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Banned Sci-Fi Channel UFO Special! - James Doohan, Bob Lazar

engineear

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#81
That's been in Minnesota too long, needs some sun. Or, stay away from the flour bag when you're sneezing...that IS flour, right?
Thing is on drugs, really dilated!
 

mtnman

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#82
I've looked over those drawings about the ufo's and how they're constructed. I've figured the answer to my question. These craft are so fast, use wormholes, folded space, warp drive, etc....that they don't need bathrooms. They come here, harass us, then speed home. The other option is they wear Depends. Assuming they eat, of course.
Oh, they eat.....
 

GOLDBRIX

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#83

ZZZZZ

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#86
In other news today...

I-Team: Former Sen. Reid calls for congressional hearings into UFOs





Posted: Jan 31, 2019 / 03:07 PM PST / Updated: Jan 31, 2019 / 05:06 PM PST

LAS VEGAS - Former Nevada Senator Harry Reid is calling for formal congressional hearings probing the enduring mystery of UFOs.
The longtime leader of Senate Democrats quietly sponsored a secret Pentagon study of UFOs and related mysteries. The program was based in Las Vegas but ended in 2012.

Now, in his first on-camera interview in more than a year, Reid says both Congress and the Pentagon should take a fresh look at the topic, and he intends to help make it happen.

"Some people say, why is Reid doing this? He doesn't know anything about science. Well, I'm doing it out of sheer curiosity," Reid said .
Harry Reid's interest in UFOs dates back 30 years, but he kept it quiet until Dec. 2017 when the New York Times reported about the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP), a secret Pentagon study of UFOs and related phenomena, initiated by Reid and two other senators. Documents related to AATIP and its offshoot -- Advanced Aerospace Weapons Systems Application Program (AAWSAP) -- do not mention UFOs , ET's, or little green men, and Reid has been careful to avoid the tabloid slant.



Reporter George Knapp: "You've used that quote about 'It's not little green men.' We don't know, we don't know what it is or where they are from?"

Harry Reid: "We do not know. What I have learned is, you can't just hide your head in the sand and say these things are not happening. We have military installations where hundreds and hundreds of people who are there and see these things."



Dramatic military episodes involving highly-advanced but unknown intruders, such as a fleet of so-called gimbal craft in 2015 or the 2004 incursions by large tic tac's more than justify an ongoing study, Reid said.

"As I said, this is a worldwide phenomenon. It's not just here in the United States. There are certain places we don't understand why but there are more occurrences and have been for a long long time."

The study based in Las Vegas explored topics far beyond the nuts and bolts of flying saucers. Physicist Dr. Hal Puthoff assigned 38 topics to academics and experts, tasking the authors to project to the year 2050 and speculate on what our cutting-edge technology might become. UFOs, whatever they are, have already demonstrated some of what is possible.

In July 2018, the I-Team first released the list of those papers. Two weeks ago, the Defense Intelligence Agency confirmed the list when it released a letter from late Senator John McCain, who had requested all available materials from AATIP for his armed services committee. Reid and McCain were from different parties but were close.

"Sure, John knew what I was doing. He didn't hide the fact that he was interested also. It's why he wrote the letter."

Media critics have griped that the papers explored fringe science. That was the assignment, according to Dr. Puthoff. One publication explores invisibility cloaking -- craft that are not only invisible to radar, but actually invisible. That research has reportedly been underway at Nevada's Area 51 base in recent years.

Another paper by a UNLV engineer explored how to detect and track hypersonic objects, things that traverse earth's atmosphere at incredible speeds, similar to hypersonic missiles Russia's military now claims to possess.

Reporter George Knapp: "It could tell us about UFOs but also Russian missiles, so it has practical benefits."

Harry Reid: "Of course."

One of the papers on the AATIP list focused on metamaterials, exotic compounds that could explain the physics of UFOs. Since AATIP ended, private groups such as To The Stars Academy have scoured the planet, seeking bits and pieces of supposed wreckage for testing.
Former Pentagon intelligence officer Lue Elizondo is spearheading that effort.

In 2009, Senator Reid tried to turn AATIP into a special access program, in part so it might gain access to evidence that has not yet been made public.

Reporter George Knapp: "It suggests there might be other studies and programs that might shed light on this?"

Harry Reid: "Other programs that have been done and information they have, including different pieces of evidence."

Under Senate rules, Reid was prohibited from lobbying his former colleagues for two years. That time limit expired earlier this month and he's been making calls to key people in Washington about this issue.

The I-Team asked Senator Reid if he thinks it is time for an official disclosure about UFOs. Here's his answer.
Video here:
https://www.lasvegasnow.com/news/i-...r-congressional-hearings-into-ufos/1743467461
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DodgebyDave

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#87
One of these days a glorious space vessel is going to warp into a bag of shit some bastard tossed into space
 

newmisty

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#88
One of these days a glorious space vessel is going to warp into a bag of shit some bastard tossed into space
Yeah, they call it a BMW.
 

OverOver

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#89
Well hmmmm, what I need is an answer, preferably from a de-classified document originating from a 'highest source'

Look at Robert Lazar's W-2 and the ID with his picture. It has on them "United States Department of Naval Intelligence/U.S. Department of Naval Intelligence" There's a Department of the Navy and within it there is the "Office of Naval Intelligence" As far as I can find out there is no United States Department of Naval Intelligence.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#90
as I can find out there is no United States Department of Naval Intelligence.
"It's superty secret, Hushity-hush". :secret:

I've learned when it comes to government just because it is not common knowledge does not mean it does not exist.
Look how long they denied Area 51. How long the A-12 had been in service before pilots on a Red-Eye flight seen one above them and squawked about it to Air Traffic Control......
 

ZZZZZ

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#91
Alien ship may be among us, Harvard astronomer insists, despite grumbling and criticism from peers

Avi Loeb's theory about an alien spaceship has made the rounds in the media and caused controversy in the academic community.
(Adam Glanzman/For The Washington Post)
Avi SelikThe Washington Post

Before he started the whole alien spaceship thing last year, the chairman of Harvard University 's astronomy department was known for public lectures on modesty. Personal modesty, which Avi Loeb said he learned growing up on a farm. And what Loeb calls "cosmic modesty" - the idea that it's arrogant to assume we are alone in the universe, or even a particularly special species.

You can find a poster for one of these lectures in Loeb's office today, though it's a bit lost among the clutter: photos of Loeb posing under the dome of Harvard's enormous 19th-century telescope; thank-you notes from elementary schoolchildren; a framed interview he gave the New York Times in 2014; his books on the formation of galaxies; his face, again and again - a bespectacled man in his mid-50s with a perpetually satisfied smile.

Loeb stands beside his desk on the first morning of spring courses in a creaseless suit, stapling syllabi for his afternoon class. He points visitors to this and that on the wall. He mentions that four TV crews were in this office on the day in the fall when his spaceship theory went viral, and now five film companies are interested in making a movie about his life.

A neatly handwritten page of equations sits on the desk, on the edge closest to the guest chairs.

"Oh, this is something I did last night," Loeb says. It's a calculation, he explains, supporting his theory that an extraterrestrial spacecraft, or at least a piece of one, may at this moment be flying past the orbit of Jupiter.

Since publishing his controversial paper, Loeb has run a nearly nonstop media circuit, embracing the celebrity that comes from being perhaps the most academically distinguished E.T. enthusiast of his time - the top Harvard astronomer who suspects technology from another solar system just showed up at our door. And this, in turn, has left some of his peers nonplused - grumbling at what they see as a flimsy theory or bewildered as to why Harvard's top astronomer won't shut up about aliens.

What you can't call Loeb is a crank. When astronomers in Hawaii stumbled across the first known interstellar object in late 2017 - a blip of light moving so fast past the sun that it could only have come from another star - Loeb had three decades of Ivy League professorship and hundreds of astronomical publications on his résumé, mostly to do with the nature of black holes and early galaxies and other subjects far from any tabloid shelf.
So when seemingly every astronomer on the planet was trying to figure out how the interstellar object (dubbed 'Oumuamua, Hawaiian for "scout") got to our remote patch of Milky Way, Loeb's extraordinarily confident suggestion that it probably came from another civilization could not be easily dismissed.
"Considering an artificial origin, one possibility is that 'Oumuamua" - pronounced Oh-mooah-mooah - "is a lightsail, floating in interstellar space as a debris from an advanced technological equipment," Loeb wrote with his colleague Shmuel Bialy in Astrophysical Journal Letters in November - thrilling E.T. enthusiasts and upsetting the fragile orbits of space academia.

" 'Oumuamua is not an alien spaceship, and the authors of the paper insult honest scientific inquiry to even suggest it," tweeted Paul Sutter, an astrophysicist at Ohio State University , shortly after the paper published.

"A shocking example of sensationalist, ill-motivated science," theoretical astrophysicist Ethan Siegel wrote in Forbes. North Carolina State Universityastrophycisist Katie Mack suggested Loeb was trolling for publicity. "Sometimes you write a paper about something that you don't believe to be true at all, just for the purpose of putting out there," she told the Verge.

Most scientists besides Loeb assume 'Oumuamua is some sort of rock, be it an asteroid ejected from some star in meltdown hundreds of millions of years ago, or an icy comet wandering the interstellar void. But it's moving too fast for an inert rock, Loeb points out - zooming away from the sun as if something is pushing it from behind. And if it's a comet spewing jets of steam, the limited observations astronomers made of it showed no sign.

Loeb argues that 'Oumuamua's behavior means it can't be, as is commonly imagined, a clump of rock shaped like a long potato, but rather an object that's very long and no more than 1 millimeter thick, perhaps like a kilometer-long obloid pancake - or a ship sail - so light and thin that sunlight is pushing it out of our solar system.

And while he's not saying it's definitely aliens, he is saying he can't think of anything other than aliens that fits the data. And he's saying that all over international news.

"Many people expected once there would be this publicity, I would back down," Loeb says. "If someone shows me evidence to the contrary, I will immediately back down."

In the meantime, he's doubling down, hosting a Reddit AMA on "how the discovery of alien life in space will transform our life," and constantly emailing his "friends and colleagues" with updates on all the reporters who are speaking to him.

In a matter of months, Loeb has become a one-man alternative to the dirge of terrestrial news.

"It changes your perception on reality, just knowing that we're not alone," he says. "We are fighting on borders, on resources. . . . It would make us feel part of planet Earth as a civilization rather than individual countries voting on Brexit."

So now he is famous, styling himself as a truth-teller and risk-taker in an age of overly conservative, quiescent scientists.

Avi Loeb said the existence of aliens "would make us feel part of planet earth as a civilization rather than individual countries voting on Brexit."
(Adam Glanzman/For The Washington Post)

"The mainstream approach [is] you can sort of drink your coffee in the morning and expect what you will find later on. It's a stable lifestyle, but for me it resembles more the lifestyle of a business person rather than scientists," he says.

"The worst thing that can happen to me is I would be relieved of my administrative duties, and that would give me even more time to focus on science," Loeb adds. " All the titles I have, I can dial them back. In fact, I can dial myself back to the farm."

Loeb grew up in an Israeli farming village. He would sit in the hills and read philosophy books imagining the broader universe, he says, a fascination that led him into academia and all the way to 'Oumuamua.

"I don't have a class system in my head of academia being the elite," he says, as he leads a reporter into the locked chamber of the Great Refractor - an enormous 19th-century telescope where he sometimes does photo ops. "I see it as a continuation of childhood curiosity - trying to understand what the world is like."

He joined Princeton University 's Institute for Advanced Study in the late 1980s ("Where Einstein used to be," he notes) and later took a junior position in Harvard's astronomy department, where "for 20 years no one had been promoted from within . . . They tenured me after three years.")
As he tells it, his life story sounds like a cerebral version of "Forrest Gump" - Loeb always singemindedly pursuing his science and intersecting with the giants of the field, whom he regularly name-drops. Stephen Hawking had dinner at his house. Stephen Spielberg once asked him for movie tips. Russian billionaire Uri Milner once walked into his office and sat on the couch and asked him to help design humanity's first interstellar spaceship - which he is now doing, with a research budget of $100 million and the endorsement of Mark Zuckerberg and the late Hawking.

Loeb mentions casually that when he was 24 years old he got a private audience with the famed physicist Freeman Dyson - and then pauses for effect beneath the 20-foot shaft of the Great Refractor, grinning until he realizes the reporter doesn't know who Freeman Dyson is.
At midday, Loeb leaves the telescope and his office and descends to a bare white classroom to introduce the basics of astrophysics to a dozen new students.

If he's mastered the national news interview by now, his lecture begins a bit stilted. He looks down at the table as he speaks. He asks the freshmen at this most prestigious of universities to go around the table and list their hobbies.

Ten minutes later, Loeb goes off script.

"Did anyone hear the name 'Oumuamua?" he asks. "What did it mean?"

Almost everyone nods, and freshman Matt Jacobsen, who came to Harvard from an Iowa farm town, volunteers quietly: "There was speculation that it was from another civilization."

"Who made that speculation?" Loeb asks, smiling.

There's an awkward silence in the room, and then Jacobsen cries, "Was it you? Oh my gosh!" and the professor smiles wider.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news...harvard-astronomer-aliens-20190204-story.html
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OverOver

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#92
"It's superty secret, Hushity-hush". :secret:

I've learned when it comes to government just because it is not common knowledge does not mean it does not exist.
Look how long they denied Area 51. How long the A-12 had been in service before pilots on a Red-Eye flight seen one above them and squawked about it to Air Traffic Control......
That was one of the first things that crossed my mind. But I'd still like to see something that shows a Department of Naval Intelligence exists.
 

the_shootist

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#94
Have you ever heard Ralph Rings story?
I'm familiar with him but by no means an expert. I know he's got some pretty advanced ideas
 

Ironpig

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#95
I'm familiar with him but by no means an expert. I know he's got some pretty advanced ideas
Ralph Ring worked with Otis Carr. His claim is they built a flying disc with a magnetic propulsion system. True or not, I have no clue. His story is fascinating though. He says they were ready to go to production when the government shut them down due to "A Threat to US economy".
Obviously, if true, the technology would replace many things in the world.
 

the_shootist

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#96
Ralph Ring worked with Otis Carr. His claim is they built a flying disc with a magnetic propulsion system. True or not, I have no clue. His story is fascinating though. He says they were ready to go to production when the government shut them down due to "A Threat to US economy".
Obviously, if true, the technology would replace many things in the world.
Amazing how much governments stifle the progress of man, isn't it? Imagine what advanced secrets sit in the back pockets of government!!
 

Ironpig

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#97
Amazing how much governments stifle the progress of man, isn't it? Imagine what advanced secrets sit in the back pockets of government!!
Yup,. You must be familiar with Steven Greer. Who talks about Zero Point Energy. THE DISCLOSURE PROJECT and SIRIUS.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#98
Amazing how much governments stifle the progress of man, isn't it? Imagine what advanced secrets sit in the back pockets of government!!
Yeah, Like the carborator that allows gasoline vehicles 200 miles per gallon.
 

Ironpig

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#99
Yeah, Like the carborator that allows gasoline vehicles 200 miles per gallon.
Yes, exactly. I also heard of a carb, (may be the same you are refering to) that steam cleaned itself, allowing better gas mileage. The inventor was convinced to sell out .