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Cabin Porn

newmisty

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Much better HH. I was just thinking the other day how long it's been since I've installed shakes.
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I can't find Grace I&W Shield around here. They look at me like I'm nuts. This is the current deck repair I'm on and using Protecto Wrap. Not bad stuff. This wall has a 4'overhang on it but would like to avoid future rot if a little rubber helps. I figure while I was flashing the joint I'd quickly cover the crack between the joist and girder for a lil some extra. On a new deck I'm a proponent of covering the entire substructure with tar paper/IWS and extend the frame's life by a fair margin.
 

DodgebyDave

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I bet not a one of those cabins have a Hiwatt amplifier...........................
 

hoarder

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I think the multi-angled roof on this cabin has a purpose. Log settle after they are built. It takes 5 years to fully settle. Lots of people refuse to build log gables because they are problematic. Mine is going to be stick framed. A log stacked gable settles and ends up with less pitch that it started out with, and the log ends will end up with a sawtooth pattern and huge voids where log ends meet roof. The multi-angled roof may have been designed to compensate and allow the top of the roof to settle more than the lower sides. Looks neat anyway.
 

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smooth

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I think the multi-angled roof on this cabin has a purpose. Log settle after they are built. It takes 5 years to fully settle. Lots of people refuse to build log gables because they are problematic. Mine is going to be stick framed. A log stacked gable settles and ends up with less pitch that it started out with, and the log ends will end up with a sawtooth pattern and huge voids where log ends meet roof. The multi-angled roof may have been designed to compensate and allow the top of the roof to settle more than the lower sides. Looks neat anyway.
Hoarder, wrong thread probably, but what measures are taken to protect that bottom log from moisture/contact?
 

hoarder

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Hoarder, wrong thread probably, but what measures are taken to protect that bottom log from moisture/contact?
Mainly roof overhang. People who are unfamiliar with log homes think overhang is measured from the outside walls to the drip edge. Actually it's measured from the ends of the logs to the drip line. For every 8 feet of elevation you need one foot of overhang minimum. Horizontal wood rots much faster than vertical wood! Also, the first course should be elevated at least 18" above ground to keep eave drips from splashing on it. Otherwise rain gutters are needed. There is a product to protect logs from rot called "Impel rods". They are pieces of borax/boric acid that fit in drilled passages and leach out borates when they get wet. Not really needed if designed correctly.
The cabin below only has a couple inches of overhang and does not have the logs elevated, and to make things worse, the ridge purlin sticks out past the roofline. It will not last.
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newmisty

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Was pulling out pics for a proposal and came across some more pics from the cabin reno. Nice HEAVY stone sink we pulled from the metal shop and I plumbed in beneath the new window. This ols stone sink was at the metal shop when I worked there and 30 years ago was pulled out of a POND here in AR. Fell in love with his old desk too.
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newmisty

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Looks like a big hard shell tent.
 

Irons

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Looks like a big hard shell tent.
A-frames and A-frame hybrids are pretty common in the woods here but they are all older now. I don't see them being built anymore.
They look cool and shed snow well but wasted space and crappy insulation doesn't make them very practical for a home.


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DodgebyDave

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newmisty

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A-frames and A-frame hybrids are pretty common in the woods here but they are all older now. I don't see them being built anymore.
They look cool and shed snow well but wasted space and crappy insulation doesn't make them very practical for a home.


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I always equated them with them Skanderbamhoovia places where they ski for a living.
 

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A-frames and A-frame hybrids are pretty common in the woods here but they are all older now. I don't see them being built anymore.
They look cool and shed snow well but wasted space and crappy insulation doesn't make them very practical for a home.


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My grandfather had a A-Frame lakehouse in Montana, they can be retro fitted with shed roofs on the sides to make them more functional. Whataburger used A-Frames in various configurations - here's one with the shed roof sides, the only pic I could find that explains it:

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newmisty

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Likely not a cabin but this old barn I photographed tonight fits the thread. A friend of mine has some acreage with this 100+ year old dilapidated beauty on it. My phone's camera sux but enjoy anyway.

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hoarder

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My grandfather had a A-Frame lakehouse in Montana, they can be retro fitted with shed roofs on the sides to make them more functional.
There really aren't that many A frames in Montana. Mostly they're found in the most extreme snow load areas, which incidentally are often ski hotspots. They're fairly cheap to build since the metal roofing displaces need for siding, soffit and fascia on two sides. If you put wings on them, you defy the purpose of A frames. 20 foot framing members are a little shy of adequate but will do in the most primitive A frames. Roof penetrations for wood stoves and plumbing vents is complicated.
 

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Likely not a cabin but this old barn I photographed tonight fits the thread. A friend of mine has some acreage with this 100+ year old dilapidated beauty on it. My phone's camera sux but enjoy anyway.

View attachment 99624
Looks like a corn crib. I doubt there is much to salvage, but it is an interesting old relic - I would let it go back to the earth.
 

Silver

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There really aren't that many A frames in Montana. Mostly they're found in the most extreme snow load areas, which incidentally are often ski hotspots. They're fairly cheap to build since the metal roofing displaces need for siding, soffit and fascia on two sides. If you put wings on them, you defy the purpose of A frames. 20 foot framing members are a little shy of adequate but will do in the most primitive A frames. Roof penetrations for wood stoves and plumbing vents is complicated.
This was on Duck Lake on the east side near Glacier - the ranch was the Glacier Pack and Saddle Ranch, they supplied the park with horses before the Going To The Sun Road put them out of business. Glacier used to be accessible by horse and by foot, the Chalets were one days ride apart.

If the wings on the A-Frame have enough slope, you can still increase the usable space. I don't remember houses in Montana having very steep roof pitches - around the reservations I seem to remember low slope government houses were the most common house. Until recently, Montana was pretty hard scrabble - the Lodge Style was at the Parks in Glacier and Waterton, now that the ricos are there, it's the fashion.
 

hoarder

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If the wings on the A-Frame have enough slope, you can still increase the usable space.
But you'll be wondering why you built an A frame in the first place. The pros and cons don't pencil out. Think inside walls, how to justify sloped framing members. Now you have to justify it on both sides.
I don't remember houses in Montana having very steep roof pitches.
4 in 12 is pretty common in elevations 3200 and below, which is where most people live in Western Montana. Roof cave ins are not that uncommon. What happens is when you get the biggest snow in 30 years you have to get up there and shovel it off. If you don't, tough luck. Where inspections apply, snow load is engineered. Metals roofs are quite popular because snow slides off. If it doesn't just turn up the heat and it will.
Mobile homes fare surprisingly well if lived in. No roof overhang to freeze and hinder gravity. Vacant ones not heated collapse pretty easy.
 
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hoarder

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Looks like a corn crib. I doubt there is much to salvage, but it is an interesting old relic - I would let it go back to the earth.
I've known of a couple log home restorations (moved to another location and re-assembled) and there was a lot of cussing and "should-coulda" talk about having just built from scratch instead. Usually the bottom logs need replaced.
 

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But you'll be wondering why you built an A frame in the first place. The pros and cons don't pencil out. Think inside walls, how to justify sloped framing members.
I was thinking in terms of retro-fitting an A-Frame to have more usable space, I wouldn't build one like that starting new, like you said, it wouldn't pencil out - but if you picked one up cheap, you could turn it into a nice lodge style dwelling on a budget..
 

hoarder

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I was thinking in terms of retro-fitting an A-Frame to have more usable space, I wouldn't build one like that starting new, like you said, it wouldn't pencil out - but if you picked one up cheap, you could turn it into a nice lodge style dwelling on a budget..
Very true, the economics of building in phases makes sense, but If I was actually planning a "Phase one-phase two" house, it wouldn't.
Another thing I've seen on A frames is a shed dormer. cheaper, easier and makes more sense than a gable dormer (but you still have those framing members to think about). The latter always looks odd on an A frame because of roof angles.