• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

A new 40-year-old Mountain House taste test.

mayhem

Другая перспектива
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,769
Likes
5,230
#1
Joel, a hermit living in the high desert of AZ does a review of some Mountain House.
http://joelsgulch.com/a-new-40-year-old-mountain-house-taste-test/

Mesdames, Messieurs, bonsoir! Our entrée for today is…


Now, I’ll be totally honest with you – I don’t even know what Shrimp Creole is. So I looked it up…

Shrimp creole is a dish of Louisiana Creole origin, consisting of cooked shrimp in a mixture of whole or diced tomatoes, the Holy trinity of onion, celery and bell pepper, spiced with hot pepper sauce and/or cayenne-based seasoning, and served over steamed or boiled white rice

Okay, so this stuff is eaten with rice. Makes sense, anybody interested in storing long-term food will certainly have a sack of rice or ten.

The can was very sparsely flecked with rust and – like both its predecessors, clearly inflated with some internal pressure. That’s just as it should be, it says right on the can that it’s packed in nitrogen. Cut open the top…


And we see that things have ossified into chunks, just like the spaghetti and the stew did. It just wants some manual breaking up of the chunks before you measure it out.

During which process you learn that Mountain House Shrimp Creole really does contain tiny mummified shrimp, and not just a few.


…which is kind of off-putting under the circumstances. I don’t mind trying 40-year-old freeze-dried beef. But seafood? Hm.

This is already-cooked and freeze-dried quicky food, so the “recipe” is simple: One cup hot water to 1.25 cups dry mix. The result is soupy at first…


Between five and ten minutes later…


And we dig in. Rather gingerly at first.

Honestly, this stuff is delicious! Once I grow to trust its effect on my digestion – and the jury’s still out on that – I might go so far as delightful. As with the vegetable stew, whatever process they used for preservation left the flavor in the mix. I don’t know how vivid the tastes would have been if the cans were only, say, a decade old but it’s quite acceptable as it is. I really can see eating this over rice, though you might want to spice it up a bit.

I only ate about 3/4 of a bowl and gave the rest to LB, because even though there was no “off” taste or immediate bad result and I’m only being excessively cautious, I still don’t entirely trust the shrimp. But once I’ve settled my mind about that, Shrimp Creole is going to be a favorite while it lasts. It’s better than the vegetable stew (which suffers from all that corn starch really not aging all that gracefully) and way better than the spaghetti.

LB gives it two paws up. (LB is Joels dog)
 
Last edited:

Garyw

The Military gave me Defoliant Exposure
Silver Miner
Joined
Mar 16, 2011
Messages
1,251
Likes
990
Location
State of Jefferson
#2
Mountain house is made in Albany oregon. I grew up there. Many friends worked there. When we had the columbus day storm(our west coast version of a hurricane) The public library was flooded. Albany FreezeDry took all the books and freeze dried the books They saved most of them. They are a great company and a good neighbor. Andyes the food is excellent.
 

the_shootist

The war is here on our doorstep!
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2015
Messages
19,786
Likes
20,828
Location
Somewhere out there!
#3
Joel, a hermit living in the high desert of AZ does a review of some Mountain House.
http://joelsgulch.com/a-new-40-year-old-mountain-house-taste-test/

Mesdames, Messieurs, bonsoir! Our entrée for today is…


Now, I’ll be totally honest with you – I don’t even know what Shrimp Creole is. So I looked it up…

Shrimp creole is a dish of Louisiana Creole origin, consisting of cooked shrimp in a mixture of whole or diced tomatoes, the Holy trinity of onion, celery and bell pepper, spiced with hot pepper sauce and/or cayenne-based seasoning, and served over steamed or boiled white rice

Okay, so this stuff is eaten with rice. Makes sense, anybody interested in storing long-term food will certainly have a sack of rice or ten.

The can was very sparsely flecked with rust and – like both its predecessors, clearly inflated with some internal pressure. That’s just as it should be, it says right on the can that it’s packed in nitrogen. Cut open the top…


And we see that things have ossified into chunks, just like the spaghetti and the stew did. It just wants some manual breaking up of the chunks before you measure it out.

During which process you learn that Mountain House Shrimp Creole really does contain tiny mummified shrimp, and not just a few.


…which is kind of off-putting under the circumstances. I don’t mind trying 40-year-old freeze-dried beef. But seafood? Hm.

This is already-cooked and freeze-dried quicky food, so the “recipe” is simple: One cup hot water to 1.25 cups dry mix. The result is soupy at first…


Between five and ten minutes later…


And we dig in. Rather gingerly at first.

Honestly, this stuff is delicious! Once I grow to trust its effect on my digestion – and the jury’s still out on that – I might go so far as delightful. As with the vegetable stew, whatever process they used for preservation left the flavor in the mix. I don’t know how vivid the tastes would have been if the cans were only, say, a decade old but it’s quite acceptable as it is. I really can see eating this over rice, though you might want to spice it up a bit.

I only ate about 3/4 of a bowl and gave the rest to LB, because even though there was no “off” taste or immediate bad result and I’m only being excessively cautious, I still don’t entirely trust the shrimp. But once I’ve settled my mind about that, Shrimp Creole is going to be a favorite while it lasts. It’s better than the vegetable stew (which suffers from all that corn starch really not aging all that gracefully) and way better than the spaghetti.

LB gives it two paws up. (LB is Joels dog)
What? No post process toilet bowl update pics?? You cut me to the quick sir!
 

mayhem

Другая перспектива
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,769
Likes
5,230
#4
I have 30 cases that have been stored in a spare bedroom since 2002. We tried the pork chops, and surprisingly they were good. But I can see where I would loose some weight real quick.

Back in the early days of GIM we were stockpiling, doing group buys ect. Today prepping is hardly a topic here any longer.
 

mayhem

Другая перспектива
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,769
Likes
5,230
#6

anywoundedduck

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
2,526
Likes
2,604
Location
Kentucky
#7
I have 30 cases that have been stored in a spare bedroom since 2002. We tried the pork chops, and surprisingly they were good. But I can see where I would loose some weight real quick.

Back in the early days of GIM we were stockpiling, doing group buys ect. Today prepping is hardly a topic here any longer.
That's because we done prepped and prepped, until we were all prepped out.
Still stacking though.
 

mayhem

Другая перспектива
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,769
Likes
5,230
#8
That's because we done prepped and prepped, until we were all prepped out.
Still stacking though.
I've reached the age now that I'm slowly un-stacking. But then my cost average is really low. Only have about 1k oz of silver right now, mostly eagles in tubes that haven't been open. Sold off all the junk over the last few years.
 

Merlin

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,425
Likes
2,902
#9
Back in the early days of GIM we were stockpiling, doing group buys ect. Today prepping is hardly a topic here any longer.
I was here back then, clawing in preps, hand over fist, with every spare dollar I could find. Today? I've been all in for years now; don't have spare powder. I've learned a few things over the years that I'd be happy to share though.

1) Don't expect that you can be successful with your small backyard garden. Things happen unexpectedly. My neighbor to the West had cerebral palsy. He had a small peach sapling planted in his back yard about 2 1/2 feet from our fence. Said he would transplant it to the front yard when it was "specimen size." Instead, he fell down his front steps, hit his head on the sidewalk, and never came home from the hospital.

His tree is now about 40 feet tall, if not more. My garage on the East side of the yard casts a shadow until about 9:00. Neighbor's tree begins to shade at 1:00. Just what can I grow in 4 hours of direct sunlight? Not much.

Every time I approached the widow to talk to her about taking down the tree, I'd be treated to "Oh, Elmer loved that tree. It's so dear to me."

I'm a good neighbor. Lost my garden.
 

mayhem

Другая перспектива
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,769
Likes
5,230
#10
Well Merlin you could always rent a Ditch Witch and a axe and dig a 6 foot trench right along your property line. Then go to HD and buy a gallon of generic Round Up ($110.00) pour it into the ditch, water vigorously and then fill in the trench. Ole Elmer's tree would be looking pretty sparce within 6 months. Not say'n I would ever do such a thing personally. Just say'n.

Axe is needed to chop those stubborn roots the DW can't get through.
 

90%RealMoney

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
4,796
Likes
4,020
Location
Left Flank, Oceana...Locked and Loaded!
#11
I got so tired of having sour milk in my fridge. I'd buy a gallon, and couldn't finish it all before it went bad. So I've been using my cans of Provident Pantry powdered milk. Just make it as I go now. Don't eat cereal much any more, so no need for milk all the time. I mostly use it for protein shakes. Gotta mix the whey powder in anyway, so mixing in milk powder is no big deal. Cans of powdered milk are over 10 years old now, so I figured time to rotate stock anyway.
 

Merlin

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,425
Likes
2,902
#12
I got so tired of having sour milk in my fridge. I'd buy a gallon, and couldn't finish it all before it went bad. So I've been using my cans of Provident Pantry powdered milk. Just make it as I go now. Don't eat cereal much any more, so no need for milk all the time. I mostly use it for protein shakes. Gotta mix the whey powder in anyway, so mixing in milk powder is no big deal. Cans of powdered milk are over 10 years old now, so I figured time to rotate stock anyway.
I had the same problem. Didn't use milk fast enough to avoid spoilage. So now I mix powdered milk by the quart. It gets used mostly in my coffee and it's just fine.

Lesson #2 learned the hard way. You know how virtually all our canned food comes with pop-top lids? Well, I was storing the cans upside down (expiration dates are on the bottom, so convenience was the reason.) I learned that the pop-top seals can fail and you wind up with liquid draining all over your shelves. Not nice at all. Store your canned goods right side up, or you'll regret it.
 

Professur

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
5,206
Likes
5,289
#13
Hardly ever see pop top cans here.
 

chrisflhtc

Seeker
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Jun 8, 2012
Messages
110
Likes
116
#14
If I'm storing I look for solid lids.
C
 

Merlin

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,425
Likes
2,902
#15
If I'm storing I look for solid lids.
C
Well, I learn the hard way. Leaking cans happened to me with several different brands, so it wasn't a fluke.