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Am I the only azzhole who doesn't like dogs?

You're an azzhole!

  • Yes

    Votes: 20 52.6%
  • No

    Votes: 10 26.3%
  • Other

    Votes: 8 21.1%

  • Total voters
    38

ErrosionOfAccord

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It's not really that I dislike them but, I guess it is. I don't want the responsibility of maintaining one. I don't want to pet them or be licked by them. I don't want their hair all over my place, their poop in my yard or, urine in my carpet. I don't want to appease them by scratching their head. I don't want to deal with putting them in a kennel or finding a sitter. I don't want to hear the neighbors dogs raising hell. I recognize their value as a tool if you live outside of town but not so much as a pet.

Every woman I've met lately has a damned dog and I'm honestly kinda turned off by them. The dogs, not the women.

No, I didn't always feel this way, I just don't want the bother.
 

Voodoo

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I will give you that they are a bit of work and not for everyone. But they are kinda like kids but on 1/1000th the scale.
 

hammerhead

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I used to feel the same way about cats. I was highly allergic to them.
 

EO 11110

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not a big fan of inside dogs. i, like you, wouldnt want a dog included in my date
 

Mujahideen

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I like dogs, but it’s a 15 year commitment unless you adopt an old one.
 

chieftain

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Dogs are better people than most two leggahs.
 

the_shootist

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Dogs are great but the commitment isn't something I would look forward to!
 

the_shootist

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brosil

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You're not fixing them right. You have to scrape as much fat off as possible or it leaves a rancid taste. Slice it thinly across the grain and wok with hot peppers. Serve over rice. You're welcome.
 

Goldhedge

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It's not really that I dislike them but, I guess it is. I don't want the responsibility of maintaining one.
They are great pals. You'd feed your child 3 times a day.
I don't want to pet them or be licked by them.
Most dogs do not lick you, unless you allow them to as a puppy. "Petting" them is a reciprocal form of love for both of you.
I don't want their hair all over my place,
There are dog breeds that do not shed.
their poop in my yard or, urine in my carpet.
Poop is a given - you feed them, they poop! You can hire folks who will pick it up.
Peeing on the carpet means you didn't let them out, OR house train them.
I don't want to appease them by scratching their head.
There's a double benefit to scratching a dog's head.
I don't want to deal with putting them in a kennel or finding a sitter.
If you have an active life, or live in a small apartment (with an active life) you don't want a dog. Most dogs don't need a 'sitter' or a kennel.
I don't want to hear the neighbors dogs raising hell.
Why would the neighbor's dog raise hell? If your neighbor has a dog, they'll 'raise hell' whether you have one or not. Dogs are territorial and will announce, or 'protect' their area. That's one of the benefits of having a dog. They'll hear and smell things sooner than you will. They're a low cost early warning system and a deterrent to most criminals.
I recognize their value as a tool if you live outside of town but not so much as a pet.
If you have the time, get a dog. They'll be your best friend for about 13 years or so and then you'll cry like a baby when you have to put them down.


Most of the 'problems' that folks have with dogs are because they don't understand the difference between humans and canines.

Dogs are like children up until the age of 18 months and then the child will progress in brainpower. People are human. They think on a totally different level than dogs.

Dogs are pack animals. There's always ONE in the pack that is the leader. It doesn't matter what 'the pack' consists of.

Your 'family' with a dog is 'a pack' to the dog. If YOU are not the pack leader, then the dog IS. This is a given. You must BE the pack leader. If you don't comprehend this simple fact and you complain about your dog's behavior - LOOK IN THE MIRROR for the problem.

Your dog's behavior is directly related to your understanding of this concept and your ability to internalize it in training your dog.
 

PhucilliJerry

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I don’t mind dogs although I agree with most of what you said. For me, it’s certain types of dog people that ruin dogs for me. Like the ones that tell me having a dog is just like having children, uh, no! Also, the ones who put their dog’s poop in a bag and then just leave it on the side of a trail or hanging from a branch along said trail. And worse yet, ones that abuse their dogs, resulting in nasty pups.
My oldest has been begging for a dog, so we’ll probably end up with one sooner than later, although not the guard dog type I’d want…..
 

specsaregood

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jrog100

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It's not really that I dislike them but, I guess it is. I don't want the responsibility of maintaining one. I don't want to pet them or be licked by them. I don't want their hair all over my place, their poop in my yard or, urine in my carpet. I don't want to appease them by scratching their head. I don't want to deal with putting them in a kennel or finding a sitter. I don't want to hear the neighbors dogs raising hell. I recognize their value as a tool if you live outside of town but not so much as a pet.

Every woman I've met lately has a damned dog and I'm honestly kinda turned off by them. The dogs, not the women.

No, I didn't always feel this way, I just don't want the bother.

Well, if she's hot could you maybe overlook the dog for about 15 minutes or so?
 

mtnman

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If my dogs don't like you, I don't like you. I trust my dogs intuition and it has never failed me. My dogs live in the house with me and my wife and I am the pack leader. My around town truck is their second home, if it's leaving the driveway. they are in it, it's really their truck, they allow me to drive them around in it.
P1120089.JPG
 

Jarrod32

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It's not really that I dislike them but, I guess it is. I don't want the responsibility of maintaining one. I don't want to pet them or be licked by them. I don't want their hair all over my place, their poop in my yard or, urine in my carpet. I don't want to appease them by scratching their head.

I reckon they feel the same about you.

1631581186872.jpeg
 

tigerwillow1

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I don't mind the well behaved dogs, It's the ones running loose that are aggressive toward me, or jump up on me, or sniff me, or lick me that get me hating dogs. More than half the owners around me don't obey the leash law, and when I stand my ground with their dog they more often than not are angry at me. Someday I'm going to get up the nerve to run up and sniff the owners and/or drool on their legs.
 

hammerhead

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EOA, just checked and will continue to check the vote tallies. I hope people are voting yes only because you don't like dogs. For the record, I am impartial to what people tolerate.
 

Goldhedge

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Like the ones that tell me having a dog is just like having children,
Dogs are LIKE a child up until 18 months - mentally... after that the child surpasses the dogs ability to reason.

Having a dog is nothing like having a child.
 

ErrosionOfAccord

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EOA, just checked and will continue to check the vote tallies. I hope people are voting yes only because you don't like dogs. For the record, I am impartial to what people tolerate.
Well, I knew myself to be an azzhole. I just didn’t know this is part of the reason as to why I’m an azzhole
 

Zed

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I love other peoples dogs! I just don't want one.
 

ErrosionOfAccord

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To be honest, I’m shocked that the board is full of species traitors. I guess I shoulda known with that bear running rampant through the place.
Furthermore, I think the dog dislikers have no voice because they are afraid to come forward to face the denigration.
I’m a dog disliker and damned proud of it.
 

hoarder

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I love dogs and dogs love me. If I went on a first date (heaven forbid, at my age) and she took her dog along it would be a score. The dog would instantly like me better than any other men she had and the gal would figure I must be a really wonderful man, and follow the dog's lead.
 

chieftain

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^ This man knows.
 

coopersmith

for fuck sake..........
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I have 4 dogs. You have to feed em, and do some training, I wouldnt do without em.

2 pyrenees and a chow cross outside (he is fast), they have never been thru the front door, their world is out there. I have a little cow dog bitch ive spoiled to the extreme, she sleeps on the bed indoors.

I live 25 miles in the country, the meth-ers have stole on all the farms around me. I still have all my tools. And I dont have to be on guard all the time, I can get drunk and not worry about it. Them dogs are on the job.

I havent lost A chicken in 7 years.

And the dogs shit in the pasture, not on the mowed ground.
 

Fatrat

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Never trust a person that doesn't like dogs, you may not be an asshole, but I'd avoid you.
 

jimswift

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Humans have been with dogs for a pretty long time. There's something else going other than just the utility.

Read this earlier this year, pretty good....

Does God Exist? Look into the Eyes of a Dog

By Boyd D. Cathey
My Corner
May 21, 2020

Last night, after my customary evening prayers and climbing into bed, my cocker spaniel Jasper jumped on the bed with me, as he is apt to do, and, then hovering over me like some special guardian surveying his charge, his legs on my chest, looked directly at me with his two adoring brown eyes. It was as if to say: “It’s bed-time, and I wanted to ‘say’ to you ‘please keep safe,’ ‘good night,’ ‘my love and devotion’ for you.”

I know, I know—dogs don’t speak, but they do communicate in so many other ways…in their movements, in their barking and whining, by wagging their tails or moving their paws, but perhaps most effectively with their eyes. Jasper’s eyes were lit with warmth and contentment, but also with a kind of fealty and intimate comradeship that only a person who has had a close canine companion for any length of time can understand and fathom.

As I looked back into those golden globes, I thought: “Here indeed was one of God’s little creatures, a kind of little barking Guardian Angel, a creature whose ancestors began to faithfully accompany man thousands of years ago, at the very origins of civilization.”

Here in this adoring face was in fact a representation of the goodness of the Creator—in a sense, the Face of God Himself exemplified by this canine, composed of an intricate pattern of muscle, organs and tissue, but far more than the sum of his physical parts. Yes, a creation of Nature, the result of a very long line of other canines, but issuing forth in a living being with a unique personality all his own.

For me—and I realize to those with a scientific bent this may seem a bit naïve—that Jasper exists is, in a very special way, a definite sign that not only does God exist, but that He has taken very special effort in devising His creation.

Consider the essential: here is this animal, this creature who breathes, moves, eats, plays with and accompanies me, has emotions (which on close inspection over time I can detect)…and shows them. Here is a creature of extreme complexity physiologically, less so than humans, but still complex. Millions of minute cells programmed to work in harmony, and over them all a distinct, motivating, life-giving personality, and indeed what St. Thomas Aquinas called a living “animal soul.”

I was put in mind of that superb English film, “Dean Spanley” (2008), starring Jeremy Northam, Sir Peter O’Toole, Sam Neill, Judy Parfit, and Bryan Brown; it’s one of my favorite—perhaps my all-time favorite—movies. Based on a short novella by British writer Baron Dunsany it is both whimsical and deeply moving in it message. And it uses dogs to represent the kind of spiritual bond that exists between mankind and canines, but also, more importantly, between Man and other human beings. That bond is ineffable, it is spiritual, but it exists. And it is something which cannot be created in the most advanced, the most modern scientific laboratory. It is, if I may be so bold, something that cannot be explained fully by evolutionary biology.

Years ago, when I was studying in Spain, one of my professors was Dr. Wolfgang Strobl, without doubt the most brilliant man I’ve ever met or had the privilege to know. Dr. Strobl was born in Bavaria and a shell-shocked veteran of World War II, which gave him a permanent limp (he walked with a cane). After the war he earned his first doctorate at the University of Munich in philosophy, mathematics and physics (1952) “summa cum laude,” with a mammoth work, titled, “The Fundamental Problems of the Philosophy of Nature in the Ontological Sense of the New Physics.” A second earned doctorate came in 1967 (Pontifical University of Navarra): “Scientific Reality and Its Philosophical Criticism.” Fluent in a dozen languages, guest professor at numerous universities in every part of the world, including Columbia, Fordham, and St. John’s in the United States, translator of Werner Heisenberg and other German philosophers into Spanish, he was amazing. In his lectures at Navarra it was if someone just pushed a button and out flowed a perfectly organized (and for me, diagrammed) fifty minutes of brilliance.

I recall back then—in 1973—we took up the work of French scientist/philosopher Jacques Monod, Chance and Necessity (published first as Le Hasard et la Nécessité: Essai sur la philosophie naturelle de la biologie moderne). Monod’s work was all the rage at the time, and not just in France, but also in the United States. Basically, and not to do him an injustice, Monod posited that “the combined effects of chance and necessity, which are amenable to scientific investigation, account for our existence and the universe we inhabit, without the need to invoke mystical, supernatural, or religious explanations. While acknowledging the likely evolutionary origin of a human need for explanatory myths, in the final chapter of Chance and Necessity, Monod advocates for adopting an objective (hence value-free), scientific worldview as our guide to assessing truth. He describes this as an ‘ethics of knowledge’, which disrupts the older philosophical, mythological and religious ontologies that claimed to provide both ethical values and a standard for judging truth.”

As Monod summed up his work: “…man at last knows he is alone in the unfeeling immensity of the universe, out of which he has emerged only by chance. His destiny is nowhere spelled out, nor is his duty.”

For a number of sessions Strobl lectured about—and profoundly critiqued—Monod’s work and his assertions. And he did so not only from biological science and the standpoint of physics, but also from mathematics and the philosophy of logic.

On various occasions I was privileged to visit him and his wife for lunch and continue those discussions. I recall distinctly him describing the inadequacy of Monod’s (and other’s) theories of human evolution that left out, noticeably and fatally, essential ingredients in the make-up of Man. Like some other critics, Strobl contended that Monod failed in his attempt to banish “mind and purpose from the phenomenon of life” in the name of science.

And, venturing into the foundations and philosophy of mathematics—if I may call it that—Dr. Strobl added that the study of probabilities, alone, made the commonly-held belief in biological evolution, as currently conceived, a practical impossibility. After one reaches a certain level of (im)probability, a happening, an event, an occurrence is considered not just improbable, but, practically speaking, impossible. Distinct and widely disparate amounts of time are required for something to occur depending on the level of probability—the chance, if you will—that it might happen in nature.

The chance that I get stung by a yellow jacket this summer while working in my yard can be calculated roughly using a number of factors: where the yellow jacket nests are, how many of them exists, where exactly I work and step, the care I take, how many times I work in my yard, and so on. Depending on these conditions, I could, if I knew them all, estimate my chances, maybe 5%, maybe more, maybe less.

But let’s take something much more extensive and far more improbable: the example of a monkey sitting in front of key board and pecking out the entire works of William Shakespeare by chance. Of necessity it would require millions—perhaps billions—of years (of trial and error), and then what are the percentages? Would it actually ever come to pass?

As Dr. Strobl explained, after reaching a certain level of improbability, a happening becomes in effect impossible. Despite the billions of years for that monkey to type out Shakespeare by chance, if at all, at a certain point mathematically such a calculation is essentially impossible.

Thus, if we posit that a one cell amoeba somehow evolves and has evolved into my canine companion Jasper, not only does that evolutionary process demand millions, perhaps even billions of years, but from a mathematical viewpoint is dead on arrival, impossible.

Without something more than the cold theories of evolutionary science, stripped of all other considerations and ignoring (or refusing to examine) the insights of other disciplines which offer a more rounded and fuller picture of life, we are left bare, tiny meaningless specks in an inscrutable and unforgiving universe.

I recall an interview with the late Southern novelist and writer, Walker Percy, from Esquire back in 1977. In it Percy was asked why he was a Christian, and he responded: “What else is there?” And the follow-up question:

“Would you exclude, for example, scientific humanism as a rational and honorable alternative?” And he answered: “Yes…It’s not good enough…This life is much too much trouble, far too strange, to arrive at the end of it and then to be asked what you make of it and to have to answer ‘Scientific humanism.’ That won’t do. A poor show. Life is a mystery, love is a delight. Therefore I take it as axiomatic that one should settle for nothing less than the infinite mystery and the infinite delight, i.e., God. In fact I demand it. I refuse to settle for anything less. I don’t see why anyone should settle for less than Jacob, who actually grabbed aholt of God and wouldn’t let go until God identified himself and blessed him.”

So it was when I looked into those two loving orbs, those two golden brown eyes of Jasper last night, and he communicated to me his love and companionship and care, far, far beyond any consideration of what amoeba he might have supposedly come from billions of years ago. And as I reached out and scratched his floppy ears with my returned affection, yes, I stared into the face of one of God’s creatures whose very existence signaled to me, to echo Walker Percy, “What else is there?” Scientific humanism and atheism won’t do. “Life is a mystery, love is a delight. Therefore I take it as axiomatic that one should settle for nothing less than the infinite mystery and the infinite delight”—God. The Creator once more demonstrated His love last night through His little creature on my bed, as I prepared to end the day and take one more step towards eternity.
 

ErrosionOfAccord

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Never trust a person that doesn't like dogs, you may not be an asshole, but I'd avoid you.
That’s some kind of backwards internet lore. If your'e falling for that I’d prefer to be avoided.
 
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Avalon

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It's not really that I dislike them but, I guess it is. I don't want the responsibility of maintaining one. I don't want to pet them or be licked by them. I don't want their hair all over my place, their poop in my yard or, urine in my carpet. I don't want to appease them by scratching their head. I don't want to deal with putting them in a kennel or finding a sitter. I don't want to hear the neighbors dogs raising hell. I recognize their value as a tool if you live outside of town but not so much as a pet.

Every woman I've met lately has a damned dog and I'm honestly kinda turned off by them. The dogs, not the women.

No, I didn't always feel this way, I just don't want the bother.
Dogs are like children. You might not like other peoples but when they are yours they grow on you . if your dating you better like the dog too. Never give a woman an ultimatum between you and the dog. Guess who wins. :rotf:
 

Avalon

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Humans have been with dogs for a pretty long time. There's something else going other than just the utility.

Read this earlier this year, pretty good....

Does God Exist? Look into the Eyes of a Dog

By Boyd D. Cathey
My Corner
May 21, 2020

Last night, after my customary evening prayers and climbing into bed, my cocker spaniel Jasper jumped on the bed with me, as he is apt to do, and, then hovering over me like some special guardian surveying his charge, his legs on my chest, looked directly at me with his two adoring brown eyes. It was as if to say: “It’s bed-time, and I wanted to ‘say’ to you ‘please keep safe,’ ‘good night,’ ‘my love and devotion’ for you.”

I know, I know—dogs don’t speak, but they do communicate in so many other ways…in their movements, in their barking and whining, by wagging their tails or moving their paws, but perhaps most effectively with their eyes. Jasper’s eyes were lit with warmth and contentment, but also with a kind of fealty and intimate comradeship that only a person who has had a close canine companion for any length of time can understand and fathom.

As I looked back into those golden globes, I thought: “Here indeed was one of God’s little creatures, a kind of little barking Guardian Angel, a creature whose ancestors began to faithfully accompany man thousands of years ago, at the very origins of civilization.”

Here in this adoring face was in fact a representation of the goodness of the Creator—in a sense, the Face of God Himself exemplified by this canine, composed of an intricate pattern of muscle, organs and tissue, but far more than the sum of his physical parts. Yes, a creation of Nature, the result of a very long line of other canines, but issuing forth in a living being with a unique personality all his own.

For me—and I realize to those with a scientific bent this may seem a bit naïve—that Jasper exists is, in a very special way, a definite sign that not only does God exist, but that He has taken very special effort in devising His creation.

Consider the essential: here is this animal, this creature who breathes, moves, eats, plays with and accompanies me, has emotions (which on close inspection over time I can detect)…and shows them. Here is a creature of extreme complexity physiologically, less so than humans, but still complex. Millions of minute cells programmed to work in harmony, and over them all a distinct, motivating, life-giving personality, and indeed what St. Thomas Aquinas called a living “animal soul.”

I was put in mind of that superb English film, “Dean Spanley” (2008), starring Jeremy Northam, Sir Peter O’Toole, Sam Neill, Judy Parfit, and Bryan Brown; it’s one of my favorite—perhaps my all-time favorite—movies. Based on a short novella by British writer Baron Dunsany it is both whimsical and deeply moving in it message. And it uses dogs to represent the kind of spiritual bond that exists between mankind and canines, but also, more importantly, between Man and other human beings. That bond is ineffable, it is spiritual, but it exists. And it is something which cannot be created in the most advanced, the most modern scientific laboratory. It is, if I may be so bold, something that cannot be explained fully by evolutionary biology.

Years ago, when I was studying in Spain, one of my professors was Dr. Wolfgang Strobl, without doubt the most brilliant man I’ve ever met or had the privilege to know. Dr. Strobl was born in Bavaria and a shell-shocked veteran of World War II, which gave him a permanent limp (he walked with a cane). After the war he earned his first doctorate at the University of Munich in philosophy, mathematics and physics (1952) “summa cum laude,” with a mammoth work, titled, “The Fundamental Problems of the Philosophy of Nature in the Ontological Sense of the New Physics.” A second earned doctorate came in 1967 (Pontifical University of Navarra): “Scientific Reality and Its Philosophical Criticism.” Fluent in a dozen languages, guest professor at numerous universities in every part of the world, including Columbia, Fordham, and St. John’s in the United States, translator of Werner Heisenberg and other German philosophers into Spanish, he was amazing. In his lectures at Navarra it was if someone just pushed a button and out flowed a perfectly organized (and for me, diagrammed) fifty minutes of brilliance.

I recall back then—in 1973—we took up the work of French scientist/philosopher Jacques Monod, Chance and Necessity (published first as Le Hasard et la Nécessité: Essai sur la philosophie naturelle de la biologie moderne). Monod’s work was all the rage at the time, and not just in France, but also in the United States. Basically, and not to do him an injustice, Monod posited that “the combined effects of chance and necessity, which are amenable to scientific investigation, account for our existence and the universe we inhabit, without the need to invoke mystical, supernatural, or religious explanations. While acknowledging the likely evolutionary origin of a human need for explanatory myths, in the final chapter of Chance and Necessity, Monod advocates for adopting an objective (hence value-free), scientific worldview as our guide to assessing truth. He describes this as an ‘ethics of knowledge’, which disrupts the older philosophical, mythological and religious ontologies that claimed to provide both ethical values and a standard for judging truth.”

As Monod summed up his work: “…man at last knows he is alone in the unfeeling immensity of the universe, out of which he has emerged only by chance. His destiny is nowhere spelled out, nor is his duty.”

For a number of sessions Strobl lectured about—and profoundly critiqued—Monod’s work and his assertions. And he did so not only from biological science and the standpoint of physics, but also from mathematics and the philosophy of logic.

On various occasions I was privileged to visit him and his wife for lunch and continue those discussions. I recall distinctly him describing the inadequacy of Monod’s (and other’s) theories of human evolution that left out, noticeably and fatally, essential ingredients in the make-up of Man. Like some other critics, Strobl contended that Monod failed in his attempt to banish “mind and purpose from the phenomenon of life” in the name of science.

And, venturing into the foundations and philosophy of mathematics—if I may call it that—Dr. Strobl added that the study of probabilities, alone, made the commonly-held belief in biological evolution, as currently conceived, a practical impossibility. After one reaches a certain level of (im)probability, a happening, an event, an occurrence is considered not just improbable, but, practically speaking, impossible. Distinct and widely disparate amounts of time are required for something to occur depending on the level of probability—the chance, if you will—that it might happen in nature.

The chance that I get stung by a yellow jacket this summer while working in my yard can be calculated roughly using a number of factors: where the yellow jacket nests are, how many of them exists, where exactly I work and step, the care I take, how many times I work in my yard, and so on. Depending on these conditions, I could, if I knew them all, estimate my chances, maybe 5%, maybe more, maybe less.

But let’s take something much more extensive and far more improbable: the example of a monkey sitting in front of key board and pecking out the entire works of William Shakespeare by chance. Of necessity it would require millions—perhaps billions—of years (of trial and error), and then what are the percentages? Would it actually ever come to pass?

As Dr. Strobl explained, after reaching a certain level of improbability, a happening becomes in effect impossible. Despite the billions of years for that monkey to type out Shakespeare by chance, if at all, at a certain point mathematically such a calculation is essentially impossible.

Thus, if we posit that a one cell amoeba somehow evolves and has evolved into my canine companion Jasper, not only does that evolutionary process demand millions, perhaps even billions of years, but from a mathematical viewpoint is dead on arrival, impossible.

Without something more than the cold theories of evolutionary science, stripped of all other considerations and ignoring (or refusing to examine) the insights of other disciplines which offer a more rounded and fuller picture of life, we are left bare, tiny meaningless specks in an inscrutable and unforgiving universe.

I recall an interview with the late Southern novelist and writer, Walker Percy, from Esquire back in 1977. In it Percy was asked why he was a Christian, and he responded: “What else is there?” And the follow-up question:



So it was when I looked into those two loving orbs, those two golden brown eyes of Jasper last night, and he communicated to me his love and companionship and care, far, far beyond any consideration of what amoeba he might have supposedly come from billions of years ago. And as I reached out and scratched his floppy ears with my returned affection, yes, I stared into the face of one of God’s creatures whose very existence signaled to me, to echo Walker Percy, “What else is there?” Scientific humanism and atheism won’t do. “Life is a mystery, love is a delight. Therefore I take it as axiomatic that one should settle for nothing less than the infinite mystery and the infinite delight”—God. The Creator once more demonstrated His love last night through His little creature on my bed, as I prepared to end the day and take one more step towards eternity.
Dogs and even contemptuous cats are way nicer than people. When you lose one of these friends you bury a little of your heart with them
 

Avalon

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I love other peoples dogs! I just don't want one.
I'm there too. After decades of having every critter from cats, dogs , emus, possums and gerbils living here I am ready to own no pets. God had a different plan though and a stray cat moved on to my porch two weeks after the dog died. So I now have a cat. LOL
 

hoarder

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A dog will love you unconditionally, a woman?...not so much. Will always have one...er....both.
If you lock your dog in the trunk of your car overnight, it will be happy to see you when you open it the next morning. Try that with your wife. This is proof dogs are better than women! :belly laugh:
ninemile 008.JPG
 

specsaregood

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this is now another thread for people to post photos of their dogs.
 

specsaregood

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I'm sure it depends on the dog as well.
eg: the girl below is the least needy dog I've ever had. she doesn't really care to cuddle or be petted other than an occasional pat on the head. She is the sweetest and obedient little thing, and completely fine with being left alone to entertain herself.

i1HfVEo.jpg
 

Joe King

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My oldest has been begging for a dog, so we’ll probably end up with one sooner than later, although not the guard dog type I’d want…
Check out Keeshonds. They are wonderful pets. Good with kids.
....and very good watch dogs. A keeshond would be a first alert to anything going on.