thing you can do.

'Politicians must take us and our ideas seriously.'​

Ria Schröder (26), Federal Chairman of the Young Liberals millennials

Ria Schröder, 26, chairman of Jungen Liberalen (the Young Liberals). Business Insider Deutschland
The baby boomers, our parents and theirs, have been instrumental in ensuring we grew up with high living standards. I'm grateful for that but we've also inherited a few problems, one of them being the pension situation. Like many in my generation, I don't assume I'll be provided for in old age. The level of baby boomers being paid for by us is ever increasing while there are fewer of us to foot the bill. It's great that people are living longer but the subsidy for the pension system is already the largest item in the German budget.
At the same time, less and less is being invested in the future: for example, in education, and in infrastructure. My generation is outnumbered. But those who focus only on large voter groups are putting the future of our country at risk in favor of short-term electoral success. Politicians must take us and our ideas seriously. Ultimately it will help not only one generation but the whole country.

'We know humanity has power over the Earth's biophysical systems, thanks to our predecessors.'​

millennial Sina Leipold, 32, Junior Professor of Social Transformation and Circular Economy at the University of Freiburg

Sina Leipold, 32, junior professor of social transformation and circular economy at the University of Freiburg. Sina Leipold
For some time, we've known humanity affects and has control over the Earth's biophysical systems more than any other force of nature — knowledge we've attained only thanks to our predecessors. It is both a blessing and a curse for our generation.
Never before have so many people been able to inhabit our planet and never before have commodities like regular holiday flights been so easy and readily affordable.
At the same time, hurricanes, floods, and heatwaves have threatened to destroy (and, in many cases, have destroyed) the lives and homes of millions.
My personal goal, through a more responsible approach than previous generations, is to help our generation ensure this power sticks around long term, instead of putting it at risk by inviting irreversible climate disasters.

'Older generations aren't prepared to take risks.'​

Christopher Obereder, 26, series founder millennial

Christopher Obereder, 26, startup founder. David Visnjic
Setting up a business in Germany is far too complex; it should be more straightforward. Other countries are well ahead and we should be moving on as soon as possible. The tax system in Germany is also massively outdated and makes it extremely difficult for those looking to get started with a business.
Start-ups could be much better supported with tax reforms so the start-ups could focus more on taking care of their business. Singapore has attracted startups from all over the world with its simple control system and has become the hub of the crypto scene. Our political structures are also too slow to change and aren't able to keep up with innovation. Things have to change on this front.
A survey by U.S. News showed Germany was in first place in the "Entrepreneurship" category, ahead of Japan and the USA. It's clear Germany is at the forefront despite the clear room for improvement.
Work has also changed: people used to stay in the same job their whole life, which is why it used to be feasible to work without constantly developing and learning. Today we seem to switch jobs every year or two. I think it has a lot to do with the Internet.
We always need to be ready to learn new things and take risks. And many opportunities and possibilities arise with the Internet if you're open to it — cryptocurrencies are something I'm currently heavily involved in and open to, and I realize older generations aren't.
There's a conflict simply because older generations always advocate stability and safety over risk-taking, which they aren't prepared to do. I can only speak for myself but if I'd never taken risks, I'd never have learned. We have to learn through trial and error that you can't make money from anything and everything. Failure has become a valid part of working life, even if older generations still don't want to admit it.
But older generations are starting to accept the start-up scene for what it is: it's fast-moving, involves risk-taking, and isn't always lucrative.

'The older generation has left European peace in a fragile state.'​

Lisa Badum, 34, Green Member of the Bundestag

Lisa Badum, 34, Green Party parliament representative. Lisa Badum
The rapid rise in greenhouse gases, the dramatically worsening climate crisis, the question of nuclear waste disposal, the irreversible death of countless plant and animal species — these are just some of the many consequences of failed climate and environmental policies from previous generations. Because they haven't relied on sustainability, they've dumped the consequences of and responsibility for their actions onto future generations. We're now having to face a mammoth challenge together: to keep global warming below two degrees to give future generations the chance to make mistakes.
As for Europe, our younger generation has inherited the task of establishing European peace, a project which the older generation has left in a sorry state. The continually rising rate of youth unemployment within the EU, austerity policies, Brexit — all of these things have greatly weakened the notion of the "European community" and reinforced right-wing nationalist and populist forces in Europe. I myself have close ties with Greece, and over the years I've witnessed the destructive effects of austerity there, and have also seen growing disillusionment towards the EU. We have to stop this in its tracks and do it now because lasting peace between us all is the most basic of prerequisites for taking on the many challenges ahead and finding solutions for tomorrow.
Where justice and gender equality are concerned, the older generation has set us on a path of clear progress, particularly as regards legal equality between the sexes. While we have to defend this success, we also have to continue fighting for 100% equality between men and women, whether in family and work, pay or pension, and the end of sexual violence towards women and girls.

'Digitisation is largely a generational issue.'​

Barbara Engels (30), Economist at the Institute of German Economics Cologne (IW) millennial

Barbara Engels, 30, economist at the Institute of German Economics Cologne (IW). IW Cologne
Being digital means being online, networking, being open to new business models — and being young. It seems to be a largely generational issue: older people are less likely to be online than younger people, which is a pity because digitization opens up many new possibilities, especially for people who are aging. It can simplify and enrich everyday life. I hope people of all ages will greet digitization with open arms and optimism, but obviously not without a healthy dose of skepticism. Networking is at the heart of the digital world and could contribute to a better level of understanding between young and old. And it would help us learn much more from older people and vice versa.

'Pension plans are a big disappointment.'​

Kristine Lütke, 35, Bundesvorsitzende der Wirtschaftsjunioren Deutschland millennial

Kristine Lütke, 35, president of WirtschaftsjuniorDeutschland (the Junior Chamber Germany). Wirtschaftsjunioren Deutschland
The subsequent drop in birth rate as a result of the rise of the contraceptive pill among the baby boomers is exacerbating demographic change. This has resulted in a shortage of specialists and labor in all areas of the economy. We young entrepreneurs and managers in particular are suffering from this as employers. Moreover, our country's pension plans are a huge disappointment for our generation and an attack on intergenerational justice, particularly in view of demographic changes. The question of billions of funding for the "maternal pension" that's been proposed in Germany remains open.
What can be done to increase employment rates and to mitigate the consequences of demographic change, as well as the pensions package? We need to look at options for flexible retirement. The statutory retirement age should be done away with. And working time law needs to be fundamentally reformed.

'Climate change presents us with challenges that will dictate the opportunities of future generations.'​

Lukas Köhler, 31, FDP Bundestagsabgeordneter

Lukas Köhler, 31, Free Democratic Party Member of Parliament. Lukas Köhler
We've inherited a lot of problems to do with CO2 in the atmosphere. Climate change today presents us with a task — and how we manage this task will directly determine the opportunities available for future generations. That's why I'm fully committed to limiting climate change as much as possible. We will only succeed with a market-based climate policy in which politicians set clear targets for reducing emissions. Other bans and regulations are unnecessary and provide false incentives. If we succeed in building a global emissions trading scheme with ambitious goals, which is as broad as possible for all economic sectors, I'm convinced we can limit global warming to an acceptable level.

'We've been left with a society that revolves around profit rather than sustainability.'​

Sonja Oberbeckmann, 36, environmental microbiologist at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research

Sonja Oberbeckmann, 36, environmental microbiologist at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research. Sonja Oberbeckmann
We have much to thank the previous generations for: no generation has grown up as carefree and with as many possibilities as ours. However, it's come at a price: we've been left with a society that revolves around profit rather than sustainability, where material prosperity counts more than individual happiness.
My professional field, science, is set up for the short term: there are many temporary contracts, focusing on trendy topics. But this profit-focused society has left its mark everywhere. The environment is riddled with pesticides, exhaust gases, plastics, and much more. People are stressed and it seems they would sooner pop pills than demand the time to live more healthily. Hardly anyone stops to breathe.
We, all generations together, can define new goals and break out of this established cycle, that's exploiting human and environmental resources. Instead of sitting passively in front of the television and getting worked up about company bosses, we should all be taking responsibility and consuming both more sustainably and consciously. And we should be asking ourselves from time to time what actually makes us truly happy.

'We're still teaching as though we're in the 19th century.'​

Nina Toller, Private Teacher millennial

Nina Toller, Private Teacher. Business Insider Deutschland
Living in the 21st century, teaching 19th-century style: this is what seems to be at the core of our schooling.
I've tried myself to fend this off with learning methods that combine critical thinking and communication with creativity and teamwork, as well as the use of digital media. My students shouldn't just be learning content and facts; they should be learning how to obtain new facts, how to share work effectively and efficiently, and how best to absorb and apply what they've learned. In this way, they develop openness, a willingness to learn, and also a certain degree of independence. The teacher becomes more of a companion for learning and a moderator.
My school is open to digital media and supports me in my creative work. I almost always use QR codes or get foreign-language authors, into the classroom via Skype.
Yet, due to a lack of technical support, training, time, and security, few teachers can organize something like this on their own initiative. On my page "Toller Unterricht" I publish lots of my ideas as well as tried and tested lesson plans, with materials included.
Politicians have made promises to digitize schools. In addition to the lack of qualifications teachers have, there also seems to be a lack of equipment. I'm glad my school has some projectors and smartboards I can use for my lessons, but some don't even have Internet access.
Data protection is currently being taken to ridiculous extremes: new data protection regulation makes the use of private computers difficult, so some are being advised to use paper and pen. This won't work within the frame of a digitization strategy for Germany in 2018.
Therefore, comprehensive reform is needed. Only then can we equip all our students with the skills to prepare them for life and learning in the 21st century.

'It's as if the parents think schools are responsible for raising children.'​

Franziska Hafer, 23, teacher

Franziska Hafer, 23, teacher. Franziska Hafer
The older generation has paid far too little attention to sustainable development. Sustainable development means empowering children to form their own opinions and encouraging them to act sustainably. Sustainable development means the current generation is developing, not compromising the next generation, but actively considering it. Children haven't been sensitized to this at all.
I think there's a very different tone in schools now. I get the sense that kids are becoming less and less respectful. Manners are disappearing and, unfortunately, you rarely see a boy holding the door open for a girl. It's as if parents think schools are responsible for bringing children up.
Some children are only interested in who has the latest, highest-end mobile. The children who do not have a say in this are outside the picture — and I think that the generation above us is responsible for instilling different values.

'We've inherited a toxic political style from the generation before us.'​

Max Lucks, 21, Federal Spokesman of the Green Youth millennials

Max Lucks, 21, spokesman for Grünen Jugend (Green Youth). Max Lucks
We've not inherited generational conflicts; we've inherited a toxic political style from the generation before us, which has dealt little with political change or shaping the future and has been more focused on how everything can remain as is. One only has to look at how Merkel's government dealt with a climate crisis and how it's always been ignored and fought against by one commission or another. This political style has disappointed our generation and rightly so: it's clear to young people that a little isn't enough to answer the hard questions. For example, how can we still find well-paid and permanent jobs in 20 years' time in spite of digitalization?

'The older ranks of conservative politicians are afraid of change.'​

Akilnathan Logeswaren, 29, European Activist

Akilnathan Logeswaren, 29, European Activist. Business Insider Deutschland
As an activist for a united Europe, I'm always reminded of how much of the older ranks of conservative politicians fear change. While young people are almost unanimous in their commitment to a united Europe, the older generation is still resistant to it, although though the United States of Europe has been on the agenda of previous German political figures such as Franz Josef Strauss himself.
While old politicians are practicing against the left by remaining on the right, today's young people are already focusing more on the spirit of the European Parliament, namely by looking for solutions.
In the 21st century, it is no longer about just having ideas, but about collaborating for a shared future. For example, the campaign #FreeInterrail — a free Interrail ticket for all Europeans as soon as they turn 18 — was devised by the youth for the youth. Ideas like these will secure our peace and cohesion in the long term.

Read the original article on Business Insider Deutschland. Copyright 2021.
This post originally appeared on Business Insider Deutschland and has been translated from German.
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davycoppitt

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There are allot who didn’t, but as a whole boomers let someone else raise their kids and they shipped their parents off to nursing homes. Now they complain about how worthless their kids are.
I was lucky my parents goal in life was not
Money it was to raise their kids and teach them. It shows in me and all my brothers.
 

Buck

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hasn't most of that been the yoke we carried? and those before us also?


...these people are disconnected so much, they'll never see it as a leadership problem


and to lay it out this way, as if last generations middle-class suddenly became the last generations leadership-class, is ignorant

-

and the division of the sheep continues
 

Scorpio

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yep davy,
I see an awful lot of good young people,

but they do indeed have a different view of things,
 

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Hoo boy.

All those whiny kids, complaining about Boomers complaining about whiny kids.

If we'd just hustle off and die...they could have their Socialist Utopia! HURRAY! We don't need to own NUFFIN!

And of course the mediuh propagandists are right there, romanticizing these illiterate ...know-nothings.

Unimpressed. Except that it strengthens my view, that we are gonna go down like that ValuJet in the Everglades.
 

Buck

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how about after decades of commercialization, the ads on TV were literally paid attention to by the viewing audience..............


the ads in magazines, advertisements everywhere that told them they were someone.....


Someone With Cash (the ads left that part out), just that they were Someone of Importance and when you buy this / that product, you became someone even Better


that had a profound impression on us all...You Asked For It, We Made It, For YOU!


...yeah, no one ever asked me, yet, time after time, there they are, saying it again


i must be important....
 

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There are allot who didn’t, but as a whole boomers let someone else raise their kids and they shipped their parents off to nursing homes. Now they complain about how worthless their kids are.
I was lucky my parents goal in life was not
Money it was to raise their kids and teach them. It shows in me and all my brothers.
That is exactly why we homeschool our kids and are a one income family. The budget can be tough at times, but who educates our kids and how they are raised is more important than new gadgets or cars or expensive trips and all that consumerism stuff!
 

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Boomers on the whole were spoiled by the class of parents who grew up poor during the Great Depression. Some took that to the next level.
Don't know how things were for you growing up but in my house you earned everything you got! Nothing was easy and anything of value required hard work and dedication. I must have missed the spoiled part
 

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Don't know how things were for you growing up but in my house you earned everything you got! Nothing was easy and anything of value required hard work and dedication. I must have missed the spoiled part

I got a bat and a mitt and go out and play with your friends.
 

hammerhead

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Boomers on the whole were spoiled by the class of parents who grew up poor during the Great Depression. Some took that to the next level.
Each generation has it's challenges and by solving them, it makes life easier for the next generation and before you know it, the cycle starts all over.
 

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Each generation has it's challenges and by solving them, it makes life easier for the next generation and before you know it, the cycle starts all over.
Periodically there's a cultural upheaval and much of the knowledge is lost.

I think we're seeing it now.
 

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Hoo boy.

All those whiny kids, complaining about Boomers complaining about whiny kids.

If we'd just hustle off and die...they could have their Socialist Utopia! HURRAY! We don't need to own NUFFIN!

And of course the mediuh propagandists are right there, romanticizing these illiterate ...know-nothings.

Unimpressed. Except that it strengthens my view, that we are gonna go down like that ValuJet in the Everglades.
we may prove harder to kill than they would like :)
 

Buck

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we may prove harder to kill than they would like :)
but if they're such Beta individuals, that's never going to really happen...


put a knife to their face, you'll get them to be your slaves for a very long time imho
 

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This is an article with a predetermined outcome.
-----------------------------------
How many of these nice young people are vaccinated ? how many of them supports covid measures of the government ?
 

EO 11110

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gay bastard tide pod eaters will do better? i'll bet the under, max bet
 

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Screen Shot 2021-10-14 at 10.40.58 AM.png

“It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.”​


― Ronald Reagan
 

TAEZZAR

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'Too much emphasis on progress and performance is a key problem we've inherited from the older generation.'
Bullshit, we are the generation that brought technology to it's highest level EVER. These whiny little ne'er-do-wells, a product of a federal indoctrination system have NO IDEA of how well they have it.
'We've inherited abandoned the baby boomers' workaholic attitude and taken it to a lower the next level.

The one criticism I have of our generation, is that we put or heads down & our asses up (always a bad position) and worked like hell, believing that the government would not turn on us. We were naïve, very naïve. cry:
EVERYTHING WE BUILT HAS BEEN USED AGAINST US !!!!:make happy:
 
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Scorpio

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if one was a readin' it and paying attention,

there was this one who stated something to the order of 'those born in '68 really made a difference', etc

which if they were born in 68, had nothing to do with the events of 68,
and they are not part of the boomer gen

secondly, if anyone knows anything of the events of 68, they would IMO come to see it as not a positive, quite forcefully so
 

the_shootist

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.41Dave

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This is just more divide-and-conquer pablum intended to separate people. The PTB want to divide us as many ways as possible. Separate us by skin color, ethnicity, religion, age, and whatever else they can think of to keep us fighting amongst ourselves so we don't recognize who our real enemy is.
 

Avalon

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'We've inherited the baby boomers' workaholic attitude and taken it to the next level."

Sure you did.
:laughing: these youngsters miss work for a headaches or a sniffle. Old work horses from my generation don't miss work unless a body part is dangling half attached.
 

nickndfl

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WWII generation was the greatest since the Civil War. The Boomers had some issues, but nothing like the dumb kids today. The people above have dysfunctional values which could their judgement and give them false logic.
 

Casey Jones

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:laughing: these youngsters miss work for a headaches or a sniffle. Old work horses from my generation don't miss work unless a body part is dangling half attached.
They're perfect for Communism.

Soviet worker of the era: "We pretend to work; and they pretend to pay us."
 

Avalon

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They're perfect for Communism.

Soviet worker of the era: "We pretend to work; and they pretend to pay us."
Not all of them. I love my young coworkers. We older workers just have to train them to the reality of the world. My two favorite are both 28 yrs old. When they first came we were blown away by their computer skills. Both of them started that calling out for a headache crap. We had to scruff them on the back of the neck like bad puppies. They figured it out. Don't call out for stupid stuff. They are a soft bunch but getting better.. They breath new life into things. One thing that does concern me about the young ones is they all talk about their anxiety. I have never seen so much anxiety assembled in a small area.
 

Silvergun

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Lost me at...

The climate crisis is the greatest challenge of our time. The CO2 clock is ticking.

Yawn.

Doom and gloom for over a century with this bullshit. Warming, no cooling, back to warming, to ice age by 1975, to yadda yadda bullshit.

Only thing consistant is the fear, the secret eugenics policies, etc. Lets talk about weather modification technology before we even make one policy or law to battle "climate change". Im not pro pollution, obviously, but I call a spade a spade. All this fear just leads to less sovernty, more taxes, more .gov overeach. No thanks.

As far as generations go, theres good people and tards of all ages. YMMV.
 
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Casey Jones

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One thing that does concern me about the young ones is they all talk about their anxiety. I have never seen so much anxiety assembled in a small area.
They're improperly socialized. NEVER were they allowed to just run the neighborhood and be kids. ESPECIALLY the males.

They didn't learn the differences between boys and girls. Oh, not the genitals - but the behavioral, instinctive and motivation differences. They weren't guided - they were left with NO guidance, and/or confusing rules; and then formally punished, harshly, for violating the sensibility of their Woke Feminist teachers.

No wonder they're neurotic.

No wonder they wish sex would just go away - that surgically, the differences between male and female would just be erased.

No wonder they go homosexual, or, worse, get caught up in this insane play-acting and have their privates disfigured.

And now that I'm working down a laundry list...no wonder the Covid Nazis have made such progress, even with such insane postulates and directives. The under-30s only know, OBEDIENCE. Not to parents but to GOVERNMENT.
 

Mujahideen

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The trick I see being played is that my grandpa could work a single job and afford to feed all his children and keep a roof over his head.

Today both parents often live paycheck to paycheck.

The currency was more sound, and we weren’t outsourcing as many jobs to the rest of the world back then. And there was also a lot less welfare.

I’m on my grind mode big time with my business and my investments, but I honestly don’t see a reason to live here other than the fact that I can bust my ass and make money if I play my cards right. I can live in another country for far cheaper. If I have $3000 a month in Colombia I’m living good, but 3k here after mortgage payment and bills isn’t that great.
 
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Casey Jones

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The trick I see being played is that my grandpa could work a single job and afford to feed all his children and keep a roof over his head.

Today both parents often live paycheck to paycheck.

The currency was more sound, and we weren’t outsourcing as many jobs to the rest of the world back then.
What percentage of their income went to food? Forty percent?

We spend far less on food; but we've been spoiled. For three generations we lived in abundance.

I hear your point, and it's valid; but we should be able to, and can, live on a lot less.

I live in an area that 150 years ago, was big in silver and gold prospecting. Touring the Western ghost towns (the ones that survive; I'd been doing this for thirty years) is instructive.

Reading the history, in general, of the West's settling, and of specific towns...and looking at the tiny cabin-homes...and considering what life was like...is eye-opening. You see photos by Matthew-Brady-era photographers.. The miner, maybe his wife, all posed in front of their cabin...the size of a large tool shed. In their Sunday clothes - one of two sets that they might have. Two changes of clothing.

Spread before them might be all they have: Cookware, a workbench, a table, some household tools and trinkets. That was ALL.

How many of us could live that way? I have a closet stuffed with clothes, and I don't even have that much. Maybe eight shirts I fit into. Five pairs of shoes, from running shoes to my old Navy dress shoes (be buried in them, I guess). Work shoes, casual shoes, worn-out sneakers.

And so on.

How hard would it be to cut down, and just follow a tight budget? Even the poorest of us makes $30k, probably, now. Few of us would spend $400 a month on food, if we just cooked our own, packed lunches, ate carry-out out of the grocery store rather than the Fallen Arches.

What we have going on is a travesty; but we're not, YET, up against the wall. We have time to push back, and meantime, there's adaptive strategies.
 

tigerwillow1

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This is just more divide-and-conquer pablum intended to separate people. The PTB want to divide us as many ways as possible. Separate us by skin color, ethnicity, religion, age, and whatever else they can think of to keep us fighting amongst ourselves so we don't recognize who our real enemy is.
View this article through the lens that it's from the Axel Springer organization, one of the more active divider media outlets. Yes, there are some valid truths in it, and the boomers did screw up a lot of things. Most of the effective lies and propaganda have truth bookends around them in an attempt to appear credible.
 

the_shootist

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What percentage of their income went to food? Forty percent?

We spend far less on food; but we've been spoiled. For three generations we lived in abundance.

I hear your point, and it's valid; but we should be able to, and can, live on a lot less.

I live in an area that 150 years ago, was big in silver and gold prospecting. Touring the Western ghost towns (the ones that survive; I'd been doing this for thirty years) is instructive.

Reading the history, in general, of the West's settling, and of specific towns...and looking at the tiny cabin-homes...and considering what life was like...is eye-opening. You see photos by Matthew-Brady-era photographers.. The miner, maybe his wife, all posed in front of their cabin...the size of a large tool shed. In their Sunday clothes - one of two sets that they might have. Two changes of clothing.

Spread before them might be all they have: Cookware, a workbench, a table, some household tools and trinkets. That was ALL.

How many of us could live that way? I have a closet stuffed with clothes, and I don't even have that much. Maybe eight shirts I fit into. Five pairs of shoes, from running shoes to my old Navy dress shoes (be buried in them, I guess). Work shoes, casual shoes, worn-out sneakers.

And so on.

How hard would it be to cut down, and just follow a tight budget? Even the poorest of us makes $30k, probably, now. Few of us would spend $400 a month on food, if we just cooked our own, packed lunches, ate carry-out out of the grocery store rather than the Fallen Arches.

What we have going on is a travesty; but we're not, YET, up against the wall. We have time to push back, and meantime, there's adaptive strategies.
Believe it or not, there are many families with 6 figure annual incomes who can't make ends meet. It could be all the excess usury they ran up with all those loans and credit cards for the new flat screen tvs in every room, the 2 Escalades in the driveway and the annual golf club membership fees among so many other 'necessities' of life in the suburbs that run up debt for the average American!

Who's fault would that be?
 

Mujahideen

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How much money is going to Walmart or other corporations and out of the community?

But Im supposed to be mad at old folks? Big misdirection. Older folks are just the smokescreen for the corporations, banks, Wall Street and government.
 

Mujahideen

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I do agree that the way children are taught in school is very outdated. As a society as a whole we really fail there. And a lot of people who have children probably shouldn’t also.

It’s like the country needs a software update.
 

ToBeSelfEvident

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They seem most alarmed about pensions and climate. Climate is a globalist hustle so not a real problem, except for the Millenial suicides when they discover they wasted their life on climate activism. The pension system will solve itself, along with every other financial house of cards, by totally collapsing. The Millenials are gonna lament the days when they only had first-world problems like climate BS and a cushy retirement to worry about.
 

newmisty

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The trick I see being played is that my grandpa could work a single job and afford to feed all his children and keep a roof over his head.

Today both parents often live paycheck to paycheck.

The currency was more sound, and we weren’t outsourcing as many jobs to the rest of the world back then. And there was also a lot less welfare.

I’m on my grind mode big time with my business and my investments, but I honestly don’t see a reason to live here other than the fact that I can bust my ass and make money if I play my cards right. I can live in another country for far cheaper. If I have $3000 a month in Colombia I’m living good, but 3k here after mortgage payment and bills isn’t that great.
And Grandpa didn't eat out, buy cell phones, have subscriptions to Netflix and Hulu, have a car that will make you a pancake breakfast as it coordinates a trigonometric Satellite Communication Network while heating your feet and scratching your nuts.
 

the_shootist

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I do agree that the way children are taught in school is very outdated. As a society as a whole we really fail there. And a lot of people who have children probably shouldn’t also.

It’s like the country needs a software update.
Students are no longer taught how to think as education programs used to be, they're now taught what to think. That transformation may have started from the last software update, initially invoked by LBJ way back in the 60's
 

Goldhedge

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bunch of whiners...
I read the whole thing.
They are ignorant.
They know so many things that just aren't so.

I can hardly wait for 2 generations down the road to blame these pussycats for all the stuff they screwed up for them.


Back in 1977 I was a mere sprout in my mid twenties.... I rented a chicken coop (turned into an apartment in the 40's) from Mr. Morgan on his 40 acres he still lived in with his wife Dessie.

He was in his 60's by then. Held 3 jobs all his life. Steel mill, farmer, and a beek.

He was old and frail (bad back) but he could still work me under the table. Hired me for $5/hr to paint a barn building. I started the job, but then had to run off for class (college). I came back about 2 hrs later and he had painted a whole side! I got the message quick.

Mr. Morgan had a story as we all do. His was he worked his ass off as a teen saving money to go to college.

Remember saving? Yeah, it used to work.

Anyway, he saved $3500 which was a shit ton of $ back then for college.

Bought a ticket and rode the Grayhound from Pueblo CO to Ft. Collins (CSU) to get ready for college.

Opened up a bank account and deposited his earnings and POOF! on Monday the banks were closed.

The start of the Great Depression had begun.

He told me this with a tear in his eye.

He had to borrow money ($0.50) for the return ticket home.

He got home and lived on his land the rest of his life. I of course moved on and lost touch with him.

He said to his progeny "NEVER SELL THE FARM".

I wonder who he blamed for his misfortune? NO ONE!

A few years ago I did some curiosity research on the 40 acres.

It was held under a different name. The family sold it, because who needs a farm these days anyway?


these whiners all need to sit down and watch this and learn a thing or two...