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Can a PASSENGER land a PLANE?

newmisty

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#1
Thought this was interesting.'Im too ADD to become a pilot.

 

Goldhedge

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#2
Depends on the plane!

There are videos of a 2 seater and the pilot heart attacks out.

The tower guide the passenger in the dark to land.
 

Zed

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#3
Thought this was interesting.'Im too ADD to become a pilot.

I did a session in a proper 727 simulator (full size) just prior to the last 727 flights in Australia, we also did a few laps of Melbourne before the old girls where put out to pasture. The pilots loved those things, as far as airliners go they are a bit of a sports car. Anyway, I found steering the thing surprisingly easy and intuitive. I'd hazard a guess that a small Cessna is probably harder. I would say that with the right person talking me through it I'd stand a reasonable chance of getting one down without too much damage. Say 60% chance, so that is to say better than nothing and conceivable, but not certain. The guys we where flying with could grease the things onto the strip so smoothly that you had to be sitting back near the wheels to notice the contact with the ground.
 

dacrunch

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#4
Flew into Newark in sleet with strong crosswinds in a small (24 seat?) (Embraer or SAAB) once.... body crabbing right to left, wings dipping deep right & left just dozens of feet above the runway... could imagine us tumbling side-over-side... The pilot timed the crosswinds gusts just right & touched us down level & straight... Applauses....
 
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dacrunch

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#5
Here are a few who "chickened-out" and did a "go-around" with LARGE carriers at Heathrow this week (storm Ciara) =

 

Zed

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#6
Flew into Newark in sleet with strong crosswinds in a small (24 seat?) Embraer once.... body crabbing right to left, wings dipping deep right & left just dozens of feet above the runway... could imagine us tumbling side-over-side... The pilot timed the crosswinds gusts just right & touched us down level & straight... Applauses....
Yeah, LOL... no it would have to be good conditions, no bad cross wind or anything. That is one advantage we have down here, our pilots don't know what real weather is about, they fly in great conditions most of the time in comparison to the USA.
 

MrLucky

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Flew into Newark Thursday from Cleveland. There was a snow storm going on. Multiple delays on takeoff. Then there was the deicing. Fog was so thick the planes disappeared into the fog within minutes of takeoff. Bumpy all the way, it was a whiteout whenever I looked out the window. Heavy cloud cover on arrival too. I doubt the pilot saw the runway until he was on approach. My hats off to him.
 

Unca Walt

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#9
If you are in a Spam Can, you can run the trim wheel alla way back, shut off the engine... (pretend to die) and the dang plane will land itself. TINS Best to do this in Kansas, becuz, well... runways are not necessary there.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#10
Thought this was interesting.'Im too ADD to become a pilot.

I flew into ATL onto ORL (stopover was a cheaper ticket).
When the plane landed and was taxing up to the gate at ATL the pilot got on the P.A. and announced " Now that we're on the ground I'd like to tell you the plane landed itself. We are required to test the system once a month. So we did this plane's on the approach. Enjoy your day".
 

MrLucky

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#11
Oh the plane was one of those Embrarer 145's. Nice tight plane with no knee room if you're over 5ft tall.
 

TomD

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#12
Maybe with some help. Hand flying the plane while working the radio while trying to find the flaps while trying to find the gear selector while watching the airspeed indicator while trying to spot the airport while ------- rapid mental overload

If there were another passenger to handle some of this stuff, then maybe.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#13
Maybe with some help. Hand flying the plane while working the radio while trying to find the flaps while trying to find the gear selector while watching the airspeed indicator while trying to spot the airport while ------- rapid mental overload

If there were another passenger to handle some of this stuff, then maybe.
Me, All I want to know is how to turn ON the auto-pilot. ;)
:bombing aircraft
 

Goldhedge

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#15
I was working at Miami Tower in the radar room that day, everyone was on edge.
This one?

Part I

Part 2

MIAMI/FORT MYERS, Fla. In what can only be called an Easter miracle several air traffic controllers in Southern Florida were able to guide a plane to a successful landing after its pilot fell unconscious and a passenger had to fly the aircraft all during a heavy traffic push due to the holiday and good weather.

Said NATCA President Patrick Forrey: If you were to ask any one of the controllers who worked this event about what happened over the skies of South Florida they would tell you that it was just a typical day at the office and that it was merely their job however, the actions they all took to save the passengers aboard the flight were beyond heroic. They all went above and beyond the call of duty and it is times like these that I hope the flying public can see the invaluable lifeline that controllers provide every day and particularly in emergency situations. These men and women are true heroes and Im proud to be in the same profession as them.

At approximately 1:30 p.m. on Sunday a Super King Air two-engine turboprop aircraft, N559DW, carrying four passengers flying from Marco Island, Fla. to Jackson, Miss. entered into the jurisdiction of air traffic control at Miami Center the facility responsible for high-altitude air traffic in both Southern Florida and the Caribbean. A controller at the center tried twice to acknowledge the aircrafts presence and issue climb instructions, waiting for a read-back.

The transmission that then came from N559DW was a passenger stating that the pilot was unconscious and that they needed help immediately. From that point forward every controller working in that jurisdiction area began to lighten the load of the two controllers who began to work the incident one of whom was called in because of her extensive pilot experience.

The passenger who radioed in was a private pilot, but was only certified in single-engine aircraft and had never flown a King Air. He informed air traffic control that the autopilot was on and that it was continuing to climb the aircraft from 10,000 feet. He then informed air traffic control that he needed to know how to take the plane off autopilot and how to land, then informing them that it appeared that the pilot had passed away.

A third controller at Miami Center stepped in to coordinate the rerouting of all aircraft in that area and transmitted emergency information to those at Ft. Myers International Airport. The controller with pilot-experience talked to the passenger to help him fly the plane and another controller worked traffic in the same area all three working on the same radio frequency.

Quickly developing a system that enabled them to effectively share the frequency they would tap ones shoulder to transfer and relinquish control on the radio channel. One would advise the passenger and then another would issue control instructions to other aircraft.

Due to the hard work of the controllers and the expertise that the one had in flying aircraft the passenger was able to get the plane off autopilot and steer the aircraft toward Ft. Meyers International Airport, transferring control to the controllers who worked that airspace.

The controllers at Ft. Meyers then took over the flight. One called a friend who was certified in the King Air for advice. When the friend had gotten out his flight checklists, manuals and cockpit layout sheets he was able to issue instructions through the controller to another controller who then relayed that information to the passenger flying the plane.

Because of this quick thinking the passenger-turned-pilot was able to safely land the aircraft on the first try.

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Goldhedge

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#16
Here's one over Northern England

 

DodgebyDave

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#17
it all depends on the plane and the passenger. Some passengers couldn't land a kiss.
 

newmisty

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Thecrensh

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#19
My thinking is that if the aircrew both kick the bucket and nobody takes over, we have a 0% chance of living. With me behind the wheel, at least we would have *some* shot...I could probably bring us in for a belly landing if nothing else.