• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding metals, finance, politics, government and many other topics"

and this is why the jobs ended up in mehico/chinland/japan/et al

Scorpio

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Workers at all of Kellogg's U.S. cereal plants go on strike​


JOSH FUNK
Tue, October 5, 2021, 1:25 PM


OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Work at all of the Kellogg Company's U.S. cereal plants came to a halt Tuesday as roughly 1,400 workers went on strike, but it wasn't immediately clear how much the supply of Frosted Flakes or any of the company's other iconic brands would be disrupted.
The strike includes plants in Omaha, Nebraska Battle Creek, Michigan; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; and Memphis, Tennessee.
The union and the Battle Creek-based company have been at an impasse at the bargaining table for more than a year, said Daniel Osborn, president of the local union in Omaha. The dispute involves an assortment of pay and benefit issues such as the loss premium health care, holiday and vacation pay and reduced retirement benefits

“The company continues to threaten to send additional jobs to Mexico if workers do not accept outrageous proposals that take away protections that workers have had for decades," said Anthony Shelton, president of the Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union.
The threat to move work to Mexico doesn't sit well with Osborn.
“A lot of Americans probably don't have too much issue with the Nike or Under Armor hats being made elsewhere or even our vehicles, but when they start manufacturing our food down where they are out of the FDA control and OSHA control, I have a huge problem with that,” Osborn said.
The company insists that its offer is fair and would increase wages and benefits for its employees that it said made an average of $120,000 a year last year.
"We are disappointed by the union’s decision to strike. Kellogg provides compensation and benefits for our U.S. ready to eat cereal employees that are among the industry’s best," Kellogg spokesperson Kris Bahner said in a statement.
Osborn said he expects the company to try to bring non-union workers into the plants at some point this week to try to resume operations and maintain the supply of its products.
The company acknowledged that it is "implementing contingency plans" to limit supply disruptions for consumers.
The plants have all continued to operate throughout the coronavirus pandemic, but Osborn said that for much of that time workers were putting in 12-hour shifts, seven days a week to keep up production while so many people were out because of the virus.
“The level we were working at is unsustainable,” Osborn said.
Kellogg’s workers aren’t the first food workers to strike during the pandemic.
Earlier this summer, more than 600 workers at a Frito-Lay plant in Topeka, Kansas, walked off the job to protest working conditions during the pandemic, including forced overtime. That strike ended in July when workers ratified a new contract.
Workers at Nabisco plants in five states went on strike in August to protest plans by Nabisco’s parent, Mondelez International, to move some work to Mexico, among other issues, according to the Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, which also represents the Kellogg's workers. That strike ended last month when workers ratified a new contract.
___
Associated Press writer Dee-Ann Durbin contributed to this report from Detroit.

 

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Kellogg's U.S. cereal plant workers go on strike​

First shift worker Travis Huffman joins other BCTGM Local 3G union members in a strike

FILE PHOTO: Kellogg's Corn Flakes cereal is pictured at a Ralphs grocery store in Pasadena

1 / 2

Kellogg's U.S. cereal plant workers go on strike​

First shift worker Travis Huffman joins other BCTGM Local 3G union members in a strike


By Praveen Paramasivam
(Reuters) - About 1,400 Kellogg Co cereal plant employees went on a strike on Tuesday, hoping to get the packaged foods maker to negotiate what a labor union called a "fair contract" for the workers.
The Froot Loops cereal maker has been negotiating the payment and benefits terms of a new contract - the existing one expired at midnight on Monday - with union workers for a while now.

Kellogg has demanded that workers give up quality health care, retirement benefits, and holiday and vacation pay, said Anthony Shelton, president of Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union.
Shelton said Kellogg has threatened to send additional jobs to Mexico if workers do not accept its proposals.
However, Kellogg, which brings in about a third of its sales from cereals, said its compensation and benefits for U.S. cereal plant employees were among the industry's best.
"We are disappointed by the union's decision to strike ... our offer includes increases to pay and benefits for our employees," Kellogg spokesperson Kris Bahner said.
The company also said it was implementing contingency plans to deal with supply disruptions, including internal and third-party resources.
The workers went on strikes at plants in Battle Creek, Michigan, Omaha, Nebraska, Lancaster, Pennsylvania and Memphis, Tennessee.
The union used what looked like an angry version of Kellogg's Frosted Flakes mascot, Tony the Tiger, in posters asking people to join the picket. Pictures on social media showed several workers holding banners outside the facilities.
"The company has a pretty good idea on how long they are willing to hold out and we are going to stand fast as long as we have to," said Daniel Osborn, president of the local union in Omaha, noting the strike had gone on for 18 hours already.
(Reporting by Praveen Paramasivam in Bengaluru; Editing by Shinjini Ganguli)

 

Fatrat

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Oatmeal is much better, let Kelloggs fail.
 

Uncle

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Perhaps the strike will have some health benefits.



Golden Regards
Uncle
 

Mujahideen

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A country that does not make it's own cereal is not a country. A country that does not make it's own childrens toys is not a country.

we live on a plantation
 

Scorpio

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I'm a 'ho, a union worker

I should and am paid equal to the lowest dweeb on the roster,
you get a raise, you get a raise, we all get raises

pay me more and I will take your jab,

I don't have any principles other than money
-------
regardless, the .corp never worries about what is right, but what is economic,
all about share price and market dominance

and they aren't going to let pesky little things like borders or shipping burden them

for a few dollars more

 

Casey Jones

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There's always two sides, at least, to an issue.

I've been well-acquainted with greedy union agitators and their tools. But there's another aspect...this New Age Woketard management, that Virtue-Signals and demands the same of their workers...WHILE in fact underpaying or abusing them in terms of hours, conditions, etc.

Going on strike is serious business. Are you ready to leave your job, find another? If you are ready to pay the ultimate price...then, by all means, walk off and picket. Because your employer may well go the way of Hostess.
 

Bigjon

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I beg to differ.

My company had almost no labor unions, yet we were targeted and sold down the river by speculators who made bundles of cash on the takedown of our company.

That is the reason and most of those speculators are those people we can't talk about here.
 

Cigarlover

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The average worker is making 120k a year to make Frosted Flakes? The Mexicans will work for 30k and be very happy about it.
As for the quality issues. People are eating some grains loaded up with sugars. I don't think they care that much about quality as long as it tastes about the same. Most people don't even know that by law, 3% rat shit is allowed in cereals.
 

Unca Walt

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The average worker is making 120k a year to make Frosted Flakes? The Mexicans will work for 30k and be very happy about it.
As for the quality issues. People are eating some grains loaded up with sugars. I don't think they care that much about quality as long as it tastes about the same. Most people don't even know that by law, 3% rat shit is allowed in cereals.

JEEEBUS. I, for one, din' know... :tongue:
 

Cigarlover

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JEEEBUS. I, for one, din' know... :tongue:
I learned about it back in the early 90's. They can't keep the critters out of their grain bins so they got approval for 3% rat shit instead LOL. I hardly ever eat cereal because of that.
 

Casey Jones

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I beg to differ.

My company had almost no labor unions, yet we were targeted and sold down the river by speculators who made bundles of cash on the takedown of our company.

That is the reason and most of those speculators are those people we can't talk about here.
I'm not taking sides.

No matter who is "right," when you go on strike you risk the real chance your job will disappear.

EVEN IF the company is not up against the wall. It may just be that the suits decide they can outsource the work or sell the operation. In Hostess' case, it was Grupo Bimbo who bought the whole outfit (Mexican bakery, and "Bimbo" doesn't mean there what it means here) out of bankruptcy. But Hostess' owners could have sold it without bankruptcy, or could have staged a bankruptcy in what was in fact a solvent company.

Financial engineering, meet militant unionism.

EDIT: It wasn't Bimbo Group who bought Hostess. Just looked it up...it was an American consortium. Bimbo was in the bidding, IIRC...
 
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Bottom Feeder

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$120,000 a year to spray sugar on frosted flakes?!!
If that's the average pay, I need to come outta retirement and apply there. They prolly pay 150 - 200 thousand a year for keeping their machines running.

BF

Oh, and the FDA has a 'contaminate list' of allowable percentages of foreign objects in food.
Don't check out the ketchup or instant potatoes.
 

edsl48

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Bought a GMC pickup this year that I ordered last year that was produced at the GM Mexico plant in Sialo. Perfect finish, fit and has no issues so far after 8 months of ownership. Don't bother asking me about trucks I bought during the Detroit heydays that practically needed repairs upon delivery. The UAW just got way to powerful back in the day and in many ways they still are. Add to that situation, governmental regulations and taxes on USA plants and a complacent management and its a wonder GM stayed in business. Oh I forgot; GM was bailed out by the Government but I am digressing here. My Mexican made truck is running great and fit and finish look great too. I should add my truck had all the chips despite what the news was broadcasting. Sales agent told me the Mexican plants had the chips...go figure.
 

Casey Jones

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Bought a GMC pickup this year that I ordered last year that was produced at the GM Mexico plant in Sialo. Perfect finish, fit and has no issues so far after 8 months of ownership. Don't bother asking me about trucks I bought during the Detroit heydays that practically needed repairs upon delivery. The UAW just got way to powerful back in the day and in many ways they still are. Add to that situation, governmental regulations and taxes on USA plants and a complacent management and its a wonder GM stayed in business. Oh I forgot; GM was bailed out by the Government but I am digressing here. My Mexican made truck is running great and fit and finish look great too. I should add my truck had all the chips despite what the news was broadcasting. Sales agent told me the Mexican plants had the chips...go figure.
Mexican manufacture is like China manufacture. It CAN be done right - if, and only if, a LOT of variables work out.

Honda runs some plants in China, and sells the product all over Europe and Asia. It's like Honda motorcycles everywhere. They're sound quality.

VW has manufactured vehicles in Puebla, Mexico since the 1940s. And...maybe it's different today...but I remember, as a kid in the 1970s, with a VW Type 1 as my first car...Volkswagen of America was starting to source replacement Beetle parts from Mexico, as Beetle manufacture had ended in Europe. Mufflers, for example...the shoddy Mexican mufflers likely would last about a year. NOT what VW owners of the time were used to. Other parts, like window regulators, equally shoddy. Body parts like bumpers, came through with chrome that would flake off in months.

Are they better now? I dunno. VW is not the same company, and they focus on status, not long life and value. I think the Jetta is manufactured there for American sale.

American plants in Mexico? Don't know. It doesn't panic me to think an American brand car is made there...unlike my response to hearing of Buicks imported from China.

But it scarcely matters. I doubt I'll ever be buying another new vehicle, or another expensive one that is not a Toyota.
 

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Maybe the idea is for the Mexicans to go back to Mexico to work.
 

specsaregood

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Bought a GMC pickup this year that I ordered last year that was produced at the GM Mexico plant in Sialo. Perfect finish, fit and has no issues so far after 8 months of ownership. Don't bother asking me about trucks I bought during the Detroit heydays that practically needed repairs upon delivery. The UAW just got way to powerful back in the day and in many ways they still are. Add to that situation, governmental regulations and taxes on USA plants and a complacent management and its a wonder GM stayed in business. Oh I forgot; GM was bailed out by the Government but I am digressing here. My Mexican made truck is running great and fit and finish look great too. I should add my truck had all the chips despite what the news was broadcasting. Sales agent told me the Mexican plants had the chips...go figure.

I'm not sure its fair to compare the quality of manufacturing to a product now vs many decades ago. I mean they arent building them in mexico using 80s technology, they are modern plants with modern equipment/computers/robots, etc.
 

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Maybe the idea is for the Mexicans to go back to Mexico to work.
That was always my idea for supporting NAFTA.

When they can get reasonable-paying work and be Mexicans in Mexico, instead of illegals in Detroit...I say, fine. They're happy, being home. I'm happy, with them not flooding us with an alien culture.

Win-win.
 

Casey Jones

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I'm not sure its fair to compare the quality of manufacturing to a product now vs many decades ago. I mean they arent building them in mexico using 80s technology, they are modern plants with modern equipment/computers/robots, etc.
Well, sometimes.

But it always comes down to the people. Mexican plant managers, with Mexican quality-control inspectors, Mexican foremen...and all of them resentful that foreign gringos (whether German, Italian or American) own their plant and issue their pay...quality goes down. Or never comes up.

If there's either pride in workmanship - hard to instill, in a third-world tropical country like Mexico - or strict management sent from the home office - then, product-quality will be of the company's standards.
 

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it's okay for megacorps to collude to suppress wages but not okay for workers to collude to raise wages
 

edsl48

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I will concede that today's current technology is better than yesterdays. However a truck I bought a decade take or give a year or so came out of the Fort Wayne plant and it had issues. Anyway, and I am not making excuses for management here, many times when the automakers wanted to install new technology the unions fought it tooth and nail under their "save your job" program. The GM job bank was a hilarious situation that, like it or not, was paid by the end consumer of GM's products. When I think of the money that could have been invested in increased productivity and quality instead of paying UAW types to lay around it boggles my mind. I prefer USA made items but to pay extra for a bunch laying around all day...I pay taxes for that.
 

Casey Jones

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it's okay for megacorps to collude to suppress wages but not okay for workers to collude to raise wages
Who is saying that?

And, as a tangent...do you know what happened to Bethlehem Steel? Because I do, at least in broad strokes.

The steelworkers' union was powerful and militant in the 1960s. Remember, this was the tail end of the postwar boom period...a lot of steel exports, as well as much growth in the US. So there was the market.

The unions demanded, and backed it up with strikes and threats of strikes. And Bethlehem and US Steel, all acquiesced.

What happened from there, was a complete cessation of capital investment in plants. While the Japanese invested in new technologies, such as Continuous Casting, Bethlehem, USS and Republic Steel just kept going with what they had.

It didn't matter much, at first - in fact it was an immediate savings, that enabled them to pay the new contracts. Then it mattered a little, as Japan was able to produce higher-quality steel for a little less money. Then a lot less money. Then higher quality, still. Then, able to charge more, with accusations of "dumping" steel (demonstrated untrue, later).

The American steel mill lines got older and more obsolete, and their market share continued to shrink. And they were still making money, just not so much...running their plants into the ground. LTV, a financial-engineering conglomerate, bought US Steel and Republic Steel, before themselves going bankrupt - twice.

Bethlehem limped along, closing their Bethlehem, PA plant, and then, about 2001, went bankrupt and locked up their Lackawanna, NY plant. All gone - bye-by.

Because the cost of their unionized labor precluded the needed ongoing capital investment to stay competitive.

This is a lesson we should have learned just a few years ago. Are we ready to repeat these same mistakes, so soon? For eighty years, the government has been aggressively siding with unions against management. EVEN AS they side with those same corporations, in their quest for government rents and carve-out deals. Have we not had enough of THAT.
 

EO 11110

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think i might find kelloggs in the list of megacorp wage suppression/open border/globalist colluders that make up the US chamber of commerce?
 

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Drop the dollar out of the wage discussion and consider instead "the standard of living" a job gave oneself. My father and my father in law after being mustered out at the end of WW2. They both had good USA factory type of jobs. They both lived in pretty modest rental properties, didn't have a car and started a family. They saved up for a house down payment, bought a 1000 sq ft ranch house consisting of 3 bedrooms and one bathroom and picked up some old car along the way. Times moved on and many of these old GI types lived in those ranch homes the rest of their lives. That is the lifestyle a good union job provided for them. Today's union type expects a new McMansion type of house, a new 65,000 + pick up truck and assorted play toys such as boats, four wheelers, jet skis etc etc. To me the unions just got too greedy with their lifestyle expectations that has contributed to the situation we are in today. One thing I might add is Ross Perot ran for President on a ticket to stop the international free trade agreements. Perot split the Republican vote but the "vote for blue no matter who" group once again voted in lockstep to get Bill Clinton elected and, as Perot predicted, the NAFTA agreement was signed by Clinton. Interestingly enough the unions once again were solidly in the "vote for blue no matter who" group once again so they ironically voted to send their jobs across the borders. Most union types I tell that to call me a liar because they will say "NAFTA" was a Bush thing but they have that wrong because fair and square Clinton signed it into law.
Life goes on
 

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not all unions are created equal

the communist type municipalities are the worst. wildly overpaid and embedded in the communist machine

there are some private sector unions that are similar

this is mostly a communist state problem - and in no way universal
 

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Yeah, that's it.

It was always the chocolate specs that gagged me.
 

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I'm a 'ho, a union worker

I should and am paid equal to the lowest dweeb on the roster,
you get a raise, you get a raise, we all get raises

pay me more and I will take your jab,

I don't have any principles other than money
-------
regardless, the .corp never worries about what is right, but what is economic,
all about share price and market dominance

and they aren't going to let pesky little things like borders or shipping burden them

for a few dollars more


$120,000 a year working for Kellogg's and they want more... Sheesh! No wonder they all relocate offshore & elsewhere....
 

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Fatrat

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I wonder what the real story will be, I doubt anybody is actually making 120k unless they are pulling down insane O.T.. As for my municipality, we are screwed as a third or more of the road maintenance guys have left for greener pastures...
 

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I met a Mexican in Cancun at a resort. He had his family there. Worked at a ford plant down there. Flew the family to Cancun for the weekend. He was very happy to have a good paying job down there. He and his family were very nice.
 

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NEW: The workers who make Rice Krispies & Froot Loops are on strike at all Kellogg's U.S. cereal plants. They work 16-hour forced overtime shifts and 7-day work weeks, sometimes up to 120 days straight. Now, amid record profits, Kellogg's wants to cut their pay & benefits.
Honestly, I don't blame them. That's insane to work 4 months without a day off.
 

hammerhead

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With that kind of working conditions, you'd think they would unionize. A union would never allow that to happen.
 

Casey Jones

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With that kind of working conditions, you'd think they would unionize. A union would never allow that to happen.
I was unionized, and exactly that kind of thing was done to us on the railroad.

It took a law, changes in the Hours of Service laws for railroaders, to get us a day off once a week. Put a monthly cap on hours, but we still had many 72-hour weeks.

We were paid by trip, not by hours, so there was no overtime.