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Beaver Control

D-FENZ

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#1
Anyone have an idea how to control beavers? No, not those beavers.

The ones that do this.



IMG_4472[1].JPG

Beavers in this area are quite rare. But one (or more) showed up in my back yard last week and started chewing on some trees. It seemed sort of novel and cute at first but within 3 days this one fell. This could get old quickly. It seems like it is chewing on random trees here and there just taking a few bites here and there. I did discover that it's shacked up under the dock (over by the boat in the photo) and he is about the size of a medium to large dog.

There are 3 wooded streams running through our acreage with some awesome places for a beaver to build a dam. But here they are picking on an established pond in my back yard, ruining the landscaping. They seem quite persistent.

I have been stomping on the dock making racket every time I come home but he just swims away only to return later. Anyone have any idea how to encourage them to get the hell out short of trapping or shooting them?
 

andial

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#2
Throw rocks at them?
 

nickndfl

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#3
Walk point in the bush and hunt them like Charlie, man.


 
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hoarder

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#5
Anyone have any idea how to encourage them to get the hell out short of trapping or shooting them?
Why not shoot or trap them?
 

<SLV>

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#6
Beaver tastes great. The tail should be laid on coals until the skin blisters, then turn over and do the same thing. Boil the hind quarters in a stock put with garlic, onions, and any other spices you prefer until the meat falls off the bone. Then put the meat in a crock pot with BBQ sauce and let it simmer for a couple hours. Beaver BBQ sandwiches are excellent!
 

hammerhead

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#7
Nasty little buggers. I agree with BigJim. You will have to contact a game division and they can point you to a trapper. If you kill them, you get get in big trouble.
 

90%RealMoney

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#8
I would stay up all night, perched on my roof with a sniper rifle, to take out the bitch that did that to my trees. On a smaller scale, I had to slice up some 5 gallon plastic nursery pots, and wire them around some young giant sequoia trees that I grew from seedlings. Something girdled one of them completely around the trunk, from the ground to about 18" up the trunk. These are 6 to 8 foot trees. Skunk? Rat? I love living in the country, but you can go insane from what all the varmints can do to your hard labor. Almost every morning, wood peckers tapping on the side of the house. Those cute little deer destroying anything you plant. Fox leaving turds in the exact center of your door mat. I got holes all over the ridge cap shingles on my roof. Then there's the gophers...



143801172.D6sBS5Cy.jpg
 

hoarder

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#9
. On a smaller scale, I had to slice up some 5 gallon plastic nursery pots, and wire them around some young giant sequoia trees that I grew from seedlings. Something girdled one of them completely around the trunk, from the ground to about 18" up the trunk. These are 6 to 8 foot trees. Skunk? Rat?
Porcupines will girdle trees big time. Sometimes at the base and sometimes as high as 20' up. I hear they are excellent eating too, though I have a hard time visualizing myself skinning one..
 

andial

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#10
I'm serious D-FENZ had raccoons and possum around here thinking who the feck they were until i started going palestinian on their asses. They were like what the hell is happening !?!?! freaked them out, they are gone. Rabbits use just small stones i let them stay though. One word, rocks.
 

BigJim#1-8

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#11
Beaver tastes great. The tail should be laid on coals until the skin blisters, then turn over and do the same thing. Boil the hind quarters in a stock put with garlic, onions, and any other spices you prefer until the meat falls off the bone. Then put the meat in a crock pot with BBQ sauce and let it simmer for a couple hours. Beaver BBQ sandwiches are excellent!
Eat a beaver, save a tree.
 

Pyramid

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#12
Anyone have an idea how to control beavers? No, not those beavers.

The ones that do this.

Beavers in this area are quite rare. But one (or more) showed up in my back yard last week and started chewing on some trees. It seemed sort of novel and cute at first but within 3 days this one fell. This could get old quickly. It seems like it is chewing on random trees here and there just taking a few bites here and there. I did discover that it's shacked up under the dock (over by the boat in the photo) and he is about the size of a medium to large dog.

There are 3 wooded streams running through our acreage with some awesome places for a beaver to build a dam. But here they are picking on an established pond in my back yard, ruining the landscaping. They seem quite persistent.

I have been stomping on the dock making racket every time I come home but he just swims away only to return later. Anyone have any idea how to encourage them to get the hell out short of trapping or shooting them?
D-FENZ:
You can wrap your Willows and other trees near the pond with chicken wire or similar to stop them from chewing on them. It's not chewing on them at random, its going to drop them so it has an unlimited supply of food and building material without leaving the water.

An established pond is always preferred over damning a stream to create a pond. They need deep water to cache food near their lodge that will last them through the winter when they are less active, even if you are in a warmer climate where the pond will not freeze.

"Persistent" is an understatement. Once established, they do not go away ever unless they exhaust their food supply. Just wait until (s)he finds a mate and they start reproducing. Based on my experience, there is no way to shoo them away short of live traps or lethal methods. They are incredibly impressive animals in both work ethic and size when fully grown (60+ pounds). I have a great appreciation mixed with hatred for them, as they do not give up and it's very difficult to outwork or outsmart them...they eventually will find a workaround that suits their needs.

Good luck.
 

Irons

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#14
My buddy Buzzy traps beaver and other problem animals for the county. They get enough complaints, like when the feckers dammed a stream and flooded 1/3 of the town of Sand Lake overnight they call in Buzzy to trap them out. He gets to keep the beavers too.

You guys ever read this famous letter? One of my houses is not far from where this took place in Montcalm county. Yes it's true!
Many an evening in the bars of Howard City, Sand Lake, Pierson, Coral, Amble etc. was had laughing hard at the Spring Pond beaver dilemma.

Mr. Ryan DeVries
2088 Dagget
Pierson, MI 49339
SUBJECT: DEQ File No. 97-59-0023; T11N; R10W, Sec. 20;

Site Location: Montcalm County

Dear Mr. DeVries:

It has come to the attention of the Department of Environmental Quality that there has been recent unauthorized activity on the above referenced parcel of property. You have been certified as the legal landowner and/or contractor who did the following unauthorized activity:

Construction and maintenance of two wood debris dams across the outlet stream of Spring Pond.

A permit must be issued prior to the start of this type of activity. A review of the Department’s files shows that no permits have been issued.

Therefore, the Department has determined that this activity is in violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws annotated.

The Department has been informed that one or both of the dams partially failed during a recent rain event, causing debris and flooding at downstream locations. We find that dams of this nature are inherently hazardous and cannot be permitted.

The Department therefore orders you to cease and desist all activities at this location, and to restore the stream to a free-flow condition by removing all wood and brush forming the dams from the stream channel. All restoration work shall be completed no later than January 31, 2002.

Please notify this office when the restoration has been completed so that a follow-up site inspection may be scheduled by our staff. Failure to comply with this request or any further unauthorized activity on the site may result in this case being referred for elevated enforcement action.

We anticipate and would appreciate your full cooperation in this matter. Please feel free to contact me at this office if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
David L. Price
District Representative
Land and Water Management Division


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

RESPONSE:

Dear Mr. Price,

Re: DEQ File No. 97-59-0023; T11N; R10W, Sec. 20;
Montcalm County

Reference your certified letter dated 12/17/2000 has been referred to me to respond to. First of all, Mr. Ryan De Vries is not the legal landowner and/or contractor at 2088 Dagget, Pierson, Michigan.

I am the legal owner and a couple of beavers are in the (State unauthorized) process of constructing and maintaining two wood “debris” dams across the outlet stream of my Spring Pond.

While I did not pay for, authorize, nor supervise their dam project, I think they would be highly offended that you call their skillful use of natural building materials “debris.” I would like to challenge your department to attempt to emulate their dam project any time and/or any place you choose. I believe I can safely state there is no way you could ever match their dam skills, their dam resourcefulness, their dam ingenuity, their dam persistence, their dam determination and/or their dam work ethic.

As to your request, I do not think the beavers are aware that they must first fill out a dam permit prior to the start of this type of dam
activity. My first dam question to you is: (1) Are you trying to discriminate against my Spring Pond Beavers? or, (2) do you require all beavers throughout this State to conform to said dam request?

If you are not discriminating against these particular beavers, through the Freedom of Information Act I request completed copies of all those other applicable beaver dam permits that have been issued. Perhaps we will see if there really is a dam violation of P! art 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.3010,1 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws, annotated. I have several concerns. My first concern is aren’t the beavers entitled to legal representation?

The Spring Pond Beavers are financially destitute and are unable to pay for said representation – so the State will have to provide them with a lawyer.

The Department’s dam concern that either one or both of the dams failed during a recent rain event causing flooding is proof that this is a natural occurrence, which the Department is required to protect. In other words, we should leave the Spring Pond Beavers alone rather than harrass them and call their dam names. If you want the stream “restored” to a dam free-flow condition – please contact the beavers – but if you are going to arrest them they obviously did not pay any attention to your dam letter (being unable to read English).

In my humble ! opinion, the Spring Pond Beavers have a right to build their unauthorized dams as long as the sky is blue, the grass is green and water flows downstream. They have more dam right than I do to live and enjoy Spring Pond. If the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection lives up to its name, it should protect the natural resources (Beavers) and the environment (Beavers’ Dams).

So, as far as the beavers and I are concerned, this dam case can be referred for more elevated enforcement action right now. Why wait until 1/31/2002 The Spring Pond Beavers may be under the dam ice then, and there will be no way for you or your dam staff to contact/harass them then.

In conclusion, I would like to bring to your attention a real environmental quality (health) problem in the area. It is the bears.
Bears are actually defecating in our woods. I definitely believe you should be persecuting the defecating bears and leave the beavers alone.

If you are going to investigate the beaver dam, watch your step! (The bears are not careful where they dump!)

Being unable to comply with your dam request, and being unable to contact you on your answering machine, I am sending this response to your office via another government organization – the USPS. Maybe, someday, it will get there.

Sincerely,
Stephen L. Tvedten
 

D-FENZ

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#15
D-FENZ:
You can wrap your Willows and other trees near the pond with chicken wire or similar to stop them from chewing on them. It's not chewing on them at random, its going to drop them so it has an unlimited supply of food and building material without leaving the water.

An established pond is always preferred over damning a stream to create a pond. They need deep water to cache food near their lodge that will last them through the winter when they are less active, even if you are in a warmer climate where the pond will not freeze.

"Persistent" is an understatement. Once established, they do not go away ever unless they exhaust their food supply. Just wait until (s)he finds a mate and they start reproducing. Based on my experience, there is no way to shoo them away short of live traps or lethal methods. They are incredibly impressive animals in both work ethic and size when fully grown (60+ pounds). I have a great appreciation mixed with hatred for them, as they do not give up and it's very difficult to outwork or outsmart them...they eventually will find a workaround that suits their needs.

Good luck.
That's what I will do- double wrap the other trees around the pond in chicken wire. While throwing rocks at them sounds like more fun and is certainly a bit edgier, I've never been any good with my aim.

I hate to shoot them because they are so incredibly hard working and industrious, traits that I admire in any creature (except mice and moles). If push comes to shove though and they keep eating my trees I will shoot them and make hats out of their asses.
 

Irons

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#16
That's what I will do- double wrap the other trees around the pond in chicken wire. While throwing rocks at them sounds like more fun and is certainly a bit edgier, I've never been any good with my aim.

I hate to shoot them because they are so incredibly hard working and industrious, traits that I admire in any creature (except mice and moles). If push comes to shove though and they keep eating my trees I will shoot them and make hats out of their asses.
I feel for you man. I see beaver ponds in the woods and the dozens and dozens of chewed dead trees all around them. More dead trees than they could ever eat.
Total destruction in some areas. And they are incredibly difficult to get rid of. Good luck!

.
 

Lt Dan

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#19
If you've few trees they can ruin - do the wire fence thing, probably the best method, as if they've nothing to eat, they will leave.

Other choices would be to shoot, or trap the animal, but only if legal. Animal damage control professional would probably have a live trap and could remove and relocate the animal at a cost to you. So chicken wire would possibly be the best route.

55508_max.png.jpeg
 

andial

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#20
They laugh at that chicken wire, rocks scare the shit out of them, it's not nice having rocks thrown at you. I don't even want to talk about the deer that thought it found a home in my back yard last spring.
 

Lt Dan

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#22
Fire rocks...

Bullet-vector--bullet-in-fire_27-72.jpg


Just aim small hit small.

Only kidding, a last resort.
 

hoarder

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#24
I hate to shoot them because they are so incredibly hard working and industrious, traits that I admire in any creature
Mosquitoes are pretty diligent and determined. Very good traits, I agree. I still kill every one of them that I can.
 
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#25
I have seen whole hills cleared of trees, with the beavers dragging tree parts a couple of hundred yards downhill on massive four-foot-wide drag trails. They love aspens and cottonwoods, but will eat other trees if they are not available. That pine is probably safe but I have read that conifers have been cut down merely for construction material.
 

Agavegirl1

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#26
We hired a trapper when they began destroying trees on our property. Zoning prohibits us from removing more that a set number of trees visible from the lake but apparently the beavers were unaware of the ordinance. The trapper was actually my son-in-law but he did it for the hides and made really beautiful hats. He had some kind of license and removed lots of nuisance beavers.
 
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#28
If you've few trees they can ruin - do the wire fence thing, probably the best method, as if they've nothing to eat, they will leave.

Other choices would be to shoot, or trap the animal, but only if legal. Animal damage control professional would probably have a live trap and could remove and relocate the animal at a cost to you. So chicken wire would possibly be the best route.

View attachment 95279
Unless the goal of the fence is to keep the beaver from using it, I think it is much too late to save the tree in the picture.
 

Zed

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#30
I hear that you shouldn't get them wet...

...or is that gremlins?



... maybe it's beavers that you have to get wet?

I get confused...