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Bald Eagle Cam - Harriet (mate is Ozzie) Eaglets About to Hatch

newmisty

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#82
Î I was watching some great grey owl nest cams the other day. Those things are quite fascinating to watch.

 

GOLDBRIX

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#83
Well, The second clutch of eggs, 3rd egg of this season noticeable pip. About day 36 of being laid. So a hatching is imminent.
The second (4th of the season) egg was laid 3 days after egg #3 so it still possibly viable.
In my area Bald Eagles are not seen in the wild to often.
I've lived here sine 1981 and just last year was my first sighting of a wild Bald Eagle.
I've have always been an admirer of raptors ever since I was a kid growing up 9 miles North of Dayton,Ohio. Yet only saw damaged eagles cared for by men and women.
I am fascinated with this emergence of a new life.

Several camera feeds of this nest here. Enjoy or ignore you decide:
https://www.dickpritchettrealestate.com/eagle-feed.html
 

GOLDBRIX

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#85
I have seen the same pair in the nest by my house every day since my post on the 14th.
Supposedly it takes 35 day average once an egg is laid for hatching to begin.
2:34pm first peeps picked up on the microphone. Last visual a significant crack has a flap beginning to angle out.
Both parents are now staying closer to the nest. One in the bowl with eggs and the mate perched on a branch within ear shot. They are both watching now.
 

Rusty Shackelford

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#86
That's what I am seeing in the nest by me...one in nest and one perched in tree no more than 50 yards away. I can stop on road about 1/4 mile away and watch them with some quality binoculars
 

GOLDBRIX

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#87
Well, As of 6:35pm a chunk of shell has broke off and you can see a little beak bobbing in and out as the egg shell cracks more and more.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#88
This morning at 5:30 AM Eaglet 15 (E15) made a jail break and is completely out of it's shell.
The second egg of this clutch (Egg 4) has developed a pip now too. It's gonna get busy there real soon.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#89
Just saw Harriet trying to feed E15. She must have had food in her crop as nothing has been brought to the nest yet.
E15 is bobbing and weaving all around (no neck strength). Harriet, trying to hit a moving target with the food.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#90
6:48pm E16 got out of the shell and into his new world. Harriett and M15 are both at the nest feeding both eaglets.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#91
I turned on the nest earlier than usual this morning at 7:35 am the nest camera found Harriett up off her pair of eaglets E16 and E15 rough housing each other and Harriet "reffin" the tussel. 7:38am Harriet get tired of the horse play and broods the two for now. Kids will be kids. Fun to watch the goings on.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#92
8:15 Harriett gets up to feed the two. Meals going find as long as the two are butt to butt and don't see the other. Once they move to where they can see each other it is "On like Donkey Kong". Harriett tries to buy some peace tempting the two with food. The youngest excepts the bribes but when the older eaglet gets full he aint buyin' the bribes anymore and the tusselin' begins again.
Harriet eats while the two fight but then gives up on the situation by putting them both in time-out ( brooding them down).
 

GOLDBRIX

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#93
About 6:15pm Harriett started supper for the two. The Law of the Jungle should be titled The Law of the Wild: Only the strong survive. During this almost 30 minute feed H was pre-occupied with feeding E15 ( the oldest and biggest of the two). E16 got a scrap after about 5 minutes of continuous picks to 15. 16 began sitting and just waiting for a bite. If 16 was to slow to respond to mom mom ate it. 15 would woulf bump 16 out of the way to grab the next bite.
Once 15 was about into a food coma mom would start feeding 16. Mom was not as patient w/16 as she was w/15. If 16 didn't open up fast enough Mom would eat it.
Finally both Es seemed full and 15 was falling asleep.
While typing this entry up Harriett brooded the kids down for a sleep.
I'm envious of these two parents and their fishing abilities. They've brought fish back to the nest I'd be proud to catch.
At this time I use https://www.dickpritchettrealestate.com/eagle-feed.html as a screen saver and leave it open in the background. If I hear some swallin' or camera zooming in and out I jump over to see what is going on with this eagle family.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#94
11:21am Lunch is over according to Mom. E15 ( the oldest) is moved to the other side of the bowl and hanging out by himself while Harriett broods E16 for a nap. E15 is catnapping against the twigs and seems perfectly happy not being under mom's wing/body.
E15 shoots a poop sack clear out of the nest. Must be a natural instinct. Stumblin', bumblin' around in the bowl too.
1st sign of independence.
 

EricTheCat

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It just occurred to me I haven't seen an eagle here in at least a few days which is unusual. I wonder if they are tending to young and so not making their way all the way out here now. Also with all the lakes opening up they probably aren't hunting out here so far from water as often.
 

newmisty

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It just occurred to me I haven't seen an eagle here in at least a few days which is unusual. I wonder if they are tending to young and so not making their way all the way out here now. Also with all the lakes opening up they probably aren't hunting out here so far from water as often.
News has spread to the Animal Kingdom...
 

newmisty

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Ah, so the eagles around here are social distancing? That could explain it but only if the vultures did not get the memo.
I hear the vultures are safe it's the "carrier" pigeons you need to be concerned with. Nyuk nyuk.
 

GOLDBRIX

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It just occurred to me I haven't seen an eagle here in at least a few days which is unusual. I wonder if they are tending to young and so not making their way all the way out here now. Also with all the lakes opening up they probably aren't hunting out here so far from water as often.
Very possible the further North the laying and hatching season is delayed.
 

GOLDBRIX

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2:45pm Just checked in on the nest. 1st time either one of the parents are not in the nest or the tree and its many perches / view points.
This is when a nest can get raided by local crows, owls, or hawks.
3:00pm Dad's back (M15) "security, security".
 

GOLDBRIX

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E16 and E15 are getting strong enough to waddle around in the nesting bowl. Mom and Dad are spending more time out of the nest. One of the parents are always close to the nest with a few exceptions. When the eaglets don't have mom or dad in or on the nest they stumble over to the one side of the nest where a limb comes up from under the nest and usually Mom or Dad is perched over there and they can see them, and within ear-shot of the young'uns.
The eaglets get along pretty good now-a-days.
If one parent get tired of watching the nest it will start screechin' for the mate to show back up so they can take a break.
Harriett usually is the one that stays in the nest all night with the two. Both parents good at feeding the youngsters too.
Years past the oldest eaglet would "Bogart" the grub from the younger sibling.
 

GOLDBRIX

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Another thing I've noticed with this late and successful hatch is the feed is different. With early hatching of the past the diet has been predominately fish w/ an occasional rabbit or squirrel entree.
With this late hatch the eaglets are getting more squirrel, some fish, and one or two rabbits.
Maybe the early hatch is in sync with fish spawning thus fish in shallower waters are easier to find an grab from an aerial assault . Maybe IDK
 

GOLDBRIX

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The eaglets are now all big enough to get to the rim of the nest and look out on their world. They sit side by side a lot. A lot less bickering between the two so the hierarchy / pecking order is set. The oldest by two a half days E15 is biggest, but E16 is not that far behind now. And E16 gets his occasional lick or food swipe in on a daily basis.

https://www.dickpritchettrealestate.com/eagle-feed.html
 

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https://www.toledoblade.com/local/e...rbine-at-Wood-County-site/stories/20200503028



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Bald eagle killed by wind turbine at Wood County site


Matt Markey
The Blade
mmarkey@theblade.com

May 1, 2020
1:15 PM

BOWLING GREEN — As they labored trying to start a broken down truck near the north end of the Wood County Landfill, Ken Vollmar, superintendent of the facility, and one of his employees felt the bite of the winter chill. Their cold hands had their attention as one of the four wind turbines located at the site spun nearby.
But then they heard a loud thump and turned to witness a large bird tumbling to the frozen ground. What they soon learned was the severed wing of the bird floated in its slower descent and landed about 50 feet away.
“We looked around as soon as we heard the turbine hit something, but at first we couldn’t tell exactly what it was,” Mr. Vollmar said. He immediately called his superiors downtown and then reported the incident to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Reid Van Cleve, a veteran officer with the Division of Wildlife assigned to Ottawa County, who was also covering Wood County that January day, responded to the site in about an hour. The report he filed on the kill indicated the dead bird was an adult bald eagle, a species safeguarded under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
“The wing was ripped off,” Officer Van Cleve said last week. “It was definitely a turbine strike.”
Following protocol with incidents involving federally protected species, he took the dead eagle to an evidence storage facility and contacted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and one of their investigators picked up the carcass.
Amy Weller, who lives near the Bowling Green wind farm, said she had been concerned since the first two turbines went up in 2003 that their large blades would claim many birds, bats, hawks, or even bald eagles. Two more of the 1.8-megawatt turbines were added the following year. Bowling Green owns about a 50-percent share in the facility and the wind farm provides just 1.5 percent of the electrical needs for the city, according to Daryl Stockburger with the Bowling Green Utilities Department.
“I was opposed to those windmills from the start because of the impact they could have on wildlife,” Ms. Weller said. “I had been out to California about 20 years ago and saw the carcasses on the ground under the wind turbines. From an environmental standpoint, I can’t believe they would want to do that here, with all of the migration we have in this area and the bald eagles.”
The carcass of an adult bald eagle killed when it was struck by one of the wind turbines located at the Wood County Landfill lies on the ground near the base of the turbine. ODNR
The situation at the landfill became more critical when a pair of adult bald eagles built a large nest in one of the tall trees just east of the site. John Hageman, a retired biologist who lives a few miles from the site and travels past the landfill area often, was likely the first to report that active bald eagle nest earlier this spring when he photographed two mature bald eagles on the rim of the nest. Out of concern over the safety of the eagles nesting so close to the turbines, Mr. Hageman called USFWS and ODNR and learned an eagle had been killed at the site back in January.
“The USFWS representative took the location information and mentioned that since there were so many nests in Ohio, they probably could operate [the turbines] as they pleased,” Mr. Hageman said.
Mr. Vollmar said he is not sure how long the nest has been there and that it “seemed to come out of nowhere.”
“We’ve been seeing bald eagles here and there for years, but that nest is huge, and they seemed to have built it pretty quickly,” he said. “The ODNR told us not to be driving close to it while they’re nesting, so we’ve stayed away.”
Elizabeth Wick lives on Green Road where her family’s property butts up against the landfill, and she recalled seeing a group of bald eagles — two adults and two eaglets — in a nearby field a couple of years ago, and she assumed at the time the birds were just passing through the area.
“I was really excited to hear that they were nesting here at the landfill. I just love seeing them,” she said. “I still whip out my cellphone every time and try to get a picture. It is just really cool to have them around.”
The wing of an adult bald eagle was severed when the bird was struck and killed by one of the wind turbines located at the Wood County Landfill. ODNR
Besides their striking appearance — a deep, dark brown body that appears almost black, with a bright white head and tail — bald eagles also stand out for their size. Adults have a wingspan of about 6 1/2 feet, making them one of the largest raptors in North America.
More than three months after the bald eagle was killed at the landfill, the USFWS has released no pictures or written reports on the incident, and has given out very little basic information.
“Our investigation is currently ongoing,” said Tina Shaw, public affairs specialist with the USFWS office in Bloomington, Minn., where the case is being handled.
This past week, Holly Karg, the director of media relations and communications with American Municipal Power, Inc., which operates the wind turbines at the Bowling Green site, said AMP had not received a report of the eagle being killed by the turbine, so an investigation was started in response to The Blade’s inquiry.
“The investigation provided no evidence of the claim,” Ms. Karg later stated in a Thursday afternoon email.
The lack of information being disseminated about the incident does not surprise Mr. Hageman, who serves on the conservation committee for the Black Swamp Bird Observatory. What makes this incident so significant is it has provided a habeas corpus moment.
“We have these discussions all of the time about how the turbine operators are being so secretive about the number of bird and bat kills that take place at these sites. They are absolutely petrified about the general public knowing how many eagles and bats are killed by wind turbines,” he said.
A recent report by Audubon indicated wind turbines in North America kill up to 328,000 birds each year, “making it the most threatening form of green energy,” Audubon said. Many experts believe the actual death toll from wind turbines is much higher due to random sampling protocols and the proliferation of turbines across the landscape. The Audubon report also cited the rapid expansion of wind energy in the United States and added “the wind industry has the incentive to stop the slaughter” by giving serious consideration to the potential impact on birds and wildlife when determining where wind farms are developed.
“Especially with bald eagles, are we going to fight so hard to save something that was almost extinct, and then say it’s OK to kill them?” Mr. Hageman said, referencing the fact bald eagles, revered since they were designated as the national symbol of the United States in 1782, teetered on the verge of extirpation a few decades ago.
Bald eagle numbers were decimated during the middle of the 20th century by the loss of habitat, the use of pesticides that ruined the shells of their eggs, and illegal hunting.
By 1979, there were only four nesting pairs left in Ohio, and none of those nests were producing any young.
A ban on the use of DDT and better protection of the eagles and their habitat with the Endangered Species Act allowed the bald eagle to start a steady recovery. By 2007, bald eagle numbers had recovered to the point that the USFWS removed them from the endangered species list. A recent survey by the ODNR indicated there are 707 bald eagle nests in the state and bald eagles are nesting in 85 of Ohio’s 88 counties.
Bald eagles have been a dominant factor in the debate over a half dozen proposed massive wind farms in Seneca, Huron, Erie, Sandusky, and Crawford counties. The Republic Wind, Seneca Wind, Emerson Creek Wind, Honey Creek Wind, Buck Springs Wind, and Emerson West Wind projects could add hundreds of wind turbines to a part of Ohio that is used by many migratory birds, and is now home to many bald eagle nests.
Chris Aichholz is an activist with Seneca Anti-Wind Union, a grassroots group that has been battling with the large power brokers seeking to add these new wind farms across northwest Ohio’s agricultural midsection, and in the middle of what has become very active bald eagle nesting grounds. An ODNR study earlier this spring revealed Seneca County ranks fifth in Ohio with at least 24 active bald eagle nests.
Mr. Aichholz, who lives in rural Seneca County, said he now regularly sees adult bald eagles soaring and hunting across the farm fields and woodlots near his home. His concern for the fate of the bald eagles spiked when he learned that the Seneca Wind project, now in a state of limbo, would have included 27 wind turbines twice the height of those at the Bowling Green wind farm within two miles of his home.
“What happened with the turbine blade killing that bald eagle over in Wood County — that just confirmed our worst fears,” he said. “That dead eagle is the reality of this issue, and it shows that this can happen right here in our backyard. It is awful, and you just hope you can find someone who is interested on the federal level and get them to take some kind of action.”
Mark Shieldcastle, a retired avian biologist from the ODNR who is widely recognized as the region’s preeminent expert on birds and bald eagles, said the flying and hunting patterns of bald eagles put them in a very precarious position when wind turbines sprout in their habitat.
“They do a lot of crepuscular movement, before dawn and after dark, and that would make it very difficult for them to see things such as the moving blades of a wind turbine,” he said. “I’m sure these wind companies don’t want to get the word out that a turbine killed an eagle, but these turbines might be directly between their feeding area and the nest, so I could see their style of flight being very problematic.”
Mr. Hageman, who retired in 2011 after a quarter of a century working for Ohio Sea Grant and Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory, said any new wind projects should be heavily scrutinized for their potentially devastating impact on birds, bats, bald eagles, and hawks, while existing facilities such as the Bowling Green wind complex should modify the use of the turbines to give the resident bald eagles a chance to survive.
“I would like to see them turn the darned things off at least through the early part of the year when they are raising young and teaching them to fly,” he said. “That seems like a small sacrifice to keep these birds alive. Bald eagles are the most valuable player in the bird world, but I get the impression that some people look at them as expendable these days, since we have more around.”
 

mtnman

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https://www.toledoblade.com/local/e...rbine-at-Wood-County-site/stories/20200503028



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Bald eagle killed by wind turbine at Wood County site


Matt Markey
The Blade
mmarkey@theblade.com

May 1, 2020
1:15 PM

BOWLING GREEN — As they labored trying to start a broken down truck near the north end of the Wood County Landfill, Ken Vollmar, superintendent of the facility, and one of his employees felt the bite of the winter chill. Their cold hands had their attention as one of the four wind turbines located at the site spun nearby.
But then they heard a loud thump and turned to witness a large bird tumbling to the frozen ground. What they soon learned was the severed wing of the bird floated in its slower descent and landed about 50 feet away.
“We looked around as soon as we heard the turbine hit something, but at first we couldn’t tell exactly what it was,” Mr. Vollmar said. He immediately called his superiors downtown and then reported the incident to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Reid Van Cleve, a veteran officer with the Division of Wildlife assigned to Ottawa County, who was also covering Wood County that January day, responded to the site in about an hour. The report he filed on the kill indicated the dead bird was an adult bald eagle, a species safeguarded under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
“The wing was ripped off,” Officer Van Cleve said last week. “It was definitely a turbine strike.”
Following protocol with incidents involving federally protected species, he took the dead eagle to an evidence storage facility and contacted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and one of their investigators picked up the carcass.
Amy Weller, who lives near the Bowling Green wind farm, said she had been concerned since the first two turbines went up in 2003 that their large blades would claim many birds, bats, hawks, or even bald eagles. Two more of the 1.8-megawatt turbines were added the following year. Bowling Green owns about a 50-percent share in the facility and the wind farm provides just 1.5 percent of the electrical needs for the city, according to Daryl Stockburger with the Bowling Green Utilities Department.
“I was opposed to those windmills from the start because of the impact they could have on wildlife,” Ms. Weller said. “I had been out to California about 20 years ago and saw the carcasses on the ground under the wind turbines. From an environmental standpoint, I can’t believe they would want to do that here, with all of the migration we have in this area and the bald eagles.”
The carcass of an adult bald eagle killed when it was struck by one of the wind turbines located at the Wood County Landfill lies on the ground near the base of the turbine. ODNR
The situation at the landfill became more critical when a pair of adult bald eagles built a large nest in one of the tall trees just east of the site. John Hageman, a retired biologist who lives a few miles from the site and travels past the landfill area often, was likely the first to report that active bald eagle nest earlier this spring when he photographed two mature bald eagles on the rim of the nest. Out of concern over the safety of the eagles nesting so close to the turbines, Mr. Hageman called USFWS and ODNR and learned an eagle had been killed at the site back in January.
“The USFWS representative took the location information and mentioned that since there were so many nests in Ohio, they probably could operate [the turbines] as they pleased,” Mr. Hageman said.
Mr. Vollmar said he is not sure how long the nest has been there and that it “seemed to come out of nowhere.”
“We’ve been seeing bald eagles here and there for years, but that nest is huge, and they seemed to have built it pretty quickly,” he said. “The ODNR told us not to be driving close to it while they’re nesting, so we’ve stayed away.”
Elizabeth Wick lives on Green Road where her family’s property butts up against the landfill, and she recalled seeing a group of bald eagles — two adults and two eaglets — in a nearby field a couple of years ago, and she assumed at the time the birds were just passing through the area.
“I was really excited to hear that they were nesting here at the landfill. I just love seeing them,” she said. “I still whip out my cellphone every time and try to get a picture. It is just really cool to have them around.”
The wing of an adult bald eagle was severed when the bird was struck and killed by one of the wind turbines located at the Wood County Landfill. ODNR
Besides their striking appearance — a deep, dark brown body that appears almost black, with a bright white head and tail — bald eagles also stand out for their size. Adults have a wingspan of about 6 1/2 feet, making them one of the largest raptors in North America.
More than three months after the bald eagle was killed at the landfill, the USFWS has released no pictures or written reports on the incident, and has given out very little basic information.
“Our investigation is currently ongoing,” said Tina Shaw, public affairs specialist with the USFWS office in Bloomington, Minn., where the case is being handled.
This past week, Holly Karg, the director of media relations and communications with American Municipal Power, Inc., which operates the wind turbines at the Bowling Green site, said AMP had not received a report of the eagle being killed by the turbine, so an investigation was started in response to The Blade’s inquiry.
“The investigation provided no evidence of the claim,” Ms. Karg later stated in a Thursday afternoon email.
The lack of information being disseminated about the incident does not surprise Mr. Hageman, who serves on the conservation committee for the Black Swamp Bird Observatory. What makes this incident so significant is it has provided a habeas corpus moment.
“We have these discussions all of the time about how the turbine operators are being so secretive about the number of bird and bat kills that take place at these sites. They are absolutely petrified about the general public knowing how many eagles and bats are killed by wind turbines,” he said.
A recent report by Audubon indicated wind turbines in North America kill up to 328,000 birds each year, “making it the most threatening form of green energy,” Audubon said. Many experts believe the actual death toll from wind turbines is much higher due to random sampling protocols and the proliferation of turbines across the landscape. The Audubon report also cited the rapid expansion of wind energy in the United States and added “the wind industry has the incentive to stop the slaughter” by giving serious consideration to the potential impact on birds and wildlife when determining where wind farms are developed.
“Especially with bald eagles, are we going to fight so hard to save something that was almost extinct, and then say it’s OK to kill them?” Mr. Hageman said, referencing the fact bald eagles, revered since they were designated as the national symbol of the United States in 1782, teetered on the verge of extirpation a few decades ago.
Bald eagle numbers were decimated during the middle of the 20th century by the loss of habitat, the use of pesticides that ruined the shells of their eggs, and illegal hunting.
By 1979, there were only four nesting pairs left in Ohio, and none of those nests were producing any young.
A ban on the use of DDT and better protection of the eagles and their habitat with the Endangered Species Act allowed the bald eagle to start a steady recovery. By 2007, bald eagle numbers had recovered to the point that the USFWS removed them from the endangered species list. A recent survey by the ODNR indicated there are 707 bald eagle nests in the state and bald eagles are nesting in 85 of Ohio’s 88 counties.
Bald eagles have been a dominant factor in the debate over a half dozen proposed massive wind farms in Seneca, Huron, Erie, Sandusky, and Crawford counties. The Republic Wind, Seneca Wind, Emerson Creek Wind, Honey Creek Wind, Buck Springs Wind, and Emerson West Wind projects could add hundreds of wind turbines to a part of Ohio that is used by many migratory birds, and is now home to many bald eagle nests.
Chris Aichholz is an activist with Seneca Anti-Wind Union, a grassroots group that has been battling with the large power brokers seeking to add these new wind farms across northwest Ohio’s agricultural midsection, and in the middle of what has become very active bald eagle nesting grounds. An ODNR study earlier this spring revealed Seneca County ranks fifth in Ohio with at least 24 active bald eagle nests.
Mr. Aichholz, who lives in rural Seneca County, said he now regularly sees adult bald eagles soaring and hunting across the farm fields and woodlots near his home. His concern for the fate of the bald eagles spiked when he learned that the Seneca Wind project, now in a state of limbo, would have included 27 wind turbines twice the height of those at the Bowling Green wind farm within two miles of his home.
“What happened with the turbine blade killing that bald eagle over in Wood County — that just confirmed our worst fears,” he said. “That dead eagle is the reality of this issue, and it shows that this can happen right here in our backyard. It is awful, and you just hope you can find someone who is interested on the federal level and get them to take some kind of action.”
Mark Shieldcastle, a retired avian biologist from the ODNR who is widely recognized as the region’s preeminent expert on birds and bald eagles, said the flying and hunting patterns of bald eagles put them in a very precarious position when wind turbines sprout in their habitat.
“They do a lot of crepuscular movement, before dawn and after dark, and that would make it very difficult for them to see things such as the moving blades of a wind turbine,” he said. “I’m sure these wind companies don’t want to get the word out that a turbine killed an eagle, but these turbines might be directly between their feeding area and the nest, so I could see their style of flight being very problematic.”
Mr. Hageman, who retired in 2011 after a quarter of a century working for Ohio Sea Grant and Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory, said any new wind projects should be heavily scrutinized for their potentially devastating impact on birds, bats, bald eagles, and hawks, while existing facilities such as the Bowling Green wind complex should modify the use of the turbines to give the resident bald eagles a chance to survive.
“I would like to see them turn the darned things off at least through the early part of the year when they are raising young and teaching them to fly,” he said. “That seems like a small sacrifice to keep these birds alive. Bald eagles are the most valuable player in the bird world, but I get the impression that some people look at them as expendable these days, since we have more around.”
This happens every day wind turbine are know bird killers.
 

EricTheCat

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A little OT, but I was just mowing the ditch and I saw a big bird shadow so I looked up and there was a vulture flying really low. He hovered over me for a while. I told him "you might as well stick around, you never know". At that moment I saw a 2nd shadow figuring it was another vulture, so I look up and see the 2nd one was an osprey flying even lower. Got a real good look at them.
 

GOLDBRIX

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Well, the eaglets are looking and acting more like gangling teens. Glide hop from one side of the nest to the other, and now perching on branches just off the nest.
Mom and Dad spend less time at the nest usually to just drop food off and maybe peck out the first bites or so for the kids.
Harriet and M15 usually perch on branches above the nest, off to the side on a big branch, or a short way away in a tree that is probably dead but high enough they can see the nest in the main tree.

https://www.dickpritchettrealestate.com/eagle-feed.html
 

GOLDBRIX

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This morning E15 has "Bogarted" a fish dad brought into the nest for close to an hour. E16 gets abused anytime he get close to food so he just waits. Harriett finally flies in from he perch takes what is left of the fish and start feeding 15 more and herself with 16 begging but not interfering. Finally Mom starts pulling off scraps for 16 but that fish is about consumed by big 15.
While typing this Mom went back to her perch, 15 is perching on a branch just off the nest. E16 still searching for morsels and scraps. Dad is not around maybe he'll bring in more food.
It is amazing how close to a three day head start for E15 has given him such a distinct advantage in dominating his sibling. Mom and dad are the only ones that can take the prey from him with no aggression from him. E16 has been relegated to finding scraps or the generosity from Mom or Dad and that is little consolation.
It appears E16 will survive to the point of getting out on his own but one thing is for sure watching this seasons siblings:
ONLY THE STRONG SURVIVE. E15 will by his brutish tactics. E16 might by his wits.

To be Continued
 
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GOLDBRIX

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Well, I say the eaglets are now full fledged Juveniles now. While all their flights are short hops they are hops out of the nest bowl and out on the outer branches with mom and dad. I am not certain but the older one E15 I believe has flown down to the ground and got himself back up to the nest. E16 is out on a long branch just behind mom.
Any day I'll catch a flight now. It will be shot ones around the home tree for the first week then longer and longer adventures, but always home for a chowtime.
 

GOLDBRIX

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E15 is out on a flight. I don't see him in any of the cameras (4). E16 is sitting in the nest bowl dad has dropped off two fish and 16 just looks at them. Humid rainy day where they are at in Florida.
1:37pm 15 just showed up in one of the 'attic" branches.
 

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E15 is out on a flight. I don't see him in any of the cameras (4). E16 is sitting in the nest bowl dad has dropped off two fish and 16 just looks at them. Humid rainy day where they are at in Florida.
1:37pm 15 just showed up in one of the 'attic" branches.
Sounds like 15 has 16 trained well. Don't touch the food till i'm done.
 

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Not sure why but it has always saddened me greatly when I hear about bad things happening to raptors.
Not sure why? Maybe because they are beautiful, majestic creatures, surviving in an ever dimininishing natural environment and you are a compassionate human being.
 

GOLDBRIX

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Well, 15 has been Flight Practicing flapping from nest to branches numerous times. 16 has flapped over to one branch close to his elder sibling and just watches. 15 is back and forth like a pinball in a machine. Even trying to land on one of the cameras. 16 watches 15 like 15 has a second head growing out. (funny)
The wind and rain has picked up and the kids have went back to the bowl for safety.
 

GOLDBRIX

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It has been a few days since I checked in on the juveniles. I don't think they are called eaglets at this stage. 15 is not at the nest or in the tree. Harriette is sitting up in the attic and 16 just took a mini-flight from the nest to the main outer branch.
The last time I saw juvi. eagles they'd take flights but would return to the nest at night. So maybe 15 will so up closer to dark.
Since 16 is almost 3 days younger and received less food from mom and dad I think his maturing is being delayed or stunted. He did look good when I watched his mini-flight so his physical fitness is improving.

8:20 pm 15 is back perching outside the nest. So both kids and one adukt is at the nest/tree now.
 
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GOLDBRIX

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According to the update E15 has been out of the nest and on a pylon at the pond for about three hours. E16 is at the nest but out on the main branch looking over his back at his sibling at the pond. Screeching at him on occasion.
15 is now down on a cement culvert showing a lot of interest in the fish close to the surface.
 

EO 11110

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every time i see this thread title i think of this coin. think peter schiff hit me with mk ultra 10 years ago

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