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Chinese Construction Quality

Uglytruth

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It’s like the Japanese in the 60/70s before Deming’s Quality Teachings

Corruption, inferior materials, shoddy workmanship

I have said before in the fab shop the material would crack if bent. Simply garbage material.
Ya think much of that has made it's way into US products like crane's, bridges, trucks, beams, EVERYTHING?
 

newmisty

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I have said before in the fab shop the material would crack if bent. Simply garbage material.
Ya think much of that has made it's way into US products like crane's, bridges, trucks, beams, EVERYTHING?
Fortunately those who truly have our best interests at heart are well aware of this.


Trump targets cheap Chinese steel in probe, rallying U.S. steel stocks​

By Steve Holland, Mike Stone

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Thursday launched a trade probe against China and other exporters of cheap steel into the U.S. market, raising the possibility of new tariffs and sending shares of some U.S. steel makers up over 8 percent
 

TAEZZAR

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Outgassing in some cases is intentional

That new car small is voc

When you enter a new car, it has a strong specific smell: that’s because of the higher VOC off-gassing rate. Over time, the smell will disappear and eventually you’ll breather clean air.
Growing up, my dad had a friend that bought a new car, every year. Because he liked the "new car smell".
 

TAEZZAR

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I have said before in the fab shop the material would crack if bent. Simply garbage material.
Ya think much of that has made it's way into US products like crane's, bridges, trucks, beams, EVERYTHING?
Not to get too technical, however, material bent with the grain will stress crack, particularly if it is a tight bend, less than 2 times the thickness.
 

newmisty

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Growing up, my dad had a friend that bought a new car, every year. Because he liked the "new car smell".
3d-automobile.gif
:spring:
 

Uglytruth

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The Chinese have zero interest in that. If anything, their interest is to make the product as shoddy as they can get away with; as inferior as the importer that ordered it, will accept.
As the US and the rest of the world have transitioned to using Chinese slave labor they have the world by the balls as the rest of the world has gotten rid of the infrastructure, training, knowledge and work ethic to bring it back.
 

Uglytruth

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Not to get too technical, however, material bent with the grain will stress crack, particularly if it is a tight bend, less than 2 times the thickness.
Parts that were made for years all of the sudden had problems. We opened up the radius as much as the part would allow trying to get away from the cracking. Nothing worked except for a change of material.

It was a lasered part with windows & holes in it. Once you change the bend radius you have to redesign everything & start over.
 

TAEZZAR

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Parts that were made for years all of the sudden had problems. We opened up the radius as much as the part would allow trying to get away from the cracking. Nothing worked except for a change of material.

It was a lasered part with windows & holes in it. Once you change the bend radius you have to redesign everything & start over.
I understand. I got out of sheetmetal fab in 1992 when the crap metal was starting.
I was just pointing out for all to understand that bends should go against the grain.
I lost my set-back book in the fire, along with a bunch of tech manuals.
Can you require "certs" to be sure you get decent material?
 

Casey Jones

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As the US and the rest of the world have transitioned to using Chinese slave labor they have the world by the balls as the rest of the world has gotten rid of the infrastructure, training, knowledge and work ethic to bring it back.
Yes, it's a problem and a crisis.

But. Do any of us really think that a society that cannot build a dam, or a road that doesn't have sinkholes suddenly appearing in it, or a high-rise tower that collapses months after completion...

...and when it does, cares so little for the victims, it doesn't even search for them or identify missing persons...

...do we think this society can rule the world, or even the United States? ONLY HABIT, IMHO, keeps the CCP in power in China; and their hold now is tenuous.

They can wreak a lot of havoc on this nation, especially after the economy craters and "President Biden" invites the UN Peacekeepers (meaning Chynese in blue helmets) to "keep order."

It's far easier to destroy than to rebuild. It's easier to slaughter than to govern. I think we're on the cusp, not of a reign of Chyna as the dominant power, but of an anarchial Dark Ages.
 

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It’s like the Japanese in the 60/70s before Deming’s Quality Teachings

Corruption, inferior materials, shoddy workmanship


I think most of the asian countries are / were like that. I remember reading about korean bridges collapsing and department stores collapsing in the 90s; thousands died.
 

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I think most of the asian countries are / were like that. I remember reading about korean bridges collapsing and department stores collapsing in the 90s; thousands died.
And the Koreans improved their industrial quality. The same as the Japanese.

It's the difference, literally, between an open society that rewards excellence, and a totalitarian society with a command/control economy...where quality that increases cost or delays a commissar's diktats, is viewed as subversion.
 

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Looking at this thread and realised why none of their cars get even one star when tested by the Euro NCAP.

We have a few models this side, and I must mention that, aesthetically, they are getting there.

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

Casey Jones

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Looking at this thread and realised why none of their cars get even one star when tested by the Euro NCAP.

We have a few models this side, and I must mention that, aesthetically, they are getting there.

Golden Regards
Uncle
Aesthetics, styling, doesn't matter.

Renault has had any number of beautifully-styled cars. Garbage; but beautiful when new. Same is true of GM in its worst years.

Toyota...before they went Transformer with the styling, they were blander than bland. But their products would last for at LEAST a quarter-million miles.

A company called Wildfire was importing Chinese three-wheeled cars to the US...even before the EPA shut them down, because the emissions compliance documents were based on fraudulent tests...they didn't sell. They were far more attractive than the Reliant Robin, but under those beautiful curves were chassis of angle iron and sloppy welds.
 

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My old boss would try to go cheap from time to time, chinese flea market batteries and some one way bolts. That didn't go well.
 

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Makes me wonder how their military equipment is put together. Steal/given our military secrets and make cheaper?
Norinco AK47 rifles were made in China and they are very good quality compared to the same rifles made in many other countries. The Chinese have the ability but not the motive. Instead of taking pride in their work and reputation, they take pride in swindling anyone they can. Any time they get something for nothing it's considered a personal victory. It's cultural or genetic or both.
But with the right leadership and supervision, their ability is not to be underestimated.
 

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... The Chinese have the ability but not the motive. ...
Yep. Nothing against Chinese people. They are no doubt intelligent and industrious folks. It’s their godamn system. They’re effing communists.
 

TAEZZAR

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My old boss would try to go cheap from time to time, chinese flea market batteries and some one way bolts. That didn't go well.
VALUES.jpg


ALSO, A cheap, inadequate tool will let you down in a time of need.
A first class tool will be there for you, EVERYTIME you use it !
 

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ALSO, A cheap, inadequate tool will let you down in a time of need.
A first class tool will be there for you, EVERYTIME you use it !
When I was digging a trench through red sandstone, I used (up) a Harbor Freight impact hammer drill. I had a Bosch hammer drill on the side, but looking at the prices, I decided to put the wear on the HF hammer drill.
 

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I have said before in the fab shop the material would crack if bent. Simply garbage material.
Ya think much of that has made it's way into US products like crane's, bridges, trucks, beams, EVERYTHING?
Ha. I just got a thought.

Involves railroading, because that's what I know. There was a real, serious problem, rooted in the early 1980s - Japanese steel rails. Now, of course, not all Japanese products are, or were, alike. Nissan is not Toyota. But back in the late 1970s, Japanese steel mills were on a roll. Remember the charges of "dumping" steel into the American market? I don't know if it was really "dumping" (selling under cost to destroy competitors) but the purchase price was far below.

Some of that steel came as rail. Railroad track. Republic, US Steel and Bethlehem were major sources of the rail for track, and all of them were in trouble. Republic was reorganized; Bethlehem was slowly winding down (gone by 2003) and I don't recall what happened with US Steel.

But there was all this Japanese rail. And yes...unlike Toyotas of the time, this rail was crap.

Now, railroad rail has a service life, and it's a long life. Rail in a properly-maintained roadbed can last 70 years. That's right - seventy years. You can still go out on some railroad lines, look at the rail...by FRA edict, rail must be stamped with its date of manufacture. The date is coded; but the year is plain. On branch lines and switching tracks you can see 1925 as the casting date.

The Japanese steel of the 1980s, JUST DID NOT CUT IT. Who knows why - what mill, or what contract. I started railroading as a rail tester, on the Santa Fe line from Barstow to Needles. We were told, anytime we found a crack, flaw...even a suspected flaw (using ultrasound) and it was on Japanese rail (the mill casting it had to put its mark on it, in Western characters...true of all rail) we were to condemn it. The whole length. No repair, no reconsideration. A blip on the ultrasound, out would go 30 feet of rail.

China had barely penetrated our markets, back then...the mid-1990s.

So...who knows what is happening in boardrooms, in Purchasing offices, now. Berkshire-Hathaway owns, outright, all of the combined Burlington-Northern and the AT&SF railroads. Globalist crony Warren Buffet controls B-H, with minority shareholders ignored. Is he buying China crap as rail?

We won't know for ten years or so...and when it fails...well, dramatic as a falling construction crane is, it's NOTHING to one of Buffet's oil trains coming off the rail and piling up. That has happened, repeatedly; and the conflagrations go on for days, often weeks. Google "Casselton ND train wreck" - dramatic story, both the wreck and the fireball.
 

Uglytruth

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Ha. I just got a thought.

Involves railroading, because that's what I know. There was a real, serious problem, rooted in the early 1980s - Japanese steel rails. Now, of course, not all Japanese products are, or were, alike. Nissan is not Toyota. But back in the late 1970s, Japanese steel mills were on a roll. Remember the charges of "dumping" steel into the American market? I don't know if it was really "dumping" (selling under cost to destroy competitors) but the purchase price was far below.

Some of that steel came as rail. Railroad track. Republic, US Steel and Bethlehem were major sources of the rail for track, and all of them were in trouble. Republic was reorganized; Bethlehem was slowly winding down (gone by 2003) and I don't recall what happened with US Steel.

But there was all this Japanese rail. And yes...unlike Toyotas of the time, this rail was crap.

Now, railroad rail has a service life, and it's a long life. Rail in a properly-maintained roadbed can last 70 years. That's right - seventy years. You can still go out on some railroad lines, look at the rail...by FRA edict, rail must be stamped with its date of manufacture. The date is coded; but the year is plain. On branch lines and switching tracks you can see 1925 as the casting date.

The Japanese steel of the 1980s, JUST DID NOT CUT IT. Who knows why - what mill, or what contract. I started railroading as a rail tester, on the Santa Fe line from Barstow to Needles. We were told, anytime we found a crack, flaw...even a suspected flaw (using ultrasound) and it was on Japanese rail (the mill casting it had to put its mark on it, in Western characters...true of all rail) we were to condemn it. The whole length. No repair, no reconsideration. A blip on the ultrasound, out would go 30 feet of rail.

China had barely penetrated our markets, back then...the mid-1990s.

So...who knows what is happening in boardrooms, in Purchasing offices, now. Berkshire-Hathaway owns, outright, all of the combined Burlington-Northern and the AT&SF railroads. Globalist crony Warren Buffet controls B-H, with minority shareholders ignored. Is he buying China crap as rail?

We won't know for ten years or so...and when it fails...well, dramatic as a falling construction crane is, it's NOTHING to one of Buffet's oil trains coming off the rail and piling up. That has happened, repeatedly; and the conflagrations go on for days, often weeks. Google "Casselton ND train wreck" - dramatic story, both the wreck and the fireball.
Poor quality is a disaster in the making no matter if it's the rail, the tanker cars or the pipeline carrying the oil.
 

Son of Gloin

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Ha. I just got a thought.

Involves railroading, because that's what I know. There was a real, serious problem, rooted in the early 1980s - Japanese steel rails. Now, of course, not all Japanese products are, or were, alike. Nissan is not Toyota. But back in the late 1970s, Japanese steel mills were on a roll. Remember the charges of "dumping" steel into the American market? I don't know if it was really "dumping" (selling under cost to destroy competitors) but the purchase price was far below.

Some of that steel came as rail. Railroad track. Republic, US Steel and Bethlehem were major sources of the rail for track, and all of them were in trouble. Republic was reorganized; Bethlehem was slowly winding down (gone by 2003) and I don't recall what happened with US Steel.

But there was all this Japanese rail. And yes...unlike Toyotas of the time, this rail was crap.

Now, railroad rail has a service life, and it's a long life. Rail in a properly-maintained roadbed can last 70 years. That's right - seventy years. You can still go out on some railroad lines, look at the rail...by FRA edict, rail must be stamped with its date of manufacture. The date is coded; but the year is plain. On branch lines and switching tracks you can see 1925 as the casting date.

The Japanese steel of the 1980s, JUST DID NOT CUT IT. Who knows why - what mill, or what contract. I started railroading as a rail tester, on the Santa Fe line from Barstow to Needles. We were told, anytime we found a crack, flaw...even a suspected flaw (using ultrasound) and it was on Japanese rail (the mill casting it had to put its mark on it, in Western characters...true of all rail) we were to condemn it. The whole length. No repair, no reconsideration. A blip on the ultrasound, out would go 30 feet of rail.

China had barely penetrated our markets, back then...the mid-1990s.

So...who knows what is happening in boardrooms, in Purchasing offices, now. Berkshire-Hathaway owns, outright, all of the combined Burlington-Northern and the AT&SF railroads. Globalist crony Warren Buffet controls B-H, with minority shareholders ignored. Is he buying China crap as rail?

We won't know for ten years or so...and when it fails...well, dramatic as a falling construction crane is, it's NOTHING to one of Buffet's oil trains coming off the rail and piling up. That has happened, repeatedly; and the conflagrations go on for days, often weeks. Google "Casselton ND train wreck" - dramatic story, both the wreck and the fireball.
Incredible to think, they canceled the Keystone Pipeline for supposed environmental reasons and the possibilities of environmental disaster from an oil train wreck.
 

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Ha. I just got a thought.

Involves railroading, because that's what I know. There was a real, serious problem, rooted in the early 1980s - Japanese steel rails. Now, of course, not all Japanese products are, or were, alike. Nissan is not Toyota. But back in the late 1970s, Japanese steel mills were on a roll. Remember the charges of "dumping" steel into the American market? I don't know if it was really "dumping" (selling under cost to destroy competitors) but the purchase price was far below.

Some of that steel came as rail. Railroad track. Republic, US Steel and Bethlehem were major sources of the rail for track, and all of them were in trouble. Republic was reorganized; Bethlehem was slowly winding down (gone by 2003) and I don't recall what happened with US Steel.

But there was all this Japanese rail. And yes...unlike Toyotas of the time, this rail was crap.

Now, railroad rail has a service life, and it's a long life. Rail in a properly-maintained roadbed can last 70 years. That's right - seventy years. You can still go out on some railroad lines, look at the rail...by FRA edict, rail must be stamped with its date of manufacture. The date is coded; but the year is plain. On branch lines and switching tracks you can see 1925 as the casting date.

The Japanese steel of the 1980s, JUST DID NOT CUT IT. Who knows why - what mill, or what contract. I started railroading as a rail tester, on the Santa Fe line from Barstow to Needles. We were told, anytime we found a crack, flaw...even a suspected flaw (using ultrasound) and it was on Japanese rail (the mill casting it had to put its mark on it, in Western characters...true of all rail) we were to condemn it. The whole length. No repair, no reconsideration. A blip on the ultrasound, out would go 30 feet of rail.

China had barely penetrated our markets, back then...the mid-1990s.

So...who knows what is happening in boardrooms, in Purchasing offices, now. Berkshire-Hathaway owns, outright, all of the combined Burlington-Northern and the AT&SF railroads. Globalist crony Warren Buffet controls B-H, with minority shareholders ignored. Is he buying China crap as rail?

We won't know for ten years or so...and when it fails...well, dramatic as a falling construction crane is, it's NOTHING to one of Buffet's oil trains coming off the rail and piling up. That has happened, repeatedly; and the conflagrations go on for days, often weeks. Google "Casselton ND train wreck" - dramatic story, both the wreck and the fireball.

warren buffett doesnt give a shit he wants cheap rails. he will be dead in ten years.........
 

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Two decades ago, I was very interested in what Buffet was doing, since he was doing so well. In dollars, I should add. Now I am most interested in doing well with my family and community. My priorities are family, town, state, and republic, in that order. The "world" is a diseased beast that can work out its solution. I wish it the best, but I won't get involved in its problems.
 

Casey Jones

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warren buffett doesnt give a shit he wants cheap rails. he will be dead in ten years.........
Probably true.

But what does he give a schitte about cheap rails? Here's what doing things on the cheap, results in...this.


He has all the money he needs. Why not show some benign corporate paternalism, and do things right for a change.
 

Casey Jones

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Incredible to think, they canceled the Keystone Pipeline for supposed environmental reasons and the possibilities of environmental disaster from an oil train wreck.
It actually makes perfect sense, if you get beyond their public shibboleths, and dig into their real motives.

Pipelines are safe. So pipelines represent, doing things as they've always been done. No CHANGE.

They want a change. They want to de-industrialize. I'm not sure why; oligarchs know this Deep-Earf Ecology is so much nonsense. I guess it's about forcible depopulation - same as the faux-vaxx. Starve the Deplorables out.

So, they move oil this clumsy, dangerous way...and when enough of those rolling serial bombs go off the rails and up in hellfire, they'll have their tools beat the drums to **STOP OIL**. To de-industrialize and depopulate.

They fugure, perhaps correctly, they can exempt themselves, at least for awhile. There will still be residual limos and aircraft for many years. There will be a bit of oil produced, to run generators for the Elites' redoubts.
 

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CJ -- One of the things I useta do was to look at the dates on the rails. They are coded now, so it is no fun anymore. The oldest I ever found was 1895.
 

Casey Jones

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CJ -- One of the things I useta do was to look at the dates on the rails. They are coded now, so it is no fun anymore. The oldest I ever found was 1895.
They're still there - the year, anyway. The hashmarks indicate the date. Each slash represents a day of the year, so something made, say, in August, maybe on the 220th day of the year, would have 220 raised chicken scratches. That's why all those relief sticks, on the web of the rail.

The date is still there, but sometimes not near the chicken scratches. Often not repeated much - once every 30 feet. The foundry is still on the rail, but sometimes in opaque wording. Bethlehem Steel made rail in its Lackawanna foundary, so the rail was marked LACKAWANNA BETH.
 

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Probably true.

But what does he give a schitte about cheap rails? Here's what doing things on the cheap, results in...this.


He has all the money he needs. Why not show some benign corporate paternalism, and do things right for a change.
That was a crappy day for many!
 

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They're still there - the year, anyway. The hashmarks indicate the date. Each slash represents a day of the year, so something made, say, in August, maybe on the 220th day of the year, would have 220 raised chicken scratches. That's why all those relief sticks, on the web of the rail.

The date is still there, but sometimes not near the chicken scratches. Often not repeated much - once every 30 feet. The foundry is still on the rail, but sometimes in opaque wording. Bethlehem Steel made rail in its Lackawanna foundary, so the rail was marked LACKAWANNA BETH.
Is it marked on the outside of the rail?